This list is not official and is subject to change. Classes may be canceled or added prior to the beginning of the semester. Check MyMadison for the most accurate information.

This list does not reflect whether a class is open or closed for enrollment. Check MyMadison for the most accurate enrollment information.

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Summer 2020

HON 300 - Who Am I Now? Reflecting on our Responses to Global Crises (3 credits)

Class #: 52295 |  Section: 4101 Four Wk 1  |  Instructors: Vesna Hart & Taryn Roberts (CGE)  |  MoTuWeTh 9:00-11:40  |  Location: Online

Through this interdisciplinary course, students will be asked to reflect upon the interconnectedness of communities around the world and how those connections influence our responses to global crises like pandemics. Students will learn frameworks for how people perceive similarities, differences, and interdependencies among human societies. Through dialogue and reflection-based activities, students will grapple with how culture and worldview influence both individual and social behaviors. The learning environment will include synchronous and asynchronous sessions where content is conveyed through multiple formats such as film, video, interactive websites, dialogue groups, concise readings, and reflective activities. Students will be asked to use creative arts and multimedia to actively participate and demonstrate learning.

Area of emphasis flags: Global Studies; Service and Civic Engagement

HTH 456 - Grant Writing in Health Sciences (3 credits)

Class #: 51309  |  Section: 4104-Four Wk 1  |  Instructor: Dayna Henry  |  Time: TBA  |  Location: Online

Increasingly social service and health providers are required to have grant writing skills and/or be responsible for obtaining external funds to support their positions, fuel projects, or promote programs. There is so much money out there to help fund programs you might want to offer. How can you find the money? How can you get the money? This course will help you learn how to find and obtain this money and all about the language surrounding the world of grants. This project-based course will provide the overview of grantsmanship skills including locating funding sources, improving collaboration skills, understanding program development and grant proposal preparation. You will leave the course with 2 highly marketable products to bring to job interviews! 

Open to Honors students in ANY major. Honors options available and encouraged! Prerequisite waived for Honors students. If you encounter difficulty with enrollment, contact Dr. Henry at henryds@jmu.edu.


Honors options in online summer courses

You are allowed to pursue an Honors option in an online summer course at JMU with permission of the course instructor. These credits count as Honors electives.

To Honors option a summer course, follow the normal protocol for options with the following modifications:

  • Deadline for contract and proposal: Submit both documents by the end of the first week of the summer term in which the course is taken
  • Signatures: Please ask your instructor to send a simple confirmation email to honors@jmu.edu. This will serve in place of the signature. Student signature is not required.
Fall 2020
Honors General Education

Cluster 1: Skills for the 21st Century

Finish by end of freshman year.

Human Communication (C1HC)

SCOM 123H - Fundamental Human Communication: Group Presentations (3 credits)

Class #: 82663  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Kara Dillard  |  TuTh 8:00-9:15 AM  |  Harrison 0112
Class #: 83195  |  Section: 0002  |  Instructor: Lori Britt  |  TuTh 11:00-12:15  |  Harrison 1246
Class #: 83288  |  Section: 0003  |  Instructor: Timothy Ball  |  MoWeFr 9:45-11:00  |  Harrison 1246
Class #: 83289  |  Section: 0004  |  Instructor: Timothy Ball |  MoWeFr 12:00-12:50  |  Harrison 1246
Class #: 83290  |  Section: 0005  |  Instructor: Michael Broderick  |  TuTh 9:30-10:45  |  Online
Class #: 83291  |  Section: 0006  |  Instructor: Michael Broderick |  TuTh 11:00-12:15  |  Online
Class #: 83292  |  Section: 0007  |  Instructor: Sarah Taylor  |  MoWeFr 9:05-9:55 AM  |  Online
Class #: 83297  |  Section: 0008  |  Instructor: Sarah Taylor  |  MoWeFr 12:00-12:50  |  Online
Class #: 86081  |  Section: 0009  |  Instructor: Sarah Taylor  |  MoWeFr 2:10-3:00  |  Online

Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in small group and public communication contexts. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive presentations. Public speaking required.

