The minor in African, African American, and Diaspora (AAAD) Studies broadens students' world perspectives by enhancing their acquaintance with and understanding of the peoples, cultures, and institutions of Africa and the African Diaspora. The AAAD program engages cross disciplinary approaches to understand and to encounter Africa and the African Diaspora in a global context. The cross disciplinary character of the program is further enhanced by the fact that courses taken to fulfill program requirements are drawn from several departments. From these course offerings, students will examine and engage with some of AAAD Studies key contributing disciplines, concepts, methods and topics including the development of new identities.

The minor program in AAAD Studies is open to all undergraduate students at JMU. Courses taken to complete the AAAD minor can also be used to satisfy the student's major, as well as General Education requirements.

Summer/Fall 2022 Courses
Summer Courses

Core Courses:

AAAD 200: Introduction to AAAD

Section 4101 | Besi Muhonja | Asynchronous Online

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora. May be used for general education credit (Cluster 4). Required for AAAD Minor.

Elective Courses:

AAAD 401: Internship in AAAD Studies

Sections 0001, 0002, 0003 | Case Watkins | Hybrid | TBD

This internship course provides the student with the opportunity to apply knowledge learned in the classroom in a practical/real-world setting(s). It prepares students for working independently in the field. Any internship experience must be approved by the internship coordinator in advance, and details of supervision and evaluation should be spelled out in advance by the supervising faculty member. If the internship is through an academic unit, it must be approved for credit by the African, African American and Diaspora Studies internship coordinator in advance of the experience.

ENG 260: Survey of African-American Literature

Sections 4101, 4201 | Mollie Godfrey | Asynchronous Online

This course introduces students to major authors, literary forms, and movements in African American literature. We study the emergence and flourishing of African American literature over the past two centuries, noting common as well as diverging themes, techniques, and arguments over the coherence of African American literature as a genre. Throughout the semester we will explore antebellum, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights, Black Arts, and contemporary writers in their historical contexts as well as make connections between texts across historical periods. Students can expect to complete in-class reading and comprehension quizzes, group discussion board writing assignments, a midterm and final exam.

JUST 301: Black Feminist Abolitionist Praxis

Section 4201 | Tatiana Benjamin | Asynchronous Online

This course focuses on various social justice issues that impact our everyday lives on both the personal and institutional level. It will explore Black feminist theory in order to introduce topics such as racial justice, immigrant rights, LGBTQ, and disability justice. By applying Black feminist theory students will engage with how intersectionality and womanism provide road maps for abolishing systems of inequality. As the feminist adage states, “the personal is political.” Students will learn how to interrogate and dismantle hegemonic ideologies that do not align with liberation for all people. They will read writings that center the experiences of marginalized communities. Lastly, this course asks students to reimagine how our social, economic, and political systems can be transformed to reflect justice within our society.

JUST 328: Race, Class, and Justice

Section 4201 | Gianluca De Fazio | Asynchronous Online

This course provides students with an overview of contemporary justice issues in a comparative perspective. It includes an introduction to case-studies, comparative research

methods and cross-national comparisons of justice issues concerning race and class. To register contact Professor De Fazio at defazigx@jmu.edu.

Course Directives (Request from Minor Coordinator):

SCOM 471: Culture and Health Communication

Section 4101 | Mohammad Ala-Uddin | Asynchronous Online

This course explores how we define and study culture in health communication. While the notion of health is broadly conceptualized, our interest and focus lie at the intersection of health, communication, and culture. Students will discover in this course that pervasive health disparities still exist and disenfranchise various cultural groups. The purpose of this course is to examine the influence of culture on communicative aspects of individuals’ health. Specifically, this course compares the culture-centered approach to studying culture and health communication to the cultural sensitivity or culture as a barrier model. In this course, we apply various theoretical lenses to understand diverse health beliefs and engage in dialogue about our own health beliefs.

WGSS 200: Introduction to WGSS

Section 4W1 | Noelle Chaddock | Online | TBD

Interdisciplinary introduction to theories and scholarship in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Examines the social construction of gender, how gender affects access to opportunity, and the experiences and contributions of women throughout history. Provides a foundation for subsequent work in the women’s, gender, and sexuality studies minor.

