Students working around a table on a poster

The rotation through various university offices provides the practical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for college and university administrative positions.

Full tuition waiver and stipend
1:1 mentoring
2/3NewsNewsfloat//5College of Health and Behavioral Studies/CMS-redirects/college-of-health-and-behavioral-studies/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-health-and-behavioral-studies/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/news/chbs/indexsite://JMU/news/chbs/indexJMUindexNewsNews/news/chbs/index-archivesite://JMU/news/chbs/index-archiveJMUindex-archiveNewsNews/_tags/source/college-of-health-and-behavioral-studies/college-of-health-and-behavioral-studiesJMUcollege-of-health-and-behavioral-studiesHealth and Wellness/stories/health-wellness-storiessite://JMU/stories/health-wellness-storiesJMUhealth-wellness-storiesHealth & Wellness StoriesHealth & Wellness Stories///_tags/Societal Relevance/Health and WellnessJMUHealth and WellnessHealth and WellnessHealth and WellnessImproving Health Care////_tags/campaign-themes/improving-health-careJMUimproving-health-careGraduate Student Association/grad/gsa/indexsite://JMU/grad/gsa/indexJMUindexGraduate Student AssociationGraduate Student Association///_tags/source/graduate-school/graduate-student-associationJMUgraduate-student-associationGraduate School/CMS-redirects/graduate-school/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/graduate-school/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/graduate-school/graduate-schoolJMUgraduate-schoolPsychology/CMS-redirects/psychology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/psychology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-health-and-behavioral-studies/psychologyJMUpsychology09-gracedeckpartialclosuretrue1462821646010sutphijlPartial Closure of Grace14624208000001472616000000Partial Closure of Grace/news/parking/2016/05/09-gracedeckpartialclosureJMUsite://JMU/news/parking/2016/05/09-gracedeckpartialclosuresutphijl1462542319155sutphijl14625424004991462420800000Partial Closure of Grace Street Parking Deck Beginning May 9News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsParking Services/parking/indexsite://JMU/parking/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/parkingJMUparking

On Monday, May 9, the Grace Street Parking Deck will begin undergoing extensive repairs that will necessitate the periodic temporary closure of portions of the deck. Parking Services will work with contractors to ensure that as much of the deck remains open for faculty/staff use as possible. Repairs are expected to last most of the summer. Check the Parking Services website for updates.

If the Grace Street Parking Deck fills to capacity, additional faculty/staff parking is available in the Warsaw Avenue Parking Deck, adjacent to the Forbes Center for the Performing Arts; on level 3 of the Cantrell Avenue Parking Deck, located adjacent to Wine-Price Hall and accessible from Martin Luther King, Jr. Way; and N3 Lot, also accessible from Martin Luther King, Jr. Way. Refer to the Campus Map or Lot Directory for additional parking options.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your patience during this important repair project.

Parking Services will work to ensure that as much of the deck remains open for faculty/staff use as possible/////
09-summerhourseffectivetrue1462821556420sutphijlSummer Hours14625072000001471665540000Summer Hours/news/parking/2016/05/09-summerhourseffectiveJMUsite://JMU/news/parking/2016/05/09-summerhourseffectivesutphijl1462538429716sutphijl14625427250651462507200000Summer Hours in Effect Monday, May 9News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsParking Services/parking/indexsite://JMU/parking/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/parkingJMUparking

The university will adopt a modified summer schedule beginning Monday, May 9 and ending Friday, August 19, 2016.

Parking Services hours will be:

Mon - Thurs: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Fri:  8:00 AM - NOON


Mon - Thurs: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Fri: 8:00 AM - NOON/////
06-cob-student-awards-ceremonytrue1462537239108chaojbThe College of Business Celebrates Outstanding Students at Awards CeremonyThe College of Business Celebrates Outstanding Students at Awards Ceremony/news/cob/2016/05/06-cob-student-awards-ceremonyJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/05/06-cob-student-awards-ceremonychaojb1462536640083chaojb14625371169641462536900000The College of Business Celebrates Outstanding Students at Awards CeremonyNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessComputer Information Systems/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/computer-information-systemsJMUcomputer-information-systemsCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

Congratulations to the College of Business’ outstanding graduating students! The College of Business Award Ceremony was held on Thursday, May 5, 2016.

Accounting

Outstanding Undergraduates in Accounting - Daniel Bowman

Outstanding Graduates, Masters of Science in Accounting – Maria Poznyakova, Jessica Stecher

Federation of Schools of Accounting Outstanding Masters Student – Kyle Sweeney

Computer Information Systems & Business Analytics

Outstanding Junior in Computer Information Systems – Allison Zeppuhar

Outstanding Seniors Computer Information Systems – Thu Nga Nguyen, Daniel Roppert

Computer Information Systems Consulting Excellence Award – Keyri Bonnilla, David DiSilvestro, Victoria Zehnder

Economics

Outstanding Senior in Economics – Michael McCullough

Faculty Award for Academic Excellence in Economics – Keith Pendergrast

Finance & Quantitative Finance

Outstanding Seniors in Finance – Daniel Burkhart, Jon Teconchuk

Outstanding Senior in Quantitative Finance – Matthew Calcagno

International Business

Outstanding Senior in International Business – Rebecca Quay

Management

Outstanding Student in Management – Daniel Roppert

Management Faculty Awards for Excellence – Genevieve Bestercy, Katelyn Ely, Dalton Malaby

Zane Showker Entrepreneurship Award – Chad Hard

Marketing

Outstanding Student in Marketing – Morgan Foran

Marketing Faculty Award for Excellence – Katharine Beveridge

Workshop Digital’s Outstanding Search Engine Marketing Student – Christine Provino

Top Female in Sales – Megan Niski

Top Male in Sales – Joseph Straub

JC Penney Spirit Award – Morgan Foran

Hart School of Hospitality, Sport & Recreation Management

Outstanding Seniors in Hospitality Management – Daniela Ilijic, Alexander Ostapovicz

Outstanding Senior in Sports & Recreation Management – Katelynn Sundheim

College of Business

Alpha Kappa Psi Award – Michael Aukamp

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key – Daniel Bowman

Valedictorian – Daniel Bowman

Outstanding Student Advisory Council Member – David Tessier

Master of Business Administration

Outstanding MBA Student – Heather Joffe

COB Honors Thesis Recognition

Economics Department:

Advisor: Dr. S. Kirk Elwood – Jasmine Grindle

Advisor: Dr. Vipul Bhatt – Keith Pendergrast

Finance & Business Law:

Advisor: Dr. Jaideep Chowdhury – Emily Blair

Advisor: Dr. Kathryn Schumann - Kathleen Fogg

2016 Graduate School Outstanding Dissertation Award for Social Sciences, Business, Health and Behavioral Studies

Strategic Leadership Studies

Dr. Laura Hunt Trull

"A Mixed Methods Study of Head Start Family Service Worker Qualifications and Family Service Utilization: Implications for Policy and Leadership"

KPMG sponsors CIS 484 competition and mentors teams of CIS and SMAD students. /////
01-news-roop-learningtrue1462461799473clemenrgJoin the ROOP Teacher Education Residential Learning Community!14624595000001470024000000Join the ROOP Teacher Education Residential Learning Community!/news/coe/2016/05/01-news-roop-learningJMUsite://JMU/news/coe/2016/05/01-news-roop-learningclemenrg1462459713127clemenrg14624617388101462424400000Join the ROOP Teacher Education Residential Learning Community!College of Education/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-education/college-of-educationJMUcollege-of-educationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews

If you are studying education and plan to follow a career path towards teaching pre-K through 12, then the Roop Teacher Education Residential Learning Community (RTLC) is for you. The RTLC is open to all education students. Students in the RTLC will take their General Education Cluster 3 science core classes together in addition to living in the same residence hall (Gifford Hall). The members of the RTLC will also have opportunities to participate in community service projects in local schools. This is an integrated learning experience that will help you build a sense of community and develop friendships that will last a lifetime.

If you are studying education and plan to follow a career path towards teaching pre-K through 12/////
madison-vision-teaching-awardtrue1462459372905shackeklStudents Award Faculty for Excellence 1373432400000Students Award Faculty for Excellence/news/academic-affairs/2016/05/madison-vision-teaching-awardJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/05/madison-vision-teaching-awardmcgivekd1462455033791shackekl14624593554291462420800000Students Award Faculty for ExcellenceOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairsNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage

This spring, students had the opportunity to recognize faculty they believe displayed JMU's principles of vision and engagement.

The Madison Vision Teaching Award was given to instructional faculty members who excelled in encouraging engaged learning in their students. These awards are unique on campus as the winners are selected entirely by students. The awarded faculty members will receive a one-time educational grant ranging from $500 - $1000.

The inaugural winners were:

  • Dr. Allison Bodkin, Department of Communication Studies
  • Dr. Kimberly DuVall, Department of Psychology
  • Dr. Mark Piper, Department of Philosophy and Religion
  • Dr. Christopher Womack, Department of Kinesiology

To create and implement this recognition, the Faculty Senate worked with the Student Government Association. A combined committee developed the award criteria and collaborated to publicize the award to the student body. The criteria  focused on JMU’s Vision Statement – To be the national model for the engaged university: engaged with ideas and the world – and the university’s definition of engaged learning: "Developing deep, purposeful and reflective learning, while uniting campus and community in the pursuit, creation, application and dissemination of knowledge." This award was designed to identify faculty who have been most involved in fostering student learning and to give students a voice in recognizing excellent teaching. 

The Madison Vision Teaching Award was given to instructional faculty members that excelled in encouraging engaged learning in their students. /////
12-emp-apprec-day-closuretrue1462390834132jonesvwClosed on Thursday, May 121462377600000Closed on Thursday, May 12/news/healthcenter/2016/05/12-emp-apprec-day-closureJMUsite://JMU/news/healthcenter/2016/05/12-emp-apprec-day-closurejonesvw1462390780519jonesvw14623907805191462377600000Closed on Thursday, May 12News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHealth Center/healthcenter/indexsite://JMU/healthcenter/indexJMUindexUHC HomeUniversity Health Center Home///_tags/source/healthcenterJMUhealthcenterHealth CenterHealth Center

The University Health Center will be closed on Thursday, May 12.  

Options for urgent medical care in Harrisonburg:

SRMH Emergency Room: 540-689-1000
Emergicare: 540-432-9996
MedExpress: 540-432-3080
Valley Urgent Care: 540-434-5709

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04-navytrue1462393955790crockeaePentagon shows off the world's largest self-driving shipPentagon shows off the world's largest self-driving shipcrockeaePentagon shows off the world's largest self-driving shippentagon, navy, ship, unmannedPentagon shows off the world's largest self-driving ship1462334400000Pentagon shows off the world's largest self-driving ship/news/cisr/2016/05/04-navyJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/05/04-navycrockeae1462386121683crockeae14623861216831462338000000Pentagon shows off the world's largest self-driving shipNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

It's not only drones and driverless cars that may become the norm someday — ocean-faring ships might also run without captains or crews. (CBCNEWS)

Read more ...

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04-cis-484-final-presentationstrue1462371659407lentilcnStudents from CoB and SMAD Team Up to Create Systems for WBLStudents from CoB and SMAD Team Up to Create Systems for WBL/news/cob/2016/05/04-cis-484-final-presentationsJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/05/04-cis-484-final-presentationslentilcn1462371633598lentilcn14623716335981462363200000Students from CoB and SMAD Team Up to Create Systems for WBLNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessComputer Information Systems/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/computer-information-systemsJMUcomputer-information-systemsCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

CIS 484 Final Presentations

Computer Information System (CIS) students are given many opportunities to work closely with large companies. One such opportunity occurs in the CIS 484: Information Systems Development and Implementation course taught by Professor Carey Cole. This semester, approximately 110 students worked on a project with a non-profit organization out of Washington, D.C., Word Beats & Life (WBL). The students also received support and mentorship from professionals from the sponsor company, KPMG and from CIS alum during the project. Additionally, this was the first semester that CIS worked with the School of Media Arts & Design (SMAD), specifically SMAD 408: Converged Media Lab taught by Professor Shelly Hokanson.

For the project, student teams were required to create computer systems from scratch. Two of the key requirements were for the project to provide a sense of community and to have functionality similar to Canvas. Most of the teams’ respective final products included such things as twitter API, a calendar for upcoming events, secure login and an eye-catching layout for multiple end-users.

Over 230 students, faculty, alumni, WBL employees, KPMG professionals, parents and friends attended the final presentation in Grafton-Stovall Theatre. At the final presentation, a panel of judges selected the best presentation/computer system. The CIS faculty judges included Art Gowan, Mike Mitri, Jeff May, Diane Lending, John Guo, Jeremy Ezell and Dmytro Babik. Nick Carrington and Kevin Denny II represented WBL. And the College of Business welcomed Renee Tran, Tom Frame and Mark Patterson, a JMU alumnus, from KPMG. 

Students presenting not only did a great job presenting their systems and answering questions, but they also kept the audience attentive and intrigued by creating an interactive, two-sided environment. The winning team, which was comprised of Laura Dobbs (CIS), Sierra Hahn-Ventrel (CIS), Kaitlyn Kling (SMAD), Alex Ledesma (CIS), Ryan Lee (CIS), Alejandro Quesada (CIS) and Dan Roppert (CIS) was mentored by JMU alumnus Steve Wong.

This project taught both CIS and SMAD students a multitude of lessons that otherwise may not have been experienced in the classroom. The general consensus amongst the participants was that the project was extremely challenging, but the process of completing it has taught CIS and SMAD student’s invaluable skills for the future.

KPMG sponsors CIS 484 competition and mentors teams of CIS and SMAD students. /////
1-AwardstrueStudent award winnersStudents volunteer at Expanding Your Horizons ConferencesStudents volunteer at Expanding Your Horizons ConferencesStudents volunteer at Expanding Your Horizons Conferences1458395640000Student awards winners/news/chemistry/2016/05/1-AwardsJMUsite://JMU/news/chemistry/2016/05/1-Awardssumneric1462299793550sumneric14623054416931457330400000Student award winnersNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsChemistry/chemistry/indexsite://JMU/chemistry/indexJMUindexChemistryChemistry///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/chemistryJMUchemistry
Congratulations to our recent student award winners!/////
7-NCStatetrue1462301652962sumnericChemistry and physics majors visit NC State's Analytical Instrumentation Facility1461765240000Chemistry and physics majors visit NC State's Analytical Instrumentation Facility/news/chemistry/2016/03/7-NCStateJMUsite://JMU/news/chemistry/2016/03/7-NCStatesumneric1462298944149sumneric14623016282211461733200000Chemistry and physics majors visit NC State's Analytical Instrumentation FacilityNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsChemistry/chemistry/indexsite://JMU/chemistry/indexJMUindexChemistryChemistry///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/chemistryJMUchemistry

On March 7, Barbara Reisner took seven students enrolled in the Science of the Small on a field trip to NC State’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility. Students had an opportunity to tour the facility and learn about one of the best materials characterization instrumentation facilities on the east coast.

Pictured from left to right: Kenna Salvatore ('17), Dr. Barbara Reisner, Tyler Price ('16) and Eli Roberts ('17)

Pictured from left to right: Alex Moore ('16), Kenna Salvatore ('17), Watson Stahl ('16), Eli Roberts ('17), David Boyle ('17), Tyler Price ('16) and Jeff Small (physics '16)

The Science of the Small course took a field trip to NC State's Analytical Instrumentation Facility/////
03-may-updatetrue1462293720989phill2mrMay 2016 UBO UpdateMay 2016 UBO Update/news/ubo/2016/05/03-may-updateJMUsite://JMU/news/ubo/2016/05/03-may-updatephill2mr1462293649763phill2mr14622936497631462248000000May 2016 UBO UpdateNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsUniversity Business Office/ubo/indexsite://JMU/ubo/indexJMUindexUniversity Business OfficeUniversity Business Office///_tags/source/administration-and-finance/uboJMUubo
  • Tuition rates were posted for the 2016-2017 school year in April. You can find more information on those rates here.
  • The UBO will be closing at 1 pm on Friday, May 6th, for commencement.
  • The UBO will be closed from 8 am to 1 pm on Tuesday, May 10th, for the Administration and Finance Division Meeting.
  • The UBO will be closed from 11 am to 1 pm on Thursday, May 12th, for the Employee Appeciation Day luncheon.
  • The summer semester due date is on Friday, May 20th.
  • If you have anyone that you wish to receive notifications about your account and to be able to speak with us about your account, please make sure to have them set up as an Authorized User in M3. You can find instructions for that here.
If you have any questions please contact our office at ubo@jmu.edu or by phone at 540/568-6505.
/////
02-afghanistantrue1462216711437crockeaeDigging for Mines in AfghanistanDigging for Mines in AfghanistanDigging for Mines in Afghanistanlandmines, afghanistanDigging for Mines in Afghanistan1462161600000Digging for Mines in Afghanistan/news/cisr/2016/05/02-afghanistanJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/05/02-afghanistancrockeae1462216687632crockeae14622166876321462165200000Digging for Mines in AfghanistanNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

I’m standing in a minefield on the side of a mountain in Afghanistan. In a few moments, a land mine will explode. Mirwais, the tall, broad-shouldered Afghan operations assistant for Mine Action Committee Center for Afghanistan (MACCA), hands me a cup of chai. The mine goes off. A controlled detonation. On the side of a mountain, in a remote part of Afghanistan, a team from MACCA is sweeping and digging for land mines. The Taliban frequently targets anyone who works with the government or the U.N.; deminers are therefore considered legitimate targets. (OZY)

Read more ...

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02-zimbabwetrue1462217122138crockeaeRed Cross donates demining equipment to ZimbabweRed Cross donates demining equipment to ZimbabwecrockeaeRed Cross donates demining equipment to ZimbabweRed Cross, Zimbabwe, deminingRed Cross donates demining equipment to Zimbabwe146216160000002-zimbabwe/news/cisr/2016/05/02-zimbabweJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/05/02-zimbabwecrockeae1462215445957crockeae14622168705081462165200000Red Cross donates demining equipment to ZimbabweNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has donated de-mining equipment, including detectors and protective equipment, to the Zimbabwe Mine Action centre in an effort to double the country’s capacity to clear landmines in the southeast of the country." (defenceWeb)

Read more ...

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02-sofiatrue1462209728177crockeaeBulgarian parliament incriminates all activities with cluster ammunitions, land minesBulgarian parliament incriminates all activities with cluster ammunitions, land minescrockeaeBulgarian parliament incriminates all activities with cluster ammunitions, land minesbulgaria, landmines, cluster munitionsBulgarian parliament incriminates all activities with cluster ammunitions, land mines1462161600000Bulgarian parliament incriminates all activities with cluster ammunitions, land mines/news/cisr/2016/05/02-sofiaJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/05/02-sofiacrockeae1462209454377crockeae14622097098581462165200000Bulgarian parliament incriminates all activities with cluster ammunitions, land minesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Bulgaria parliament adopted at first reading the amendments to the Penal Code, which incriminate all activities with cluster ammunitions and land mines outside the scope of the obtained permit, FOCUS News Agency reporter said." (FOCUS News Agency)

Read more ...

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01-newstrueTitleDisplay Name/_cascade/base assets/madison-hispanic-caucus/01-newsJMUsite://JMU/_cascade/base assets/madison-hispanic-caucus/01-newssuajc1462204735591suajc1462204816593Display NameMadison Hispanic Caucus/mhc/indexsite://JMU/mhc/indexJMUindex..///_tags/source/academic-affairs/madison-hispanic-caucusJMUmadison-hispanic-caucus/////04-16-david-mcgrawtrue1461962001246hawker2016 David McGraw14491188000002016 David McGraw/news/facultysenate/2016/04/04-16-david-mcgrawJMUsite://JMU/news/facultysenate/2016/04/04-16-david-mcgrawhawker1461961257904hawker14619618273621461902400000Proclamation of Gratitude for David McGraw's Faculty Senate ServiceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsFaculty Senate/facultysenate/indexsite://JMU/facultysenate/indexJMUindexFaculty SenateFaculty Senate///_tags/source/facultysenateJMUfacultysenate

JMU’s Faculty Senate recognizes Mr. David McGraw for his significant contributions as Speaker of the Senate. On Thursday, April 28, Mr. McGraw announced his term in the position is ending after four years of service as Speaker and nine years spent on Faculty Senate. The following resolution was passed to express gratitude for David’s leadership.

David McGraw's Faculty Senate Service

The Faculty Senate Steering Commitee

Proclamation of Gratitude for David McGraw’s Service and Leadership in the Faculty Senate

Whereas

David McGraw has been nothing less than an exemplary Speaker of the JMU Faculty Senate for the past four years, having deepened and broadened positive collaboration between the faculty and the administration in numerous ways, and having been a tireless and successful advocate for faculty support and empowerment in countless ways,

Be it now resolved that

The Faculty Senate of James Madison University expresses its deep and lasting gratitude and appreciation to David for his leadership and service.  

