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Fall 2021

AAAD 200: Introduction to African, African American, and Diaspora Studies 

Section 0001 | Etana Dinka | TuTh 11:20AM-12:35PM | In-Person 

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora. May be used for general education credit (Cluster 4). Required for AAAD minor. 

AAAD 400: The Antiracist Gen Ed Project (A JMU X-Labs Class) 

Section 0002 | Tolu Odumosu (co-taught by Amy Lewis, Allison Fagan, and Carah Whaley) | TuTh 9:40-10:55AM | In-Person 

Join students from across campus to redefine and reimagine “diversity,” “equity,” and “inclusion” in the General Education curriculum. What broad skills does a college graduate in 2026 need to have? Whose knowledge should count as important enough to teach to the leaders of tomorrow? Whose stories should we tell? Are you interested in joining a diverse team of multidisciplinary faculty from across campus to critique the syllabi of yesterday and shape the courses of tomorrow? Are interested in rethinking the Gen Ed experience from an anti-racist perspective? If so, join the conversation and sign up for this class. Admission is by instructor permission only. Apply here by Wednesday, April 14: http://bit.ly/GenEdXLabs 

Course Cross-Listed with LAXC 495, POSC 351, MUS 490, ISAT 480, HON 300, UNST 300E, ENG 302 

AAAD 401: Internship in African, African American and Diaspora Studies 

Sections 0001 (one credit hour), 0002 (two credit hours), 0003 (three credit hours) | Case Watkins | TBD | Multiple 

This internship course provides the student with the opportunity to apply knowledge learned in the classroom in a practical/real-world setting(s). It prepares students for working independently in the field. Any internship experience must be approved by the internship coordinator in advance, and details of supervision and evaluation should be spelled in advance by the supervising faculty member. If the internship is through an academic unit, it must be approved for credit by the African, African American and Diaspora Studies internship coordinator in advance of the experience. Students should seek out their own internship opportunities, respond to opportunities posted by the Director of AAAD Internships, and/or work with AAAD faculty and partners to develop internship opportunities.Questions? Contact Director of AAAD Internships, Dr. Case Watkins, at watki2ac@jmu.edu. 

AMST 200: Introduction to American Studies 

Section 0002 / 0003 | H. Gelfand | MW 3:55-5:10PM / MW 5:35-6:50PM | In Person/Hybrid 

This course examines representations of the United States in literature, history, philosophy, religion, popular culture, music, and art through the concepts of Identity, Place, and Activism with a strong emphasis on People of Color and people of all abilities, economic backgrounds, ethnicities, genders, and sexualities. 

EDUC 310: Teaching in a Diverse Society 

Section 0001 / 0003 | Diana Meza (0001) or Ruthie Bosch (0003) | MW 9:40-10:55AM (0001) / TuTh 9:40-10:55AM (0003) | In-Person 

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning. The pre-service teachers will develop an understanding of similar unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage language and learning abilities, gender socialization and sexual orientation 

ELED 310: Diversity, Equity, and Justice in Elementary Education 

Section 0003 / 0004 / 0005 | Kara Kavanagh | M 11:45AM-2:30PM / M 8:00-10:45AM / W 8:00-10:45AM | In-Person 

This course guides students in critically examining their own perspectives regarding diversity in our society. Through this course, students will expand their awareness and understanding of individuals and groups apparently different from themselves. Students will explore pedagogical issues and practices in the classroom that embrace the whole community of learners and their families. 

ENG 239: Studies in World Literature: Literatures of Global English 

Section 0002 | David Babcock | TuTh 9:40-10:55AM | In-Person/Hybrid 

This course serves as an introduction to world anglophone literatures since 1945, with special attention to English as a global language with a colonial history. Our texts are produced in places where, historically, English has been the language of imperialism and colonization, ranging from the Indian subcontinent, Africa, the Caribbean, and North America. Keeping in mind this bloody history, we will consider what it means to think in terms of a "global" English literature today, and identify common literary themes, problems, and strategies that have arisen across different areas of the world. How do postcolonial writers go about using English for their own purposes, occupying a potentially treacherous literary ground? 

ENG 260: Survey of African American Literature 

Section 0001 | Mollie Godfrey | MWF 1:00-1:50PM | In-Person/Hybrid 

This course introduces students to major authors, literary forms, and movements in African American literature. We study the emergence and flourishing of African American literature over the past two centuries, noting common as well as diverging themes, techniques, and arguments over the coherence of African American literature as a genre. Throughout the semester we will explore antebellum, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights, Black Arts, and contemporary writers in their historical contexts as well as make connections between texts across historical periods. Students can expect to complete in-class reading and comprehension quizzes, group discussion board writing assignments, a midterm and final exam. 

ENG 335: African American Children's Literature 

Section 0001 | Danielle Price | TuTh 2:40-3:55PM | In-Person 

This course studies the conventions and history of African American children’s literature. We begin with the overarching question of what exactly is African American children’s literature and then consider its history and expression in various genres including the picture book, poetry, historical fiction, realistic fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also discuss the position of African American literature within the wider world of children’s books, book publishing, and popular culture. 

ENG 496: Advanced Creative Writing: Life Writing 

Section 0004 | Joanne Gabbin | TuTh 9:40-10:55AM | In-Person 

Creative life writing class organized around readings in memoirs and autobiographies written by Black American authors, including Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Barack Obama, James McBride, Jesmyn Ward, and Edwidge Danticat. 

HIST 263: Introduction to African History 

Section 0001 | David Owusu-Ansah | MWF 8:00-8:50AM | In Person 

History 263 introduces students to topics in the African past. The course begins with presentations about the African past as evidenced in paleanthropological discoveries and continues through the colonial period. articular attention is given to the development of political structures, religious concepts/institutions, and socio-economic patterns within the continent. Contacts with the outside world—the Arabia world and Europe—examine Africa in global history. 

HIST 341: A History of Modern Africa 

Section 0001 | Etana Dinka | TuTh 4:20-5:35PM | In-Person 

This course examines selected key themes in the history of modern Africa. It 
explores historical transitions and challenges in society, economy and politics in the 19th and 20th centuries. The major themes of the course include the 19th-century transformations in the west and southern Africa, East Africa and the Indian ocean, Islam in Africa, conquest and colonialism, Africa and the two world wars, the process of decolonization and the eventual departure of European colonial rule in parts of tropical Africa, and independent Africa's politics and economies. The course is organized chronologically and thematically, providing students with a broad knowledge of modern Africa that will prepare them for further in-depth learning of the continent's contemporary history. Lectures, class discussions, films, and historical significance issues in selected African countries from different geographical zones will be employed to illustrate the key themes of discussions in the course. 

HIST 355: African American History to 1865 

Section 0001 | Andrew Witmer | TuTh 11:20AM-12:35PM | In-Person 

A survey of the experience and changing status of African Americans in the United States from 1619 through the Civil War, with attention to the West African background, cultural developments, social and political movements, slavery and the slave trade, dual-consciousness, and emancipation. 

