FACE COVERING DESIGN PICTURE DESCRIPTION ACCESSIBILITY CONSIDERATIONS
Fabric face mask The duke dog with a JMU themed cloth mask Manufactured or homemade fabric mask with multiple layers designed to cover nose and mouth. Medical-grade masks and personal protective equipment should be reserved for medical personnel. The use of cloth face coverings does not replace the need to maintain six feet of physical social distancing, to clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces routinely, to stay home when sick, and to practice frequent handwashing.
Disposable face mask disposable face masks with the word "outside" imprinted Manufactured non-woven material 3 ply filter with elastic loops that covers nose and mouth. Consider if thicker cloth masks cause difficulty breathing.
Clear mask clear mask with fabric seals on top and bottom in front of packaging Mask with face visibility. Consider when ability to view the speaker's mouth is necessary (e.g., need to have the ability to read lips).
Face shield woman with face shield, a plastic barrier covering her face A face shield is designed as a head band with a clear material over the face that extends to the chin or below and provides some protection to eyes, nose and mouth. A face shield can be worn as personal protective equipment in addition to a mask. it is an option of last resort when a mask is not accessible and considerations are needed for effective communication with those who are deaf or hard of hearing.
Neck Gaiter Profile of a white mannequin, head and shoulders, wearing a black gaiter around its neck and stretched over its mouth and nose. A neck gaiter is a closed tube of fabric that can be worn about the neck and can be pulled over the mouth and nose. New data show that neck gaiters can be effective face coverings. A double layer gaiter is superior to a single layer gaiter and they should be worn in this way.
  • JMU students who need to seek accommodation of disability related to the face covering policies should follow procedures to register with the Office of Disability Services. See our Getting Started page for instructions.
  • Further information about consideration for wearing masks is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Considerations for Wearing Masks"

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