David McGraw recognized for collaboration and advocacy/////
29-udalltrue1461954498422dienerjlHonors student selected 2016 Udall ScholarHonors student selected 2016 Udall Scholar/news/honorsprog/2016/04/29-udallJMUsite://JMU/news/honorsprog/2016/04/29-udalldienerjl1461953014397dienerjl14619543532771461952800000Honors student selected 2016 Udall ScholarNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHonors Program/honorsprog/indexsite://JMU/honorsprog/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/honorsprogJMUhonorsprog

Anna NordsethBiology major Anna Nordseth ('17) has been selected to receive a 2016 Udall Scholarship. Each year the Udall Foundation awards 60 scholarships of up to $7,000 to sophomores and juniors who study issues related to the environment or American Indian nations. Anna is one of three students from the state of Virginia to receive this prestigious national award. Anna works on forest ecology and conservation biology. She received an Honors Hillcrest Scholarship to participate in a tropical ecology and convervation study abroad program in Monteverde, Costa Rica in the summer of 2015. 

Learn more about Anna and the Udall Scholarships.

Biology major Anna Nordseth ('17) studies forest ecology and conservation biology/////_images/honorsprog/news/2016_AnnaNordseth_fb.jpgsite://JMU/_images/honorsprog/news/2016_AnnaNordseth_fb.jpgJMU2016_AnnaNordseth_fb.jpgAnna NordsethAnna Nordseth
04-29-davidmcgrawfacultysenatetrue1461961068901hawkerProclamation of Gratitude for David McGraw's Service 1373432400000Proclamation of Gratitude for David McGraw's Service/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-29-davidmcgrawfacultysenateJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-29-davidmcgrawfacultysenatehawker1461935038382hawker14619604966651461902400000Proclamation of Gratitude for David McGraw's Faculty Senate ServiceOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairsNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage

JMU’s Faculty Senate recognizes Mr. David McGraw for his significant contributions as Speaker of the Senate. On Thursday, April 28, Mr. McGraw announced his term in the position is ending after four years of service as Speaker and nine years spent on Faculty Senate. The following resolution was passed to express gratitude for David’s leadership.

David McGraw's Faculty Senate Service

The Faculty Senate Steering Commitee

Proclamation of Gratitude for David McGraw’s Service and Leadership in the Faculty Senate

Whereas

David McGraw has been nothing less than an exemplary Speaker of the JMU Faculty Senate for the past four years, having deepened and broadened positive collaboration between the faculty and the administration in numerous ways, and having been a tireless and successful advocate for faculty support and empowerment in countless ways,

Be it now resolved that

The Faculty Senate of James Madison University expresses its deep and lasting gratitude and appreciation to David for his leadership and service.  

McGraw recognized for leadership in faculty senate/////
28-renovationtrue1461873167137gibsonkjUREC Addition and Renovation1422771000000UREC Addition and Renovation/news/recreation/2016/04/28-renovationJMUsite://JMU/news/recreation/2016/04/28-renovationgibsonkj1461873147859gibsonkj14618731478591454351460000UREC Addition and RenovationUniversity Recreation/recreation/indexsite://JMU/recreation/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/recreationJMUrecreationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews

James Madison University Recreation is now under construction for the addition and renovation of the UREC facility! The addition will total 137,815 square feet of new space (currently UREC is a 140,700 square foot facility) and 25,128 square feet of renovated space. The facility will be completed in two phases, one for the addition, and one for the renovated areas which will take an additional six months to complete once those spaces are vacated.

View construction photos.

View the UREC Addition/Renovation Plan Renderings.

View the #NewREC Video!

UREC Addition

Student Demand

“It's like the hunger games trying to find an open machine in UREC right now,” “Ugh I hate how crowded UREC is,” and “PSA: half of JMU is in UREC right now so stay as far away as possible.” These are just a few of the frustrated tweets you will find if you search for “UREC” on Twitter. In fact, all of these were tweets from JMU students on one day: January 13, 2014.

Step into UREC during the Fall or Spring semester between the hours of 3pm until 9pm on a weekday and you will see that these students are not exaggerating. In 1996, UREC was constructed to meet the demands of a student body of 12,500. With a student body now close to 20,000, the need for an expansion has been pressing for 5-10 years. A busy day in the late nineties consisted of about 2,200 students, faculty and staff frequenting the building, and today, a busy day can top 4,500 participants.

The UREC staff has been collaborating with architects since early 2012 to survey all JMU students, hold focus groups, review comment cards, and review participation information and trends to determine what facilities are most desired by JMU students.  It will offer more space for overcrowded fitness and court programs, as well as new program and service areas identified by surveys and student requests.

Green Construction

Sustainable construction efforts are of prime importance and the plans include green practices that are intended to certify the new portion of the building as LEED Silver. Some of the major sustainable efforts include recycling the lower turf, re-using field lighting at other locations, re-using soils and natural resources, and planning for the use of natural light in the new facility.

New Spaces in Addition

The addition is located directly behind UREC (on the former site of the lower turf). This part of the building will be open for use beginning at 4pm on January 10, 2016. The following facilities will be included in the new space:

  • Weight, Fitness & Cardio Spaces (These spaces will be approximately 2.5 times the size of the current space for these activities. The current fitness spaces will be renovated for other use.)
  • Six Group Fitness Studios (Two mind-body spaces, one group cycling space, and three general use spaces. The current studios will be renovated for other uses.)
  • Three Super Multi-Activity Centers (Gym and court spaces, with two regulation basketball and volleyball courts in each, two have integrated goals for indoor soccer and one will include batting cages and floor hockey goals.) 
  • Indoor Track (The new 1/6 mile track will be intended for running and jogging. The current 1/10 mile indoor track will remain and will be intended for walking and slower jogging.)
  • Fitness/Instructional Pool and Spa (The new pool will feature a jetted fitness channel, in-water volleyball court and basketball hoops. The new spa will be approximately four times the size of the old Spa and will feature natural rock look with a waterfall. The Dry Sauna will reopen).
  • Outdoor Courtyard (The new courtyard will be located on the back-side of the facility).

Spaces in Renovation

The renovation phase of construction is expected to take place between December 2015 and Summer 2016. As portions of the renovations are completed, they will be opened for use as soon as possible. The entire facility is expected to be complete and fully operational by the start of the Fall 2016 Semester. The following facilities will be included in the renovated space:

  • Adventure Center with free-standing Climbing Wall, Bouldering Wall, instructional space, Bicycle Repair Center, and Outdoor Equipment Check-Out (Planned for the current MAC Gym.)
  • Demonstration Kitchen and Wellness Instruction Room (This dual purpose room is planned for the current Fitness Level 1. When the kitchen is not in use, a partition will be closed.)
  • Wellness Suite with Studios for Massage (2), Personal Training, Assessment, Small Group Exercise Instruction and an Athletic Training Room (Planned for the current Fitness 2 and Multipurpose Studio.)
  • Club Room (Instructional/meeting space equipped with latest technology for groups of up to 200 people. Planned for the second floor of the current MAC Gym.)
  • Universal Changing/Restrooms (3) – (Gender-neutral restroom/changing spaces planned for the current Fitness 1.)
  • Faculty and Staff Locker Rooms (Planned for the current Fitness 1.)
  • Wet/Dry Classroom (Aquatics and Safety instructional space for certification and educational courses. Planned for the current Fitness 1.)
  • Parking (Expanded D-Lot parking planned at old tennis court location by Duke Dog Alley and additional handicap-accessible parking will be added along Driver Drive.)
  • Meditation Room (Planned for current Cycle Studio).
  • Squash Court (Planned for current Racquetball Court 5, which is currently the Assessment Center. A motorized wall will allow for both Racquetball and Squash to be played in the court. Also, Racquetball Court 8 will revert back to a Racquetball Court, as it is currently serving as the TRX Training Center).
  • Large Traffic Turnaround (Bus stop and drop off space planned for the end of Driver Drive near the Adventure Center).

Over the Next Two Years

UREC is sensitive to the experience of current students while construction is underway. We have been working with construction managers to plan to minimize inconveniences and interruptions to facility availability. Participants can expect most spaces to remain open. The Courtyard, the Hydrotherapy Spa and Sauna, Wet Classroom are temporarily closed. Participants seeking turf space and tennis courts for informal recreation are encouraged to visit University Park. Some other facilities will experience minor disruptions from time to time (including dust and noise, and some short periods of closure) but  we will make every attempt to have service interruptions during times of low activity (breaks, weekends, and early mornings).

UREC Homepage / Facebook / Twitter

Construction plans and important participant information!/////
28-summer-hourstrue1461872527003gibsonkjMaymester and Summer HoursMaymester and Summer Hours/news/recreation/2016/04/28-summer-hoursJMUsite://JMU/news/recreation/2016/04/28-summer-hoursgibsonkj1461872106743gibsonkj14618725100011459058940000Maymester and Summer HoursUniversity Recreation/recreation/indexsite://JMU/recreation/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/recreationJMUrecreationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews

UREC SUMMER HOURS

May 16 - July 21, 2016

  • Monday – Thursday: 11am - 9pm
  • Friday: 11am - 7pm
  • Saturday: Noon - 5pm
  • Sunday: 4pm - 9pm

*Memorial Day 2016

  • Friday, May 27: 11am - 5pm
  • Sat-Mon, May 28 - 30: CLOSED

*Fourth of July 2016

  • Friday, July 1: 11am - 5pm
  • Sat-Mon, July 2 - 4: CLOSED

Friday, July 22, 2016: 11am - 5pm

July 23 – August 21, 2016

  • Monday-Thursday: 11:30am-1:30pm, 5-7pm
  • Friday: 11:30am-1:30pm
  • Saturday – Sunday: CLOSED

Fall Opening Week 2016

  • Monday, Aug. 22 - Thursday, Aug. 25: CLOSED
  • Friday, Aug. 26: 3 - 9pm
  • Saturday, Aug. 27: Noon-10pm
  • Sunday, Aug. 28: Noon - 11:30pm

UPARK SUMMER HOURS

May 16 - July 22, 2016

  • Monday - Thursday: 3:00pm - 8:00pm
  • Friday - Sunday: CLOSED

*Memorial Day 2016

  • Monday, May 30: CLOSED

*Fourth of July

  • Monday, July 4: CLOSED

July 23 - Aug. 25, 2016: CLOSED

Fall Opening Week 2016

  • Friday, Aug. 26: 3 - 9pm
  • Saturday, Aug. 27: Noon - 10pm
  • Sunday, Aug. 28: 11am - 11:30pm

UREC Homepage / Facebook / Twitter

/////
28-fma-visits-nyctrue1462279363616lentilcnFMA Visits New York FMA Visits New York /news/cob/2016/04/28-fma-visits-nycJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/28-fma-visits-nyclentilcn1461847065085lentilcn14622793456091461844800000FMA Visits New York News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsFinance/CMS-redirects/finance/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/finance/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/financeJMUfinanceCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Annamarie Nyirady

FMA Visits New York CityFifteen students from James Madison University’s (JMU) chapter of the Financial Management Association International (FMA) visited New York City (NYC) for a Wall Street Experience workshop on April 1-2. This inaugural trip was led by FMA Vice President Nick Walker and FMA Vice President of Finance Alex Hogge. Through this experience, the student chapter was given a chance to see the inner-workings of the NYC financial district.

The students participated in a capital markets simulation and a stock trading game. The capital markets simulation demonstrated over-the-counter broker deals which involved students quoting bid-ask prices, engaging in price discovery and conducting both active and passive trades. The stock trading game was designed to mimic the competition of the trading floor environment. Students were then given a tour by a former NASDAQ market maker and NYSE trader. According to Farshid Javar, a student on the trip,  the “NYSE trader taught basic concepts relevant to the industry and did an outstanding job explaining the 2007 Wall Street crisis.”

FMA’s mission includes enhancing the quality and relevance of education in finance, as well as providing opportunities for professional interaction between academics, practitioners and students. The trip provided hands-on experience to supplement classroom learning, as well as many networking opportunities. Funding for the trip was provided by the College of Business and FMA chapter fundraisers.

Accompanied by Nick Walker and Alex Hogge, FMA students participate in Wall Street Experience workshop./////
27-graduating-students-e-id-dukes-accounts-ready-for-graduationtrue1461847153201sujajGraduating Students, are your e-ID and Dukes account ready for graduation?Graduating Students, are your e-ID and Dukes account ready for graduation?/news/computing/2016/04/27-graduating-students-e-id-dukes-accounts-ready-for-graduationJMUsite://JMU/news/computing/2016/04/27-graduating-students-e-id-dukes-accounts-ready-for-graduationsujaj1461846865678sujaj14618471206091461733200000Graduating Students, are your e-ID and Dukes account ready for graduation?News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsInformation Technology/computing/indexsite://JMU/computing/indexJMUindexComputing HomeComputing Home///_tags/source/administration-and-finance/information-technologyJMUinformation-technology
  • Remember, you keep your Dukes email forever! Check it at http://dukes.jmu.edu
  • If you forget your email password, you can change it through MyMadison (https://mymadison.jmu.edu) on the MyAccounts tab
  • Your e-ID password requires a password change every 90 days. Keeping your password current allows access to MyMadison for transcripts and to reset a forgotten Dukes email password
  • Set up your One Time Password to reset your e-ID password in case you forget it.  Log into MyMadison, MyAccounts, Password Management, and select “Update your One Time Password (OTP) Reset Registration
  • Ensure your mailing addresses and telephone numbers are current in MyMadison
  • Copy any files in OneDrive to a flash drive or non-JMU storage location. Access to Canvas, Office 365 applications installed through your Dukes account (OneDrive, Word, Excel, etc.) and SSL VPN will only remain active until October 1, 2016
  • Student employees with JMU Exchange accounts: set an automatic reply with a new way to contact you, forward all important email and save all contacts to your student Dukes account or another personal email account prior to graduation

Questions?  Contact the Information Technology Help Desk at 540-568-3555 or http://www.jmu.edu/computing/helpdesk

Graduating Students, are your e-ID and Dukes account ready for graduation?/////
27-students-e-id-dukes-accounts-ready-for-summertrue1461847083897sujajApple/Dell Hardware Warranty Repairs for StudentsStudents, are your e-ID and Dukes account ready for summer?/news/computing/2016/04/27-students-e-id-dukes-accounts-ready-for-summerJMUsite://JMU/news/computing/2016/04/27-students-e-id-dukes-accounts-ready-for-summersujaj1461846827347sujaj14618470654011461733200000Students, are your e-ID and Dukes account ready for summer?News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsInformation Technology/computing/indexsite://JMU/computing/indexJMUindexComputing HomeComputing Home///_tags/source/administration-and-finance/information-technologyJMUinformation-technology

Read Your JMU Dukes Email

Keep Your JMU e-ID Password Current

  • Your e-ID password requires a password change every 90 days.  Password expiration notices will be sent to your Dukes email
  • Set up your One Time Password to reset your e-ID password in case you forget it.  Log into MyMadison, MyAccounts, Password Management, and select “Update your One Time Password (OTP) Reset Registration

Questions?  Contact the Information Technology Help Desk at 540-568-3555 or http://www.jmu.edu/computing/helpdesk

Students, are your e-ID and Dukes account ready for summer?/////
28-revised-nih-guidelines-biosafetytrue1461846851067tillmaceRevised NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules Now AvailableRevised NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules Now Availablebiosafety, ibc14618466000001461846600000Revised NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules Now Available/news/researchintegrity/2016/04/28-revised-nih-guidelines-biosafetyJMUsite://JMU/news/researchintegrity/2016/04/28-revised-nih-guidelines-biosafetytillmace1461845963133tillmace14618468380431461846600000Revised NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules Now AvailableNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Research Integrity/researchintegrity/indexsite://JMU/researchintegrity/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/researchintegrityJMUresearchintegrity

Revised NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules Now Available

On March 22, 2016, the NIH Office of Science Policy (OSP) published a Federal Register notice detailing the revised procedures for the review of human gene transfer trials subject to the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules (NIH Guidelines).  These changes are effective as of April 27, 2016.  A version of the April 2016 NIH Guidelines can now be found on the OSP website.  OSP has also added a number of additional resources to assist institutions in complying with the revised NIH Guidelines.  These resources include:

     RAC Revisions Fact Sheet

    FAQs on the NIH Review Process for Human Gene Transfer Trials (April 2016)

     FAQs on the NIH Guidelines Vaccine Exemption (April 2016)

If you have any questions about the revisions to the NIH Guidelines, or about the educational resources above, please feel free to email the NIH Office of Science Policy at SciencePolicy@od.nih.gov

/////
27-Conferencestrue1462301602430sumnericStudents attend regional and national conferences1461765240000Students attend regional and national conferences/news/chemistry/2016/04/27-ConferencesJMUsite://JMU/news/chemistry/2016/04/27-Conferencessumneric1461765536625sumneric14623015753201461733200000Students attend regional and national conferencesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsChemistry/chemistry/indexsite://JMU/chemistry/indexJMUindexChemistryChemistry///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/chemistryJMUchemistry

Many of our majors have attended and presented original work at several national and regional conferences. These conferences provide our students with a unique opportunity to network with professional scientists, teachers and their peers from all over the country. Some highlights are pictured below.

18th Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences

The Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences is hosted by the University of Maryland-Baltimore County and highlights original undergraduate research in chemistry, biology and biochemistry.

Matt Bowen ('16) and Matt Davisson ('16) present their work on synthetic nucleic acid monomers.

2016 National Conference on Science Education

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), has roughly 55,000 members and is the world's largest organization promoting excellence in teaching science.

Lainey Scarvey ('16) will be a student in JMU’s MAT program next fall. She is the President of the JMU’s NSTA (National Science Teacher Association) Student Chapter and is also a pre-service teacher representative to the NSTA Pre-service Teacher Committee. In April, she traveled to the NSTA National Meeting to serve on her committee and learn about all of the opportunities available to pre-service teachers.

60th Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society

The Biophysical Society was founded in 1958 to promote biophysics, a multidisciplinary branch of science that applies and develops the tools of physics, mathematics, chemistry and computation to study life processes at all levels. The annual meeting features hundreds of presentations from all across the globe.

Taylor Light ('16) of the MacDonald lab presents his work on ion interactions with peptides.

Daniel Marzolf ('18) of the Kokhan lab explains his research on porphyrins and proteins.

251st American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition

The American Chemical Society is the world's largest scientific society and the national meetings host over 10,000 chemists and related processionals from all over the world.

Wil Andahazy ('17) of the Baber lab presents his work on carbon dioxide chemistry.

David Boyle ('17) of the Baber lab presents his work on ethanol chemistry.

Aaron Davis ('17) of the Sumner lab presents his work enzyme catalysis.

Walker Jones ('17) of the Sumner lab presents his work enzyme catalysis.

2016 Meeting of the Virginia and North Carolina Chapters of the American Fisheries Society

The American Fisheries Society is the world’s largest and oldest organization dedicated to the scientific management of aquatic resources. The North Carolina and Virginia chanters were established in 1989 and 1990, respectively.

Christian Cabino ('16) of the Downey lab presents his work on lake evaporation.

Kevin Pyska ('17) of the Downey lab presents his work on stream rehabilitation.

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 2016 Annual Meeting

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is dedicated to advancing biochemistry and molecular biology and has over 12,000 members.

Alanna Huthinson-Lundy ('16) and Austin Crithary ('16) of the Watkins lab present their enzymology work.

Cassidy Jackson ('17) of the Berndsen lab explains her work on enzyme catalysis.

Jonathan Schmitz of the Watkins lab presents his research on choline oxidase.

Hamilton Young ('16) of the Berndsen lab explains his work on the enzyme, GCN5.

2016 Colonial Academic Alliance Undergraduate Research Conference

The Colonial Academic Alliance is composed of 10 colleges and universities and comprises over 160,000 students.

Daniel Corbin ('17) of the Boardman Lab presents his work on photovoltaic materials.

Rachel Policke ('17) of the Wright lab is talking about her research on muscle proteins.

Kevin Pyska ('17) of the Downey lab presents his work on stream rehabilitation.

Many of our majors have attended and presented original work at national and regional conferences./////
26-apple-dell-hardware-warranty-repair-for-studentstrue1461694567909sujajApple/Dell Hardware Warranty Repairs for StudentsApple/Dell Hardware Warranty Repairs for Students/news/computing/2016/04/26-apple-dell-hardware-warranty-repair-for-studentsJMUsite://JMU/news/computing/2016/04/26-apple-dell-hardware-warranty-repair-for-studentssujaj1461694377720sujaj14616945240331461646800000Apple/Dell Hardware Warranty Repairs for StudentsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsInformation Technology/computing/indexsite://JMU/computing/indexJMUindexComputing HomeComputing Home///_tags/source/administration-and-finance/information-technologyJMUinformation-technology

In order to guarantee completion of Apple/Dell hardware warranty repairs and equipment return prior to leaving town for summer break or graduation, we need to receive your hardware at least 3 days prior to your departure date.  We do not ship laptops to your home!

If necessary, you can contact Dell or Apple directly for warranty hardware repairs.