IDLS 395/ENVT 300: Environmental Thought and Activism 

Section 0003 | H. Gelfand | Th 4:20-6:50PM | In-Person/Hybrid 

This course examines the development of environmental thought in the United states, including environmental protection, environmental activism, environmental justice, urban adaptations to environmental degradation and poverty, land use, ecopoverty, and the impacts of resource extraction and refining, with a particular emphasis on People of Color and economically challenged populations. 

JUST 355: Solutions to Global Poverty 

Section 0001 | Daniel Beers | W 6:30-9:00PM | In-Person 

This course will analyze the root causes of global poverty and critically examine a range of approaches designed to improve conditions for the world’s poor. Topics include nutrition and agriculture, healthcare, education, gender equality, water and sanitation, environmental management, and microfinance. Throughout the course, we will read policy documents, work with poverty-related data, and analyze a variety of real-world case studies to 
illustrate key ideas. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and one other 200-level JUST course, not including JUST 225. (Limited availability; pre-reqs waived for AAAD students). 

JUST 357: Environmental Justice 

Section 0001 | Case Watkins | TuTh 2:00-3:15PM | In-Person 

This course provides students with an interdisciplinary introduction to 
environmental justice. Emphasizing how contemporary environmental issues are profoundly rooted in social, political, and economic conditions, students will apply principles and conceptions of justice to ecological challenges and sustainability efforts in local, national, and global contexts. Class Notes: Students are divided into subgroups and attend alternating face-to-face and remote classes on a schedule set by their instructor. Prerequisites: JUST 200 and one other 200-level JUST course, not including JUST 225. (Limited 
availability; pre-reqs waived for AAAD students). 

POSC 340: Politics of Development 

Section 0001 | Melinda Adams | TuTh 11:20AM-12:35PM | In-Person 

What is development and what strategies successfully promote it? This course examines questions related to development--what it is, what factors promote or obstruct it, and the ways that academic and practitioner-based approaches to it have changed over time. Throughout the semester, we will pay significant attention to issues of governance, institutions, strategies of development and poverty alleviation, and foreign aid and conflict. 

POSC 341: Social Movements in the US & Abroad 

Section 0001 | Kristin Wylie | MW 2:15-3:30PM | In-Person 

In recent decades, social movements have mobilized people concerned about issues ranging from the rights of ethno-racial minorities, women, sexual minorities, and immigrants to the environment, human rights, and world peace. This course will examine the origins, modes of action, and impact of such movements. We will apply the comparative method to analyze social 
movements in the United States and abroad, investigating how different socioeconomic and political contexts shape social movements based on common issues. The course will emphasize how social movements emerge and function within and alongside existing structures of formal politics. 

PSYC 402: Independent Readings in Black in America 

Section 0001 | Pam Gibson | M 11:00AM-12:15PM | Synchronous Online 

This course reads and discusses 7 books and 2 reports by Black authors that deal with being Black in the United States. Some emphasis is put on identity and students will write a paper on their racial identity. Students will also explore their own implicit biases with an exercise designed by the instructor. Books will include: When They Call You a Terrorist by Patrisse Kahn-Cullors (co-founder of Black Lives Matter); The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander; The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin; Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, "Overpoliced, and Underprotected" by Kimberle Williams Crenshaw with Priscilla Ocen and Jyoti Nanda (African American Policy forum www.aapf.org and Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies. www.intersectionality-center.org); "Say Her Name Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women." African American Policy forum. On Canvas and at www.aapf.orgWhy Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? by Beverly Daniel Tatum; Whistling Vivaldi by Claude M. Steele; White Rage by Carol Anderson; and Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates. This course is handled via override. Please email instructor at gibsonpr@jmu.edu. 

REL 300: Race and Religion 

Section 0001 | Emily Gravett | MW 9:40-10:55AM | In-Person 

Both race and religion are interwoven into who we are and how we inhabit our various worlds, even if we don’t think of these as important or relevant parts of our lives. This class will explore the complicated and long-standing intersection of these two concepts, wondering: What do they each mean? How have these terms functioned, throughout history? How do race and religion interact? How has one informed or shaped our understanding of the other? When differing racial and religious identities converge for individuals and communities, what happens? With the foundation provided by the course and our time together, you will also have the opportunity to explore your own various identities as well as case study of your choosing that involves an intersection of race and religion. 

SCOM 248: Intercultural Communication 

Section 0001 / 0002 | Kathryn Hobson | TuTh 11:20-12:35PM / 1:00-2:15PM | In-Person 

The study of human communication in a variety of cultural settings and contexts. Emphasis on developing understanding and analytical skills regarding communication between people from different racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds in both domestic and international settings. Consideration of relevance and application to social, business, and political environments 

WGSS 200: Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 

Section 0002 | Besi Muhonja | MW 9:40-10:55AM | In-Person 

This course offers an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies from a critical, transnational, intersectional and cross-cultural perspective. Participants will interrogate intersections of gender, nationality, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, age, and other identities through the lenses of production and reproduction, public and private 
concepts/spheres, margins and centers, privilege and subordination, cultural realities, resistance, colonialisms, decolonial knowledges, globalization and neo-colonialisms. 

Spring 2021

AAAD 200: Introduction to African, African American, and Diaspora Studies

Section 0001 | Besi Muhonja | TuTh 2:15-3:30pm | Synchronous Online

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora. May be used for general education credit (Cluster 4). Required for AAAD minor.

ARTH 424: Arts of Ancient Egypt

Section 0001 | Aderonke Adesanya | TuTh 2:40-3:55pm | Synchronous Online

The course covers ancient the Egyptian civilization from the Old to New Egyptian Kingdoms. It explores the foundations of the arts and architecture, the relationship between religion and artistic tradition, ideas about hierarchies, leadership, and gender, and illustrates these with the arts of the era of some Egyptian pharaohs. The course takes students through the philosophy and belief systems governing artistic production in the ancient Egyptian world. Mythological ideas about the culture, ideologies and ideosyncrasies of Egyptian kings, queens and nobles, as well Egypt under the Nubian, Greek and Roman eras come into sharp relief in thematic studies throughout the semester. Egyptian sculpture, painting, architecture, jewelry, textiles and ceramic, the techniques of production, iconography, and other elements in the various works of art and architecture as well as terminologies applied to them are examined.

ARTH 428: Advanced Topics in Modern and Contemporary African Art (New African Diaspora Art)

Section 0001 | Aderonke Adesanya | TuTh 11:20AM-12:35PM | Synchronous Online

An examination of the works and experiences of New African Diaspora artists (NADA) in western locations notably, America, the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, France, and Germany. It brings into focus the artists’ processes and productions, their critique of and responses to race, politics, identity, migration, decolonization, and other experiences. It also highlights the avenues for exhibition and circulation of their works, and how they navigate and mediate the politics of art making, dealing with intermediaries and institutions, and belonging to the local and global art market. Students are required to find case studies for their research.

ELED 310: Diversity, Equity, and Justice in Elementary Education

Section 0004, 0005, or 0006 | Kara Kavanagh | M 8:00AM-10:45AM, W 11:45AM-2:30PM, W 8:00AM-10:45AM | In Person

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning. The pre-service teachers will develop an understanding of unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage, language, learning abilities, gender socialization, and sexual orientation.

