Dhammananda Bhikkhuni

Thailand

"The Buddha Gave It to Us: The Female Ordination Issue in Buddhism"

Lecture was given: March 29, 2006, at 7 p.m., in CISAT/HHS 2301

Venerable Dhammananda was born as Chatsumarn Kabilsingh. She was a professor of Buddhist Philosophy at Thammasat University in Bangkok for twenty-seven years. One of the very few Thai Buddhist scholars fluent in English, Venerable Dhammananda received her M.A. degree from McMaster University, Canada, and Ph.D. degree from Magadh University, India. She is engaged in a historic struggle for full participation by women in the Buddhist monastic institution (the place of leadership in the Buddhist world). She is the first and only fully ordained Theravada Buddhist bhikkhuni (female monk) in Thailand, quite a controversial position to be in, and is currently training a new generation of bhikkhuni. 

Resources available for this lecture:

A videorecording of this lecture is available at the Gandhi Center Library.


 

Johan Galtung

Norway

"On the Coming Decline and Fall of the U.S. Empire"

Lecture was given: April 19, 2006, at 7 p.m., in CISAT/HHS 2301

Johan Galtung is the founder and Director of TRANSCEND, a global network of scholars and activists conducting conflict analysis and mediation in various trouble spots. He is Rector of TRANSCEND Peace University. An experienced peace worker and Professor of Peace Studies, he is widely regarded as the founder of the academic discipline of peace research and one of the leading pioneers of peace and conflict transformation in theory and practice. He has played an active role in helping mediate and prevent violence in forty-five major conflicts around the world over the past four decades and is author of the United Nations' first ever manual for trainers and participants on "Conflict Transformation by Peaceful Means: The TRANSCEND Approach" (2000). He has taught Peace Studies at the University of Hawaii, University of Witten/Herdecke, University of Tromsoe, University of Alicante, University of Ritsumeikan, and the European Peace University, among many others. Professor Galtung established the Peace Research Institute, Oslo in 1959, the Journal of Peace Research in 1964, and co-launched the Nordic Institute for Peace Research in 2000. He has published more than 1000 articles covering a wide-range of fields, including peaceful conflict transformation, deep culture, peace pedagogy, reconciliation, development, peace building and empowerment, global governance, direct structural and cultural peace/violence, peace journalism, and reflections on current events, and more than 100 books translated into dozens of languages. His most recent books include Transcend and Transform, Searching for Peace the Road to TRANSCEND, Peace by Peaceful Means: Peace and Conflict, Development and Civilization, Collective Essays on Peace Research and Methodology, and 60 Speeches on War and Peace. He is currently finishing a book on the coming decline and fall of the U.S. Empire. He is a consultant to several UN agencies and a constantly traveling trainer/lecturer. He holds numerous honorary degrees and awards, including the Right Livelihood Award (1987) and the Bajaj International Award for Promoting Gandhian Values (1993). Professor Johan Galtung joined the international Advisory Board of the Mahatma Gandhi Center for Global Nonviolence at James Madison University in 2005. 

Resources available for this lecture:

A videorecording of this lecture is available at the Gandhi Center Library.


 

Salameh Nematt

Jordan

"The World is Not Flat: A Clash of Civilizations or a New World Order"

Lecture was given: September 13, 2006, at 6:15 p.m., in CISAT/HHS 2301

Salameh Nematt is the Washington Bureau Chief of Al-Hayat, a London-based Arabic language newspaper, and the Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation, the Lebanon-based Arab Satellite Channel, since June 2003. Among his previous posts, he has been diplomatic correspondent in London for Al-Hayat as well as the Amman Bureau Chief for Al-Hayat and freelance correspondent for the BBC Arabic Service. For a brief period in 1999, he served as Head of the Strategy Unit at Jordan's Royal Court, an advisory post for the king. He resigned two months after taking the job due to policy differences with the government over democratic reforms. He returned shortly afterwards to Al-Hayat. He was Chief Political correspondent of the English-language Jordan Times daily and Al-Rai, the leading Arabic-language Jordanian daily. Over the past 20 years, his work has involved reporting on and analyzing developments related to the Iran-Iraq war, the 1990-91 Iraq invasion of Kuwait and the second Gulf war, and the Arab-Israeli peace process. He is widely published.