In order to guarantee completion of Apple/Dell hardware warranty repairs and equipment return prior to leaving town for summer break or graduation, we need to receive your hardware at least 3 days prior to your departure date. We do not ship laptops .../////
26-real-estate-symposiumtrue1461674769246lentilcnMaking Connections: Alumni and Students Gather for Real Estate SymposiumMaking Connections: Alumni and Students Gather for Real Estate Symposium/news/cob/2016/04/26-real-estate-symposiumJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/26-real-estate-symposiumlentilcn1461674746706lentilcn14616747467061461672000000Making Connections: Alumni and Students Gather for Real Estate SymposiumNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCoB Alumni////cob/_cascade/_tags/alumniJMUalumniFinance/CMS-redirects/finance/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/finance/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/financeJMUfinanceCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Caitlin Fuchs

Real Estate SymposiumOver 60 students gathered at the College of Business on April 20 to hear from five successful JMU alumni at the Real Estate Symposium. The event, hosted by the Department of Finance and Business Analytics, exposed students to current trends in real estate and to the range of career opportunities in the industry.

Alumni panelists included: 

Kemper Funkhouser (Moderator): Adjunct Instructor of Real Estate, James Madison University; Chief Operating Officer, Funkhouser Real Estate Group

Lyle Schiavone - Analyst, American Capital Ltd.; President, Valerius Capital Partners 

Bill Chipman - Owner, CRES Inc. 

Adam Armiger - Vice President, AlumnCreek Holdings LLC

Micah Corder - Sales Associate, Washington Fine Properties

Panelists came from as far away as Washington, D.C. and New York City to share their experiences in investing, development, management and sales.

“The Real Estate Symposium gives students a unique opportunity to learn about various sectors of the industry from alums,” said moderator Kemper Funkhouser. “We discuss[ed] the career paths from JMU to the panelists’ current positions. The students learn[ed] about career opportunities in real estate and insights to current and future market trends.”

Students were also provided time to network and discuss internship and job opportunities.

The Department of Finance and Business Analytics hosted a real estate symposium for students to network with successful alum. /////
25-summer-pharmacytrue1461618309296jonesvwSummer Pharmacy Hours Start May 9Summer Pharmacy Hours Start May 9/news/healthcenter/2016/04/25-summer-pharmacyJMUsite://JMU/news/healthcenter/2016/04/25-summer-pharmacyjonesvw1461617532477jonesvw14616182803911461556800000Summer Pharmacy Hours Start May 9News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHealth Center/healthcenter/indexsite://JMU/healthcenter/indexJMUindexUHC HomeUniversity Health Center Home///_tags/source/healthcenterJMUhealthcenterHealth CenterHealth Center

Pharmacy Hours Until June 8:

  • Monday - Thursday 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. (closed for lunch 1-2 p.m.)
  • Fridays 9 a.m. - noon 

Pharmacy will be closed:

  • May 27
  • May 30
  • June 9-14

As of June 15 the Pharmacy will be open on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. - noon until August 3.

/////
25-swaynedronestrue1461601227903neckowkdNick Swayne brings UAV technology to the College of Education1461600480000Nick Swayne brings UAV technology to the College of Education/news/coe/2016/04/25-swaynedronesJMUsite://JMU/news/coe/2016/04/25-swaynedronesneckowkd1461601208614neckowkd14616012086141461560400000Nick Swayne brings UAV technology to the College of EducationCollege of Education/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-education/college-of-educationJMUcollege-of-educationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsWe are pleased to announce that Nick Swayne​, Director of External Relations & Outreach for the College of Education and  Executive Director of 4-VA at JMU​, has been selected as JMU’s point of contact for all matters related to unmanned aerial vehicles/systems (UAV/UAS), commonly known as drones.  This will include JMU and state policies governing the use of UAVs for instruction and research, JMU’s certificate of authorization/333 exemption from the FAA (federal guidelines), and external inquiries regarding UAV use in the Division of Academic Affairs.  Through the 4-Virginia initiative, Nick has been involved in a number of academic projects in this space, and we owe him a great deal of thanks for coordinating JMU’s efforts in this emerging and exciting field.
According to Swayne, "[The program is] a multi-disciplinary course designed to get students and faculty together to solve real world problems.  The UAV aspect serves as the academic catnip to pull everyone together." Seven faculty members, along with forty-two students from Physics, Engineering, Computer Science, Industrial design, WRTC, Biology, and Learning Technology and Leadership Education have identified six different projects that formed the basis of the six drone designs: finding landmines, destroying landmines, mapping air pollution, delivering medicine, mapping stream beds, and creating 3D models of architectural sites.  Faculty experts in these areas pitched their research needs to the students and students were allowed to pick which project they wanted to work on.  The students were divided into multi-disciplinary teams and challenged to develop and prototype real solutions. The faculty subject matter experts attended class periodically and served as advisers and mentors throughout the semester.  Swayne added, "We were joined by real UAV experts/engineers from NOVA-Labs, a makerspace located in Reston, Virginia.  Each week, these three experts tap into our video conferencing system or on our Beam telepresence robots to teach classes, interact with students, and provide expertise and advice on design solutions."
 
"Ultimately, 4-VA is involved because the goal is to be developing classes to share between our partner institutions (GMU, UVA, ODU, VT, JMU) that move Virginia forward as a state.  The idea for the drone class was to prototype it here and then gradually add institutions, instructors, and students – creating a real ecosystem that pushes everyone to learn, evolve and adapt to new ideas that emerge.  That part is working – this semester ODU joined the class with ten engineering students.  They report that this is one of the best classes they’ve had at ODU. Participating faculty have been accepted to present at least five research projects or journal articles resulting from their discipline specific outcomes of the course or in the scholarship of teaching and learning." - Nick Swayne
Nick Swayne brings UAV technology to the College of Education/////
25-deloitte-case-competition-2016true1461600069567lentilcnDeloitte Professionals Visit the CoB for CompetitionDeloitte Professionals Visit the CoB for Competition/news/cob/2016/04/25-deloitte-case-competition-2016JMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/25-deloitte-case-competition-2016lentilcn1461600047481lentilcn14616000474811461585600000Deloitte Professionals Visit the CoB for CompetitionNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessComputer Information Systems/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/computer-information-systemsJMUcomputer-information-systemsCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Colleen Lentile 

Deloitte Case Competition Winners

Image 1, From left: Jason Gallick, Gregory Frattaroli, Dyuti Mahendru, Ussamma Baggaili, Jefferson Daeschner, AJ Logue, Will Schulte, Patrick Couvillon. 

The 12th Semi-Annual Deloitte Innovation Case Competition was held earlier this month and welcomed four Deloitte Consulting LLP professionals, including H. Schaffer Hilton, Ussamma Baggili, Jason Gallick and Dyuti Mahendru. The Deloitte professionals served as the team’s mentors and the competition’s judges offering the students feedback on their presentations and tips for their future careers.

Out of the six teams from Dr. Fariss Mousa’s MGT 420: Management of Technology and Innovation course that competed the team comprised of Gregory Frattaroli, Jefferson Daeschner, AJ Logue, Will Schulte and Patrick Couvillon received first place (See Image 1). And the team including Michael Ginsberg, Keith Slaydon, Adam Drosdak, Rebecca Mann and Dalton Duriez were the runner-ups (See Image 2).

The students were challenged to research and create solutions to possible pressures that top-level managers could face in the corporate world. They also developed an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of intrapreneurial boot camps, making suggestions about how an organization can achieve maximum impact.  

Deloitte Case Competition- Winners

Image 2, From left: Jason Gallick, Michael Ginsberg, Dyuti Mahendru, Keith Slaydon, Ussamma Bagglili, Adam Drosdak, Rebecca Mann, Dalton Duriez. 

Student teams compete in Deloitte Innovation Case Competition and seek feedback from Deloitte professionals. /////
25-lauren-mcclure-wins-cybersecurity-scholarshiptrue1461599563773lentilcnCIS Student Receives Cybersecurity Diversity ScholarshipCIS Student Receives Cybersecurity Diversity Scholarship/news/cob/2016/04/25-lauren-mcclure-wins-cybersecurity-scholarshipJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/25-lauren-mcclure-wins-cybersecurity-scholarshiplentilcn1461599518529lentilcn14615995436741461585600000CIS Student Receives Cybersecurity Diversity ScholarshipNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsComputer Information Systems/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/computer-information-systemsJMUcomputer-information-systemsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

CIS student, Lauren McClureJames Madison University (JMU) senior Lauren McClure has been awarded the Building Cybersecurity Diversity Scholarship from the Financial Services – Information Sharing and Analysis Center (FS-ISAC), the financial industry’s leading resource for cyber and physical threat intelligence analysis. McClure is one of three students from the mid-Atlantic region to receive the award to explore the fields of cyber risk and security.

“Cybersecurity is about problem-solving--much like working puzzles--and I like the idea of searching for something that you don’t even know is there,” says McClure, a computer information systems (CIS) major from Yorktown, Va. “It’s an interesting field that’s always changing, so I’m interested in learning more.”

McClure will receive a $5,000 educational scholarship plus an all-expenses-paid trip to FS-ISAC’s Annual Summit, to be held in Miami, Fla. in May.  

While women represent more than one-half of the workforce, they are underrepresented in the fields of information technology (IT) and cybersecurity. The Building Cybersecurity Diversity Scholarship is one way that FS-ISAC is addressing the need to cultivate a more diverse workforce. During the Annual Summit, McClure will be matched with a mentor and after the conference, she and the other scholarship recipients will prepare a presentation for the FS-ISAC board and membership.

“Lauren is a good fit for the cybersecurity field because she’s a good troubleshooter and a good problem solver,” says Carey Cole, instructor of CIS and Business Analytics. “She’s got good technical skills, as well as good interpersonal skills. She was a perfect fit for this opportunity.”

McClure, who will begin working as an IT consultant for Protiviti in September, credits her professors with encouraging her interest in cybersecurity and providing opportunities for her to learn more about the field in the classroom and beyond. The FS-ISAC Conference will allow her to explore a variety of topics in the field of cybersecurity.

“For me, it’s a personal goal to keep learning and to keep myself inspired,” says McClure, who is planning trips to Ireland, Scotland and Mexico after graduation. “To have the opportunity to go to this conference at the end of college and to keep learning is exciting.” 

Life-long learner, Lauren McClure will work for Protiviti in September as an IT consultant. /////
04-25-jmunewcompensationtrue1461604474213hawkerJMU's New Compensation Peer Group 1373432400000JMU's New Compensation Peer Group/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-25-jmunewcompensationJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-25-jmunewcompensationhawker1461598714933hawker14616042687961461556800000JMU's New Compensation Peer GroupOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairsNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage

The university’s Strategic Plan states, “The university will recruit and retain high-quality faculty and staff through providing competitive salaries, other compensation and opportunities for professional development” (Goal 1C). To address that goal, it is important for the university to have a relevant peer group for determining that salaries and other compensation are competitive.

Log in to continue: https://www.jmu.edu/academic-affairs/policies-and-reports/faculty-survey/peer-group.shtml
Addressing the University's Strategic Plan Goal 1C /////
04-madison-scholarstrue1461598313294hawkerSpotlight Madison Scholars 1461556800000Spotlight Madison Scholars/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-madison-scholarsJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-madison-scholarshawker1461598030804hawker14615983887131461556800000Spotlight Madison ScholarsOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairsNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage

See what's going on with Madison Scholars:

JMU Destination Imagination team prepares for the 2016 Global Finals 

See what's going on with Madison Scholars/////
04-25-cobtrue1461617640554hawkerThe Joy of Learning 1373432400000The Joy of Learning/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-25-cobJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-25-cobhawker1461596490569hawker14616174500901461556800000The Joy of LearningOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairsNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage

By Karen Doss Bowman

For JMU professor Scott Stevens, the passion for learning began when, as a child, he declared that he wanted to be a “professional student.” Whether teaching business students or delivering video lectures for The Great Courses (formerly called The Teaching Company), Stevens is still enthusiastic about sharing knowledge with others.

 “I’m one of those people who loves to learn something and then tell other people about it,” says Stevens, who is known among his students for an energetic, approachable style of teaching. “When delivering lectures, I’m like the kid in the candy shop. For someone who loves to teach, there are few satisfactions as rich as the company of someone who loves to learn.”

A mathematician and physicist, Stevens joined the College of Business faculty in 1985 and teaches in the department of Computer Information Systems and Business Analytics. He also has taught physics and calculus for other schools on campus.

In addition to teaching on JMU’s campus, Stevens has produced two video series for The Great Courses, a company that selects only the top one percent of more than 500,000 college professors worldwide to star in educational videos on a variety of topics. Stevens’ “Games People Play: Game Theory in Life, Business and Beyond,” produced in 2008, is still a popular choice for consumers. His latest course, “Mathematical Decision Making: Predictive Models and Optimization,” produced in 2015, has a 98 percent positive online rating. “At the moment, I know of only 8 of the company’s 576 courses that are more highly rated,” says Stevens, who is married to Kathryn Stevens, director of the Madison Art Collection.

A recipient of JMU’s Carl L. Harter Distinguished Teacher Award, Stevens has received numerous teaching honors, including the Distinguished Teacher for the College of Business and the Kenneth Bartee Award for Innovation in Teaching. He is also a five-time recipient of the Students’ Choice for Outstanding Professor in the College of Business award and was first to receive the honor.

Stevens finds joy in teaching young adults and encourages his students to learn new concepts through association, rather than by memorization. He emphasizes the importance of learning to read research and figuring out “how the pieces fit together.”

“In the world today, lifelong learning is essential,” Stevens says, “I have a hidden agenda in my courses to help students become confident and competent with the content while developing the skills to learn for the rest of their lives.”

JMU Professor Scott Stevens Strives to Inspire Students to Keep Learning/////
25-finals-studyingtrue1461596096483capleyaePrepare for Finals With the SSC!finals, studying, student success centerPrepare for Finals With the SSC!/news/successcenter/2016/04/25-finals-studyingJMUsite://JMU/news/successcenter/2016/04/25-finals-studyingcapleyae1461595759645capleyae14615960712711461589200000Prepare for Finals With the SSC!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsStudent Success Center/successcenter/indexsite://JMU/successcenter/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/student-affairs/student-success-centerJMUstudent-success-center

By: Allison Capley (’16), Student Affairs Technical Services

Looking to escape the chaos of the libraries when studying for finals? The Student Success Center (SSC) may be the study spot for you! The SSC has a number of resources available to students that can facilitate your studying during the next week or two. The SSC building hours until May 5th are as follows:

Student success center
  • Monday-Thursday: 7:00am-11:00pm
  • Friday: 7:00am-9:00pm
  • Saturday: 9:00am-9:00pm
  • Sunday: 9:00am-11:00pm

Did you know that Career and Academic Planning (CAP) has 13 meeting rooms available for students to book for studying? CAP is located on the 3rd floor of the SSC, and you can either walk in or call them at (540) 568-7379 to reserve a room. These rooms are open weekdays from 8:00am-4:00pm until May 6th.

The SSC also has 2 group study rooms located on the 1st floor that may be booked by students. These rooms feature flat panel displays and whiteboard walls. To reserve one, call (540) 568-7747 or stop by the guest services guest on the 1st floor. Bookings must be for 2 or more people and may not exceed 2 hours.

In addition to group study rooms, have you ever heard of LSI? The Learning Strategies Instruction team is located in the Office of Disability Serves on the 1st floor of the SSC, in suite 1202. Here, you can make an appointment with a trained peer educator to learn the best techniques for studying, test taking, time management, reading, and note-taking. To schedule an appointment, call their office at (540) 568-6705 or stop by the office. 

In addition to the resources above, the SSC Learning Centers will be open for the last week of classes (April 25th-29th). They will not be open for students during finals week (

May 2nd-6th). The Learning Centers are located on the 1st floor and offer free tutoring to students. Here’s a little bit about what each center does:

  • University Writing Center: Need help with a term paper? Visit the Writing Center for one-on-one consultations at any stage of the writing process. Visit their website to make an appointment, chat with a tutor, or find online writing tips and resources. The main Writing Center in the SSC is open Monday-Thursday from 10:00am-8:00pm, and Friday from 10:00am-2:00pm.
  • Communication Center: Would you like to improve your public speaking and presentation skills? The Communication Center is here to help you develop your charisma and ace your final presentations. To schedule a one-on-one appointment or to find more information on presentation support, test preparation, and interview skills, visit their website! The Communication Center is open Monday-Wednesday from 10:00am-7:00pm, Thursday from 10:00am-5:00pm, and Friday from 10:00am-2:00pm.
  • Digital Communication Consulting (DigiComm): At the DigiComm center website, you can book a consultation if you need any help working on a digital assignment or creating an online portfolio. These appointments are one-on-one and can last up to 45 minutes. DigiComm is open this Monday-Thursday from 9:00-5:00pm.
  • Science & Math Learning Center: If you need help understanding course content, homework assignments, or lab reports in first or second level chemistry, math, or statistics, this center is for you! No appointments are necessary, but a tutoring schedule by subject can be found on the center’s website. The Science & Math Learning Center is open Monday-Thursday from 10:00am-8:00pm and Friday from 10:00am-2:00pm.
  • Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS): This learning center offers study sessions twice a week for 50 minutes for specific first and second level biology, chemistry, business, economics, and math courses. For a full list of courses and study session times and locations, visit the center’s website.
  • English Language Learner Services (ELLS): ELLS offers academic support and one-on-one tutoring sessions with completing assignments and coursework in U.S. American academic English. Visit their website to make a consultation or learn about more programs they offer. The ELLS is open Monday-Thursday from 10:00am-5:00pm.

With it’s open layout, collaborative learning opportunities, and comfy study spaces, the SSC proves itself to be a great place for students to be productive among the commotion of finals. Don’t forget that additional computers and printing services are available on the 1st floor near the elevators! Additionally, Dunkin’ Donuts has your back for all of your caffeine-related study needs, and if you get hungry you can take a study break and grab a bite to eat at the Grace Street Market, Get Your Green On, Bistro 1908, or the SSC food court on the 2nd floor. Happy studying!

Looking to escape the chaos of the libraries when studying for finals? The Student Success Center (SSC) may be the study spot for you!/////
22-palmyratrue1461592030159willi4bmPalmyra Declared Free of Landmines by RussiaPalmyra Declared Free of Landmines by Russiawillli4bmPalmyra Declared Free of Landmines by RussiaSyria, Palmyra, landmine, mine free, RussiaPalmyra Declared Free of Landmines by Russia1461297600000Palmyra Declared Free of Landmines by Russia/news/cisr/2016/04/22-palmyraJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/22-palmyrawilli4bm1461591841126willi4bm14615918411261461301200000Palmyra Declared Free of Landmines by RussiaNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Russia's military has declared the Syrian site of Palmyra free of explosive devices. It comes as the US expressed concern about Russian military equipment being brought into Syria, and as the Geneva peace talks stall." (dw.com)

Read more.

/////
25-cps-named-top-university-for-sales-educationtrue1461591716318lentilcnSales Education Foundation Names JMU CoB A Top University for Professional Sales Education Sales Education Foundation Names JMU CoB A Top University for Professional Sales Education /news/cob/2016/04/25-cps-named-top-university-for-sales-educationJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/25-cps-named-top-university-for-sales-educationlentilcn1461591664219lentilcn14615916961571461585600000Sales Education Foundation Names JMU CoB A Top University for Professional Sales Education News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMarketing/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/college-of-business/marketingJMUmarketingCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessGeneral////cob/_cascade/_tags/generalJMUgeneral

James Madison University’s (JMU) College of Business (CoB) announces their recognition by the Sales Education Foundation (SEF) as a “Top Universit[y] for Professional Sales Education.” SEF recognizes our university for preparing students for successful careers in professional selling and helping to elevate the sales profession. The SEF 2016 ANNUAL magazine, their 10th edition, will be available on their website, www.salesfoundation.org, by the end of April.

Dr. Andy Wood, Interim Director of the Center for Professional Sales and the Wardinski Family Foundation Faculty Fellow noted, “While employment rates are rising for recent college graduates, it is our sales program that is reporting a 100% placement rate.”   

For information on partnerships with the Center for Professional Sales contact: Dr. Andy Wood at wood3ja@jmu.edu 540.568.2332.  To learn more about the growing sales education space, contact the Sales Education Foundation at 800.776.4436 or visit www.salesfoundation.org

JMU Center for Professional Sales has a 100% employment placement rate. /////
04-25-cdstrue1461595951019subobJMU Environmental Sociologist Receives Grant to Explore Resource Shocks and Community Change 1448946000000JMU Environmental Sociologist Receives Grant to Explore Resource Shocks and Community Change /news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-25-cdsJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-25-cdshawker1461590936130subob14615959301571461556800000JMU Environmental Sociologist Receives Grant to Explore Resource Shocks and Community Change Office of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairsNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage

Dr. Chris Colocousis has been a member of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology and IDLS faculty since 2010. An environmental sociologist, much of his research focuses on society-environment interactions at the community level with an emphasis on understanding patterns of social and environmental change in natural resource dependent communities that have historically relied on timber, pulp and paper, and fishing. He is particularly interested in how changes contribute to the reproduction of inequality across space and how historical patterns of resource control can constrain the future of communities through long-term processes of environmental change.

What happens when a community that has depended on resource-based industry for a century sees that livelihood disappear? Why do communities in broadly similar circumstances take on different trajectories after experiencing such shocks? Colocousis endeavors to answer questions such as these; his work has been published in both mainstream sociology and interdisciplinary journals.