Cluster 2: Arts & Humanities

Literature (C2L)

ENG 221H - Literature/Culture/Ideas (3 credits)

Class #: 83802  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Robert Aguirre  |  TuTh 9:30-10:45  |  SSC 4045

TOPIC: The Idea of California

ENG 236H – Survey of English Literature: Eighteenth Century to Modern (3 credits)

Class #: 84289  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Danielle Price  |  TuTh 1:15-2:30  |  Online
Class #: 85958  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Danielle Price  |  TuTh 2:45-4:00  |  Online

This course introduces you to major authors and literary movements from the late eighteenth century on. Works will include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Keats’ odes, Dickens’ A Christmas Carol,and Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. We will examine the historical contexts of such movements as romanticism and modernism, and move from broad discussions (of aesthetics, history, philosophy, etc.) to close readings of individual texts. Throughout the course we will work on developing and applying the terminology of literary studies. 

In our class discussions we will consider how literary works both shape and reflect changing ideas of childhood, gender, and empire. Of particular interest will be the character of the doppelganger or double, which appears repeatedly on the syllabus. Why do so many characters have eerie doubles? What do those doubles tell us about the hopes and fears of the times in which they appear?

Cluster 3: The Natural World

Quantitative Reasoning (C3QR)

MATH 220H - Elementary Statistics (3 credits)

Class #: 81273  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Dinesh Sharma  |  TuTh 2:45-4:00  |  Roop 0212; Roop 0127
Class #: 86462  |  Section: 0002  |  Instructor: Dinesh Sharma  |  TuTh 5:00-6:15  |  Roop 0212; Roop 0127

Descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, sampling, estimation and testing of hypotheses, regression, correlation and an introduction to statistical analysis using computers.

Natural Systems (C3NS)

BIO 140H – Foundations of Biology I (4 Credits)

Class #: 83354  |  Section: 0001-LEC  |  Instructor: Terrie Rife  |  MoWeFr 9:05-9:55  |  EnGeo 1301
Class #: 83355  |  Section: 1001-Lab  |  Instructor: Andrea Pesce  |  Tu 12:40-3:30  |  Bioscience 1025

*Must enroll in both lecture and lab
The foundations of the cellular molecules, structures, and processes that sustain life in the contexts of evolution will be explored. Topics will include structure and function; information flow, storage and exchange; pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and systems biology. The lab experience will allow students to participate in science as it is practiced and will prepare students to be scientifically and quantitatively literate.

Physical Principles (C3PP)

HON 300 – Science and Technology for Future Presidents (3 credits)

Class #: 86723 |  Section: 0015 |  Instructor: Bradley Newcomer (Honors)  |  TuTh 12:30-1:45  |  Duke 2039

NEW: This Honors seminar has been approved to count for GenEd Cluster 3 Physical Principles credit. Students may use this course for EITHER Honors GenEd credit OR Honors seminar credit, but it cannot double count for both. You will indicate your preference to the instructor at the beginning of the semester.

This Honors seminar is designed as an introduction to the nature of science and technology in order to understand some of today's core science and technology issues our world faces today.  This course will focus on empowering students possessing any level of scientific background with the tools needed to make better informed decisions and to argue their views persuasively.  From the science of energy, climate change, the complicated reality of nuclear power and radioactivity, the complexities of biotechnology, to the realities of quantum phenomenon, this course will introduce students to how modern science can affect the decisions of political leaders, business leaders, and the lives of every citizen of the 21st century.

Cluster 4: Social and Cultural Processes

The American Experience (C4AE)

POSC 225H - U.S. Government (4 credits)

Class #: 82361  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Andreas Broscheid  |  MoWe 4:00-5:15, 5:30-6:45  |  Online

5:30-6:45 PM meets periodically. An examination of institutions, processes and intellectual concepts which structure American political activity. The interaction of the political system with the changing American society and America's changing role in world affairs are also treated. The course provides an introduction to quantitative methodology.