Resources available for this lecture:

A videorecording of this lecture is available at the Gandhi Center Library.

The lecture was co-sponsored with Center for Justice and Peacebuilding at Eastern Mennonite University and Americans for Informed Democracy in Washington D.C.


 

Elias Chacour

Israel

"Is Peace Possible in the Middle East?" 

Lecture was given: October 24, 2006, at 7 p.m., in CISAT/HHS 2301

Elias Chacour is the Archbishop of Galilee, Israel. Father Chacour, a Melkite priest, was born to a Palestinian Christian family in the village of Biram. Along with his whole village he experienced the tragedy of eviction by Israeli authorities in 1947 and became a refugee. He became a citizen of Israel when the State of Israel was created in 1948. In 1965, Father Chacour was appointed parish priest of the village of Ibillin. He has been there since. He founded Mar Elias Educational Institutions to fill a tremendous educational need for Palestinian students and to foster peace and reconciliation and just opened the first Christian Arab Israeli University in Galilee. His lifelong effort to build understanding and reconciliation through education and dialogue continues unabated. In 1994 he was awarded the World Methodist Peace Award, in 1999 France's Legion of Honor award, and in 2001 Japan's 18th Niwano Peace Award. He has been nominated three times for the Nobel Peace Prize and currently serves on the Vatican's special task force of cardinals and bishops working to strengthen dialogue with the Jewish people. Dr. Chacour is author of a number of books, including Blood Brothers, We Belong to the Land, and J'ai foi en nous.

Resources available for this lecture:

A videorecording of this lecture is available at the Gandhi Center Library. 

The lecture was co-sponsored with Center for Justice and Peacebuilding at Eastern Mennonite University.


 

Jack DuVall

Washington, D.C.

"Nonviolent Power and the End of Domination" 

Lecture was given: October 2, 2007, at 6:30 p.m., in CISAT/HHS 1302

Jack DuVall is President and founding Director of the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict in Washington, D.C. He is the Executive Producer of the two-part Emmy-nominated PBS television series, "A Force More Powerful," and co-author with Peter Ackerman of the companion book of the same name.

Resources available for this lecture:

The lecture text is available here in Adobe PDF: Jack DuVall Lecture.


 

Jakob De Roover

Belgium 

"The Dark Hour of Secularism: Liberal Toleration and Hindu Fundamentalism in Colonial India"

Lecture was given: November 15, 2007, at 6:30 p.m., in Taylor 405

Jakob De Roover is a Post-Doctoral Fellow of Research Foundation - Flanders at Research Centre Vergelijkende Cultuurwetenschap, Ghent University, Belgium. He is currently a Research Scholar at the Mahatma Gandhi Center for Global Nonviolence and Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at James Madison University.

The lecture was co-sponsored with Global Nonviolence Student Club.


 

Bruce Rich

Washington, D.C.

"To Uphold the World: The Global Economy Requires a Global Ethic of Non-Violence"

Lecture was given: September 23, 2008, at 6:30 p.m., in ISAT/HHS 1302

Bruce Rich is a Senior Attorney and Director of the International Program at the Environmental Defense Fund, a leading US national environmental organization with over 300,000 members. He has published extensively in environmental and policy journals, as well as in magazines and newspapers such as the Financial Times, the Nation, and the Ecologist. He is the author of Mortgaging the Earth (Beacon Press and Earthscan, 1994), a widely acclaimed critique of the World Bank and reflection on the philosophical and historical evolution of the project of economic development in the West, and of To Uphold the World: The Message of Ashoka and Kautilya for the 21st Century, with a Foreword by Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen and Afterword by His Holiness the Dalai Lama (Viking, 2008). He has been accorded the United Nations Environment Program "Global 500 Award," the highest environmental prize of the United Nations, in 1988, and also won the World Hunger Media Award in that year for the best periodical piece on development issues.

Resources available for this lecture:

A videorecording of this lecture is available at the Gandhi Center Library.