In addition to his advising duties as IDLS faculty, Dr. Colocousis teaches the IDLS 400 capstone seminar on energy and society. This course for future teachers explores the ways in which all of us are embedded in systems of energy production and consumption on a daily basis and illustrates that patterns of energy production and use, with respect to both the past and the future, are not random or inevitable. In the course, Dr. Colocousis emphasizes that negotiating the future in a way that successfully addresses the social and environmental issues posed by our patterns of energy use will depend on increased energy literacy. Students in the course work to develop a set of materials and skills to promote energy literacy in elementary schools.

In collaboration with colleagues at Ohio State University, the University of Connecticut, and the University of Maine, Dr. Colocousis was recently awarded a $500,000 research grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This study will integrate social and environmental data to better understand how rural community characteristics influence patterns of change following shocks—such as mill closures, wildfires, or resource depletion—that disrupt the relationship between forest-based communities and the ecosystems on which they depend.

Dr. Chris Colocousis researches patterns of social and environmental change at the community level./////
25-itera-case-competition-2016true1461588393641lentilcnCIS Program Recognized as ITERA's 2016 Program of the Year CIS Program Recognized as ITERA's 2016 Program of the Year /news/cob/2016/04/25-itera-case-competition-2016JMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/25-itera-case-competition-2016lentilcn1461588176616lentilcn14615883802131461585600000CIS Program Recognized as ITERA's 2016 Program of the Year News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsComputer Information Systems/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/computer-information-systemsJMUcomputer-information-systemsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

2016 ITERA Case CompetitionJames Madison University’s (JMU) Computer Information Systems (CIS) program has received national recognition as the Information and Telecommunications Education and Research Association (ITERA) 2016 Program of the Year Award. The award was announced during the organization’s annual conference, held April 8-10 in Louisville, Ky.

During the conference, a team of senior CIS majors competed in the final round of ITERA’s Case Study Competition, facing opponents (many of them graduate students) from Murray State University, Oklahoma University-Tulsa and the University of Pittsburgh. Team members were Andrew Adams, Greg Barton, Anthony Jewett and Tyler Mamrot. Adams and Jewett also are majoring in media arts and design.

The competition engages students in a months-long effort to solve a real-world telecommunications problem by applying their technical and problem-solving skills. During the final round of competition, they presented their case to a panel of judges representing companies such as Cisco, Facebook and Excelacom. JMU professor Harry Reif designed the 2015-2016 case, which centered around protecting a city park, and managed the competition.

“We want our students to develop professionalism, technical acumen and to be able to demonstrate those qualities in real-world scenarios--that’s invaluable for our students,” Reif says. “The case study competition reinforces these qualities. It’s like the frosting on the cake. They learn these things in class and then have the opportunity to demonstrate them in front of industry experts. That makes them competitive in the job market.”

For Andrew Adams, who also presented a paper on Google Cars, the conference and competition presented an opportunity to network with industry leaders while learning about emerging technologies and the latest advances in the field. Adams says the coursework in JMU’s CIS program and throughout the College of Business helped him develop skills that were critical for the Case Study Competition, from working in teams and project management to financial projection, budget preparation and proposal development.

“The CIS program has prepared us well,” Adams says. “We stacked up evenly against these other students in the competition--many who are graduate students and professionals in the field. That speaks to the quality of the undergraduate program here at JMU.”

Student teams compete in the final round of the ITERA Case Study Competition. /////
25-datablitz-deloitte-competitiontrue1461587399776lentilcnJMU Business Students Compete in Deloitte DataBlitz CompetitionJMU Business Students Compete in Deloitte DataBlitz Competition/news/cob/2016/04/25-datablitz-deloitte-competitionJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/25-datablitz-deloitte-competitionlentilcn1461587378351lentilcn14615873783511461585600000JMU Business Students Compete in Deloitte DataBlitz CompetitionNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsManagement/cob/management/indexsite://JMU/cob/management/indexJMUindexBusiness - ManagementBusiness - Management///_tags/source/college-of-business/managementJMUmanagementFinance/CMS-redirects/finance/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/finance/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/financeJMUfinanceCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

James Madison University’s (JMU) Department of Finance and Business Law partnered with Deloitte Consulting to host the DataBlitz Analytics Competition, with the final round held on Thursday, April 14. Nearly 130 students, representing all majors in the College of Business, participated in the competition.

Working in small teams, the students were given data on airline arrival and departure times to analyze. Each team was matched with Deloitte professionals (who are also JMU alumni) who provided mentoring and training on Tableau, a data visualization software popular among business consultants. The teams then submitted formal written presentations, and four finalists were selected by the judges from Deloitte to give oral presentations.

“One of the biggest values of this competition is that students have an opportunity to learn Tableau, which many business consultants and advisors use,” said Hui He Sono,  J. Gray Ferguson Eminent Professor in Finance and head of the Department of Finance and Business Law. “But it’s also important that they had the opportunity to network with alumni while practicing their presentation and teamwork skills. This competition builds their consulting skills, which is important career preparation.”

Congratulations to the four teams that made it to the final round:

First place -- Finance majors Henry Brandmark (business analytics minor), Sheila Porter (business analytics minor) and Gregory Zajic (statistics minor); CIS major Shelby Spangler and accounting major Dillon Rudnicki (CIS minor).

Second Place -- Management majors Dalton Malaby (business analytics minor), Alexander McGuire (spanish minor) and Erick  Morales (economics minor).

Third place -- Finance majors Duc Tam Nguyen (spanish minor), Kyle Papke (economics minor), Erik Carlson (double majoring in economics and minoring in CIS) and Aarya Sawant; QFIN and mathematics major Uiseok Jung (economics minor).

Fourth Place -- Finance majors Zachary Jacobs, Stephen Chiang and Reed Clifford, and QFIN and mathematics major Zheng Peng (CIS minor).

The JMU alumni who represented Deloitte as mentors and judges for the competition were Schaffer Hilton, Saša Erić, Jason Gallick, Michael Beck, Andrew Mannarino, Stephen Gianfortoni and Leul Assefa.

Deloitte professionals teach student teams about Tableau and judge student presentations on the software. /////
22-hillcrest-2016true1461954498422dienerjlHonors Program announces 2016-2017 Hillcrest Scholarship winners Honors Program announces 2016-2017 Hillcrest Scholarship winners /news/honorsprog/2016/04/22-hillcrest-2016JMUsite://JMU/news/honorsprog/2016/04/22-hillcrest-2016dienerjl1461347256827franapl14616153048901461344400000Honors Program announces 2016 Hillcrest Scholarship winners News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHonors Program/honorsprog/indexsite://JMU/honorsprog/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/honorsprogJMUhonorsprog

The JMU Honors Program is pleased to announce this year’s Hillcrest Scholars. The scholarships are awarded to support transformative, off-campus experiences for Honors students in the summer following the junior year. Each Hillcrest Scholarship provides up to $5,000 in financial assistance for students to engage in a research experience, internship, entrepreneurial activity, or service- or leadership-related initiative.

Each of the recipients designed a unique project that meets both academic and career goals. The winners are: Mary Hawkins, Heather McKay, Amelia Morrison, Stephanie Pasewaldt, and Cecilia Rogers.

Mary Hawkins

Honors student Mary Hawkins, a Modern Foreign Language (Spanish) major, will be traveling to Salamanca, Spain, next year to teach English. In the process she hopes to complete significant work on her senior honors project, which will compare the teaching of English as a foreign language in Spain with the teaching of Spanish in America.

Mary was inspired in the pursuit of this goal during an Honors global studies Area of Emphasis course trip to the Dominican Republic with Office of International Programs executive associate director of strategic partnerships Dr. Felix Wang, who will also serve as the faculty mentor for her Hillcrest Scholarship experience. Says Mary, “I cannot fathom how much I will benefit from being immersed in a different culture, while also getting to translate all I’ve learned at JMU into practice in a Spanish school.”

Heather McKay

Heather McKay, an honors student majoring in Health Sciences/Pre-Optometry, will be serving with Unite for Sight, a non-profit organization founded by Jennifer Staple-Clark and dedicated to reducing barriers to healthcare delivery around the world. Heather will participate in the Ghana program, which operates eye clinics in Accra, Kumasi, and Tamale. Her mentor on the project is Dr. Cindy Klevickis, a professor in the JMU Department of Integrated Science and Technology.

Heather was inspired to take this important next step after participating in many other service opportunities, including experiences with Sheffield Place homeless shelter in Kansas City, a new school for underprivileged youth in the Dominican Republic, and Overcoming Barriers of Harrisonburg.  

“Volunteer optometrists do exams and give people eye glasses,” she says. “I will be distributing these glasses and shadowing the optometrists. I’ve learned that, when you address a particular human need, it leads you to a host of other questions and needs. But simple things can make a difference. The relationships you form in performing service are often equal to the thing you have fixed.”

Amelia Morrison

Geographic Science major and honors student Amelia Morrison will examine sustainable urban living in Groningen, The Netherlands and Palma de Mallorca, Spain through a Council on International Educational Exchange summer study abroad program. Her faculty mentor is Dr. Rob Alexander, an assistant professor in the JMU Department of Political Science.

Amelia will conduct an independent GIS mapping survey of the alternative transportation infrastructure of the municipality of Groningen and examine slope stability in the coastal environment of the Balearic Islands in Spain. Her participation in local efforts with permaculture community project Vine & Fig, an anti-pollution student organization Waves Over Waste, and the active citizen’s group Virginia Power Dialogue, provided impetus for her efforts to find creative ways to build a more sustainable global society and economy.

The Hillcrest Scholarship, she says, “is a great way to introduce myself to urban planning and environmental issues. Cities are sandboxes for understanding cultural resistance to change and finding creative ways to make informed choices. I want to help plan cities by using systems thinking and solid geographic principles.”

Stephanie Pasewaldt

Stephanie Pasewaldt, a Health Sciences/Public Health Education major and honors sophomore aims to develop, implement, and evaluate two health promotion interventions in Kampala, Uganda and Nairobi, Kenya. Her project, supervised by Dr. Stephanie Baller in the JMU Department of Health Sciences, will involve her fourth trip to master public health promotion and education principles and serve the street children of East Africa.

Stephanie’s project funded by the Hillcrest Scholarship will focus on the Uganda organization Raising Up Hope and the Kenyan nonprofit Paradigm Youth Network Organization. Stephanie has already published an article for Girls’ Globe with collaborator Nick Oketch, a community organizer and leader of a Nairobi orphanage and children’s refuge.

“I want to fight to end poverty in impoverished communities in developing countries,” she explains. “My proposal will help only two of the many thousands of communities facing shortages of food and shelter, as well as drug abuse. This ratio may seem small, but step by step, project by project, intervention by intervention, we can bring an end to extreme global poverty.” 

Cecilia Rogers

Honors student and Biology major Cecilia Rogers will investigate the ecology of the understudied and threatened plant Solanum conocarpum on the island of St. John in Virgin Islands National Park. This thornless flowering shrub, which can reach more than nine feet in height, may have mutualistic relationships with native bee and butterfly pollinators and animal seed dispersers such as bats.

Cecilia will engage with other scientists on the island to help inform their management plans for the national park. She will also guide local high school students by involving them in her field research. Cecilia’s faculty mentor is Dr. Heather Griscom, an associate professor in the Department of Biology. She was also inspired on the project by past Hillcrest Scholarship recipient Anna Nordseth, who studied coffee cultivation in Costa Rica.

“One of my favorite things about JMU is the mantra ‘be the change you want to see in the world,’” says Cecilia. “I think this project is a poster child for that message. This is an area of the world that means so much to me, and it is also at the eco-movement’s epicenter.” Tropical ecology and conservation are made real on this small island of two thousand people, she explains, as outside pressures threaten the land and its resources. “It is a really unique, diverse corner of the world. There are indigenous people living here, as well as North and South Americans and Europeans. It is a crossroads and melting pot of peoples and ideas.”

Hillcrest scholars are selected on the basis of their ability to connect the proposed experience to honors senior projects and future goals, leadership experience and community engagement, and ability to make a significant contribution to society. The Hillcrest Scholarship helps fulfill the JMU Honors Program’s mission to prepare thoughtful and engaged citizens equipped to lead, innovate, and make meaningful contributions in a complex and ever changing global community.

The Honors Program would like to thank the Honors Advisory Council and the members of this year’s Hillcrest Scholarship selection committee.

Hillcrest awards support transformative off-campus experiences /////
22-summer-hourstrue1461957224104jonesvwSummer Hours Start May 9Summer Hours Start May 9/news/healthcenter/2016/04/22-summer-hoursJMUsite://JMU/news/healthcenter/2016/04/22-summer-hoursjonesvw1461339971987jonesvw14619571943071461902400000Summer Hours Start May 9News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHealth Center/healthcenter/indexsite://JMU/healthcenter/indexJMUindexUHC HomeUniversity Health Center Home///_tags/source/healthcenterJMUhealthcenterHealth CenterHealth Center

From May 9-August 15 the UHC is open, please use the Urgent Care entrance for appointments and urgent care needs during this time.

Hours for medical needs:

  • Monday & Wednesday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. (closed for lunch 1-2 p.m.)
  • Tuesday & Thursday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. (closed for lunch 1-2 p.m.)
  • Friday 8 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

*Monday, May 9 will close from noon-2 p.m. 

The Well - health education, prevention and advocacy

  • Monday & Wednesday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
  • Tuesday & Thursday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
  • Fridays 8 a.m. - noon

Continuing students not enrolled in summer classes may utilize the health center for $25 per visit (and any additional fees incurred during the visit) if they were enrolled in spring 2016 classes and are pre-registered for fall 2016 classes.

May graduates may continue to use utilize the health center for $25 per visit (and any additional fees incurred during the visit) until May 31.

 

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21-palautrue1461260250912willi4bmPalau Ratifies Convention on Cluster MunitionsPalau Ratifies Convention on Cluster Munitionswillli4bmPalau Ratifies Convention on Cluster MunitionsPalau, Convention on Cluster MunitionsPalau Ratifies Convention on Cluster Munitions1461211200000Palau Ratifies Convention on Cluster Munitions/news/cisr/2016/04/21-palauJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/21-palauwilli4bm1461260090368willi4bm14612602230241461214800000Palau Ratifies Convention on Cluster MunitionsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Palau deposited its instrument of ratification of the Convention on Cluster Munitions on 19 April at the United Nations’ headquarters in New York. Congratulations on becoming the 100th State Party!" (stopclustermunitions.org)

Read more.

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20-naxaltrue1461259616449willi4bmRecord Number of Naxal IEDs Recovered in IndiaRecord Number of Naxal IEDs Recovered in Indiawillli4bmRecord Number of Naxal IEDs Recovered in IndiaIndia, Naxal, IEDRecord Number of Naxal IEDs Recovered in India1461124800000Record Number of Naxal IEDs Recovered in India/news/cisr/2016/04/20-naxalJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/20-naxalwilli4bm1461259442971willi4bm14612594429711461128400000Record Number of Naxal IEDs Recovered in IndiaNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"With back-to-back incidents of security forces personnel and civilians being targeted by using these bombs in the affected states in the recent past, central security agencies and the operations command of the CRPF have ordered a "strict observance" of operating procedures, usage of sniffer dogs, absolute discard of vehicles and effective gathering of intelligence every time a patrol goes out or an operation is executed." (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)

Read more.

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21-eric-major-inducted-into-bgstrue1461585848391lentilcnC-Suite Speaker Eric Major Demonstrates How to Be the ChangeC-Suite Speaker Eric Major Demonstrates How to Be the Change/news/cob/2016/04/21-eric-major-inducted-into-bgsJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/21-eric-major-inducted-into-bgslentilcn1461248637956lentilcn14615858200771461240000000C-Suite Speaker Eric Major Demonstrates How to Be the ChangeCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Alumni////cob/_cascade/_tags/alumniJMUalumni

Eric MajorJames Madison University alumnus Eric Major, ‘91, received the 2016 Medallion for Entrepreneurship from Beta Gamma Sigma International Business Honor Society, the global honor society serving higher education business programs accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). This award is the highest honor Beta Gamma Sigma bestows upon a business professional, recognizing individuals who demonstrate both innovative business achievements and dedication to serving others.

Major was presented the award on April 20, following the induction of 36 new members into the JMU chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma--one of more than 560 collegiate chapters throughout the world. Following both ceremonies, Major addressed the audience as the College of Business (CoB) C-Suite Speaker.

A member of the JMU College of Business Board of Advisors, Major is president, CEO and co-founder of K2M Inc., a fast growing global medical device company that develops innovative surgical solutions for the most complex spinal conditions. Headquartered in Leesburg, Va., the company also has offices in the United Kingdom and Germany.

“No one is more deserving of this award than Eric Major,” says Dr. Mary Gowan, dean of JMU’s College of Business. “Eric epitomizes the ideals of JMU through his work as a successful entrepreneur and philanthropist. In addition to his ongoing support of JMU with time and financial resources, his company makes donations to indigent care and medical missions, as well as supports activities in his local community. Eric demonstrates what we mean at JMU when we tell our students and alumni to ‘Be the Change.’”

With more than 20 years of experience in the spine industry, Major also co-founded and served as president and CEO of American OsteoMedix Corp. (AOM). After Interpore Cross International (now a Biomet company) acquired AOM in 2001, he served as president of the company’s Minimally Invasive Division until 2002. In 2010, he received the Entrepreneur of the Year Award for Emerging Technologies in the Greater Washington, D.C., region and currently is a member of the AdvaMed CEO Advisory Council. He also serves on the Loudoun Small Business Development Center Board of Directors and on the Board of Trustees for the Westmoreland Davis Memorial Foundation, Inc., a local historic preservation organization.  

CEO of K2M Inc. receives 2016 Medallion for Entrepreneurship from Beta Gamma Sigma./////
20-self-care-stationtrue1461166495499capleyaeCome Visit the New Self-Care Station in the Pharmacy!Need a little health pick-me-up? The University Health Center (UHC) has recently introduced a self-care station!Come Visit the New Self-Care Station in the Pharmacy!/news/healthcenter/2016/04/20-self-care-stationJMUsite://JMU/news/healthcenter/2016/04/20-self-care-stationcapleyae1461162863839capleyae14611666176221461124800000Come Visit the New Self-Care Station in the Pharmacy!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHealth Center/healthcenter/indexsite://JMU/healthcenter/indexJMUindexUHC HomeUniversity Health Center Home///_tags/source/healthcenterJMUhealthcenterHealth CenterHealth CenterStudent Success Center/successcenter/indexsite://JMU/successcenter/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/student-affairs/student-success-centerJMUstudent-success-centerHealth Center/CMS-redirects/health-center/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/health-center/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/student-affairs/health-centerJMUhealth-centerStudent Success////_tags/source/student-affairs/student-successJMUstudent-success

By: Allison Capley (’16), Student Affairs Technical Services

self care stationNeed a little health pick-me-up? The University Health Center (UHC) has recently introduced a self-care station! At the self-care station, you can find information sheets on a variety of common health conditions and receive tools to help you treat them. The station is located inside of the UHC Pharmacy on the first floor of the Student Success Center. There are signs outside of the Pharmacy directing students to the self-care station. The self-care station is open for students to utilize during the Pharmacy’s hours of operation: Monday-Friday from 9:00am-12:30pm, and 1:00pm-4:30pm.

The station is divided into 4 steps. At step 1, you can pick up self-care guides for some of the most common health conditions and identify which one might match your symptoms. Each self-care guide contains information about symptoms, self-care measures, how to limit spreading the condition to others, when to seek care from a medical provider, and suggest a further resource on the subject. The station carries information sheets for the common cold, nausea, vomiting, coughing, sore throats, the flu, pink eye, and yeast infections. Before moving on to step 2, you can pick up a thermometer card that can read your temperature incase of a fever! The directions for use can be found on the back of the card.

At step 2, you can choose the correct self-care measures for yourself. Here, you can pick up a checklist for choosing over-the-counter medicine. These checklists help to identify the problem and provide advice for finding the medication that you need while at the pharmacy or store. Additionally, the checklist helps to explain what drug fact labels on medications mean. Next to the checklists are brochures that identify what over-the-counter medications are available at the UHC pharmacy, which include a list of conditions, their treatments, and the cost of the medication. Last, step 2 also has bins of tissues and hand sanitizer.

At step 3, students are encouraged to limit the spread of health conditions to others by completing a self-care note on the computer provided. To do this, you can log into your MyJMUHelath account and follow the instructions to print out a self-care note at the pharmacy. The self-care note can be used to communicate absences with instructors, supervisors, and more to show that you have visited the self-care station at the UHC Pharmacy. (Class and employment attendance policies may still apply.) 

Last, step 4 provides recommendations for knowing when to seek help from a medical provider. On the step 4 sign, you will find names and further direction to medical resources both on and off-campus. Before you leave, be sure to pick up a self-care survey located by the exit. The survey is less than 10 questions long and submitting it at the Pharmacy will help the UHC to improve the services provided by the self-care station!

