Associate Professor of Sociology and Sociology Program Coordinator

brewebd@jmu.edu

Contact Info

Website: http://sites.jmu.edu/benbrewer


Education

Ph.D. (Sociology), The Johns Hopkins University

M.A. (Sociology), The Johns Hopkins University

B.A. (Sociology), University of California at Santa Cruz

Teaching
  • Social Issues in a Global Context
  • Introduction to Developing Societies
  • Sociological Inquiry
  • Markets, Capitalism and Crisis
Research

Economic Sociology, Work, Craft Economies and "Making", World-Systems Analysis, Development and Global Inequalities, the Social Economy and Resilient Societies.

Publications

"The Commerical Transformation of World Football and the North-South Divide: A Global Value Chain Analysis" (2017) International Review for the Sociology of Sport.

"Making the 'Handmade' Bike and Trying to Make a Living: Market Objects, Field-Configuring Events and Some Limits to Market Making" (2017) Consumption, Markets & Culture.

"Global Commodity Chains and the Organizational Grounding of Consumer Cultural Production" (2015) Criticial Sociology, 41(4-5): 717-734.

2011. "Global Commodity Chains and World Income Inequalities: The 'Upgrading' Paradox and the Missing Link of Inequality," Journal of World-Systems Research.

2011. "The Long Twentieth Century and the Cultural Turn: World-Historical Origins of the Cultural Economy," Journal of World-Systems Research.

2005. "Industrial Convergence and the North-South Income Divide: A Rejoinder to Firebaugh (2004)" with Giovanni Arrighi and Beverly J. Silver, Studies in Comparative International Development.

2003. "Industrial Convergence and the Persistence of the North-South Divide" & "Response to Alice Amsden" with Giovanni Arrighi and Beverly J. Silver, Studies in Comparative International Development.

2002. "Commercialization in Professional Cycling 1950-2000: Institutional Transformations and the Rationalization of 'Doping,'" Sociology of Sport Journal.

2000. "Trade Globalization since 1795: Waves of Intergration in the World-System," with Christopher Chase-Dunn and Yukio Kawano, American Sociological Reveiw.

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