Honors Seminars

HON 200 - Biology in the Movies (3 credits)

Class #: 83150 |  Section: 0001 |  Instructor: Christopher Rose (Biology)  |  Tu 9:30-11:30, Th 9:30-10:45  |  EnGeo 2204

Advances in genetics and development biology allow scientists to manipulate genes, cells, and embryos in ways that increasingly challenge traditional concepts of human identity and could permanently alter the structure of human society. At the same time, media bombard the public with science-based entertainment that is timely, engaging, and at some level credible to an increasingly savvy and demanding audience. This course explores the intersection of these trends by addressing how popular culture presents science in movies and the potential costs of its misrepresentation. Topics include human cloning, genetic engineering, origin and evolution of humans, and artificial and extraterrestrial intelligence.

Area of emphasis flag: none

HON 200 – Inclusive Leadership Directive (2 credits)

Class #: 83902 |  Section: 0002 |  Instructor: Carson Lonett (Dux Center)  |  We 4:00-6:30  |  Jennings Hall MPR

The purpose of this course is to grow individuals in their leadership through self-awareness in their personality, identity, and values. Through evaluation of leadership strategies and tools, individuals will gain a critical perspective of leadership, while participating and reflecting on real-life, applied leadership experience. ENROLLMENT RESTRICTED to incoming first year students.

Area of emphasis flag: Leadership

HON 200 – Ancient Oracles, Modern Questions (3 credits)

Class #: 86093 |  Section: 0003 |  Instructor: Wren Stevens (Visual & Performing Arts)  |  MoWeFr 12:00-12:50  |  Online

It has been said that those who do not learn from the past are doomed to repeat its mistakes. This course will examine key points in the ancient world when humanity was faced with complex challenges. From the invention of written language to the creation of the urban centers of the Roman & Mayan Empires, students will study archeological and historical sources to understand both the problems faced and the solutions that were implemented. Coursework includes self-reflective activities, class discussion, and projects that address the large questions faced by our society today and their possible solutions.

Area of emphasis flag(s): Creativity & Innovation

HON 200 – Poor Mothers: Welfare, Love, Labor, and Inequality (3 credits)

Class #: 86094 |  Section: 0004 |  Instructor: Alysia Davis (Honors)  |  MoWeFr 1:05-1:55  |  Online

This course analyzes changes in leisure, work and family relations over the past century alongside an assessment of the gendered and racialized history of welfare reform and federal marriage policy. Students would learn to evaluate policies that disproportionately affect women with children in a broad intersectional context of gender, race, poverty, and inequality. Key themes covered by the class would include historical assessment of gender and welfare as a New Deal program; the welfare rights movement of the 1960s; racial politics of welfare backlash targeting women of color; realities of pre-reform welfare use and the 1996 passage of legislation leading to TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families), including corresponding federal marriage policy initiatives to establish two-parent married families as an anti-poverty strategy; and now, almost 25 years later, current realities of welfare policy and the economic well-being of low-income single-mother families.

Area of emphasis flag(s): Creativity & Innovation; Service & Civic Engagement

HON 200 – Mentorship in Honors (1 credit)

Class #: 86099 |  Section: 0006 |  Instructor: Fawn-Amber Montoya (Honors)  |  Th 2:45-4:00  |  Duke 2039

This course examines the unique challenges, constraints, and opportunities that face first generation college students. The class will address strategies to navigate financial aid and scholarships, develop techniques for building a mentoring relationship with peers and faculty, and identify resume building opportunities and acclimating to college life.