The self-care station is open to all JMU students. For questions about the station, contact Veronica Jones at jonesvw@jmu.edu. For additional information about the UHC or Pharmacy, visit the UHC website

Need a little health pick-me-up? The University Health Center (UHC) has recently introduced a self-care station!/////
04-19-2016_simoncicawardtrue1461097113842pipermcSenior Mark Simoncic wins the philosophy essay competitionSenior Mark Simoncic wins the philosophy essay competition/news/philrel/2016/04/04-19-2016_simoncicawardJMUsite://JMU/news/philrel/2016/04/04-19-2016_simoncicawardpipermc1461097080032pipermc14610970800321461038400000Senior Mark Simoncic wins the philosophy essay competitionNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsPhilosophy and Religion/philrel/indexsite://JMU/philrel/indexJMUindexPhilosophy and ReligionPhilosophy and Religion///_tags/source/college-of-arts-and-letters/philosophy-and-religionJMUphilosophy-and-religion

Mark Simoncic

Congratulations to senior Mark Simoncic, who is the winner of the annual philosophy essay competition!  Mark's paper was entitled "The Concept of Truth and Moral Sentences."  He will be attending graduate school in philosophy at Texas Tech next year.  We wish him the best of luck!

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19-bloomberg-rankingstrue1461097551271chaojbCollege of Business included in Bloomberg's top 50 undergraduate programsCollege of Business included in Bloomberg's top 50 undergraduate programs/news/cob/2016/04/19-bloomberg-rankingsJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/19-bloomberg-rankingschaojb1461094506871chaojb14610975374211461094800000Bloomberg Businessweek's final rankings of undergraduate programs, includes JMU's College of Business in the top 50 in the nation.News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews/College of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudentsCoB Faculty////cob/_cascade/_tags/facultyJMUfaculty

Harrisonburg, VA – James Madison University’s undergraduate business program continues to rank among the top 50 in the country, according to the 2016 Bloomberg Businessweek rankings, released April 19, 2016. The College of Business (CoB) ranked in the top 20 among public institutions and #41 among all business schools nationwide, affirming its reputation as a leading business school.

 “JMU’s College of Business is consistently ranked among the top business programs in the nation. We embrace JMU’s focus on engaged learning, community engagement, and civic engagement while preparing our students to be collaborative business partners. That combination prepares our students to truly make the difference when they start their first jobs and beyond.” said Dean Mary Gowan.

The schools were ranked by a combination of information from student and employer surveys, and data on internships and starting salaries. The program ranked #25 on the employer survey out of the 114  undergraduate programs reviewed, a testament to the quality of preparation provided by the JMU faculty and the depth of the students’ preparation for success through experiential learning and internships. Unlike many business programs, JMU does not require an internship but data shows that 77 percent of business students acquired job experience related to their major prior to graduation.

JMU’s undergraduate business curriculum is anchored within the JMU liberal arts tradition, ensuring students graduate with business acumen and understand the world in which business operates. Students are challenged by a rigorous and innovative business program taught by exceptional professors who ensure students develop strong analytical and critical thinking and interpersonal skills.

The CoB is among the fewer than 5% of business programs accredited by AACSB-International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), and one of 182 programs with both business and accounting accreditation. The College is known for its commitment to experiential learning, undergraduate research, superior faculty, state-of-the-art learning facilities and the integration of ethics and service into curricular and extracurricular experiences. Additionally,

  • JMU marketing students have more wins in the Google Online Marketing Challenge than any program in the world, including being recognized 4 times as the Americas Champion and also World Champions in  2014.
  • Accounting students complete a fifth year masters program and recently had the #1 pass rate on the CPA exam among schools with 20 or more students taking the exam
  • The Computer Information Systems and Business Analytics  program was just named  Information and Telecommunications Education and Research Association (ITERA) 2016 Program of the Year
  • Madison Investment Fund students consistently take home the #1 or #2 spot in student investment fund competitions.

To see the complete ranking, please visit: www.businessweek.com.

Bloomberg Businessweek did not conduct rankings of undergraduate business programs in 2015.  The magazine has recently announced that it will discontinue the ranking of undergraduate business programs after this year’s ranking.

Bloomberg Businessweek's final rankings of undergraduate programs, includes JMU's College of Business in the top 50 in the nation./////
19-new-afst-coursetrue1461087435865mcdonnkcNew AFST course being offered in Fall 2016New AFST course being offered in Fall 2016/news/africana/2016/04/19-new-afst-courseJMUsite://JMU/news/africana/2016/04/19-new-afst-coursemcdonnkc1461087420407mcdonnkc14610874204071461038400000New AFST course being offered in Fall 2016News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsAfricana Studies/africana/indexsite://JMU/africana/indexJMUindexAfricana StudiesAfricana Studies///_tags/source/cds/africanaJMUafricana

Dr. Case Watkins in ISAT is offering a course that may be of interest to you for Fall 2016. AFST 400/ISAT 480: Africa and Science will be offered on Tuesday evenings form 6:00-8:30pm in ISAT 337. This team-taught seminar analyzes historical and contemporary relationships linking science with Africa, Africans, and Afro-descendants in diaspora.

What images does the word, “Africa” bring to mind? What about “Science?” Each of these terms are contested social constructions that both derive from and help (re)shape the way we perceive the world and the diverse peoples whom inhabit it. The first half of the course uncovers “hidden histories” of Africa and the African Diaspora with a critical focus on the development and distinction of “scientific” and “traditional” knowledges. The second half surveys many contemporary scientific innovations conceived by Africans and Afro-descendants and discusses Africa’s place in the future of Science. Together we will observe, analyze, and rediscover Africa from an extraordinarily wide range of intellectual perspectives. We will uncover many important contributions to scientific knowledge advanced by Africans and their descendants in diaspora. We will find that Science and scientific knowledges are never flawless truths, but rather contested social constructs shaped by place, time, and power and modulated through race and gender. We will come to view Africa and Afro-descendent peoples as crucial generators of scientific knowledges. Finally we will look to Africa and Afro-descendants to help understand and address the planet’s greatest challenges, such as human and economic development and global climate change, finding many exciting ideas and even cause for optimism.

This is a team-taught course that draws on many diverse people, perspectives, fields, and disciplines to recognize and analyze Africa, Science, and their many interconnections. Dr. Case Watkins, instructor in Geographic Sciences and Africana Studies, will facilitate the team. He will be present at each class meeting, deliver lectures, hold regular office hours, and grade writing assignments. Other professors will assign readings and deliver lectures related to their fields of expertise, as well as serve as advisors for individual research projects when appropriate. Members of the teaching team include: 

  • Dr. Aderonke Adesanya
  • Dr. Jennifer Coffman
  • Dr. Yvonne Harris
  • Dr. Lamont King
  • Dr. Joshua Linder
  • Dr. Besi Muhonja
  • Dr. Adebayo Ogundipe
  • Dr. David Owusu-Ansah
  • Dr. Johnathan Walker 

If interested please sign up in My Madison using course number 76147.

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19-kurdistantrue1461080700958willi4bmOver 4 Tons of ISIS Landmines Defused Over 4 Tons of ISIS Landmines Defused willli4bmOver 4 Tons of ISIS Landmines Defused landmines, ISIS, KirkukOver 4 Tons of ISIS Landmines Defused 1461038400000Over 4 Tons of ISIS Landmines Defused /news/cisr/2016/04/19-kurdistanJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/19-kurdistanwilli4bm1461080606776willi4bm14610806067761461042000000Over 4 Tons of ISIS Landmines Defused News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Peshmerga bomb disposal teams defused more than 4 tons of landmines and explosives laid by Islamic State (ISIS) militants in land inhabited by the Kurdish religious minority Kakaiy. Their land, on the outskirts of Kirkuk, was recently retaken from ISIS." (rudaw.net)

Read more.

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19-dolley-awardstrue1461079499137lentilcnElias Semaan and Two Marketing Students Receive Awards at Dolley AwardsElias Semaan and Two Marketing Students Receive Awards at Dolley Awards/news/cob/2016/04/19-dolley-awardsJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/19-dolley-awardslentilcn1461071099638lentilcn14610794703561461063600000Elias Semaan and Two Marketing Students Receive Awards at Dolley AwardsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews/CoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudentsMarketing/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/college-of-business/marketingJMUmarketingFinance/CMS-redirects/finance/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/finance/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/financeJMUfinanceCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Faculty////cob/_cascade/_tags/facultyJMUfaculty

By Caitlyn Fuchs

Photo Credit to Stephen Foster Meyer, from the JMU Technology & Design Office

Joseph Straub at the Dolley AwardsThe Office of Student Activities & Involvement hosted their annual Dolley Leadership Awards banquet this past week where they recognized and celebrated the achievements of student organizations and outstanding individuals. The ‘Dolley’ Leadership awards are named after Dolley Madison, the wife of James Madison. This year, three outstanding members of the College of Business (CoB) were recognized: Dr. Elias Semaan and marketing students Joseph Straub and Mary Smilack.

Elias Semaan at the Dolley AwardsSemaan, a professor in the finance department and the faculty advisor for the Madison Investment Fund (MIF), was the receiver of the Hall Outstanding Faculty Achievement Award. 

Straub was awarded the Carrier Award for Outstanding Personal Pursuit of Leadership Development. He was a founding member of the Delta Upsilon International Fraternity,the Student Alumni Association and the Professional Sales Club at James Madison University (JMU), and has held executive positions with each of these organizations. He has also been a contributing member to Students With Diabetes and The Relay For Life of JMU.

Mary Smilack at the Dolley AwardsSmilack won her second Dolley Award and earned the Pepsi Scholarship Award for Substance Abuse Awareness for her work as the previous vice president and now the current president for the Sober Party, and for her work with REACH. Last year, the Sober Party won an award for Emerging Organization.

For more information about the Dolley Awards, please visit their website. Congrats to our CoB recipients! 

Dr. Elias Semaan, Joseph Straub and Mary Smilack win awards at the Dolley Leadership Awards banquet./////
18-refugee-fact-sheettrue1461013645157mcdonnkcFact Sheet: The Refugee / Migration Crisis and GreeceFact Sheet: The Refugee / Migration Crisis and Greece/news/humanitarian/2016/04/18-refugee-fact-sheetJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/04/18-refugee-fact-sheetmcdonnkc1461013623396mcdonnkc14610136233961460952000000Fact Sheet: The Refugee / Migration Crisis and GreeceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarianView the fact sheet here from the Greek News Agenda./////18-earthquake-strikes-japantrue1461013645157mcdonnkcSecond Powerful Earthquake Strikes JapanSecond Powerful Earthquake Strikes Japan/news/humanitarian/2016/04/18-earthquake-strikes-japanJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/04/18-earthquake-strikes-japanmcdonnkc1461013467809mcdonnkc14610134678091460952000000Second Powerful Earthquake Strikes JapanNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarianView the New York Times article here. Written by Jonathan Soble./////18-pope-francis-takes-refugees-to-vaticantrue1461013645157mcdonnkcPope Francis Takes 12 Refugees Back to Vatican After Trip to GreecePope Francis Takes 12 Refugees Back to Vatican After Trip to Greece/news/humanitarian/2016/04/18-pope-francis-takes-refugees-to-vaticanJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/04/18-pope-francis-takes-refugees-to-vaticanmcdonnkc1461013368010mcdonnkc14610133680101460952000000Pope Francis Takes 12 Refugees Back to Vatican After Trip to GreeceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarianView the New York Times article here. Written by Jim Yardley./////18-curcischolarship-milscitrue1461002479203neckowkdA Teacher, A Soldier: Joanna Curci ('18) Wins ROTC Scholarship1461000900000A Teacher, A Soldier: Joanna Curci ('18)/news/coe/2016/04/18-curcischolarship-milsciJMUsite://JMU/news/coe/2016/04/18-curcischolarship-milscineckowkd1461002323669neckowkd14610024613801460998800000A Teacher, A Soldier: Joanna Curci ('18) Wins ROTC ScholarshipCollege of Education/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-education/college-of-educationJMUcollege-of-educationMilitary Science/CMS-redirects/military-science/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/military-science/indexJMUindexROTCROTC///_tags/source/college-of-education/military-scienceJMUmilitary-scienceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsEarly Elementary and Reading Education/coe/eere/indexsite://JMU/coe/eere/indexJMUindexEarly, Elementary & Reading EducationEarly, Elementary & Reading Education///_tags/source/college-of-education/early-elementary-and-reading-educationJMUearly-elementary-and-reading-education

In this profile: We feature a very unique College of Education student: Joanna Curci ('18). She is part of the Elementary Education program as well as the JMU ROTC Duke Battalion.  Curci is the recipient of a 3.5 year Army ROTC Campus Based Scholarship. She recieves 3.5 years of full tuition at JMU, $4,200 for books and fees, and  $12,000 in stipend money paid out over the 3.5 years. This Scholarship was awarded on merit for her leadership, athletics/physical fitness and her scholarship abilities. The type of scholarship she received allows her to compete for an Active Duty Commission or decide later to go into any National Guard system or the US Army Reserves (USAR).

Joanna took the time to reflect on her time here at JMU and her future carrer in Education and the Military.

You are an IDLS major, with a minor in Elementary Education. Can you tell us more about why you’re choosing Elementary Education and what vision/goals you have for your educational career?

    “When I envision my most rewarding future, I see myself educating and mentoring students. I choose to study elementary education, because I feel I can be the most impactful on younger students. Elementary students are at the age where others are still heavily influencing them, especially teachers. As an elementary school teacher, I hope to influence my students by giving them a good foundation for learning. It is crucial to give the students a positive foundation to education, as that is what drives their decision-making throughout their education and life.  The more influential and positive the foundation, the stronger desire the students will have to learn in and out of the classroom. It is my goal that the foundation I build will carry on with them throughout and beyond their schooling.”

How do you imagine your commitment to the Military will blend with those educational career goals? 

    “I know that my military experience will only benefit me as I move on to my educational career, because the skills and lessons I will learn in the Army are identical to those in the educational program. One of the most beneficial lessons I have already learned through ROTC is that to be a great leader, you have to be aware and accepting of everyone’s personalities, backgrounds, beliefs, and learning styles. Everyone in the military and everyone in a classroom is impactful, it is our job as a leader to figure out their strengths and use them to benefit everyone.

    I also feel that a leadership position in the military will give me the experience needed to be a mentor for others, which will help make the transition to teaching much simpler. By the time I am ready to retire from the Army, I will have learned how to be a great listener, leader, learner, decision-maker, and role model: characteristics that are crucial for any successful teacher.”

Tell us more about why you chose JMU and how, by the second week of school, you knew you wanted to be a teacher?

    “I chose JMU for its beauty. It’s depth, atmosphere, location, and reputation stood out above all other universities to me. There was no comparison. When applying for colleges I could always find at least one thing that I did not care for in each school, whether it was the distance from home, the food, or just the overall feel I got when touring them, but I could never find one for James Madison. It is the perfect school for me in every way possible.

    I was also drawn to JMU for its Business program. I thought about what life would be like graduating with a business major: a large variety of jobs lined up, all with substantial pay. I figured I would be very successful in that field, but then I thought about what success really means to me. Success to me is not about how much money I make, its about how much I can positively impact a person’s/people’s lives. Once I came to this realization, I knew that teaching students would be the utmost rewarding career path for me.”

Lastly: is there anything that you’ve experienced so far, by pursuing your education licensure, that was unexpected? A special relationship? An ah-ha moment in one of your classes? 

    “I never imagined bonding with other students in the education program as fast and as strong as I have this semester. The amazing thing about this program is that everyone in it has the same end goal, which is to truly educate and have a positive impact on their students’ lives. This shared goal is the glue that bonds education students together, and is unlike any other major.

    I also never realized how identical the teachings in the military are to the teachings in the Education program, until taking EDUC 300. EDUC 300 with Professor Larry Huffman has truly deepened my understanding of the building blocks that create the most successful teacher. He explains that the foundations of American Education are knowledge, attitude, skills, leadership, learning, motivation, assessment, resources, people, and impact. The more he explained how they are used in American education, the easier it became to visualize how they are used to build a strong military.”

Joanna Curci ('18) is committed to four years of active duty and four years of reserve post-graduation. She shares more about her path in this statement.

A Teacher, A Soldier: Joanna Curci ('18) Wins ROTC Scholarship/////_images/coe/milsci/Curci.pngsite://JMU/_images/coe/milsci/Curci.pngJMUCurci.pngCurci.png
19-EYHtrue1462301652962sumnericStudents volunteer at EYH ConferenceStudents volunteer at Expanding Your Horizons ConferencesStudents volunteer at Expanding Your Horizons ConferencesStudents volunteer at Expanding Your Horizons Conferences1458395640000Students volunteer at EYH Conference/news/chemistry/2016/03/19-EYHJMUsite://JMU/news/chemistry/2016/03/19-EYHsumneric1460988613210sumneric14609904807361458363600000Students volunteer at EYH ConferenceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsChemistry/chemistry/indexsite://JMU/chemistry/indexJMUindexChemistryChemistry///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/chemistryJMUchemistry

Expanding Your Horizons (EYH) is a one-day science and math conference designed for 6th-10th grade girls. The participants interact with JMU faculty and students at hands-n workshops. The goal of this conference is to spark interest in science and math. Dr. Iona Black (College of Science and Mathematics),  Dr. Talé Mitchell (SMAD)  created and ran a workshop called "What colors do you see?" with the help of several student volunteers (pictured below).

EYH Student Volunteers

Back (left to right): Yasmin Shahkarami, Melanie Odenkirk, Lainey Scarvey, Kenna Salvatore, Alex Moore, Dr. Talé Mitchell, Hasti Izadpanah, Kayla Mcleod

Front (left to right): Marissa Reilly, Laurel Feichtel, Dr. Iona Black, Kirstie Thompson, Monica Paneru

Expanding Your Horizons (EYH) is a one-day science and math conference designed for 6th-10th grade girls./////
18-moztrue1460984915537willi4bmLandmines Along Mozambique-Zimbabwe Cause DeathLandmines Along Mozambique-Zimbabwe Cause Deathwillli4bmLandmines Along Mozambique-Zimbabwe Cause DeathMozambique, Zimbabwe, landmineLandmines Along Mozambique-Zimbabwe Cause Death1460952000000Landmines Along Mozambique-Zimbabwe Cause Death/news/cisr/2016/04/18-mozJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/18-mozwilli4bm1460984897544willi4bm14609848975441460955600000Landmines Along Mozambique-Zimbabwe Cause DeathNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Nyamapanda- Landmines planted along the Zimbabwe-Mozambican during the country’s liberation struggle have over the years continued being the major causes of deaths of humans and animals in Nyamapanda in Mashonaland East Province." (southernafrican.news)

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15-britishtrue1460726432203willi4bmBritish University Developing Drone to Scan for LandminesBritish University Developing Drone to Scan for Landmineswillli4bmBritish University Developing Drone to Scan for Landmineslandmine, droneBritish University Developing Drone to Scan for Landmines1460692800000British University Developing Drone to Scan for Landmines/news/cisr/2016/04/15-britishJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/15-britishwilli4bm1460726414733willi4bm14607264147331460696400000British University Developing Drone to Scan for LandminesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Landmines never stop waiting. The simple machines are explosives with triggers, set in the ground primed and ready for someone to set them off. For landmines, the war never ends. For humans, war does, and the landmines that once marked the front line between warring factions can change instead to deadly artifacts, a lethal trap for anyone who wanders unknowingly into danger. Getting rid of landmines is a humanitarian concern. To solve it, scientists from the University of Bristol are enlisting the help of drones." (popsci.com)

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01-srilankatrue1460645963533willi4bmSri Lanka Sets Ambitious Date to be Mine Impact FreeSri Lanka Sets Ambitious Date to be Mine Impact Freewillli4bmSri Lanka Sets Ambitious Date to be Mine Impact FreeSri Lanka, landmine, mine impact freeSri Lanka Sets Ambitious Date to be Mine Impact Free1456808400000Sri Lanka Sets Ambitious Date to be Mine Impact Free/news/cisr/2016/03/01-srilankaJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/03/01-srilankawilli4bm1460645941264willi4bm14606459412641456812000000Sri Lanka Sets Ambitious Date to be Mine Impact FreeNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"The goal set by the Sri Lanka government to make the country free of mine impact by 2020 is “very ambitious” but it is essential, Ananda Chandrasiri, Director/Programme Manager of the Delvon Assistance for Social Harmony (DASH), a six-year-old non government organisation working in the area of demining, said on Tuesday." (thehindu.com)

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08-roboticstrue1460643058895willi4bmMarines Use Robots to Reduce Explosive RisksMarines Use Robots to Reduce Explosive Riskswillli4bmMarines Use Robots to Reduce Explosive RisksMarines, robot, explosivesMarines Use Robots to Reduce Explosive Risks1460001600000Marines Use Robots to Reduce Explosive Risks/news/cisr/2016/04/08-roboticsJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/08-roboticswilli4bm1460643047950willi4bm14606430479501460091600000Marines Use Robots to Reduce Explosive RisksNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"CAMP HANSEN, Okinawa, Japan -- The new Remote Fuse Disassembly System was introduced for the first time to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Marines with 9th Engineer Support Battalion during a five-day course at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan April 4-8." (marines.mil)

