2021-poetryprizeflyer-ffpc.jpgFurious Flower Poetry Prize 2021

No longer accepting submissions for 2021

Prize winners will be notified in April 2021

Our Poetry Prize is an annual contest for emerging creative writers whose work aligns with our mission to Celebrate. Educate. Preserve. Black poetry. The prize is open to poets of all ages who have published no more than one collection of poetry (excluding self-published collections and chapbooks). All submissions are judge anonymously by a distinguished poet.

Prize

1 Winning Poet $1,000 award

1 Honorable Mention $500 award

Both winners will have a public reading in Fall 2021 (additional $500 honoraria provided to both winners)Prize-winning poems and a selection from the finalists will be published in Obsidian: Literature & Arts in the African Diaspora.

General Guidelines

non-refundable submission fee: $15

Submit up to 6 pages with no more than 3 unpublished poems in total.

Poems must be submitted as PDF, Word (.doc or .docx) files ONLY. 

Ensure your entry is anonymous. Please do not include your name on the manuscripts.

Multiple submissions are allowed, however, each submission must be accompanied by its own $15 submission fee.

Faculty, staff, and students of JMU are not eligible for this prize.  

 

Past Winners

2020

Diamond Forde - Winner

Nathan John - Honorable Mention

2019

Rachelle Parker - Winner

Cynthia Manick Honorable Mention

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Furious Flower Quarantine Kwansaba Contest

Furious Flower Poetry Contest for emerging creative writers in response to the COVID-19 quarantine. 

kwansaba_winner_graphic.jpegTurning

Angel C. Dye

Quarantine Kwansaba Winning Poem, 2020

My panic does not move heaven so

I try turning instead; till terror into

verse, plant praise song and patient seeds

for what remains of spring. Breather- full,

deep. Drink salt- sweet to shed when 

I weep, but I never wither. Intern;

turn inward, away from fear of still. 

 

FinalistGlens Redmond, Believed to be the First Black Woman Photographed with a Typewriter, and Sherese Francis, Dream Conducts a Mother Tongue's Memory.

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