 

Johan Galtung

Norway

"On the Coming Decline and Fall of the U.S. Empire: An Update"

Lecture was given: October 21, 2008, at 6:30 p.m., in ISAT/CS 159 

Johan Galtung is one of those rare individuals who manages to integrate rigorous scholarship and research, the development of innovative educational programs around the world, social activism, and high level consultation/mediation in many of the world's major trouble spots. He is generally regarded as the father of modern peace research and education, having founded the world's first Peace Research Institute in Oslo, Norway, in 1959, which remains one of the leading institutes of its kind, and the Journal of Peace Research in 1964. Over the past 50 years his bibliography requires a book in itself, identifying over 100 books translated into dozens of languages, and over 1000 articles. One of the many innovative concepts and terms developed by Professor Galtung that has become widely known is that of structural violence, first articulated in his book by that title. His writings reflect original thinking across an incredibly broad range of issues-the European Community as an emerging superpower, violence and imperialism, terrorism, non-violent defence, Gandhi, alternatives to NATO, the SALT Negotiations, methodology in sociology, economic sanctions, peace culture, and the role of the media in peace and conflict situations-to name but a few. His scholarship and personal support have led to the development of many university-based peace study programs around the world. His training programs have been provided to various UN missions, as well as government officials, NGOs, and journalists around the world. However, Professor Galtung is no armchair academic. He has played an active role in helping mediate and prevent violence in nearly four dozen major conflicts around the world over the past five decades. In addition to being recognized with various honorary degrees, Professor Galtung is also the recipient of the Right Livelihood Award (aka the Alternative Nobel Peace Prize) in 1987, the Norwegian Humanist Prize in 1988, the Socrates Prize for Adult Education in 1990, the Bajaj International Award for Promoting Gandhian Values in 1993, the Aloha International Award in 1995, Norwegian Literary Prize in 2000, first Morton Deutsch Conflict Resolution Award in 2001, and the Augsburg Golden Book of Peace in 2006. Professor Galtung is currently the Director of TRANSCEND, an international Peace and Development Network.

Resources available for this lecture:

A videorecording of this lecture is available at the Gandhi Center Library.


 

Ayelet and Tzvika Shahak

Israel

"United by Tragedy: An Israeli Journey towards Reconciliation"

Lecture was given: October 29, 2008, at 6:30 p.m., in ISAT/HHS 1302 

Ayelet and Tzvika Shahak are the parents of Bat-Chen Shahak, who was murdered in 1996 in the Dizengoff terrorist bombing which took place on Purim. Bat-Chen had come to Tel Aviv with her girlfriends to celebrate her 15th birthday. At the time, Ayelet was the assistant principal at an elementary school in Tel Mond, a small town located north of Tel Aviv, where she lives with her husband, Tzvika and their two other children. Tzvika is a Lieutenant Colonel (Navy-Res.) in the Israel Defense Forces and saw action in the Yom Kippur War. He was awarded the medal of valor for courage and bravery during battle. After Bat-Chen's tragic death, her parents, Ayelet and Tzvika Shahak, gathered an enormous collection of original writings which Bat-Chen had left behind. She had written compositions and kept a diary from an early age. They found letters, notebooks and drawings. She wrote about troublesome and mature topics such as death, the Holocaust, Ron Arad, Arabs, the Mid-East conflict, and her desire for peace. She also shared her ideas about the typical dilemmas of a young girl such as girl friends, school, love, teachers, and family. The material has been published in Hebrew as well as translated and published into Japanese, Dutch, German, Arabic, Italian, and in honor of Israel's 60th year of independence-in English. Ayelet's research into her daughter's diaries earned her a master's degree where she developed a computerized educational program to study the genre of the diary. As a result of their tragedy, Bat-Chen's parents, Ayelet and Tzvika, have established an association commemorating the memory of their daughter. Tzvika, a long-time veteran fighter of the Israel Defense Forces gradually became a fighter for peace and reconciliation, and the Shahaks focused their efforts on building a dialog for peace. Tzvika was instrumental in establishing the "Forum of Bereaved Families"-a group of Palestinian and Israeli bereaved families who meet several times a year. The association and the family are very publicly active in affairs of peace and co-existence as well as promoting literacy and encouraging children to keep a diary. Both Ayelet and Tzvika appear in schools, the army, youth groups, and community centers with the purpose of encouraging free expression through writing a diary. This has been especially relevant and significant the past year in Sderot where daily rocket fire has turned into reality and keeping a diary has helped children express their fears and anxieties.

Resources available for this lecture:

A videorecording of this lecture is available at the Gandhi Center Library.

The lecture was co-sponsored with Eastern Mennonite University.

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