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07-dentisttrue1460642044035willi4bmHong Kong Inventor Shares Ideas to Clear LandminesHong Kong Inventor Shares Ideas to Clear Landmineswillli4bmHong Kong Inventor Shares Ideas to Clear LandminesHong Kong, landmine, inventorHong Kong Inventor Shares Ideas to Clear Landmines1460001600000Hong Kong Inventor Shares Ideas to Clear Landmines/news/cisr/2016/04/07-dentistJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/07-dentistwilli4bm1460642028867willi4bm14606420288671460005200000Hong Kong Inventor Shares Ideas to Clear LandminesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"A Hong Kong inventor whose ideas have been successfully utilised in international space programmes believes he has a solution to the deadly threat of landmines, which still plagues the rural populations of Cambodia and other countries in the Asia-Pacific region." (scmp.com)

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06-cubatrue1460641840099willi4bmCuba Bans Cluster BombsCuba Bans Cluster Bombswillli4bmCuba Bans Cluster BombsCuba, cluster bombs, Cluster Munition CoaltionCuba Bans Cluster Bombs1459915200000Cuba Bans Cluster Bombs/news/cisr/2016/04/06-cubaJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/06-cubawilli4bm1460641825150willi4bm14606418251501459918800000Cuba Bans Cluster BombsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Cuba is the 99th State Party to the Convention on Cluster Munitions. The instrument of accession was submitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, at the UN Headquarters in New York, on 6 April 2016." (stopclustermunitions.org)

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05-ddgtrue1460641563796willi4bmDanish Demining Group Releases Short Films on MREDanish Demining Group Releases Short Films on MREwillli4bmDanish Demining Group Releases Short Films on MREDanish Demining Group, Afghanistan, mine risk education, MREDanish Demining Group Releases Short Films on MRE1459828800000Danish Demining Group Releases Short Films on MRE/news/cisr/2016/04/05-ddgJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/05-ddgwilli4bm1460641471536willi4bm14606414715361459832400000Danish Demining Group Releases Short Films on MRENews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Danish Demining Group (DDG) in Afghanistan has released three short films to be used as part of mine risk education (MRE) programming for children, youth, and their parents." (danishdeminingroup.dk)

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04-clustertrue1460641064319willi4bmCluster Munition Coalition Marks International Mine Awareness DayCluster Munition Coalition Marks International Mine Awareness Daywillli4bmCluster Munition Coalition Marks International Mine Awareness DayCluster Munition Coalition, International Mine Awareness DayCluster Munition Coalition Marks International Mine Awareness Day1459742400000Cluster Munition Coalition Marks International Mine Awareness Day/news/cisr/2016/04/04-clusterJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/04-clusterwilli4bm1460641034152willi4bm14606410341521459746000000Cluster Munition Coalition Marks International Mine Awareness DayNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"We are marking 4 April, the day of International Mine Awareness and Assistance in Mine Action, while regrettably cluster munitions continue to be used in Yemen and Syria-- and to threaten the lives of civilians in these countries. 4 April is observed globally and aims to stop the harm caused by all indiscriminate weapons, including the internationally outlawed cluster munitions." (stopclustermunitions.org)

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14-malitrue1460640409082willi4bmLandmine Kills Three French Soldiers in MaliLandmine Kills Three French Soldiers in Maliwillli4bmLandmine Kills Three French Soldiers in MaliMali, landmine, French soldiersLandmine Kills Three French Soldiers in Mali1460606400000Landmine Kills Three French Soldiers in Mali/news/cisr/2016/04/14-maliJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/14-maliwilli4bm1460640390579willi4bm14606403905791460610000000Landmine Kills Three French Soldiers in MaliNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"A landmine in Mali has killed three French soldiers on an operation in the north of the country, the French presidency says." (bbc.com)

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14-scott-stevens-the-joy-of-learningtrue1460639888027lentilcnThe Joy of Learning: JMU Professor Scott Stevens Strives to Inspire Students to Keep LearningThe Joy of Learning: JMU Professor Scott Stevens Strives to Inspire Students to Keep Learning/news/cob/2016/04/14-scott-stevens-the-joy-of-learningJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/14-scott-stevens-the-joy-of-learninglentilcn1460639865395lentilcn14606398653951460635200000The Joy of Learning: JMU Professor Scott Stevens Strives to Inspire Students to Keep LearningNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsComputer Information Systems/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-information-systems/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/computer-information-systemsJMUcomputer-information-systemsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Faculty////cob/_cascade/_tags/facultyJMUfaculty

By Karen Doss Bowman

Professor Scott StevensFor James Madison University (JMU) professor Scott Stevens, the passion for learning began during childhood, when he declared that he wanted to be a “professional student.” Whether teaching business students or delivering video lectures for The Great Courses (formerly called The Teaching Company), Stevens is enthusiastic about sharing knowledge with others.

 “I’m one of those people who loves to learn something and then tell other people about it,” says Stevens, who is known among his students for his energetic, approachable style of teaching. “When delivering lectures, I’m like the kid in the candy shop. For someone who loves to teach, there are few satisfactions as rich as the company of someone who loves to learn.”

A mathematician and physicist, Stevens joined the College of Business (CoB) faculty in 1985 and teaches in the Department of Computer Information Systems and Business Analytics. He also has taught physics and calculus for other schools on campus.

Stevens has done two video series for The Great Courses, a company that selects only the top one percent of more than 500,000 college professors worldwide to star in educational videos on a wide variety of topics. “Games People Play: Game Theory in Life, Business and Beyond,” produced in 2008 is still a popular choice for consumers, and his latest course, “Mathematical Decision Making: Predictive Models and Optimization” (2015), has a 98 percent positive online rating.

“At the moment, I know of only 8 of the company’s 576 courses that are more highly rated,” says Stevens, who is married to Kathryn Stevens, director of the Madison Art Collection.

A recipient of JMU’s Carl L. Harter Distinguished Teacher Award, Stevens has received numerous teaching honors, including the Distinguished Teacher for the College of Business Award. The 2010 recipient of the Kenneth Bartee Award for Innovation in Teaching, Stevens is a five-time recipient of the Students’ Choice for Outstanding Professor in the College of Business Award and was first to receive the honor.

Stevens finds joy in teaching young adults and encourages his students to learn new concepts through association, rather than by memorization. He emphasizes the importance of learning to read research and figuring out “how the pieces fit together.”

“In the world today, lifelong learning is essential,” Stevens says. “I have a hidden agenda in my courses to help students become confident and competent with the content while developing the skills to learn for the rest of their lives.”

Five-time recipient of the Students' Choice for Outstanding Professor in the CoB, Scott Stevens has the desire to be a lifelong student. /////
14-george-akerlof-econ-speaker-seriestrue1460639376512lentilcnPhishing for Phools: Nobel Prize Laureate George Akerlof Visits JMUPhishing for Phools: Nobel Prize Laureate George Akerlof Visits JMU/news/cob/2016/04/14-george-akerlof-econ-speaker-seriesJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/14-george-akerlof-econ-speaker-serieslentilcn1460639173793lentilcn14606393507611460635200000Phishing for Phools: Nobel Prize Laureate George Akerlof Visits JMUNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessEconomics/CMS-redirects/economics/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/economics/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/economicsJMUeconomicsGeneral////cob/_cascade/_tags/generalJMUgeneral

By Karen Doss Bowman

Photo Courtesy of the Warwick Economics Exchange

Nobel Laureate, George AkerlofNobel Prize winner George Akerlof, an American economist and professor at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy, visited JMU on April 7 to speak on his new book, "Phishing for Phools: The Economics of Manipulation and Deception," co-authored with fellow Nobel Prize winner, Robert Shiller. The book, which challenges conventional ideas about the free market, focuses on how consumers may be duped by markets that prey on their ignorance and emotional weaknesses.

Akerlof, who is the Daniel E. Koshland, Sr. Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, received the Nobel Prize in Economic Science in 2001, along with Michael Spence and Joseph Stiglitz. The Nobel Prize committee cited his groundbreaking paper, “The Market for ‘Lemons,’” published in 1970, which illustrates through the used car market Akerlof’s theory of asymmetric information and its impact on economic behavior.

Educated at Yale University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Akerlof is a past president of the American Economic Association. As a former guest scholar at the International Monetary Fund, Akerlof also has been a senior fellow for the The Brookings Institution and was the Cassell Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics.

Akerlof has served as associate editor for  American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization and was a co-editor of Economics and Politics. He has been senior economist at the President’s Council of Economic Advisers and holds honorary doctorates from the London School of Economics, the University of Zurich and the University of Antwerp, and Bard College. Akerlof is married to Janet Yellen, Chair of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Federal Reserve System.
As a part of the Economics Speaker Series, JMU welcomed Nobel Laureate George Akerlof/////
14-blaw-class-trip-to-the-supreme-courttrue1460635938057lentilcnBLAW Students Visit the U.S. Supreme CourtBLAW Students Visit the U.S. Supreme Court/news/cob/2016/04/14-blaw-class-trip-to-the-supreme-courtJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/14-blaw-class-trip-to-the-supreme-courtlentilcn1460635763003lentilcn14606359156341460635200000BLAW Students Visit the U.S. Supreme CourtNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsFinance/CMS-redirects/finance/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/finance/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/financeJMUfinanceCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

BLAW Trip to the Supreme Court

The College of Business White Collar Crime Class (BLAW 494) visited Washington, D.C. on April 8, 2016. The class visited the U.S. Supreme Court to gain a better understanding of its history and procedures. Students toured the courthouse and received a lecture in the courtroom where the cases are argued. According to BLAW 494’s professor, Dr. David Parker, “The visit to the U.S. Supreme Court helped students understand the importance of our judicial system and the Constitution it upholds.”

Dr. David Parker gives his students a real-life look at the judicial system and the Constitution at work. /////
15-stuff-the-trucktrue1461268152619hajdaslkStuff the Truck: 2016 Administration and Finance Divisional Meeting1454331600000Stuff the Truck: 2016 Administration and Finance Divisional Meeting/news/humanresources/2016/04/15-stuff-the-truckJMUsite://JMU/news/humanresources/2016/04/15-stuff-the-truckhajdaslk1460580082461hajdaslk14612681242231460721600000Stuff the Truck: 2016 Admininstration and Finance Divisional MeetingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHuman Resources/humanresources/indexsite://JMU/humanresources/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/humanresourcesJMUhumanresourcesHuman Resources////_tags/source/administration-and-finance/human-resourcesJMUhuman-resources

This year, the Administration and Finance Division will again be participating in a service project to benefit the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank. We are encouraging employees to bring non-perishable food items and paper products to “Stuff the Truck” for those in need across the Valley. Last year, the division donated a total of 1,514 pounds of non-perishable food and paper products! We would like to surpass that total this year with a goal of 2,000 pounds.

From April 15th to May 10th, collection bins will be at various locations around campus so that employees can donate items prior to the annual divisional meeting on May 10th. If you wish to bring your items the day of the meeting, there will be a truck set up in front of the Festival accepting donations. Please review the below flyer for more information and a list of collection bin locations.

http://www.jmu.edu/humanresources/_files/stuff-the-truck-flyer.pdf

- The Administration and Finance Division Meeting Committee

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13-2016-2017-tuition-ratestrue1460566010827phill2mr2016-2017 Tuition Rates Available2016-2017 Tuition Rates Available/news/ubo/2016/04/13-2016-2017-tuition-ratesJMUsite://JMU/news/ubo/2016/04/13-2016-2017-tuition-ratesphill2mr1460565314094phill2mr146056599301614605200000002016-2017 Tuition Rates AvailableNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsUniversity Business Office/ubo/indexsite://JMU/ubo/indexJMUindexUniversity Business OfficeUniversity Business Office///_tags/source/administration-and-finance/uboJMUubo

The 2016-2017 tuition rates were set by the Board of Visitors on April 11th and are now available in more detail on our website. Please visit our page on the tuition rates for more information.

If you have any questions about the commuter meal plans for 2016-2017, please visit the Card Services webpage on meal plans.

If you have any questions about study abroad program costs, please visit the Study Abroad website.

If you have any questions about the tuition rates or any help with an estimate of your student account for next year, feel free to contact our office at ubo@jmu.edu or by phone at 540/568-6505.

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13-humantrue1460563988428willi4bmRights Groups Warn that Safe Zones Put Refugees in DangerRights Groups Warn that Safe Zones Put Refugees in Dangerwillli4bmRights Groups Warn that Safe Zones Put Refugees in Dangerrights groups, refugees, safe zonesRights Groups Warn that Safe Zones Put Refugees in Danger1460520000000Rights Groups Warn that Safe Zones Put Refugees in Danger/news/cisr/2016/04/13-humanJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/13-humanwilli4bm1460563975799willi4bm14605639757991460523600000Rights Groups Warn that Safe Zones Put Refugees in DangerNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Setting up refugee “safe zones” on the Syrian side of the Turkey-Syria border and refusing to allow those fleeing the conflict to seek international protection could be a violation of international law and put vulnerable people at risk, human rights groups and aid workers have warned." (theguardian.com)

Read more.

/////
12-facebooktrue1460563668274willi4bmIllicit Small Arms and Light Weapons Sold Through FacebookIllicit Small Arms and Light Weapons Sold Through Facebookwillli4bmIllicit Small Arms and Light Weapons Sold Through FacebookSA/LW, FacebookIllicit Small Arms and Light Weapons Sold Through Facebook1460433600000Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons Sold Through Facebook/news/cisr/2016/04/12-facebookJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/12-facebookwilli4bm1460563609372willi4bm14605636093721460437200000Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons Sold Through FacebookNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery
"The report's findings were based on data acquired through a study on social media arms trafficking in Libya by the private consultancy Armament Research Services, and through previous reports by the New York Times on Syria, Iraq, and Yemen." (stateofthestateks.com)
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11-russiantrue1460563438728willi4bmRussia Calls on UN to Join Mine-clearing Activities in SyriaRussia Calls on UN to Join Mine-clearing Activities in Syriawillli4bmRussia Calls on UN to Join Mine-clearing Activities in SyriaRussia, Syria, landmine, UNRussia Calls on UN to Join Mine-clearing Activities in Syria1460347200000Russia Calls on UN to Join Mine-clearing Activities in Syria/news/cisr/2016/04/11-russianJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/11-russianwilli4bm1460563348264willi4bm14605633849951460350800000Russia Calls on UN to Join Mine-clearing Activities in SyriaNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"The Russian Defense Ministry asked the United Nations and other international organizations to join global mine-clearing activities in Syria, Russian Deputy Defense Minister Anatoly Antonov said Monday." (sputniknews.com)

Read more.

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04-13-cvpatrue1460571860031chandljlSenior Music Education Major Receives Funding to Further Field 1373432400000Senior Music Education Major Receives Funding to Further Field /news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-13-cvpaJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-13-cvpahawker1460558463863hawker14605692133971460520000000Senior Music Education Major Receives Funding to Further Field News Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage/

Jon Stapleton began producing electronic music in high school; starting in New Mexico and finishing in Lorton, Virginia. As a Music Education major at James Madison University, Stapleton was able to further his interests in music technology. "I wanted to participate more meaningfully in the electronic music community," shared Stapleton, "which led me to building customized electronic interfaces." Throughout his student career at JMU, Stapleton has not stopped building and participating in the music community.

In the fall of 2014, Stapleton presented a project on customized Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) controllers at a Virginia Music Educators Association (VMEA) Research Poster Session. Later, in the spring of 2015, he met with a local Smithland Elementary music teacher, Perry Shank. The two discussed how to improve student classroom interaction given limited instrumental proficiency. After being awarded a scholarship for undergraduate research by the College of Visual and Performing Arts (CVPA) at JMU, Stapleton and Shank designed an electronic instrument interface that allows Shank's students to better collaborate with each another and interact with music.

"We wanted to have students think critically and be intentional about how they were interacting with the sound and its interface as they made music," noted Stapleton, "We ended up making a set of tiles that locked together and formed a modular interface," he explained. The small, discreet parts each performed a specific function and worked to "[fill] the role of an instrument for students who didn't know how to play a traditional acoustic instrument or for students who did know how to play but had decided they would rather play the interface," Stapleton said. A later iteration of the interface focuses on buttons, sliders, and knobs, whose functions were programmed into computer software to create sound.

In the summer of 2015, Stapleton presented his project at the Interactive Multimedia Performing Arts and Collaborative Technologies (IMPACT) Conference at New York University. By the fall semester of 2015, he had received additional funding from the CVPA to further his research. "These scholarships do so much to broaden how we approach our discipline," reveals Stapleton. "Pursuing this interest through research has allowed me to talk to a lot of people at JMU about music technology and what it means for our field."

Currently, a case study of Shank's students and their interactions with the controllers is underway. Findings from the study will be presented at the International Society for Music Education (ISME) 32nd World Conference in Scotland in July 2016.

Stapleton will head to graduate school in the fall, but has certainly made the most of his time at JMU. In addition to his research, Stapleton is a woodwind player who was principal saxophone for the Wind Symphony (WS) in his junior year and half of his senior year. He played second saxophone for the WS his sophomore year, and was also principal saxophone for the Symphonic Band. Stapleton has played in saxophone quartets throughout his four years at JMU, in a reed quintet, with the Symphony Orchestra, and in the Jazz Band.

Stapleton builds controllers to help students in the local music community. ///_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cvpa.jpgsite://JMU/_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cvpa.jpgJMU04-13-cvpa.jpg04-13-cvpa//
04-13-csmtrue1460571860031chandljlResearch Early and Often: A Biology Alum's Path to Discovery 1373432400000Research Early and Often: A Biology Alum's Path to Discovery/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-13-csmJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-13-csmhawker1460558436292hawker14605729854601460520000000Research Early and Often: A Biology Alum's Path to DiscoveryNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage/

In high school, Cheyenne Marque Weeks-Galindo (M.S. '15) co-authored a research paper for the Journal of Tropical Ecology. While that may sound like the start of a focused career in research, Cheyenne had other plans. Instead, she traveled and divided her time between studying chemistry, language, cultural studies, plant science, and working with tuberculosis patients in Panama. It was in Panama that Cheyenne met JMU professors of biology Dr. Steve Cresawn and Dr. Jim Herrick at an infectious diseases workshop and found that her interests were perfectly aligned with JMU and the Cresawn lab.

Cheyenne studied bacteriophages that infect species of the genus Mycobacterium. Discovered in 1915, bacteriophages were quickly found to have therapeutic effects in the treatment of both animal and human bacterial infections. In both Europe and the U.S., efforts were made to commercialize phage therapy, which was even used during World War II. However, the development of antibiotics delayed the growth and research of phage therapy.

Currently, there is renewed interest in phage therapy as it may be an important alternative to antibiotics. Bacteriophages are target specific and have co-evolved with bacteria for billions of years. Phage therapy may ultimately be a more effective way to treat bacterial infections. With the hope to contribute to the field, Cheyenne conducted a comparative genomics study. The overall results of the study provide insight into the natural selective pressures exerted on bacteriophage genomes in response to the changes in resistance of their hosts. This information is not only applicable to questions regarding microbial ecology and host-parasite ecology but it also has clinical implications. 

Cheyenne continues pursuing her broad academic interests in the sciences and cultural studies. After graduating with an M.S. in 2015, she started a 12-month program in medical laboratory science (MLS) through the Sentara Rockingham Memorial Hospital School of Medical Laboratory Science. During the next four to five years, Cheyenne intends to work in reference and screening labs where she will carry out procedures in microbiology, hematology, blood banking, serology, and clinical chemistry to help physicians diagnose their patients. Her long-term goal is to do work that uses science to enhance family and community welfare. In her own words, "I am having so much fun thinking about all aspects of science more deeply! I am so grateful to JMU, Steve Cresawn, and the [biology] department for giving me the chance to start learning to be a scientist."

Biology alum uses science to enhance family and community welfare. ///_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-csm.JPGsite://JMU/_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-csm.JPGJMU04-13-csm.JPG04-13-csm.jpg//
04-13-cobtrue1460571860031chandljlA CPA Brings Professional Experience to the Classroom 1373432400000A CPA Brings Professional Experience to the Classroom/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-13-cobJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-13-cobhawker1460558406160hawker14605729722381460520000000A CPA Brings Professional Experience to the ClassroomNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage/

By Karen Doss Bowman

Kyle Sweeney left behind a lucrative career at KPMG—one of the world's top audit firms—to become a student again. A graduate student in JMU's School of Accounting, Sweeney was drawn to the quality of JMU's academic programs and faculty.

"JMU's School of Accounting has well-rounded faculty, most of whom worked in the corporate world before teaching," says Sweeney, whose wife, Amanda Deerfield, is visiting professor of economics in JMU's College of Business. "Having worked as practicing accountants, they've seen the reality of what accountants do every day in the workplace. That improves the quality of instruction and career preparation they are able to offer their students."

Sweeney, a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), has worked with JMU graduates in the corporate world and has been impressed with their expertise and professionalism. Aware of the JMU College of Business' outstanding reputation, Sweeney thought the university would be a good fit for him. He enrolled in the one-year Master of Science in accounting program in the fall of 2015 and will graduate in May.

After receiving a bachelor's degree—with a double major in accounting and piano performance—from Rider University in New Jersey, Sweeney was hired as a senior associate in KPMG's Audit Department in August 2011. He worked at the firm for four years.

For Sweeney, going back to school has been a refreshing change of pace from the corporate world. While his course load is demanding, he enjoys the intellectual challenge of being a student. He also has many opportunities to share from his professional experiences in the classroom, illustrating theoretical concepts in a real-world context.