Fall 2022 Courses
Core Courses

AAAD 200: Introduction to AAAD

Section 0001 | Etana Dinka | MW 9:35-10:50am | In-Person

Section 0002 | Kathryn Hobson | TTh 11:10am - 12:25pm | In-Person

Section 0003 | Biruk Haregu | TTh 12:45 - 2pm | Online

Section 0004 | Tatiana Benjamin | MWF 1:50 - 2:40pm | In-Person

Section 0005 | Connie Pruitt | TTh 2:20 - 3:35pm | Hybrid

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora. May be used for general education credit (Cluster 4). Required for AAAD minor.

AAAD 489: African, African American and Diaspora Studies Senior Research Experience

Section 0001 | Kathryn Hobson | Asynchronous Online

AAAD 489 is a one-credit hour, culminating experience for those in the African, African American, and Diaspora (AAAD) Studies minor program. AAAD 489 requires a substantive research paper and/or other approved project(s), as well as a public presentation, that demonstrate the student’s ability to synthesize learning gained throughout the minor program. Students work with one or more AAAD faculty members to determine the topic, research methods, and project structure. The public presentation must occur at an approved academic venue. Students may build upon coursework that they have completed at the 300 and 400 level. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that they are registered into the AAAD 489 course.

 

Elective Courses

EDUC 310: Teaching in a Diverse Society

Section 0001 | Ruthie Bosch | MW 1:50 - 3:05pm & WF 9:35am - 10:50am

Section 0002 | Diana Meza | TTh 11:10 - 12:15pm

Section 0003 | Kristin Wiley | TTH 9:35 - 10:50am

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning. The pre-service teachers will develop an understanding of similar unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage language and learning abilities, gender socialization and sexual orientation.

ELED 310: Diversity in Elementary Education

Section 0001, 0003 | Kara Kavanagh | M 8 - 10:45am; M 11:30 - 2:15pm | In-Person

ELED majors. Enroll in section 0001 of ELED 208 and section 0001 of ELED 272.

ELED 641: Families, Schools, and Communities

Section 0001 | Kara Kavanagh | W 5 - 7pm | Online

Online Course.

ENG 239: Literatures of Global English

Section 0002 | David Babcock | TTh 12:45 - 2pm | In-Person | HBS G010 

This course serves as an introduction to world Anglophone literatures since 1945, with special attention to English as a global language with a colonial history. Our texts are produced in places where, historically, English has been the language of imperialism and colonization, ranging from the Indian subcontinent, Africa, the Caribbean, and North America. Keeping in mind this bloody history, we will consider what it means to think in terms of a “global” English literature today, and identify common literary themes, problems, and strategies that have arisen across different areas of the world. How do postcolonial writers go about using English for their own purposes, occupying a potentially treacherous literary ground?

ENG 260: Survey of African-American Literature

Section 0001 | Mollie Godfrey | MWF 1:50 - 2:40pm | In-Person

This course introduces students to major authors, literary forms, and movements in African American literature. We study the emergence and flourishing of African American literature over the past two centuries, noting common as well as diverging themes, techniques, and arguments over the coherence of African American literature as a genre. Throughout the semester we will explore antebellum, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights, Black Arts, and contemporary writers in their historical contexts as well as make connections between texts across historical periods. Students can expect to complete in-class reading and comprehension quizzes, group discussion board writing assignments, a midterm and final exam.

HIST 263: Introduction to African History

Section 0001 | David Owusah-Ansah | MWF 8 - 8:50am | In-Person

History 263 introduces students to topics in the African past. The course begins with presentations about the African past as evidenced in paleoanthropological discoveries and continues through the colonial period. Particular attention is given to the development of political structures, religious concepts/institutions, and socio-economic patterns within the continent. Contacts with the outside world—the Arabia world and Europe—examine Africa in global history.

HIST 307: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade

Section 0001 | William Van Norman | MWF 12:40 - 1:30pm | In-Person

This course explores the origins, processes and outcomes of the infamous trade. By studying participants’ lives in Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, and North America, the course helps students understand people’s inhumanity to each other and the ways in which slavery and the trade in enslaved Africans forever altered the development of the Atlantic world.