EDUC 310: Teaching in a Diverse Society

Section 0001, 0002, 0003, or 0004 | Meza or Schick | TuTh 9:40-10:55AM, TuTh 2:40-3:55PM, MW 2:15-3:30PM, or MW 9:30-10:55AM | TBA

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning. The pre-service teachers will develop an understanding of similar unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage language and learning abilities, gender socialization and sexual orientation

ENG 260: Survey of African American Literature

Section 0001 | Mollie Godfrey | Asynchronous | Asynchronous Online

This course introduces students to major authors, literary forms, and movements in African American literature. We study the emergence and flourishing of African American literature over the past two centuries, noting common as well as diverging themes, techniques, and arguments over the coherence of African American literature as a genre. Throughout the semester we will explore antebellum, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights, Black Arts, and contemporary writers in their historical contexts as well as make connections between texts across historical periods.

ENG 221H: Literature/Culture/Ideas: Latinx Storytelling

Section 0001 | Allison Fagan | MWF 9:15-10:05AM | Synchronous and Asynchrounous Online

A comparative introductory survey of the stories of contemporary U.S. Latinx writers who trace their heritage to Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Central and South America. In addition to considering how race, nation, and ethnicity shape understandings of Latina/o/x identity, the course will explore the influencing forces of gender, sexuality, class, and language on Latinx writers. A student final project must focus on a topic related to AfroLatinidad for AAAD credit. May also be used for General Education credit.

ENG 335: African American Children's Literature

Section 0001 | Danielle Price | TuTh 9:40-10:55AM | Synchronous Online

This course studies the conventions and history of African American children’s literature. We begin with the overarching question of what exactly is African American children’s literature: is it defined by its readership? by the race of its authors and illustrators? by its depictions and themes? We will consider the history of this literature and its expression in various genres including the picture book, poetry, historical fiction, realistic fiction, fantasy fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also discuss the position of African-American literature within the wider world of children’s books, book publishing, and popular culture.

ENG 405: Epidemics in Contemporary Anglophone Literature

Sections 0001 | David Babcock | M 3:55-6:25PM | Synchronous Online

This course considers the ways that obsessions with disease and contagion get coded within contemporary geo-cultural contexts. Its premise is that mass epidemics can act as historical catalysts that lead communities to envision themselves—both their problems and potentialities—in new ways. Often we hear about how the boundaries of communities are policed by stoking people‘s fears of disease and death, suggesting perhaps that contagion fiction is only capable of producing reactive, xenophobic feelings. In fact, contemporary fiction presents a much more multifaceted picture, one that includes possibilities for both community-building and communal self-critique.

ENG 408: Advanced Studies in African American Literature

Section 0001 | Mollie Godfrey | M 3:55-6:25PM | Synchronous Online

This course on the Pasts, Presents, and Futures of Contemporary African American Literature offers an advanced study of key theories and genres of contemporary African American literature, including neo-slave narratives, post-soul satires, and Afrofuturism. Authors include Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, Percival Everett, Mat Johnson, Octavia Butler, and Nnedi Okorafor.

ENG 433: Advanced Studies in Arabic Literature

Section 0001 | Sofia Samatar | Tu 6:00-8:30PM | Synchronous Online

A study of the novel in North Africa, taught in English (no knowledge of Arabic is necessary). This course fulfills requirements for: Advanced Studies for English Majors; Identity, Diversity, Power; AAAD Minor; MECM Minor.

ENG 496: Trauma, Healing, and Resiliance: A Multi-Genre Workshop

Section 0002 | Erica Cavanagh | MW 2:15-3:30PM | TBA

In this creative writing workshop we will read nonfiction, poetry, and a hybrid of these two genres called the lyric essay on the themes of trauma, healing, and resilience. Of books, our readings will include Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild, Jeannette Winterson’s Why Be Happy When You Can Be Normal?, Claudia Rankine’s Don’t Let Me Be Lonely, and Danez Smith’s Don’t Call Us Dead. We will also read shorter works on subjects that are at center stage in our times, namely the effects of race-based discrimination and also the effects of quarantine amid COVID-19. Excerpts from books and podcasts on the brain science of trauma, race- and gender-based trauma, and also tools for healing and resilience will supplement the literary works we read and offer us a language for talking about the effects of difficult experiences and how we might address them. Over the course of the semester, you will have three writing assignments for which you may choose to write in the genre of nonfiction, poetry, or the lyric essay. For these writing assignments, you will not be required to write about trauma per se, but given the themes of the course, we will all likely write about challenging, alienating, or otherwise disorienting experiences and how we have tried, so far, to understand and address those experiences in our lives.

HIST 322: The New South

Section 0001 | Steven Reich | TuTh 1:00-2:15PM | In Person

During the era of Jim Crow—a period that spanned the years from the 1890s to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s—a welter of state laws, municipal ordinances, and social customs racially segregated public and private life across the American South. Jim Crow, as both legal framework and social practice, shaped the everyday lives of three generations of Southerners, both black and white. It determined where they worked, where they attended school, what they learned, where and what they ate, what they wore, where they shopped, whom they could marry, how they raised their children, how they worshipped God, how and where they relaxed and socialized, and the political allegiances they held. This class examines the complexities of segregation—its legal boundaries, its social and cultural peculiarities, and its violent enforcement. It especially focuses on the political actions that challenged and eventually dismantled it. The course satisfies requirements for the minor in African, African American, and Diaspora Studies (AAAD) and Tracks 1, 2, 3, and 7 of the Humanities and Social Sciences Concentration of the IDLS major.

HIST 489: Pandemics in African History

Section 0001 | Etana H. Dinka | TuTh 9:30-10:45am | Synchronous Online

This course explores the histories of pandemics in the entire sweep of African history. By using a continent-wide perspective to examine these histories, from the Athenian Plague—the earliest recorded pestilence—to the rise and expansion of successive Ebola epidemics, the course offers students the opportunity to understand pandemics historically and examine its role in shaping African economies, societies, cultures, and politics. Not only have pandemics shaped theoretical approaches to these contexts, but they have also become deeply rooted aspects of theories and methods. An understanding of the way histories of pandemics unfolded in Africa, mostly linked to human penetration into the natural environment—one of the major themes in African history—helps to set the discussions in the longer context of African history and opens up to analysis a potentially under-examined history of linkages between pandemics, economy, society, culture, politics. The history of pandemics, and more generally of diseases, characteristically falls under environmental history. Since pandemics are natural forces occurring beyond human control over the environment, a course emphasizing histories of pandemics will help students to think beyond such established ideas as humans control nature and to be able to generate fresh perspectives. The course begins by asking the critical question useful to frame the discussions that help to understand histories of pandemics in the longue durée of African history—what is African history? The key themes will include the role of pandemics in the shaping of human history, and the histories of major pandemics that prevailed across the continent, including the Athenian Plague, the Black Death, Cholera, Malaria, Sleeping Sickness, Tuberculosis, Influenza, HIV/AIDS, and Ebola. Although the course focuses on pandemics that had occurred in the history of Africa, occasionally students will venture into other continents tracing global trajectories of pandemics. Students registered for this course will have required and recommended readings. Class discussions are based on the required readings. A thorough reading of required materials before every class is vital. It is a requirement for every student to attend classes and engage actively in class discussions. Active class participation makes a vital part of the course.