"I've already seen first-hand so many of the scenarios we're studying in class," says Sweeney, a graduate assistant who tutors for several accounting courses and is a substitute lecturer. "The courses provide a good reinforcement of what I learned in the professional world. Every now and then, a professor will ask me about my professional experiences, and I usually have a good story to share that can help other students better understand the concepts."

Once Sweeney completes the graduate program, he hopes to work as a college-level lecturer for a year or so. After that, he plans to apply to pursue a Ph.D. in accounting or a law degree with a L.L.M. in taxation.

Sweeney enjoys connecting with students, and he believes teaching will allow him to use his own professional experiences to help launch their careers. Accounting in the professional world requires strong communication skills and problem-solving abilities, he explains, and these skills are critical for professors as well.

"The essential aspects of teaching appeal to me, and teaching accounting is an extension of these skills I've used in the business world," Sweeney says. "I believe I can use those skills to help students better understand the realities of practicing accounting. In doing so, I can help them become successful in their careers."

Sweeney adds that JMU's accounting program is well-connected with potential employers, offering a wide range of opportunities for internships and jobs after graduation.

"For students who are preparing for the interview process, JMU can help them connect with some impressive employers—and they will be well-prepared to make a good impression," Sweeney says. "JMU's master of science in accounting program is broad in terms of what students are exposed to. They get a good glimpse of what they'll experience in the professional world. JMU definitely is giving accounting students the tools they need to be successful in their future careers."

Sweeney leaves behind a lucrative career to become a student again. ///_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cob.jpgsite://JMU/_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cob.jpgJMU04-13-cob.jpg04-13-cob//
04-13-cdstrue1460572897218hawkerSchool of Communication Studies Professor Publishing Coal Industry Rhetoric Book 1373432400000School of Communication Studies Professor Publishing Coal Industry Rhetoric Book /news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-13-cdsJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/04/04-13-cdshawker1460558364966hawker14615968652681460520000000School of Communication Studies Professor Publishing Coal Industry Rhetoric Book News Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage/

Dr. Pete Bsumek is an associate professor in the School of Communication Studies, director of the M.A. program in Communication and Advocacy, and coordinator of the cross disciplinary Environmental Studies minor. Dr. Bsumek earned a B.S. in Political Science from the University of Utah, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Communication from the University of Pittsburgh. His research and teaching focus on rhetoric and the processes of advocacy and decision-making in social change, with a specific emphasis on environmental communication.  

Bsumek is currently working on a collaborative project investigating public controversies surrounding coal. In 2011, Dr. Bsumek and his colleagues, Dr. Jennifer Peeples (Utah State University), Dr. Jen Schneider (Boise State University), and Dr. Steve Schwarze (University of Montana), began an analysis of the public controversies related to society's continued reliance on fossil fuels such as coal. Bsumek and his co-authors argue that legislative inaction on climate change is best explained not as a failure of environmental advocates, but by the success of the fossil fuel industry's advocacy strategy.

Further, Bsumek and colleagues explain that the rhetoric of climate denial is but one aspect of the industry's strategy. In fact, they note that the sheer volume of resources that the fossil fuel industry is expending and the variety of campaigns they have deployed to prevent meaningful action on climate change are two indications of relative success. Their forthcoming book, Under Pressure: Coal Industry Rhetoric and Neoliberalism, details the findings in the project.

The book examines five recent U.S. coal industry advocacy campaigns that have aimed to shape public opinion about the importance of coal as well as foment opposition to regulation. Each of the core chapters demonstrates how the coal industry has crafted a public voice that speaks through a potent set of symbols, narratives, images and arguments. Topics include: the rise of industry front groups in the early 2000s, debates over "clean coal" in the context of climate legislation, pushes for increased coal exports as a solution to global energy poverty, and more. The book closes by arguing that the industry's rhetorical strategies foreclose public discussion by diverting attention from many of the key issues surrounding the continued reliance on coal as an energy source in the 21st century.

Bsumek is the 2014 recipient of the J. Robert Cox Award in Environmental Communication and Civic Engagement, given by the Environmental Communication Division of the National Communication Association. The selection committee described his activities and accomplishments in the realm of civic engagement as "impressive and inspiring." He also received the 2014 Christine L. Oravec Research Award, given for the best environmental communication article or book chapter of the year. Bsumek and his co-authors' work was recognized for its "timeliness and sophistication," and noted for its strong potential to inspire future research.

Bsumek aims to shape public opinion about the importance of coal. ///_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cds.jpgsite://JMU/_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cds.jpgJMU04-13-cds.jpg04-13-cds//
04-13-cobtrue1460557014758mcgivekdA CPA Brings Professional Experience to the Classroom 1373432400000A CPA Brings Professional Experience to the Classroom/stories/academic-affairs/2016/04-13-cobJMUsite://JMU/stories/academic-affairs/2016/04-13-cobhawker1460554929124hawker14605554284291460520000000A CPA Brings Professional Experience to the ClassroomOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairs

By Karen Doss Bowman

Kyle Sweeney left behind a lucrative career at KPMG—one of the world's top audit firms—to become a student again. A graduate student in JMU's School of Accounting, Sweeney was drawn to the quality of JMU's academic programs and faculty.

"JMU's School of Accounting has well-rounded faculty, most of whom worked in the corporate world before teaching," says Sweeney, whose wife, Amanda Deerfield, is visiting professor of economics in JMU's College of Business. "Having worked as practicing accountants, they've seen the reality of what accountants do every day in the workplace. That improves the quality of instruction and career preparation they are able to offer their students."

Sweeney, a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), has worked with JMU graduates in the corporate world and has been impressed with their expertise and professionalism. Aware of the JMU College of Business' outstanding reputation, Sweeney thought the university would be a good fit for him. He enrolled in the one-year Master of Science in accounting program in the fall of 2015 and will graduate in May.

After receiving a bachelor's degree—with a double major in accounting and piano performance—from Rider University in New Jersey, Sweeney was hired as a senior associate in KPMG's Audit Department in August 2011. He worked at the firm for four years.

For Sweeney, going back to school has been a refreshing change of pace from the corporate world. While his course load is demanding, he enjoys the intellectual challenge of being a student. He also has many opportunities to share from his professional experiences in the classroom, illustrating theoretical concepts in a real-world context.

"I've already seen first-hand so many of the scenarios we're studying in class," says Sweeney, a graduate assistant who tutors for several accounting courses and is a substitute lecturer. "The courses provide a good reinforcement of what I learned in the professional world. Every now and then, a professor will ask me about my professional experiences, and I usually have a good story to share that can help other students better understand the concepts."

Once Sweeney completes the graduate program, he hopes to work as a college-level lecturer for a year or so. After that, he plans to apply to pursue a Ph.D. in accounting or a law degree with a L.L.M. in taxation.

Sweeney enjoys connecting with students, and he believes teaching will allow him to use his own professional experiences to help launch their careers. Accounting in the professional world requires strong communication skills and problem-solving abilities, he explains, and these skills are critical for professors as well.

"The essential aspects of teaching appeal to me, and teaching accounting is an extension of these skills I've used in the business world," Sweeney says. "I believe I can use those skills to help students better understand the realities of practicing accounting. In doing so, I can help them become successful in their careers."

Sweeney adds that JMU's accounting program is well-connected with potential employers, offering a wide range of opportunities for internships and jobs after graduation.

"For students who are preparing for the interview process, JMU can help them connect with some impressive employers—and they will be well-prepared to make a good impression," Sweeney says. "JMU's master of science in accounting program is broad in terms of what students are exposed to. They get a good glimpse of what they'll experience in the professional world. JMU definitely is giving accounting students the tools they need to be successful in their future careers."

Sweeney leaves behind a lucrative career to become a student again. ///_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cob.jpgsite://JMU/_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cob.jpgJMU04-13-cob.jpg04-13-cob//
04-13-csmtrue1460557017884mcgivekdResearch Early and Often: A Biology Alum's Path to Discovery 1373432400000Research Early and Often: A Biology Alum's Path to Discovery/stories/academic-affairs/2016/04-13-csmJMUsite://JMU/stories/academic-affairs/2016/04-13-csmhawker1460554328912hawker14605554797561460520000000Research Early and Often: A Biology Alum's Path to DiscoveryOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairs

In high school, Cheyenne Marque Weeks-Galindo (M.S. '15) co-authored a research paper for the Journal of Tropical Ecology. While that may sound like the start of a focused career in research, Cheyenne had other plans. Instead, she traveled and divided her time between studying chemistry, language, cultural studies, plant science, and working with tuberculosis patients in Panama. It was in Panama that Cheyenne met JMU professors of biology Dr. Steve Cresawn and Dr. Jim Herrick at an infectious diseases workshop and found that her interests were perfectly aligned with JMU and the Cresawn lab.

Cheyenne studied bacteriophages that infect species of the genus Mycobacterium. Discovered in 1915, bacteriophages were quickly found to have therapeutic effects in the treatment of both animal and human bacterial infections. In both Europe and the U.S., efforts were made to commercialize phage therapy, which was even used during World War II. However, the development of antibiotics delayed the growth and research of phage therapy.

Currently, there is renewed interest in phage therapy as it may be an important alternative to antibiotics. Bacteriophages are target specific and have co-evolved with bacteria for billions of years. Phage therapy may ultimately be a more effective way to treat bacterial infections. With the hope to contribute to the field, Cheyenne conducted a comparative genomics study. The overall results of the study provide insight into the natural selective pressures exerted on bacteriophage genomes in response to the changes in resistance of their hosts. This information is not only applicable to questions regarding microbial ecology and host-parasite ecology but it also has clinical implications. 

Cheyenne continues pursuing her broad academic interests in the sciences and cultural studies. After graduating with an M.S. in 2015, she started a 12-month program in medical laboratory science (MLS) through the Sentara Rockingham Memorial Hospital School of Medical Laboratory Science. During the next four to five years, Cheyenne intends to work in reference and screening labs where she will carry out procedures in microbiology, hematology, blood banking, serology, and clinical chemistry to help physicians diagnose their patients. Her long-term goal is to do work that uses science to enhance family and community welfare. In her own words, "I am having so much fun thinking about all aspects of science more deeply! I am so grateful to JMU, Steve Cresawn, and the [biology] department for giving me the chance to start learning to be a scientist."

Biology alum uses science to enhance family and community welfare. ///_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-csm.JPGsite://JMU/_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-csm.JPGJMU04-13-csm.JPG04-13-csm.jpg//
04-13-cvpatrue1460557028509mcgivekdSenior Music Education Major Receives Funding to Further Field 1373432400000Senior Music Education Major Receives Funding to Further Field /stories/academic-affairs/2016/04-13-cvpaJMUsite://JMU/stories/academic-affairs/2016/04-13-cvpahawker1460553719639hawker14605554955051460520000000Senior Music Education Major Receives Funding to Further Field Office of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairs

Jon Stapleton began producing electronic music in high school; starting in New Mexico and finishing in Lorton, Virginia. As a Music Education major at James Madison University, Stapleton was able to further his interests in music technology. "I wanted to participate more meaningfully in the electronic music community," shared Stapleton, "which led me to building customized electronic interfaces." Throughout his student career at JMU, Stapleton has not stopped building and participating in the music community.

In the fall of 2014, Stapleton presented a project on customized Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) controllers at a Virginia Music Educators Association (VMEA) Research Poster Session. Later, in the spring of 2015, he met with a local Smithland Elementary music teacher, Perry Shank. The two discussed how to improve student classroom interaction given limited instrumental proficiency. After being awarded a scholarship for undergraduate research by the College of Visual and Performing Arts (CVPA) at JMU, Stapleton and Shank designed an electronic instrument interface that allows Shank's students to better collaborate with each another and interact with music.

"We wanted to have students think critically and be intentional about how they were interacting with the sound and its interface as they made music," noted Stapleton, "We ended up making a set of tiles that locked together and formed a modular interface," he explained. The small, discreet parts each performed a specific function and worked to "[fill] the role of an instrument for students who didn't know how to play a traditional acoustic instrument or for students who did know how to play but had decided they would rather play the interface," Stapleton said. A later iteration of the interface focuses on buttons, sliders, and knobs, whose functions were programmed into computer software to create sound.

In the summer of 2015, Stapleton presented his project at the Interactive Multimedia Performing Arts and Collaborative Technologies (IMPACT) Conference at New York University. By the fall semester of 2015, he had received additional funding from the CVPA to further his research. "These scholarships do so much to broaden how we approach our discipline," reveals Stapleton. "Pursuing this interest through research has allowed me to talk to a lot of people at JMU about music technology and what it means for our field."

Currently, a case study of Shank's students and their interactions with the controllers is underway. Findings from the study will be presented at the International Society for Music Education (ISME) 32nd World Conference in Scotland in July 2016.

Stapleton will head to graduate school in the fall, but has certainly made the most of his time at JMU. In addition to his research, Stapleton is a woodwind player who was principal saxophone for the Wind Symphony (WS) in his junior year and half of his senior year. He played second saxophone for the WS his sophomore year, and was also principal saxophone for the Symphonic Band. Stapleton has played in saxophone quartets throughout his four years at JMU, in a reed quintet, with the Symphony Orchestra, and in the Jazz Band.

Stapleton builds controllers to help students in the local music community. ///_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cvpa.jpgsite://JMU/_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cvpa.jpgJMU04-13-cvpa.jpg04-13-cvpa//
04-13-cdstrue1460557000053mcgivekdSchool of Communication Studies Professor Publishing Coal Industry Rhetoric Book 1373432400000School of Communication Studies Professor Publishing Coal Industry Rhetoric Book /stories/academic-affairs/2016/04-13-cdsJMUsite://JMU/stories/academic-affairs/2016/04-13-cdshawker1460552901037hawker14605554486301460520000000School of Communication Studies Professor Publishing Coal Industry Rhetoric Book Office of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairs

Dr. Pete Bsumek is an associate professor in the School of Communication Studies, director of the M.A. program in Communication and Advocacy, and coordinator of the cross disciplinary Environmental Studies minor. Dr. Bsumek earned a B.S. in Political Science from the University of Utah, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Communication from the University of Pittsburgh. His research and teaching focus on rhetoric and the processes of advocacy and decision-making in social change, with a specific emphasis on environmental communication.  

Bsumek is currently working on a collaborative project investigating public controversies surrounding coal. In 2011, Dr. Bsumek and his colleagues, Dr. Jennifer Peeples (Utah State University), Dr. Jen Schneider (Boise State University), and Dr. Steve Schwarze (University of Montana), began an analysis of the public controversies related to society's continued reliance on fossil fuels such as coal. Bsumek and his co-authors argue that legislative inaction on climate change is best explained not as a failure of environmental advocates, but by the success of the fossil fuel industry's advocacy strategy.

Further, Bsumek and colleagues explain that the rhetoric of climate denial is but one aspect of the industry's strategy. In fact, they note that the sheer volume of resources that the fossil fuel industry is expending and the variety of campaigns they have deployed to prevent meaningful action on climate change are two indications of relative success. Their forthcoming book, Under Pressure: Coal Industry Rhetoric and Neoliberalism, details the findings in the project.

The book examines five recent U.S. coal industry advocacy campaigns that have aimed to shape public opinion about the importance of coal as well as foment opposition to regulation. Each of the core chapters demonstrates how the coal industry has crafted a public voice that speaks through a potent set of symbols, narratives, images and arguments. Topics include: the rise of industry front groups in the early 2000s, debates over "clean coal" in the context of climate legislation, pushes for increased coal exports as a solution to global energy poverty, and more. The book closes by arguing that the industry's rhetorical strategies foreclose public discussion by diverting attention from many of the key issues surrounding the continued reliance on coal as an energy source in the 21st century.

Bsumek is the 2014 recipient of the J. Robert Cox Award in Environmental Communication and Civic Engagement, given by the Environmental Communication Division of the National Communication Association. The selection committee described his activities and accomplishments in the realm of civic engagement as "impressive and inspiring." He also received the 2014 Christine L. Oravec Research Award, given for the best environmental communication article or book chapter of the year. Bsumek and his co-authors' work was recognized for its "timeliness and sophistication," and noted for its strong potential to inspire future research.

Bsumek aims to shape public opinion about the importance of coal. ///_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cds.jpgsite://JMU/_images/academic-affairs/2016-feature-photos/04-13-cds.jpgJMU04-13-cds.jpg04-13-cds//
13-us-stand-syrian-refugeestrue1461013645157mcdonnkcWhere Does the U.S. Stand on Admitting Syrian Refugees into the Country?Where Does the U.S. Stand on Admitting Syrian Refugees into the Country?/news/humanitarian/2016/04/13-us-stand-syrian-refugeesJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/04/13-us-stand-syrian-refugeesmcdonnkc1460551449873mcdonnkc14605514498731460520000000Where Does the U.S. Stand on Admitting Syrian Refugees into the Country?News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarianListen to the discussion here from the TED Radio Hour on npr.com./////12-permitsunavailableonlinetrue1461006783488sutphijlPermits Unavailable Online14604336000001469937600000Permits Unavailable Online/news/parking/2016/04/12-permitsunavailableonlineJMUsite://JMU/news/parking/2016/04/12-permitsunavailableonlinesutphijl1460477858433sutphijl14610067686321460433600000Permits Temporarily Unavailable OnlineNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsParking Services/parking/indexsite://JMU/parking/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/parkingJMUparkingParking permits will be unavailable for purchase online until further notice. Permits remain available for purchase in the Parking Services office, located on the ground floor of the Champions Drive Parking Deck adjacent to Bridgeforth Stadium. Office hours during the academic year are Monday - Friday, 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Summer office hours are 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Monday - Thursday, and 8:00 AM - Noon on Fridays. Permits remain available for purchase in the Parking Services office/////12-fbla-pbl-take-third-at-state-conferencetrue1460470532284lentilcnNewly Reinstated FBLA-PBL Places Third Overall at State ConferenceNewly Reinstated FBLA-PBL Places Third Overall at State Conference/news/cob/2016/04/12-fbla-pbl-take-third-at-state-conferenceJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/12-fbla-pbl-take-third-at-state-conferencelentilcn1460470502032lentilcn14604705020321460466000000Newly Reinstated FBLA-PBL Places Third Overall at State ConferenceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Colleen Lentile

The College of Business (CoB) shined all across the board at the Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda (FBLA-PBL) State Leadership Conference this past weekend in Glen Allen, Va. at the Wyndham Virginia Crossings Hotel and Conference Center. James Madison University (JMU) placed third in overall number of awards received, winning 10 awards.

FBLA- PBL, which was just reinstated at JMU this semester, strives to help students gain a competitive edge in the business world by allowing them to compete in state and national competitions.

“I thought we did really well considering we have only been an official organization for a few months and this is my first time advising this specific organization,” said Yovan Reyes, FBLA-PBL’s advisor and Assistant Director of the CoB’s Academic Services Center. “As a new organization, we were going through the process of getting everything together, recruiting new members and preparing for State Competitions while everyone focused on their studies.”

Congratulations to the following students who placed first, second or third in their respective competitions: Shelby Friend (Human Resource Management and International Business); Chloe Huang (Management Analysis and Decision-Making); Maura Prisco (Economic Analysis & Decision-Making  and Accounting Principles); Danielle Muller (Economic Analysis and Decision-Making); Kyle McLaughlin (Macroeconomics); Laurel Eaton (Organizational Business Communications, Behavior & Leadership and Local Chapter Report); Anand Persaud (Local Chapter Report); Jake DuHadway (Local Chapter Report); and Gianna Marie Arango (Retail Management).

“Moving forward with FBLA-PBL, I'd like to recruit more students in general, but also a more diverse range of majors so that we can begin to compete in additional events that we did not get a chance to this last conference,” said Reyes.

The students are looking forward to competing at the National Leadership Conference in Atlanta, Ga. this summer and are eager to gain new members in the coming semester.

“[The students] are able to not only form genuine connections but [they also] gain invaluable experiences in leadership and career development,” said Reyes. “[Being a member of FBLA-PBL] enhances the student’s educational knowledge and assists in building a solid portfolio to go along with their degree.”

College of Business students compete in state competition and prepare for national competition./////
12-samantha-powell-diversity-conferencetrue1460470307317lentilcnAccounting Student Uses Diversity Conference to Talk about Disabilities Accounting Student Uses Diversity Conference to Talk about Disabilities /news/cob/2016/04/12-samantha-powell-diversity-conferenceJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/12-samantha-powell-diversity-conferencelentilcn1460469781587lentilcn14604702851841460466000000Accounting Student Uses Diversity Conference to Talk about Disabilities News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsAccounting/CMS-redirects/accounting/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/accounting/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/accountingJMUaccountingCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Annamarie Nyirady

Samantha Powell at the Student Diversity ConferenceSamantha Powell from the College of Business (CoB) Student Diversity Council recently facilitated two panels exploring the unique issues faced by students with disabilities at the recent Student Diversity Conference.

On March 16, the faculty-focused panel “Bridging the Gap Between Students and Faculty: Discovering the Abilities in Disabilities,” was hosted by James Madison University (JMU). Because the lecture was primarily for faculty members, there was an emphasis on supporting student inclusion and proactive communication. Panelists also discussed the importance of covering the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on their syllabi as well as the use of accessible multimedia content for use in online teaching. Dr. John Guo, Computer Information Systems (CIS) Professor and panelist, was excited to further understand “how instructional faculty can be emotionally helpful in the learning experience of a student with [a] disability.”