Area of emphasis flag(s): Creativity & Innovation; Service & Civic Engagement

HON 200 – Intergroup Relations and Intergroup Dialogue: Gender as Social Identity (3 credits)

Class #: 86100 |  Section: 0007 |  Instructor: Vesna Hart (CGE); Art Dean (Access & Inclusion)  |  Tu 5:15-7:45  |  TBD

This course explores gender as a social identity and its relevance to and impact upon individuals and groups. Social identities refer to salient sociological constructs such as gender. Race/ethnicity, culture, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, national or regional orientation, or spirituality/religious beliefs. The model of the Program on Intergroup Relations at the University of Michigan will be used as the basic structure of the course. This evidence-based program for promoting authentic conversations and increasing understanding of social identities on college campuses has been recognized by President Clinton’s Initiative on Race, the U.S. Department of Education’s Gender Equity Panel, the American Association of Higher Education, and the American College Personnel Association. Both course instructors have completed training in this method and have previously led IGD groups on race/ethnicity and gender.

Area of emphasis flag(s): Service & Civic Engagement

HON 300 - Teaching Honors for Teaching Fellows (3 credits)

Class #:  82716 |  Section: 0002 |  Instructor: Jared Diener & Alysia Davis (Honors)  |  Fr 10:10AM -11:25AM  |  Online

Honors seminar for Teaching Fellows in HON 100. Teaching Fellows are selected by application in the spring semester. RESTRICTED ENROLLMENT. This course may used as AOE practicum credit for all areas.

Area of emphasis practicum in all areas

HON 300 – Gender and Leadership (3 credits)

Class #: 83735 |  Section: 0003 |  Instructor: Amelia Underwood (Military Science)  | We 6:10-8:40  |  Taylor 0405

This course examines the unique challenges, constraints, and opportunities that face men and women today as they ascend to leadership positions in organizations. Topics include: theoretical perspectives on how the concepts of gender and leadership are constructed; gender and leadership in the workplace; the media, the political sphere and the global community; and strategies to facilitate equity. This course is experiential and will require students to reflect on past and present challenges, as well as future opportunities as they develop their own personal leadership style. 

Area of emphasis flag: Leadership

HON 300 – Political and Social Impacts of Weapons of Mass Destruction (3 credits)

Class #: 83736 |  Section: 0004 |  Instructor: Ronald Raab (ISAT, Intelligence Analysis)  |  MoWe 8:15-9:30  |  ISAT 0136

Chemical, Ordinance, Biological and Radiological Agents (COBRA) are imminent threats to the world, especially the Middle East, Asia, Europe and the United States. In the recent past, chemical agents were used in Syria, Yemen, and by Saddam Hussein’s military to decimate Iranian and Iraqi Kurdish populations. Over 5,000 people were exposed to sarin, a nerve agent were released by the Aum Shinrikyo cult in the Tokyo subway system. In 2001, anthrax spores were used to attack politically well-known individuals by means of the U.S. mail system. The current war in Syria and its store of “weapons of mass destruction,” illustrates the concern about this type of warfare and terrorism. We will focus on the political, economic, and social impacts WMDs have had impacted world politics in the past and how they will influence the future.

Area of emphasis flag: Service & Civic Engagement

HON 300 - Exploring Leadership (3 credits)

Class #: 84006 |  Section: 0005 |  Instructors: Brian Charette (President's Office), Jonathan Alger (JMU President)  |  Tu 3:00-5:30  |  SSC 4046

This course provides basic concepts of leadership and the essential skills required to become an effective leader. The course includes the study of leadership as well as the application of leadership theories, concepts, and skills. The student will be provided the opportunity for personal development through exercises in communication and leadership effectiveness. Objectives of the course are to understand leadership, know your own style and have a plan for developing your leadership. This course will examine what we know about the leadership practices that lead to effective team and organizational performance. 

Area of emphasis flag: Leadership

HON 300 - Introduction to Global Studies (3 credits)

Class #: 84480 |  Section: 0006 |  Instructor: Felix Wang (CGE)  |  Tu 4:00-6:30  |  SSC 4043

Through this course, students will examine how people perceive similarities, differences, and interdependencies among human societies in a global context. Materials and guest speakers will encourage discussions and promote critical thinking through current issues related to global studies in order to become better global citizens. Students will be asked to explore the culture and diversity of the Harrisonburg community through a collaboration with Harrisonburg High School (HHS) students. The students will jointly explore personal identity characteristics and the connections between identity and culture. In addition to the scheduled class time, students will visit HHS several times over the course of the semester. For this reason, it is important for all students to be available from 2:30PM – 4:00PM on Tuesdays. If your schedule is not free at that time, please contact the professor prior to the semester to discuss this.