HON 300: 20th and 21st Century Leadership in Black, Afro-Latinx and Latinx Popular Culture

Section TBA | Fawn-Amber Montoya | Tu 5:30-8:00PM | Hybrid

Course will analyze the historical context of 20th and 21st popular culture from the perspective of race, class, gender, and sexual identity. Students will think critically about how Black, Latinx, and Afro-Latinx female musicians, actors, and artists have portrayed the female body. The course will consider the following: How do history and current events impact popular culture? How do personal and political lines blur within the context of popular culture? What qualifies as leadership?

IDLS 395: The Unfinished Journey of People of Color in the U.S.

Section 0004 | H. Gelfand | TuTh 4:20-5:35PM | In Person/Synchronous Online

An in-depth study of People of Color in Contemporary America, with a focus on the antecedents and factors that have led to our current circumstances, and contemplations of making the country more equitable and accepting.

JUST 328: Race, Class and Justice

Section 0001 | Gianluca De Fazio | Asynchronous | Asynchronous Online

This course provides students with an overview of contemporary justice issues in a comparative perspective. It includes an introduction to case-studies, comparative research methods and cross-national comparisons of justice issues concerning race and class. Special emphasis will be devoted to explore the collective memory of racial violence.

JUST 301: Policing of Protest

Section 0002 | Gianluca De Fazio | Asynchronous | Asynchronous Online

This course investigates the contentious interactions between protesters and political authorities, in particular the policing of protest in democratic societies. The course is divided into three sections: in the first one, general issues of dissent and repression in democratic societies are investigated; in the second section we concentrate on the reality of protest policing in the United States. In the third and final section of the course, we compare transnational patterns and trends in protest policing.

POSC/WGSS 383: Women & Politics in Comparative Perspective

Section 0001 | Kristin Wylie | TuTh 2:40-3:55PM | Synchronous Online

A study of the causes and consequences of women's political marginalization in the United States and abroad. The course takes an intersectional approach to examine socioeconomic and political dimensions of gender inequality, exploring how women have worked through social movements, electoral politics, and public policy initiatives to overcome obstacles to their political empowerment.

SCOM 313: Intergroup Dialogue on Race

Section 0001 | Jennifer PeeksMease and Art Dean | Tu 2:40-5:10PM | Hybrid

This is a dialogue-driven class that focuses on our experiences of race, and how they are shaped by historical and contemporary contexts. Major assignments include two critically informed reflection papers, weekly participation in discussion boards, weekly readings to prepare for dialogues, and a semester-long group project that addresses race here at JMU. **Class is by permission, and requires that you complete this application to be considered.*** Priority is given to SCOM students, but all interested students are encouraged to apply.

SOCI 354: Social Inequality

Section 0001 | Bethany Bryson | Asynchronous | Asynchronous Online

Course covers the systems of stratification and inequality in the United States including race, class, gender, religion, sexuality, ethnicity, and nationality. Discussion will center on their role in providing rationales for oppression and discrimination in society and their relationship to the distribution of power and ideological control. Technology Note: This is a low-bandwidth interactive class. All content will be available on the first day of class, with firm deadlines for class participation and other assignments. A dependable internet connection and Respondus Lockdown Browser are required for three exams.

THEA 324: Theatre for Young Audiences

Section 0001 | Joshua Rashon Streeter | TuTh 1:00-2:15PM | Hybrid (mostly synchronous online)

Description: This course provides an exploration of Theatre for Young Audiences (TYA) and Theatre for the Very Young (TVY) through the lens of culturally responsive practice and pedagogy. This course looks at work aimed at youth (birth through high school). We will examine the historical contexts of TYA, read plays in the TYA canon and plays working to expand or disrupt the cultural understanding of what TYA is in the United States, investigate current theatre companies focused on work for youth, and explore educational applications. Our discussions will be framed by scene work, the viewing TYA/TVY, scholarly writing on the topics being discussed, dialogue with leaders in the field, and professional partnerships.

Summer 2020

AAAD 200: Introduction to African, African American, and Diaspora Studies

May 4-Week Session 1 | Besi Brillian Muhonja | Online

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora. May be used for general education credit.

ENG 239: Studies in World Literature: African Oral Literature

May 4-Week Session 1 | Besi Brillian Muhonja | Online

This course offers an overview of African oral literatures, exploring form and style, relevance and function in specific genres including folktales, witticisms, praise poetry, children’s games, and songs. Through an exploration of spiritual, social, and political themes and content of oral literature, this introductory course contextualizes orature as part of the world sense and day-today structures and operations of African communities. May be used for general education credit.

ENG 260: Survey of African American Literature

May 4-Week Session 1 | Mollie Godfrey | Online

This course introduces students to major authors, literary forms, and movements in African American literature. We study the emergence and flourishing of African American literature over the past two centuries, noting common as well as diverging themes, techniques, and arguments over the coherence of African American literature as a genre. Throughout the semester we will explore antebellum, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights, Black Arts, and contemporary writers in their historical contexts as well as make connections between texts across historical periods. May be used for general education credit.

HIST 391: Special Topics in African History: Ghana, A Case Study

6-Week Session 1 | David Owusu-Ansah | Online

Ghana, the first African country South of Sahara, is often described as symbolizing the history and conditions of the African continent. Its location just above the Equator and through which Longitude zero degrees or the Greenwich Meridian passes, Ghanaians see themselves as occupying the center of the globe, and its post-independent leaders feel obliged to model their political and economic developments for the rest of the continent. This Ghana Special Topics course is designed as an online engagement that will cover issues from slavery to emphasizing local responses to colonialism, and in discussing topics in post -independence politics, cultural and economic developments.

JUST 328: Race, Class and Justice

4-Week Session 2 | Gianluca De Fazio | Online

This course provides students with an overview of contemporary justice issues in a comparative perspective. It includes an introduction to case-studies, comparative research methods and crossnational comparisons of justice issues concerning race and class.

SOCI 336: Race and Ethnicity

May 4-Week Session 1 | Bethany Bryson | Online

This course examines the social construction of race and ethnicity around the world and how they influence social processes, institutions, change and ideology. The course will include discussions concerning the intersection of race and ethnicity with other aspects of social inequality such as class, gender, sexuality and nationality in contemporary society.

SOCI 354: Social Inequality

May 4-Week Session 2 | Bethany Bryson | Online

This course covers the systems of stratification and inequality in the United States including race, class, gender, religion, sexuality, ethnicity, and nationality. Discussion will center on their role in providing rationales for oppression and discrimination in society and their relationship to the distribution of power and ideological control.