HRD 123: Developing Multicultural Competency for Effective Facilitation

Section 0001 | Oris Griffin and Jordan Todd | Th 2:40 - 3:55pm (tentative) | In-Person

Relying on an intersectional approach, Developing Multicultural Competency for Effective Facilitation will provide students with a deeper understanding of various systems of oppressions, social identities, and facilitation skills to develop and implement trainings, programs, and dialogues focusing on areas of diversity, equity, social justice, and inclusion. Though open to all undergraduate students, HRD 123 is a prerequisite for students interested in becoming a DEEP Impact Diversity Educator, a peer-to-peer diversity and social justice education program sponsored by the Center for Multicultural Student Services at James Madison University.

POSC 326: Civil Rights 

Section 0001 | Jennifer Byrne | TTh 2:20 - 3:35pm | In-Person

An examination of the judicial interpretation of civil rights in America with emphasis on freedom of speech, due process of law and equal protection under the 14th Amendment.

POSC 353: African Politics

Section 0001 | Melinda Adams | MWF 12:40 - 1:30pm | In-Person

This course seeks to foster an understanding of contemporary politics in Africa. The course is organized thematically and draws on case studies to develop these themes. It provides an overview of the central factors affecting African politics, such as the state, societal groups, ethnic, religious, class, and gender identities, international financial institutions, and other global and domestic forces. Students should emerge from the course with concrete knowledge of African politics in particular countries as well as with a greater understanding of the theories and broader analytical debates that animate research on Africa. Students are expected to integrate a broad array of materials, including lectures, readings, current events, and films, to come to a deeper understanding of contemporary African politics.

SOCI 354: Social Inequality

Section 0001 | Bethany Bryson | Asynchronous Online 

Course covers the systems of stratification and inequality in the United States including race, class, gender, religion, sexuality, ethnicity, and nationality. Discussion will center on their role in providing rationales for oppression and discrimination in society and their relationship to the distribution of power and ideological control.

Course Directives (Request from Minor Coordinator)

ENG 433: Studies in Arabic Literature

Section 0001 | Sofia Samatar | M 4 - 7pm | In-Person

This course examines the representation of space in North African novels. Our selected texts address human experience in a variety of spaces, from interiors and villages to the open desert. These novels come from a region that is sometimes considered part of Africa, and sometimes part of the Middle East: a cultural crossroads that remains contested, full of diverse and contradictory stories about itself. Reading these novels will allow us to explore a number of rich topics, including the difference between space and place, the role of storytelling in spatial experience, and how a particular type of storytelling—the novel—helps shape our idea of the world.

GEOG 377: Feminist Geography

Section 0001 | Kayla Yurco | TTh 3:55 - 5:15pm | In-Person

This course introduces the field and practice of feminist geography with emphasis on understanding gender and other social categories such as race, class, and sexuality through a geographic perspective. Concepts and topics examined include the relationship of such identities to spatial politics, culture, knowledge, and social justice.

HIST 401: History Research Capstone: The Great Black Migration of the 20th Century

Section 0001 | Steven Reich | TTh 12:45 - 2pm | In-Person

Although African Americans had been leaving the South since the days of slavery, it was not until the twentieth century that they migrated on a massive scale to begin new lives in the urban North. From about 1910 to 1970, millions of African American migrants embarked on millions of individual journeys that resulted in a dramatic redistribution of the African American population. This Great Black Migration, as it came to be called, shifted the center of African American social, economic, political, and cultural life from the rural South to the urban North and West. The course explores the Great Migration and its wide impact on African American life, culture, and politics, through a variety of sources and culminates in a capstone research project.

JUST 225: Justice and American Society

Section 0001 | Tatiana Benjamin | MWF 12:40 - 1:30pm | In-Person

This is a General Education (Cluster IV: The American Experience) course which introduces the student to the concept and reality of justice in America. It does not count for credit in the Justice Studies major. It is a broad-based, interdisciplinary consideration of justice: What it is, what it means, and how it intersects with society and social institutions in America. Philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of justice will be considered as well as the historical context of justice in American society. Justice will also be considered in how it is conceptualized and practiced both formally and informally in social institutions in America. This includes a consideration of justice in community, family, educational, religious and government contexts. Specific attention will be given to formal justice as practiced in the American criminal justice system. Finally, students will engage in a critical examination of contemporary justice issues (such as poverty, women’s rights, immigration, human rights, etc.) using existing quantitative data and exercises. Students will be expected to engage critically on justice issues in relation to different conceptions and alternatives of justice.