Area of emphasis flag(s): Global Studies

HON 300 - Climate Change and the Humanities (3 credits)

Class #: 84801 |  Section: 0007 |  Instructor: Katey Castellano (English)  |  MoWeFr 12:00-12:50  |  Keezell 310

This course examines climate change from the perspectives of the academic humanities and artist-activists. We begin with a discussion of the science of climate change and the concept of the anthropocene, which both confront us with the fact that humans have already irrevocably altered the climate and ecology of our planet. Climate change and the problems that accompany it, such as species extinction, higher temperatures, and rising sea levels, are difficult to represent because their causes span long periods of time and the effects are global. Moreover, the effects of climate change are unevenly distributed with poorer countries bearing the burden of climate change that is caused by the carbon emissions of wealthier countries. This course will consider how the humanities—literature, philosophy, history, visual culture, and religion—can conceptualize and critique the cultures of climate change. Throughout the course we will experiment with the way the humanities can mobilize the environmental and moral imagination in order to analyze the crisis of global climate change and gesture towards modes of intervention.

Area of emphasis flag(s): Global Studies; Service & Civic Engagement

HON 300 - From the Valley to the Bay (3 credits)

Class #: 85622 |  Section: 0008 |  Instructor: Eric Fitzgerald (Rockingham County Public Schools)  |  Tu 6:30-9:00 PM  |  EnGeo 3102

The Chesapeake Bay Watershed extends over six states and 64,000 square miles including forests, farms, industries, wildlife habitat, cities, suburbs, 17 million people and more than 50 major rivers and streams. The Chesapeake Bay itself is North America’s largest estuary. Through learning about environmental, geological, historical, social, political and economic issues related to the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, students will gain an interdisciplinary understanding of the interrelated issues that connect what we do here in the Shenandoah Valley to the environmental and economic health of the Bay.

This course combines original research, community service and civic engagement in the context of environmental and social aspects of life in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The class includes field experiences, research investigations, online discussions, book discussions and a final community action project. Dr. Cindy Klevickis will serve as class co-facilitator and collaborator.

Area of emphasis flag: Global Studies; Service & Civic Engagement

HON 300 - Stories That Heal: Narrative in the Helping Professions (3 credits)

Class #: 85623 |  Section: 0009 |  Instructor: Lucy Malenke (Learning Centers)  |  MoWeFr 1:05-1:55  |  Online

Do you have a passion for helping people? Do you plan to enter a “helping profession,” such as nursing, social work, speech language pathology, occupational therapy, public health, medicine, counseling, coaching, or ministry? This service-learning course will help you develop narrative competence, which is the “ability to acknowledge, absorb, interpret, and act on the stories and plights of others” (Dr. Rita Charon). In addition to completing 15 hours of community service, you will also explore (through reading, writing, and discussion) the ways that story-telling can promote healing and human connection. This is a MWF class, but it will not meet most Fridays of the semester in order to accommodate the service requirement.

Area of emphasis flag: Service & Civic Engagement

HON 300 - Creativity, Technology, and the Search for Self (3 credits)

Class #: 84290 |  Section: 0010 |  Instructor: Jared Featherstone (WRTC)  |  TuTh 9:30-10:45  |  SSC 4040

Students will engage with a variety of philosophical and scientific approaches to defining or complicating the notion of a self. Particular attention will be given to the role of technology in the construction or dismantling of self. Through reflective writing, experimentation, and research, each student will conduct an extensive self-inventory and analysis that provides the basis for a final, multimedia creative project.

