When you register for EYH, you will indicate your top 6 choices of workshops in order of preference. Please be aware that you may not get your top 3 choices. Registering early will improve your chances of being placed in your top choices, but it is not always possible because of the schedule and the number of participants.

  1. 3D PRINTING: THE WAVE OF THE FUTURE  

    3D printers give a new and exciting way to produce all sorts of physical objects and, in particular, gives us a way to visualize mathematics as never before.  We will talk about the process of 3D printing, including types of printing and how we produce the files we print, as well as discuss the mathematical objects themselves.  The workshop will include 2 actual 3D printers in the process of printing as well as a chance to view numerous samples of previously printed objects, and participants can even take a little bit of the future home.

    Dr. Rebecca Field, Associate Professor of Mathematics, JMU and Dr. Laura Taalman, Professor of Mathematics, JMU

  2. A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A MADE STUDENT

    What is Engineering?  How do engineers create solutions that make people’s lives better?  Come experience life as a Madison Engineering (MADE) student and find out!   You’ll be doing activities with JMU engineering students that are like the ones they did on their very first day of college.  Through these challenges, you’ll learn how engineers use a design process that’s focused on the needs of people and see how you can think like an engineer to solve everyday problems in your life and the lives of others.

    The JMU Madison Engineering Ambassadors

  3. ALL THAT GLITTERS

    We all want to shine inside and out.  Have you ever wondered what makes your make up shine?  Chances are that shimmer is created by a mineral.  We use minerals every day.  Come learn about these minerals and where they come from.  Find out which minerals make your lip gloss shine, discover where they come from, and then make your own.  Visit the Mineral Museum to enjoy the glitter of gold, silver, and pyrite and discover crystals larger than your favorite lipstick. 

    Dr. Shelley Whitmeyer, Instructor of Geology and Environmental Science, JMU

  4. DON'T BE FOOLED WITH STATISTICS

    Does power posing make you feel confident?  Do you have ESP (Extra Sensory Perception)?  Is dark chocolate healthy for you?  We will examine the answers to these questions and learn how to correctly interpret the many statistical studies discussed on social media and the Internet.  This workshop will help you become a savvy statistics sleuth who understands the usefulness and limits of statistics.

    Ms. Arlene Casiple, Instructor of Statistics, JMU

  5. ENGINEERING CANDY BRIDGES

    Have you ever wondered how a bridge is capable of supporting a lot of weight? Engineers must make sure bridges can withstand large loads so that multiple cars and people can cross over them at the same time. In this workshop we will explore the strength of shapes and how they relate to the structure of bridges as well as other engineering concepts. Using candy and toothpicks, workshop participants will design and build bridges that can hold the weight of a candy bar (and yes, you can eat it afterwards!).

    Dr. Jacquelyn K. Nagel, Assistant Professor of Engineering, JMU, and The Society of Women Engineers at JMU

  6. ENGINEERING DESIGN FOR GOOD: FROM LOCAL TO GLOBAL

    How might engineers help protect healthcare workers who are fighting epidemics or help coastal communities prepare for rising sea levels? The world is facing a lot of grand challenges, but engineering design gives us a way to better understand and start tackling problems. During this workshop, you will explore a challenge that affects us locally in Virginia. Madison Engineering students will be on hand to help you Brainstorm Ideas, Rapidly Prototype, and Share Ideas to design creative solutions for good.

    Dr. Elise Barrella, Assistant Professor of Engineering, JMU, and The JMU Engineers Without Borders Club

  7. ESTIMATING THE UNSEEN

    We've all heard about species being endangered. If the members of an endangered species are rare, how do scientists know how many individuals are left? In this workshop, you'll get hands-on experience with one of the methods scientists use in the field to estimate the size of a small population. We'll do a mark-recapture experiment to estimate the size of a population of insects based on the proportion of bugs we capture and recapture. We'll also examine models of extinction time for our population of insects.

    Dr. Patrice Ludwig, Assistant Professor of Biology, JMU

  8. GO HUNT WIFI

    Have you ever wondered what makes it possible for you to watch your favorite show or to play your favorite game on your Kindle, Kindle Fire, iPad or Android Tablet? In the Go Hunt WiFi session, you will have fun learning about a device that is in almost every home today, the Home Networking Wireless Router (known as a WiFi Router for short). This is a device that has ears; I mean it has antennas. You will hunt for where they are located and discover that they are everywhere!

    Dr. Emil Salib, Professor of Integrated Science and Technology, JMU

  9. HOP TO IT! (This workshop has been cancelled)

  10. HOW LIKELY ARE YOU TO DEVELOP TYPE II DIABETES?

    Epidemiology is the scientific study of the causes, progression, and onset of disease development within a given population. Knowledge of both statistics and biology is needed to understand epidemiology of any disease. This session will explain how probability theory is used to explain the influence of different epidemiological factors (such as smoking, genetics, lack of exercise, and diet) that affect the odds of developing Type II Diabetes. In the United States almost 8.5% of the population has Type II Diabetes, and about 79 million people (25%) are pre-diabetic and likely to develop diabetes if they don’t change their habits.