Fall 2020

AAAD 200: Introduction to African, African American, and Diaspora Studies 

Section 0001 | Benita Dix | TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm 

This course is an introduction to the broad and interdisciplinary field of Africana Studies. In this course, we will examine and discuss some of Africana Studies’ major contributing disciplines, theories, concepts, methods, and topics, including the history of the field; culture; social and economic organization; migration; gender; kinship, race, and ethnicity; colonialism; development; globalization; and popular culture. 

EDUC 310: Teaching in a Diverse Society 

Sections 0001, 0002, or 0003 | Bosch, Meza, or Schick | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm, W 12:20-3:10pm, or TuTh 3:30-4:45pm 

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning.  The pre-service teachers will develop an understanding of similar unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage language and learning abilities, gender socialization and sexual orientation 

ENG 239: Studies in World Literature: Literatures of Global English 

Section 0001 | David Babcock | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

This course serves as an introduction to world anglophone literatures since 1945, with special attention to English as a global language with a colonial history. Our texts are produced in places where, historically, English has been the language of imperialism and colonization, ranging from the Indian subcontinent, Africa, the Caribbean, and North America. Keeping in mind this bloody history, we will consider what it means to think in terms of a “global” English literature today, and identify common literary themes, problems, and strategies that have arisen across different areas of the world. How do postcolonial writers go about using English for their own purposes, occupying a potentially treacherous literary ground? 

ENG 239: Studies in World Literature: African Oral Literature 

Section 0003 | Besi Brillian Muhonja | TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm 

This course offers an overview of African oral literatures, exploring form and style, relevance and function in specific genres including folktales, witticisms, praise poetry, children’s games, and songs. Through an exploration of spiritual, social, and political themes and content of oral literature, this introductory course contextualizes orature as part of the world sense and day-today structures and operations of African communities. May be used for general education credit. 

ENG 260: Survey of African American Literature 

Section 0001 | Mollie Godfrey | MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm 

This course introduces students to major authors, literary forms, and movements in African American literature.  We study the emergence and flourishing of African American literature over the past two centuries, noting common as well as diverging themes, techniques, and arguments over the coherence of African American literature as a genre. Throughout the semester we will explore antebellum, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights, Black Arts, and contemporary writers in their historical contexts as well as make connections between texts across historical periods. May be used for general education credit. 

ENG 332/WGSS 300: African American Women in/and the Media 

Section 0001 |  Besi Brillian Muhonja | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 

The course will examine the positioning and representation of Black women in the media in the USA. The course will critically engage forces that have contributed to identified representations and the transitioning narrative of the African American. Exploring media literacy, students will take on the roles of media producers, consumers and critics as we navigate the worlds of movies, TV, magazine and other forms of advertising, electronic, digital, print and new media. 

ENG 335: African-American Children’s Literature 

Section 0001 | Danielle Price | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

How do we define African-American children’s literature: by its readership? by the race of its authors and illustrators? by its depictions and themes? We will consider the history of this literature and its expression in such genres as the picture book, realistic and fantasy fiction, and the graphic novel. We will also discuss the position of African-American children’s works within the wider world of children’s books, book publishing, and popular culture. 

ENG 423: Advanced Studies in Gender and Sexuality: Gender, Sexuality and Ubuntu in African Literature 

Section 0001 | Besi Brillian Muhonja | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

Outlining the major developments in African literary studies, this course challenges students to engage critical thinking perspectives beyond normative western and Eurocentric paradigms. Through an exploration of theoretical works and novels by African and Africanist writers, the course will introduce students to African-centered perspectives and philosophies including critical African queer theories, critical African feminisms, Ubuntu, decolonial thought, Afrofuturism, and Afropolitanism. Journeying through different geographical, historical and cultural contexts, we will explore composite themes that intersect with and impact identities and performances of gender and sexuality: the colonial encounter, decolonization, cultural nationalism, modernity, cultural imperialism, and African cultural traditions, to mention a few. 

ENG 433: Studies in Arabic Literature: Space and Place: North African Novels 

Section 0001 | Sofia Samatar | M 4:00-7:00pm 

This course examines the representation of space in North African novels. Our selected texts address human experience in a variety of spaces, from interiors and villages to the open desert. Reading these novels in comparison with others from outside the region will allow us to explore a number of rich topics, including the difference between space and place, the role of storytelling in spatial experience, and how a particular type of storytelling—the novel—helps shape our idea of the world. The course is taught in English; no knowledge of Arabic is necessary.  

ENG 374: Contemporary Global Anglophone Literature: Alternative Modernities 

Section 0001 | David Babcock | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 

Since the era of decolonization, many newly independent nations in Africa, South Asia, and the 

Caribbean have been faced with the question of what "modernity" means to them going forward. Does it mean embracing technologies, economic structures, and cultural norms based in the global North? Or would this merely amount to a new form of colonial exploitation? How do communities formulate their own versions of "modernity," ones which would best serve their own interests and flourishing? These questions have preoccupied postcolonial novelists for decades, and this course will explore the literary strategies they have used to forge a range of new perspectives on this vexed issue. 

HIST 263: Introduction to African History 

Section 0001 | David Owusu-Ansah | MWF 8:00-9:00am 

Course introduces students to the history of the African past--from evidence of discoveries and analysis of paleoanthropological finds through the colonial period. Particular attention is paid to the development of political structures, religious institutions, and socioeconomic patterns that are the foundation of African civilization in the global context. 

HIST 307: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade 

Section 0001 | William Van Norman | TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm 

This course explores the origins, processes and outcomes of the infamous trade. By studying participants’ lives in Africa, Europe, Latin America and North America, the course helps students understand people’s inhumanity to each other and the ways in which slavery and the trade in slaves forever altered the development of the Atlantic world. 

HIST 489: Pandemics in African History 

Section 0001 | Etana Dinka  | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

This course explores histories of pandemics in the entire sweep of African history. By examining histories of pandemics on the continent, beginning with the earliest recorded pestilence, the Athenian Plague, to the recent Ebola epidemic, the course offers students the opportunity to understand diseases historically and examine how pandemics shaped economies, societies, cultures and politics. The understanding of the way histories of pandemics unfolded in Africa, mostly linked to human penetration into the natural environment—one of the major themes in African history—helps to set the discussion in the longer context of African history. The history of pandemics, and more generally of diseases, falls under environmental history. Since pandemics are natural forces occurring beyond human control, a course emphasizing histories of pandemics will help students to think beyond such established ideas as humans control nature, and to be able to generate fresh perspectives. The course begins by asking the critical question useful to frame and helps understand histories of pandemics in the longue durée of African history—what is African history? The key themes will include the role of pandemics in the shaping of human history, and the histories major pandemics that had prevailed on the continent, including the Athenian Plague, the Black Death, Cholera, Sleeping sickness, tuberculosis, influenza, HIV/AIDS, and Ebola. Although the course focuses on pandemics that had occurred in the history of Africa, occasionally students will venture into other continents tracing global trajectories of pandemics. 

HRD 123: Developing Multicultural Competency for Effective Facilitation 

Section 0001 | TBA | TBA 

This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of social identities, and they will gain the necessary skills to facilitate training, programs and dialogues focusing on areas of diversity, multiculturalism, inclusion and access. Students enrolled in this course will be prepared to become a diversity educator in the Diversity Education Empowerment Program sponsored by the Center for Multicultural Student Services at James Madison University. 