JUST 357: Environmental Justice

Section 0001 | Case Watkins | TTh 2:20 - 3:35 pm | In-Person

This course provides students with an interdisciplinary introduction to environmental justice. Emphasizing how contemporary environmental issues are profoundly rooted in social, political, and economic conditions, students will apply principles and conceptions of justice to ecological challenges and sustainability efforts in local, national, and global contexts. Prerequisites potentially waived for AAAD students with permission of instructor (watki2ac@jmu.edu).

POSC 341: Social Movements in the US & Abroad

Section 0001 | Kristin Wylie | MW 3:25 - 4:40pm | In-Person

In recent decades, social movements have mobilized people concerned about issues ranging from the rights of ethno-racial minorities, women, sexual minorities, and immigrants to the environment, human rights, and world peace. This course will examine the origins, modes of action, and impact of such movements. We will apply the comparative method to analyze social movements in the United States and abroad, investigating how different socioeconomic and political contexts shape social movements based on common issues. The course will emphasize how social movements emerge and function within and alongside existing structures of formal politics.

POSC 371: Black Politics

Section TBD | Jaimee Swift | MWF 11:30 - 12:20pm 

email kelle2jw@jmu.edu for permission number to enroll.

SOCI 360: Social Movements

Section 0001 | Stephen Poulson | TTh time TBD | In-Person

Introduction to the study and analysis of social movements in the United States as agents of social and ideological change. Emphasis is given to movements which have goals of extending and/or protecting rights of individuals and groups in the face of increasing industrialization, urbanization and centralization of power. Much of the course is focused on the Black Civil Rights movement and more recent Black activism, such as the Black Lives Matter movement.

SOCI 395: Special Topics: Sociology of Higher Education

Section 0001 | Deborwah Faulk | TTh 11:20am - 12:25pm | In-Person

Higher education is at the center of research, policy, and public discourse in the U.S. While the assumption is often that education is a public good and the "great equalizer", some scholars suggest that higher education only exacerbates existing social inequality. In this course, we will engage theoretical and empirical arguments about the relationship between higher education and inequality. Through in-depth interrogation of sociological theories; close reading and analysis of text; and discussion of real-world issues related to Higher Ed, we will explore this relationship. This course approaches higher education through three avenues: 1) pathways to Higher Ed; 2) experiences during college; and 3) social outcomes post-entry. For questions contact Dr. Deborwah Faulk at faulkdx@jmu.edu.

STAD 322: Equity, Access, and Inclusion in Education and Performance

Section 0001 | Rachel Rhoades | TTh 11:10 - 12:25pm | In-Person | Forbes 2234

This course examines the role of education and the performing/applied arts in two major tasks: 1) Enhancing access to resources and opportunities for artists from non-dominant identity groups, and 2) Opening space for all peoples to participate in dismantling systems of oppression, specifically through artistic cultural production.In this course, you will learn a range of critical theories (e.g. Black Feminism, Critical Disability Theory, Critical Race Theory, Indigenous Theory) and their foundational relevance to school- and community-based critical education, performing arts contexts, and in arts-based, youth-led social movement activism. We will examine not only the current issues around equity, access, and inclusion in education and the arts, but also become familiar with and imagine new forms of resistance to those injustices. We will explore case studies such as: anti-colonial, anti-capitalist youth arts “colectivos” in Venezuela; Indigenous climate justice music videos galvanizing policy change across the US; and Chilean college students utilizing “carnival strategies” such as public dance performances to challenge the egregious state of education. You will develop academic, professional, and interpersonal skills to prepare you as an advocate, educator, and artist- all of us can use our collective agency in any of these roles to demand justice! In all aspects of my teaching, my goal is to engage in the exchange of knowledge and collective inquiry on urgent issues as a means to unite students and myself as, what critical education pioneer Freire (1973) calls, “co-investigators in dialogue” as we work together towards “critical intervention in reality” through lenses of critique and renewal.

WGSS 200: Introduction to WGSS

Sections 0001, 0003 | Noelle Chaddock | TTh 5:30 - 6:15pm | Online

Interdisciplinary introduction to theories and scholarship in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Examines the social construction of gender, how gender affects access to opportunity, and the experiences and contributions of women throughout history. Provides a foundation for subsequent work in the women’s, gender, and sexuality studies minor.

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