Area of emphasis flag: Creativity & Innovation

HON 300 - Postmodernism: A Shift in Perspective (3 credits)

Class #: 86115 |  Section: 0011 |  Instructor: Mark Hawthorne (WRTC)  | MoWeFr 1:05-1:55  |  Online

In this course we will examine Postmodern artifacts and writings of artists, designers, politicians, scholars, and critics who question the assumptions of Enlightenment rationality and create diverse ways to express their rejection of those assumptions and universalism. Emerging after World War II, postmodern thinking has restructured how we conceive of the world and has led to major paradigm shifts that question “traditional” values and beliefs. We will consider whether it is a generational conflict or a challenging difference in communication style and perception, and we will ask what effects it has on our lives, our country, and our technology. Through student reports, we will examine the development and expression of Postmodernism in art, architecture, film, literature, music, popular culture, politics, sociology, and psychology with the goal of reaching a class understanding of the phenomenon. With this understanding, you will create Postmodern artifacts according to your own academic fields.

Area of emphasis flag: Creativity and Innovation

HON 300 - Mentorship in Honors, Teaching Assistants (3 credits)

Class #: 86124 |  Section: 0013 |  Instructor: Fawn-Amber Montoya (Honors)  | TuTh 2:45-4:00  |  Duke 2039

This course will participate in the facilitation of HON 200 Mentoring in Honors. Class will address teaching and mentorship for Historically Underrepresented Minorities and First Generation students.

Area of emphasis flag: Leadership

HON 300 – Science and Technology for Future Presidents (3 credits)

Class #: 86723 |  Section: 0015 |  Instructor: Bradley Newcomer (Honors)  |  TuTh 1:15-2:30  |  Duke 2039

NEW: This Honors seminar has been approved to count for GenEd Cluster 3 Physical Principles credit. Students may use this course for EITHER Honors GenEd credit OR Honors seminar credit, but it cannot double count for both. You will indicate your preference to the instructor at the beginning of the semester.

This Honors seminar is designed as an introduction to the nature of science and technology in order to understand some of today's core science and technology issues our world faces today.  This course will focus on empowering students possessing any level of scientific background with the tools needed to make better informed decisions and to argue their views persuasively.  From the science of energy, climate change, the complicated reality of nuclear power and radioactivity, the complexities of biotechnology, to the realities of quantum phenomenon, this course will introduce students to how modern science can affect the decisions of political leaders, business leaders, and the lives of every citizen of the 21st century.

Area of emphasis flag: Leadership; Service and Civic Engagement

HON 300 – Honors Capstone Research and Writing Clinic (1 credit)

Class #: 86126 |  Section: 7101-Seven Wk1 |  Instructor: Philip Frana (Honors)  |  Mo 5:05-7:35 PM  |  Miller 2104

Excited or apprehensive about your Honors capstone project? Get off to a great start on your new or ongoing honors project next semester. This is a one-credit class involving informal, small group meetings for the first 8 weeks of the fall semester. Students who are at the proposal, research, or writing stages of their projects are encouraged to participate. Note: If you have an advisor, your enrollment in the course requires their approval. This clinic is not meant to replace or override the advice of your capstone committee members. It is not meant to replace regular meetings with your advisor. It exists to support, encourage, and smooth the way.

Area of emphasis flag(s): Research

IND 200 – Interdisciplinary Scholarship: Introduction to the Independent Scholars Major (3 Credits)

Class #: 82800   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Matthew Chamberlin (IdLS)   |   TuTh 8:00-9:15 AM   |   Wilson 2041

* Restricted to Independent Scholars majors.
IND 200 is designed to introduce students to the Independent Scholars major, and to the concepts of interdisciplinary study. Students will explore interdisciplinary research in a range of contemporary areas of study, including scientific, environmental, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students will also gain familiarity with the possibilities for individualized study at JMU. Successful completion of the course will involve the development of proposals for individualized curricula.

Other Courses

Unless otherwise stated, these courses count as Honors electives.