JUST 301: Refugees and Humanitarian Response 

Section 0004 | Daniel Beers | TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm 

This course will examine the political, ethical and practical challenges facing refugees and humanitarian actors assisting them. We will explore patterns in global refugee flows and the causes behind them, the policies and institutions that facilitate or inhibit refugee movement, and the challenges that refugees face throughout their journey, from border crossings, to refugee camps, to resettlement communities. 

JUST 301: Special Topics Course on 'Policing of Protest'   

Section 0007 | Gianluca De Fazio |  

This course investigates the contentious interactions between protesters and political authorities, in particular the policing of protest in democratic societies. The course is divided into three sections: in the first one, general issues of dissent and repression in democratic societies are investigated; in the second section we concentrate on the reality of protest policing in the United States. In the third and final section of the course, we compare transnational patterns and trends in protest policing. 

POSC 353: African Politics 

Section 0001 | Melinda Adams | MWF 9:05-9:55am 

A comparative study of the institutions and social, economic, and global processes that affect contemporary African states. Political developments explored include the construction and transformation of postcolonial states, ethnic conflict, economic crisis and reform, and regime change. 

SOCI 336: Race and Ethnicity 

Section 0001 | Bethany Bryson | Online 

This course examines the social construction of race and ethnicity around the world and how they influence social processes, institutions, change and ideology. The course will include discussions concerning the intersection of race and ethnicity with other aspects of social inequality such as class, gender, sexuality and nationality in contemporary society. 

THEA 322/DANC 322: Equity, Access, and Inclusion in Theatre and Dance Education & Performance   

Section 0001 | Joshua Streeter|  

An exploration of practices in theatre and dance education and performance that support equity, inclusion, and access. This course looks at the intersections of arts education, art-making and performance, applied theatre, and community engaged practice. Through critical pedagogies, we explore individual biases, attitudes, values, and experiences that shape identity, language, actions, and ideas. Together, we learn tools to advocate and dialogue, explore theatre and dance companies who work to provide equity and access, and identify inclusionary practices in education and performance. 

Spring 2020

AAAD 200: Introduction to Africana Studies 

Section 0001 | Besi Muhonja | MW 2:30-3:45pm 

Section 0002 | Lamont King | TuTh 8:00-9:15am 

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora. May be used for general education credit. 

ARTH: 488 African American Art 

Section 0001 | John Ott | TuTh 12:30-1:45pm 

This course selectively surveys visual arts (including painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, material culture, performance, and video) produced by people of African descent in the United States from the colonial period until the present. In this seminar we will scrutinize and discuss a broad spectrum of artworks in relation to their larger historical, cultural, institutional, political, economic, and religious contexts. Course themes include debates about the connections between racial identity and artistic production; the complex relationships between African-American art and the visual and cultural traditions of Africa and Europe; black artists’ engagement with the history of popular representations of African-Americans; the influence of art education, patronage, markets, museums, and criticism; and the inter 

Sections of race with class, gender, and sexuality. 

EDUC 310: Teaching in a Diverse Society 

Section 0001 | Lisa Schick |TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning. Students will develop an understanding of similar unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage language and learning abilities, gender socialization and sexual orientation. This course encourages student reflection on their own development, perspective, and experiences in relation to themselves and the school environment. 

ELED 310: Diversity in Elementary Education 

Section 0001 | Kara Kavanagh |M 12:20-2:50pm 

Section 0002 | Kara Kavanagh |Th 2:00-4:30pm 

Section 0003 | Shin Kang |Tu 2:00-4:30pm 

This course guides students in critically examining their own perspectives regarding diversity in our society. Through this course, students will expand their awareness and understanding of individuals and groups apparently different from themselves. Students will explore pedagogical issues and practices in the classroom that embrace the whole community of learners and their families. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education. Corequisites: ECED 372, ELED 308, ELED 311 and READ 366. 

ENG 260: Survey of African American Literature 

Sec 0001 | Mollie Godfrey | MWF 12:20-1:20pm 

This course introduces students to major authors, literary forms, and movements in African American literature. We study the emergence and flourishing of African American literature over the past two centuries, noting common as well as diverging themes, techniques, and arguments over the coherence of African American literature as a genre. Throughout the semester we will explore antebellum, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights, Black Arts, and contemporary writers in their historical contexts as well as make connections between texts across historical periods. Students can expect to complete in-class reading quizzes and group work, as well as three short essays and three exams. 

ENG 332: Africana Women in the Media 

Section 0001 | Besi Muhonja |MW: 5:00-6:15pm 

The course will examine the positioning and representation of Africana women, narratives and politics in the U.S. media. 

ENG 405: Epidemics in Contemporary Anglophone Fiction 

Section 0001 | David Babcock | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 

This course considers the ways that obsessions with disease and contagion get coded within contemporary geo-cultural contexts. Its premise is that mass epidemics can act as historical catalysts that lead communities to envision themselves—both their problems and potentialities—in new ways. Often we hear about how the boundaries of communities are policed by stoking people‘s fears of disease and death, suggesting perhaps that contagion fiction is only capable of producing reactive, xenophobic feelings. In fact, contemporary fiction presents a much more multifaceted picture, one that includes possibilities for both community-building and communal self-critique. 

GEOG 335: Geography of Africa 

Section 0001 | Wayne Teel | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

The course covers the physical geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (land, climate, hydrology, vegetation, ecology) a brief historical geography that connects then to political geography, with lots of reference to the colonial era, false borders, independence and finally economic colonialism. The second part of the course looks a sub-regions focusing on economic geography and cultural geography within the political dynamic. There is a strong emphasis on agriculture and natural resources throughout the class since this is one of the professors strengths. 

HIST 263: Africa Sec 0001 | Lamont King | TuTh 12:30-1:45pm 

History 263 examines the development of African societies from their earliest beginnings to the end of the nineteenth century. It discusses major societal transformations, including: the spread of languages, agricultural techniques, and metallurgy; the political and economic organization of societies; indigenous religious practices and their inter 

Section with Islam and Christianity; the transatlantic slave trade; and the colonization of the continent. 

HIST 356: African American History since 1865 

Section 0001 | Steve Reich | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

A survey of the experience and changing status of African-Americans in the United States from Reconstruction to the present, emphasizing the strengthening of social and cultural institutions; Afro-American leadership; the impact of segregation; the Great Migration; labor, protest and cultural movements; pan-Africanism; the Civil Rights Movement; and contemporary issues. 

HIST 470: Modern Africa Sec 7101 | D. Owusu-Ansah | MWF 8:00-9:55am 

History 470 will examine the major political and economic developments in Africa in the twentieth century and evaluates how they continue to impact current developments. The approach will be both chronological and thematic. Topics to be considered include: The Partition of Africa: Collaboration and Resistance; Colonial Rule: Economics, Education, and Nationalism; Decolonization and Neocolonialism; The Independent African State System; Contemporary Crisis: Health Care, Democracy, and the African Environment. 