    Dr. Nusrat Jahan, Associate Professor of Statistics, JMU

  11. HOW TO KEEP A SECRET: AN INTRODUCTION TO CODE-MAKING AND CODE-BREAKING

    Did you ever want to keep a secret? Since ancient Rome, generals, spies, and scoundrels have used codes to convey covert information. Today, our computers use modern techniques to keep our information safe on the Internet. We will explore cryptography, the art of making and breaking codes, and how it has developed from the Caesar cipher to the public-key codes of today.

    Dr. John Webb, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, JMU

  12. LEAF TATTOOS: HOW LEAVES RESPOND TO LIGHT AT THE CELLULAR LEVEL

    Photosynthesis is a process that is essential to life on Earth. We often think of leaves as photosynthesis factories but have you ever wondered what leaves do at night? We will explore the metabolism of leaves at the cellular level and visualize the processes by using leaves to ‘develop’ a picture in a way similar to how black and white film photos are developed. You will stain (develop) your own leaf tattoo and better understand essential metabolic processes of life.

    Dr. Amanda Storm, Instructor of Biology and Postdoctoral Research Assistant, JMU

  13. MAKING SENSE OF YOUR SENSES

    Have you ever wondered why you have trouble tasting well when you are sick? Have you ever imagined what the world might look like without color? Have you asked yourself why you do not constantly feel the clothes you are wearing? Join us for fun experiments to learn more about how you experience the world around you!

    Ms. Melissa Gray and Ms. Shannon Palmer, Biology students, JMU and Dr. Bisi Velayudhan, Assistant Professor of Biology, JMU

  14. ORIGAMI FOLDING FOR MATHEMATICAL EXPLORATION

    Many people know that origami is the Japanese art of folding sculptures out of paper. Recently, origami design methods have been used in a variety of interesting applications, from NASA satellite designs (large "origami" solar arrays that fold up into a space ship) to medical applications (like the origami blood stint that uses folding to restore a collapsed blood vessel). In this workshop we'll fold paper to open the door to some beautiful concepts in mathematics and computer science.

    Dr. John C. Bowers, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, JMU

  15. PROGRAMMING WITH FINCH ROBOTS

    Discover a new world of creativity and artistic expression with computer programming! Using Python code, you and a partner will program Finch robots to do a dance, avoid obstacles, and react to light. Come see why Python is the most popular language for teaching introductory computer science at top-ranked universities. No experience necessary - anyone can learn!

    Dr. Chris Mayfield, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, JMU

  16. SOLVING MYSTERIES THROUGH CHEMISTRY

    Have you ever wondered how chemistry is used to solve mysteries? For lovers of crime shows on TV the importance of chemistry in criminal investigation is not a surprise. The truth is that a forensic scientist is often a chemist, and many of the methods for solving these problems use chemistry! The great challenge to criminal investigation is how to characterize the materials found at the crime scene and trace them back to their origin. The composition of these materials, or even the ink used to write a letter, can provide very important clues in a mystery. Come and solve some mysteries!!!

    Dr. Iona Black, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, JMU

  17. SWEET SIMULATION OF RADIOACTIVE DECAY: THE HALF-LIFE OF M&MIUM

    Radioactive decay analysis allows us to determine the length of time an element will remain in a certain radioactive state.  This is an important tool we use to understand our universe.  Besides being used in generating electricity, i.e., via nuclear reactors, radioactive dating proves extremely useful in medicine, agriculture, industry, as well as in archaeology, geology, space exploration, and even law enforcement.  Understanding some of the intricacies of the Big Bang Theory also relies on careful measurements of radioactive decay.  One way to measure the rate of radioactive decay is called half-life, which is the time it takes for one half of the sample to decay.  In this workshop, we will simulate the process of radioactive decay with sweet M&M's to understand the concept of half-life.

    Dr. Adriana Banu, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, JMU

  18. THE STORY IN YOUR DNA

    Many people now send their DNA out to find more out about their ancestors. DNA can also be used to tell about possible future development of disease. How do scientists determine all of this by just analyzing your DNA? Learn how scientists can use DNA sequences to profile an individual's traits and ancestry and discuss the ethics of DNA profiling.

    Dr. Terrie Rife, Associate Professor of Biology, JMU

  19. TURTLE ART WITH PYTHON

    Show off your creativity and problem solving skills...with turtles!  In this session, you will create art by using the Python programming language to steer a turtle across the screen. Python is a fun, easy to learn language that is widely used by software developers at Google, Facebook, Instagram and many other companies.  No experience necessary!

    Dr. Nathan Sprague, Associate Professor of Computer Science, JMU

  20. WATCHING WORMS WIGGLE

    Did you know there are itty-bitty worms living pretty much everywhere in your environment? We will to attempt to answer the burning question: How fast can a worm wiggle?

    Dr. Eva Strawbridge, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, JMU

  21. WHAT A WATER-FUL WORLD: THE IMPORTANCE OF WATER

    Have you ever thought about how many ways water is important in your life? Water helps ecosystems thrive, provides our world energy, and makes our bodies grow (in fact, your body is about 60% water). But what happens if the water we do have is contaminated? Unfortunately, many places in the world struggle to get clean water everyday. In this workshop, we will learn about some of the many ways water helps our body function, how those functions are affected by water contamination, and develop creative solutions to help those who desperately need clean water.

    The National Science Teachers Association, JMU Chapter

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