BIO 491H – Scientific Writing, Presentation, and Critical Thinking (2 credits)

Class #: 84797  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Christopher Rose  |  We 5:05-6:55 PM  |  EnGeo 1204

A discussion-based course for the development of the fundamental thinking, writing and presentation skills necessary to be a successful researcher. Offered as credit/no credit only. REQUIRED FOR ALL SECOND YEAR BIOLOGY HONORS STUDENTS.

BIO 495H – Biotechniques (1 credit)

Class #: 85167  |  Section: 0001 |  Instructor: Casonya Johnson  |  Time: TBA  |  Room: TBA

Students are trained in research theory and techniques. Students must contact and make arrangements with a supervising instructor in the term prior to registration. May be repeated for a maximum of two credits when course content changes. Offered as credit/no credit only.

BIO 496H – Literature Research (1 credit)

Class #: 84007  |  Section: 0001-IND  |  Instructor: Casonya Johnson  |  Time: TBA  |  Room: TBA

Students pursue literature research in a selected area of biology. Students must contact and make arrangements with a supervising instructor in the term prior to registration. May be repeated for a maximum of two credits when course content changes. Offered as credit/no credit only.

COB 300H – Integrative Business (1 credit)

Class #: 83850  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Eric Stark  |  Tu 6:30-7:30  |  Burruss 0229

COB 300H is an optional honors component of COB 300. This course provides an in-depth study of theory and research on teams and team effectiveness, which is applied to the COB 300 experience. The course will enable students to better understand team dynamics and how to form and manage teams for superior results. It will also develop their understanding of how to conduct research and will provide a platform for more in-depth honors study within each student's chosen major. 

COREQUISITE: COB 300.

By virtue of completing this course, a student may count 9 credits from COB 300 towards Honors elective requirements.

Taking COB 300 in Antwerp? Contact the instructor to discuss taking COB 300H the semester after.

IND 300 – Independent Scholars Workshop (1 Credit)

Class #: various   |   Section: various   |   Instructor: Philip Frana (Honors)   |   Fr 4:00-6:30 PM   |   Wilson 4033

* Restricted to Independent Scholars majors.
IND 300 is a one-credit workshop course designed to provide students in the Independent Scholars major (ISM) with methodological competencies linked to major learning objectives across their curriculum, including independent research methods, preparing presentations, data visualization, research methods, working with teams, and enhancing intellectual creativity.

NSG 350H – Foundations of Nursing (2 credits)

Class #: 83986  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Catherine Brown, Lisa Carmines  |  Tu 2:00-4:00  |  Room: TBA

This course provides an overview of foundational principles of professional nursing practice. Students will be introduced to the evolution of nursing, basic nursing theory and knowledge, and beginning concepts. This course promotes self-analysis and socialization into the role of the professional nurse.

NSG 354H – The Art and Science of Nursing (2 credits)

Class #: 83811  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Janice Gandy, Julianne Secrist  |  TBA  |  Online

This course is designed to provide an overview of current issues relevant to the art and science of the practicing nurse. This course will provide the students with a concentrated focus on the role of the professional nurse and the nursing profession. The course explores nursing theory, health care models of practice, diversity issues, as well as legal and ethical realities within the healthcare delivery system.

NSG 450H – Nursing Inquiry and Research Methods (3 credits)

Class #: 83812  |  Section: 0001  |  Instructor: Julie Strunk, Sandra Annan  |  Th 5:00-7:00  |  Room: TBA

This course explores the research process and utilization of research and theory in evidence based professional nursing practice. It also explores the dissemination and utilization of research in nursing practice. Students learn to critique healthcare literature in order to answer a research question that would impact nursing practice. 

NSG 455H – Nursing Informatics (3 credits)

Class #: 84663  |  Section: 7101-Seven Wk 1  |  Instructor: Mallory Fox  |  Time: TBA  |  Room: TBA

This course explores nursing informatics and technology applications in health care. Emphasis is on preparing entry level nurses with core nursing informatics competencies. A major theme is the use of information systems and technologies to improve the quality and safety of patient care in a changing health care environment. Students will develop their nursing informatics knowledge and skills through reading, discussions, exploration, and utilization of electronic modalities.

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