HUMN 201: Intro to Humanitarian Affairs Sec 0001 | D. Beers | TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm 

This course is designed to offer a balanced, historically grounded, and theoretically informed overview of the contemporary humanitarian system. Drawing on academic analyses, insights from practitioners, and a host of historical and contemporary case studies, the course highlights both the promise of humanitarian action, as well as the many practical and ethical challenges confronting humanitarian actors in the world today, including within humanitarian emergencies in Haiti, Somalia, Rwanda and South Sudan. 

JUST 301: Solutions to Global Poverty 

Section 0002 | Daniel Beers | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 

Extreme poverty is arguably one of the greatest challenges facing the global community. This course will critically examine a range of approaches to addressing global poverty, from international trade and aid, to microfinance and mobile banking, to grassroots anti-poverty innovations, with a focus on case studies from Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean. 

JUST 328: Race, Class and Justice 

Section 0001 | G. De Fazio | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 

This course provides students with an overview of contemporary justice issues in a comparative perspective. It includes an introduction to case-studies, comparative research methods and cross-national comparisons of justice issues concerning race and class. 

POSC/WGSS 383: Women & Politics in Comparative Perspective 

Section 0001 | Kristin Wylie | MW 2:30-3:45pm 

Women constitute the majority of electorates and social movement activists in countries throughout the world, yet are just over 10 and 20 percent of the world’s elected chief executives and legislators. This course is designed to explain the causes and consequences of women’s political marginalization and explore the possibilities for remedying gender inequities in the formal political sphere. By introducing gender and its intersections with race and sexuality into our analyses of domestic and international politics in the US and abroad, we will enhance our understanding of how power has been stratified along such dimensions and the consequences for representation and governance. We will apply an inter 

Sectional feminist lens to explore political dimensions of gender inequality, questioning universal ideals of power, citizenship, and representation. We will examine how women have worked outside and within the state to confront obstacles to their political empowerment, and the implications thereof for both the quality of politics and the lives of women. 

POSC 391: Politics and Policy of Motherhood 

Section 0001 | Jatia Wrighten | TuTh 3:30-4:45pm 

What does it mean to be a mother? What does being a mother look like across different cultures? Race, gender, age, and other characteristics create a person’s identity. A person’s identity influences the way in which they behave politically, socially, and economically. This course will explore what it means to be a mother across different cultures and how this identity of motherhood influences a woman’s political, social, and econom-ic behavior. We will do this by examining policies pertaining to women’s reproductive rights, which include work policies and healthcare policies. For example, FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) and the higher costs associated with regular medical care for women. Also, we will take a look at landmark court cases that have influenced the way in which women’s bodies are viewed in society and the effect that this has on women, specifically, mothers. Finally, this course will look at how race and culture shape society’s ideals of motherhood. 

Fall 2019

AAAD 200: Introduction to Africana Studies 

Section 0001 | Beth Hinderliter | TuTh, 2:00-3:15pm 

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora. May be used for general education credit. 

ENG 239: Studies in World Literature—African Oral Literatures 

Section 0002 | Besi Muhonja | TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm 

This course offers an overview of African oral literatures, exploring form and style, relevance and function in specific genres including folktales, witticisms, praise poetry, children’s games, and songs. Through an exploration of spiritual, social, and political themes and content of oral literature, this introductory course contextualizes orature as part of the world sense and day-to-day structures and operations of African communities. May be used for general education credit. 

ENG 260: Survey of African American Literature 

Section 0001 | Allison Fagan | MWF 9:05-9:55am 

This course introduces students to major authors, literary forms, and movements in African American literature.  We study the emergence and flourishing of African American literature over the past two centuries, noting common as well as diverging themes, techniques, and arguments over the coherence of African American literature as a genre. Throughout the semester we will explore antebellum, Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights, Black Arts, and contemporary writers in their historical contexts as well as make connections between texts across historical periods. May be used for general education credit. 

ENG 362: Anthologizing African American Poetry 

Section 0001 | Mollie Godfrey | TuTh 11:00am-12:15pm 

This course examines a broad range of African American poetry from the 18th century to the present day by looking at the way African American Poetry has been defined and selected for publication in major anthologies at key moments in history. Students will also consider the longer publication histories of certain poems to see what light these different contexts shed on the poems, and vice versa. 

ENG 408: Advanced Studies in African American Literature 

Topic: Harlem Renaissance 

Section 0001 | Brooks Hefner | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

2019 marks a hundred years since the Harlem Hellfighters returned from World War I and marched in a victory parade in the now famous African American neighborhood, a moment many scholars characterize as the beginning of the Harlem (or New Negro) Renaissance. This course will take an in-depth, interdisciplinary look at this cultural phenomenon, which extended far beyond Harlem itself and reshaped the history of American and African American culture. Our investigations into this subject will include considerations of visual artists like Aaron Douglas, the rise of jazz and the Harlem club scene that fostered it, the sensation of the popular black musical Shuffle Along, the rich print culture of Harlem and beyond, and a host of literary texts that represent the debates around black aesthetics, the thorny issues of class and representation, the pervasive dangers of racial violence, and the centrality of women and queer writers within the movement, among many other vibrant topics. Writers we may consider include Countee Cullen, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jessie Fauset, Rudoph Fisher, Angelina Weld Grimké, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Nella Larsen, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Richard Bruce Nugent, George S. Schuyler, Wallace Thurman, Jean Toomer, Dorothy West, and Edward Christopher Williams. 

ENG 420/AAAD 400: Black Studies and Black Spaces: Black Critical Frameworks and Communities at JMU and Beyond, 1968-Present 

Section 0001 | Mollie Godfrey & Besi Muhonja | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 

Now celebrating fifty years of Black Studies, this course purposes to locate JMU within this national history, while creating an archive for JMU’s special collections. This course marshals students to conduct interviews with community members, faculty, former faculty, students, administrators, staff, and alums, and to gather archival material in order to tell the larger story of the creation of Black Studies and black spaces at JMU, to place this story within a larger national narrative, to open up new spaces for further faculty and student research, and teaching, and to look forward to the next fifty years. 

HIST 263: Intro to African History 

Section 0001 | David Owusu-Ansah | MWF 8:00-8:50am 

History 263 examines the development of African societies from their earliest beginnings to the end of the nineteenth century. It discusses major societal transformations: the spread of languages, agricultural techniques, and metallurgy; the political and economic organization of societies; indigenous religious practices and their intersection with Islam and Christianity; the transatlantic slave trade; and the colonization of the continent. In so doing, the course familiarizes students with the major events, as well as the significant issues and debates in African history. 

HIST 355: African-American History to 1865 

Section 0001 | Andrew Witmer | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

A survey of the experience and changing status of African-Americans in the United States from 1619 through the Civil War, with attention to the West African background, cultural developments, social and political movements, slavery and the slave trade, dual-consciousness, and emancipation. 

HIST 436: Black Radical Traditons in the Caribbean and Latin Ameica 

Section 0001 | Bill Van Norman | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

This course seeks to recover traditions of black radical thought in hispanophone Latin America and the Caribbean in the twentieth century. It will explore the lives of important men and women of African decent in social movements throughout the region. It will also investigate the connections that were forged with francophone and anglophone thinkers and radical actors. The course will show how transnational organizations and alliances made important contributions and helped to forge a durable sense of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world during the twentieth century.  

JUST 301: Global Migration 

Section 0002 | Case Watkins | M 2:30-5:00pm 

This course surveys global migration flows over time and space. Students will analyze interdisciplinary academic literature and popular media on migration and diasporas while studying flows of people across various historical and geographical contexts, from prehistoric to contemporary and from global to local. Students taking the course for AAAD credit must complete a research project relevant to the field. 

JUST 328: Race, Class and Justice 

Section 001 | Gianluca de Fazio | TuTh 12:30-1:45pm 

This course provides students with an overview of justice issues relating to class and race in a comparative perspective. It includes an introduction to case-studies, comparative research methods and cross-national comparisons of racial and class injustice. This course is divided into four sections: the first one introduces students to comparative thinking and the social construction of difference and inequality. The second and third section address the issue of race and justice in the United States and globally. The fourth and last section deals with class inequality both in the United States and abroad. 

  

Courses in the AAAD Minor Curriculum by Course Directive: 

To count these courses toward the AAAD Minor, please make an appointment with Dr. Mollie Godfrey (godfrema@jmu.edu) or Dr. Besi Muhonja (muhonjbx@jmu.edu) to complete and submit a course directive form. 

EDUC 310: Teaching in a Diverse Society 

Section 0001 | TBA | TBA 

Section 0002 | TBA | TBA 

Section 0003 | TBA | TBA 

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning.  The pre-service teachers will develop an understanding of similar unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage language and learning abilities, gender socialization and sexual orientation. 

ELED 310: Diversity in Elementary Education with Service Learning 

Section 0001 | Kara Kavanagh | M 12:20-2:50pm 

Section 0003 | Kara Kavanagh | Tu 2:00-4:30pm 

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning.  The pre-service teachers will develop an understanding of similar unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage language and learning abilities, gender socialization and sexual orientation. 

HRD 201: Leadership Styles Theory and Application 

Section 0001 | Oris Griffin| TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 

Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the leadership framework (train and behavior theories). Students practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership skills labs. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of institutional structures, duties and responsibilities of organizational/institutional leaders, and leadership in small organizations. Case studies provide tangible context for learning leadership skills, values, actions and attributes as they apply to a contemporary setting. Prerequisite: HRD 100, HRD 101. Corequisite HRD 202. 

WGSS 200: Introduction to Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies 

Section 0003 | Besi Muhonja | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

This section offers an introduction to theories and scholarship in the interdisciplinary field of Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies from a critical, transnational, intersectional and cross-cultural perspective. May be used for general education credit. 

Spring 2019

AFST 200, Introduction to Africana Studies 
Section 0001 | Besi Muhonja | MW 2:30-3:45pm 
Section 0002 | Beth Hinderliter | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 
Section 0003 | Beth Hinderliter | TuTh 3:30-4:45pm 

An introductory survey of basic theoretical concepts to analyze the Black experience, with special focus on the general historical process common to Africa and the African Diaspora. May be used for general education credit. 

ENG 408, Advanced Studies in African-Americaan Literature 
Section 0001 | Mollie Godfrey | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

This course on the Pasts, Presents, and Futures of Contemporary African American Literature offers an advanced study of key theories and genres of contemporary African American literature, including neo-slave narratives, post-soul satires, and Afrofuturism. Authors include Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, Percival Everett, Mat Johnson, Octavia Butler, and Nnedi Okorafor. 

HIST 263: Africa 
Section 0001 | Lamont King| TuTh 12:30-1:45pm 

History 263 examines the development of African societies from their earliest beginnings to the end of the nineteenth century. It discusses major societal transformations: thespread of languages, agricultural techniques, and metallurgy; the political and economicorganization of societies; indigenous religious practices and theirintersection with Islam and Christianity; the transatlantic slave trade; and the colonization ofthe continent. In so doing, the course familiarizes students with the major events, aswell as the significant issues and debates in African history. 

SOCI 336, Race and Ethnicity 
Section 0001 | Bethany Bryson | Online 

This course examines the social construction of race and ethnicity around the world and how they influence social processes, institutions, change and ideology. The course will include discussions concerning the intersection of race and ethnicity with other aspects of social inequality such as class, gender, sexuality and nationality in contemporary society. 

 

Courses in the AAAD Minor Curriculum by Course Directive:  

To count these courses toward the AAAD Minor, please make an appointment with Dr. Mollie Godfrey (godfrema@jmu.edu) or Dr. Besi Muhonja (muhonjbx@jmu.edu) to complete and submit a course directive form. 

EDUC 310, Teaching in a Diverse Society* 
Section 0001 | Ruthie Bosch | TuTh 2:00-3:15pm 
Section 0002 | Diana Meza | M 9:05-11:50am 

This course will examine how personal and professional values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors affect teaching and learning. Students will develop an understanding of similar unique characteristics of Pre-K to 12 grade students and their families, including culture, race, ethnicity, heritage language and learning abilities, gender socialization and sexual orientation. This course encourages student reflection on their own development, perspective, and experiences in relation to themselves and the school environment. 

ENG 302, Special Topics in Literature and Language* 
Section 0003 | Mollie Godfrey | M 5:00-7:30pm 

In this JMU X-Labs course, Innovating the Archives: 25 years of Furious Flower, you will build a digital archive for the Furious Flower Poetry Center alongside students majoring in graphic design, education, and literary studies. Throughout, you will develop your design, research, collaboration, and project management skills, as well as your understanding and appreciation of African American history and art. The course includes a field trip to the National Museum of African American of History and Culture. Team-taught course with Mary Beth Cancienne, Joanne Gabbin, David Hardy, and Sean McCarthy. Meets with WRTC 328, GRAPH 392, HON 300 (also eligible for AAAD credit by course directive). 

ENG 433, Studies in Arabic Literature* 
Section 0001 | Sofia Samatar | MW 8:40-9:55am 

This course examines the representation of space in North African novels. Our selected texts address human experience in a variety of spaces, from the desert to the city to the sea. They are of particular interest because they come from a region that is sometimes considered part of Africa, and sometimes part of the Middle East: a cultural crossroads that remains contested, full of diverse and contradictory stories about itself. Reading these novels will allow us to explore a number of rich topics, including the difference between spaceand place, the role of storytelling in spatial experience, and how a particular type of storytelling—the novel—helps shape our idea of the world. 

JUST 328, Race, Class, and Justice* 
Section 0001 | Gianluca De Fazio | TuTh 9:30-10:45am 

This course provides students with an overview of justice issues relating to class and race in a comparative perspective. It includes an introduction to case-studies, comparative research methods and cross-national comparisons of racial and class injustice. This course is divided into four sections: the first one introduces students to comparative thinking and the social construction of difference and inequality. The second and third section address the issue of race and justice in the United States and globally. The fourth and last section deals with class inequality both in the United States and abroad. 

*Course requires a substitution form to be filled out by the minor coordinator to count towards the minor. 

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