During the “Exploring the Value of Disability Disclosure in the Workplace,” the importance of positive rhetoric was stressed through the concept of “People First Language” - emphasizing the person first, and then the disability. This rhetorical concept proves to be a powerful tool for productive dialogue.

Both audiences contained students, faculty and administrative staff and according to a post-panel survey, 93.75% of people found the panel was a valuable use of their time. An attendee stated that, "We're not going to make progress, if we don't talk about disabilities." Powell made a valuable impact on the JMU community,  and is “looking forward to learning from this experience and making improvements for future panels.” 

Faculty, students and staff are welcome to learn more about inclusion, accessible technology and communication at the Diversity Conference panels. /////
12-apatridas-en-su-pais-nataltrue1460465043687mcdonnkcApatridas en su pais natalApatridas en su pais natal/news/lacs/2016/04/12-apatridas-en-su-pais-natalJMUsite://JMU/news/lacs/2016/04/12-apatridas-en-su-pais-natalmcdonnkc1460464824567mcdonnkc14604651453991460433600000Apatridas en su pais natalNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsLatin American and Caribbean Studies/lacs/indexsite://JMU/lacs/indexJMUindexLatin American and Caribbean StudiesLatin American and Caribbean Studies///_tags/source/cds/lacsJMUlacsView the article here on elpais.com. Written by Antonio Pita./////11-nuance-winterguard-named-as-finalisttrue1460431464418maszleccJMU Nuance Winterguard named as a finalist in WGI World ChampionshipsJMU Nuance Winterguard named as a finalist in WGI World Championships/news/mrd/2016/04/11-nuance-winterguard-named-as-finalistJMUsite://JMU/news/mrd/2016/04/11-nuance-winterguard-named-as-finalistmaszlecc1460426897019maszlecc14604313962311460368800000JMU Nuance Winterguard named as a finalist in WGI World ChampionshipsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMarching Royal Dukes/mrd/indexsite://JMU/mrd/indexJMUindexMarching Royal DukesMarching Royal Dukes ::: Virginia's Finest and America's Favorite Collegiate Marching BandThe JMU Marching Royal Dukes are Virginia's Finest and America's Favorite Collegiate Marching Band. The band is proud to represent James Madison University.The JMU Marching Royal Dukes are Virginia's Finest and America's Favorite Collegiate Marching Band. The band is proud to represent James Madison University.Chase Conrad MaszleThe Official home of the James Madison University Marching Royal Dukes and Athletic Band programs.///_tags/source/college-of-visual-and-performing-arts/mrdJMUmrd

Nuance team poses for a photo at WGI finals

Color guard reaches new heights on program’s 10th anniversary

DAYTON, OHIO— 2016 is the second time in Nuance’s ten-year history that they made it to the finals round at the Winter Guard International (WGI) World Championships.

This weekend, JMU’s esteemed color guard competed in the World Guard International (WGI) Championships. After three days of performing, they emerged 16th out of the 73 guards who participated in the Independent A Class.

On Thursday, they competed against 73 other guards. They made the cut to semi-finals the next day, and gave a performance that earned them a spot in Saturday’s final round. They finished with a score of 84.126, which ranked them 16th in the world – an impressive feat, which puts the JMU group atop a short list of the most successful groups represented from the east coast.

Nuance Director Carly Philp, credits some of this year’s success to the guard’s excellent work in previous years. “They wanted to pick up on the drive and passion they had last season, and continue to grow from there. It was incredible to see them continue to push themselves to another level.”


Curious about winterguard and the story behind JMU Nuance's show this year? Check out this interview with Captain and Age-out Sarah Slough, directed and produced by our own Courtney Coffey and MRD member Bryn McIntyre!

Posted by JMU Nuance Winterguard on Friday, April 8, 2016


This year’s show, entitled “Can You Hear Me,” is about struggling with internal and external voices of doubt. “We begin the show with hoods on, and as the show progresses, we each remove our hoods, representing that we can finally hear the voices telling us we’re good enough,” explained Sarah Slough, one of Nuance’s senior captains.

Slough went on to describe what she enjoys most about Nuance. “We are a family. Our bond is something that I haven’t found anywhere else in my color guard experience. I love being with these people and doing something we all are passionate about.” These close-knit relationships are really what bring their show to another level.

Kerri Seaman, another captain, recalled that their largest success was knowing that a season of hard work had resulted in a strong, meaningful show. “The end product was our great performance - making finals was just a reward. It was the cherry on top.”

By Annie Franks ('18), JMU Athletic Bands
Published April 11, 2016

 

Final stats from the competition

JMU Nuance Winterguard performs at WGI World Championships in Dayton, Ohio.



JMU NUANCE WINTERGUARD: WGI WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS INDEPENDENT A CLASS FINALISTS!!! #tenyearsofnuance #canyouhearme #16thintheWORLD 💜💛

A photo posted by JMUMRDCG & Nuance Winterguard (@jmucolorguard) on






Close-knit relationships lead JMU group to success on the international stage/_images/bands/Colorguard/home35-2016win-655x393.jpgsite://JMU/_images/bands/Colorguard/home35-2016win-655x393.jpgJMUhome35-2016win-655x393.jpghome35-2016win/_images/bands/Colorguard/home35-2016win-419x251.jpgsite://JMU/_images/bands/Colorguard/home35-2016win-419x251.jpgJMUhome35-2016win-419x251.jpghome35-2016win/_images/bands/Colorguard/home35-2016win-172x103.jpgsite://JMU/_images/bands/Colorguard/home35-2016win-172x103.jpgJMUhome35-2016win-172x103.jpghome35-2016win//_images/bands/Colorguard/home35-2016win-655x393.jpgsite://JMU/_images/bands/Colorguard/home35-2016win-655x393.jpgJMUhome35-2016win-655x393.jpghome35-2016win
11-ahrdawaredforthesis-ltletrue1460402714840neckowkdAHRD Student Writes Award Winning ThesisIn recognition of her outstanding efforts with her thesis, ¿The Effects of Cross-Cultural Differences on Team Performance within an Education System,¿ Sevinj Iskandarova ('16) has been awarded The Graduate School's 2016 Outstanding Thesis/Project Award.Allie Daczkowski ('15, '16M)In recognition of her outstanding efforts with her thesis, ¿The Effects of Cross-Cultural Differences on Team Performance within an Education System,¿ Sevinj Iskandarova ('16) has been awarded The Graduate School's 2016 Outstanding Thesis/Project Award.1460400780000AHRD Student Writes Award Winning Thesis/news/coe/2016/04/11-ahrdawaredforthesis-ltleJMUsite://JMU/news/coe/2016/04/11-ahrdawaredforthesis-ltleneckowkd1460401739733neckowkd14604026997271460394000000AHRD Student Writes Award Winning ThesisCollege of Education/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-education/college-of-educationJMUcollege-of-educationLearning Technology and Leadership Education/CMS-redirects/learning-technology-and-leadership/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/learning-technology-and-leadership/indexJMUindexLearning Technology and Leadership EducationLearning Technology and Leadership Education///_tags/source/college-of-education/learning-technology-and-leadership-educationJMUlearning-technology-and-leadership-educationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews

AHRD Student Writes Award Winning ThesisIn recognition of her outstanding efforts with her thesis, “The Effects of Cross-Cultural Differences on Team Performance within an Education System,” Sevinj Iskandarova ('16) has been awarded The Graduate School's 2016 Outstanding Thesis/Project Award. This award recognizes superior scholarship, research, and writing in a master’s thesis project. Students must be nominated by their thesis/project advisor and endorsed by their Graduate Program Director or Academic Unit Head. Each graduate program may nominate only one thesis/project for consideration for this award. Theses/projects are evaluated on the basis of clarity of style and presentation, scholarship, methodology, and contributions to the field or discipline. Awards are given in two areas of study: Education, Social Sciences and Humanities, and STEM, Health, and Behavioral Studies; Iskandarova has received the award for the Education, Social Sciences, and Humanities area of study.

Iskandarova gave us a look into the development of her award winning thesis:

If you could sum up your project in a few sentences, what would they be?

The purpose of this study was to determine and measure the effect of cross-cultural differences on team performance, highlight advantages and disadvantages of those cross-cultural differences within the team, and apply the knowledge learned from the study to enhance team performance within an educational setting. By referencing these findings, educational institutions may improve organizational culture and provide a vision for increasing multicultural team performance. By highlighting the benefits and challenges of cross-cultural differences, educational administrators gain greater knowledge in understanding and promoting more productive team performance.

What was your motivation for your project?

I wanted to get a better understanding of the life of an international faculty member at JMU. One day I too would like to be a professor. I was particularly motivated by working with my advisor and the professors in Learning Technology and Leadership Education (LTLE). It was such an honor working closely with them. In my country the opportunity to collaborate with faculty members is a great honor.  This opportunity was such a motivating factor that I just could not let it pass me by. 

I am so honored to receive this award. I am also honored to be part of the College of Education and the Graduate School here at JMU.  I have learned so much during my study and time here, and I know that I am well prepared as I begin plans for my doctoral studies.

Can you give a brief explanation of what efforts went into your project/thesis?

Mapping out a plan that would be doable within the timeframe that I had was a challenge because I wanted to create something meaningful and useful to the people who invested in me and to those who are in positions to make a difference in the lives of faculty from all backgrounds. My plan is to continue this line of research into the next chapter of my education.

Is there anything else additional you would like to say about your thesis?

I would like express my appreciation for individuals who without their help and support I would not have been able to complete this work. First and foremost, I would like to thank my advisor, Professor Oris Griffin McCoy, who has put a great deal of her time and effort into the guidance of this work. Dr. Griffin supported me academically and guided me as her daughter. Her office was always opened to help me solve any issues I uncounted during the program. Next, I would like to convey my sincere thanks to Dr. Diane Wilcox for her support. From my first visit to James Madison University, Dr. Wilcox believed in, and supported me in reaching this goal. Her classes were a mix of challenge and joy for students who wanted to learn about instructional design and development. Dr. Jane Thall, a great inspirational teacher and leader provided me with the chance to glow and shine in the field, and I will not forget her continuous encouragement during every step of my academic career. A heartfelt thank you to Dr. Amy Thelk, my committee member and research consultant, for her expertise and continuous support of my research. Her valuable suggestions led to a greatly improved thesis. Dr. Michael Stoloff, thank you so much as it was an honor working with you on my research. All other LTLE faculty members: Thank you for being consistently supportive of my academic years at James Madison University! Mrs. Sandra Gilchrist: Thank you, not only for being my supervisor but also for the moral support given to me every single day at James Madison University. I cannot forget to thank Kristen Shrewsbury, one of the best members of the writing center at James Madison University. Without Kristen, my work would not have been well-written. Finally, I would like to thank the professors who I interviewed for my research at James Madison University, for their time, patience and support.

Sevinj Iskandarova ('16) will complete her Master's in Adult Education/Human Resource Development: Instructional Technology this May. She will be recognized for her Outstanding Thesis Award at The Graduate School Awards Reception on Sunday, April 17th

In recognition of her outstanding efforts with her thesis, The Effects of Cross-Cultural Differences on Team Performance within an Education System, Sevinj Iskandarova ('16) has been awarded The Graduate School's 2016 Outstanding Thesis/Project Award. /_images/coe/ltle/sevinj-iskandarova-655x873.jpgsite://JMU/_images/coe/ltle/sevinj-iskandarova-655x873.jpgJMUsevinj-iskandarova-655x873.jpgsevinj-iskandarova-900x1200/_images/coe/ltle/sevinj-iskandarova-419x558.jpgsite://JMU/_images/coe/ltle/sevinj-iskandarova-419x558.jpgJMUsevinj-iskandarova-419x558.jpgsevinj-iskandarova-900x1200/_images/coe/ltle/sevinj-iskandarova-172x229.jpgsite://JMU/_images/coe/ltle/sevinj-iskandarova-172x229.jpgJMUsevinj-iskandarova-172x229.jpgsevinj-iskandarova-900x1200//_images/coe/ltle/sevinj-iskandarova-900x1200.jpgsite://JMU/_images/coe/ltle/sevinj-iskandarova-900x1200.jpgJMUsevinj-iskandarova-900x1200.jpgsevinj-iskandarova-900x1200
11-us-donates-suppliestrue1461013645157mcdonnkcU.S. donates supplies for emergency needs of refugees in GreeceU.S. donates supplies for emergency needs of refugees in Greece/news/humanitarian/2016/04/11-us-donates-suppliesJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/04/11-us-donates-suppliesmcdonnkc1460378115099mcdonnkc14603781150991460347200000U.S. donates supplies for emergency needs of refugees in GreeceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarianView the article here on ekathimerini.com./////09-jmu-dukettes-defend-national-titletrue1460317113021maszleccThe Dukettes do it again!Annie Franksdukettes, national champion dance teamThe Dukettes do it again!/news/mrd/2016/04/09-jmu-dukettes-defend-national-titleJMUsite://JMU/news/mrd/2016/04/09-jmu-dukettes-defend-national-titlemaszlecc1460231006922maszlecc14603170967071460188800000The Dukettes do it again!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMarching Royal Dukes/mrd/indexsite://JMU/mrd/indexJMUindexMarching Royal DukesMarching Royal Dukes ::: Virginia's Finest and America's Favorite Collegiate Marching BandThe JMU Marching Royal Dukes are Virginia's Finest and America's Favorite Collegiate Marching Band. The band is proud to represent James Madison University.The JMU Marching Royal Dukes are Virginia's Finest and America's Favorite Collegiate Marching Band. The band is proud to represent James Madison University.Chase Conrad MaszleThe Official home of the James Madison University Marching Royal Dukes and Athletic Band programs.///_tags/source/college-of-visual-and-performing-arts/mrdJMUmrd

The 2016 Dukettes team posing for a post-win photo

Madison’s prestigious dance team clinches the national title again

DAYTONA BEACH, FL.- The Dukettes have shown us, once again, that “the work is worth it.” Yesterday, the dance team earned their second straight national championship title at the National Dance Alliance (NDA) Collegiate Championships.

In 2015, the Dukettes moved into a new division and faced a whole new level of competition. Despite the new, tougher circumstances, they won first place. This year they were determined to hold their ground. To do this, they challenged themselves even more than last year. “We wanted to step up our game and be really powerful,” said sophomore Marisa Brizzolara. “This year’s choreography was more difficult than last year’s, so the team focused on precision and uniformity. We wanted to master the technique.”

The precision and detail in this year’s performance is impossible to miss. But something you won’t be able to see by watching the Dukettes perform is that this year’s team is significantly younger. There are eight freshmen on the team, and only one senior.  “Last year we had eight powerhouse seniors, so it was a big difference to go from that to having only one. But I think in a way it made us stronger,” explained Brizzolara.

The team walked onto the national stage knowing they needed to fight even harder than they did last year. “Earning the title is one thing, but holding on to it is something completely different. It’s even harder,” remarked Dukettes Head Coach Julia Urban. “We had to defend that title, and we put so much work into it.” She emphasized the team focused on telling a story through their routine, and that the connections between the dancers became especially important in doing so. “When we perform even the most beautiful, lyrical routine with quiet music, my dancers are screaming their heads off for each other, because even though they’re all performing individually, they are performing as one unit. They are making eye contact with each other during the routine. We always talk about how we’re not going to be successful if we’re only thinking about ourselves.”


The JMU Dukettes bring home first place, once again. Congrats to the entire team and staff for all of their hard work!

Posted by JMU Marching Royal Dukes on Friday, April 8, 2016

The Dukettes strive to tell a story with their routine, and this year they clearly accomplished that. Assistant Director of Athletic Bands, Chad Reep, was among those in the audience cheering for the Dukettes. “They are so good at connecting with the audience,” he said. “They are able to tell such a true story, and I believe what they’re trying to tell. That’s such an important thing when it comes to dance, and art in general: being able to convey a message and be genuine.”

With the support of JMU, the team had the opportunity to perform infront of a university-wide audience before they left for Florida. On Sunday, the Dukettes excited friends and family with an exhibition performance at the Convocation Center. This year’s crowd was significantly larger than last year’s.

Joey Sandy, a junior Dukette member, recalled, “Having that bigger crowd helped us immensely, because being able to perform in front of that many people gives us adrenaline and makes us tell a story, because we want to connect with everyone in that audience. The more people there are, the more emotion we give.”

The Dukettes placed second in prelims, with Utah Valley taking first. In finals, however, The Dukettes posted a final score of 9.620, surpassing Utah Valley’s 9.594. Western Carolina finished third with a 9.349. When asked about the rehearsal between prelims and finals, Coach Urban said, “We looked at what we needed to improve but we also made sure to give ourselves credit for what the judges thought we did well. We came together as a team and realized [finals] is the last opportunity we have to do this.”

The team had many goals this year, but more than anything, they wanted to grow. “We wanted overall growth in all areas. We never wanted to settle or plateau. We did a more difficult routine to feature the strength of our dancers. We wanted to become one unit, not only onstage, but also outside of practices -- growing our friendships,” said Urban.

When asked what sets the Dukettes apart from other competitors, the team unanimously shared: “The amount of love we have for each other.”

The team would also like to express tremendous thanks to the JMU community. “We do this for JMU,” said Sandy. “Before we went on stage, we sat in a circle and talked about what we love about this team. We do this for each other. Not to win. We want to make each other proud."

Brizzolara added, “When we get on the stage, the judges and audience can tell that we love each other, and we want to dance for each other. We’re not in it to be better than anybody else -- we just want to be better for ourselves and build each other up along the way.”

By Annie Franks ('18), JMU Athletic Bands
Published April 9, 2016

 

Final stats from the competition

Give to the JMU Dukettes.

convo
beach

Madisons prestigious dance team clinches the national title again/_images/bands/slideshow/dukettes-national-championship-2016-655x393.jpgsite://JMU/_images/bands/slideshow/dukettes-national-championship-2016-655x393.jpgJMUdukettes-national-championship-2016-655x393.jpgdukettes-national-championship-2016/_images/bands/slideshow/dukettes-national-championship-2016-419x251.jpgsite://JMU/_images/bands/slideshow/dukettes-national-championship-2016-419x251.jpgJMUdukettes-national-championship-2016-419x251.jpgdukettes-national-championship-2016/_images/bands/slideshow/dukettes-national-championship-2016-172x103.jpgsite://JMU/_images/bands/slideshow/dukettes-national-championship-2016-172x103.jpgJMUdukettes-national-championship-2016-172x103.jpgdukettes-national-championship-2016//_images/bands/fb-dukettes-16.jpgsite://JMU/_images/bands/fb-dukettes-16.jpgJMUfb-dukettes-16.jpgfb-dukettes-16.jpg
04-08-2016_omearaawardtrue1460121326571pipermcDr. O'Meara wins Alger Family Faculty Endowment AwardDr. O'Meara wins Alger Family Faculty Endowment Award/news/philrel/2016/04/04-08-2016_omearaawardJMUsite://JMU/news/philrel/2016/04/04-08-2016_omearaawardpipermc1460121309680pipermc14601213096801460088000000Dr. O'Meara wins Alger Family Faculty Endowment AwardNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsPhilosophy and Religion/philrel/indexsite://JMU/philrel/indexJMUindexPhilosophy and ReligionPhilosophy and Religion///_tags/source/college-of-arts-and-letters/philosophy-and-religionJMUphilosophy-and-religion

Bill O'Meara

The Department of Philosophy and Religion is happy to report that Dr. Bill O'Meara is this year's winner of the university-wide Alger Family Faculty Endowment Award.  According to the award criteria, "this award honors a faculty member who possesses a record of achievement in engaged learning, civic engagement or community engagement."

The Department is very thankful to Dr. O'Meara for his many years of excellent service to the department, university, and community, and warmly congratulates him on this award!

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07-fma-networking-ettiquette-hourtrue1460035646147lentilcnFMA Holds Networking Cocktail Etiquette EventFMA Holds Networking Cocktail Etiquette Event/news/cob/2016/04/07-fma-networking-ettiquette-hourJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/07-fma-networking-ettiquette-hourlentilcn1460032577894lentilcn14600356244921460030400000FMA Holds Networking Cocktail Etiquette EventNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsFinance/CMS-redirects/finance/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/finance/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/financeJMUfinanceCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

FMA Etiquette Networking Event

On Tuesday, April 5, JMU’s Financial Management Association (FMA) members gathered at Festival to participate in the club’s networking cocktail etiquette hour. Tassie Pippert, Lecturer for Hospitality Management, was on hand to guide the students in proper etiquette for business cocktail parties. After a brief introduction, students were given the opportunity to mingle with finance and business law departmental faculty to practice their networking skills and receive advice from faculty with extensive business experience such as Pam Drake, Mark Graham, Daphyne Thomas, Ron Rubin, and FMA Faculty Advisor Kayti Schumann. Throughout the hour, FMA members received advice ranging from entering conversations, asking appropriate questions, plate and drinking glass etiquette, body language signs and politely exiting conversation groups. Response to the night was positive with many members expressing gratitude for the chance to practice these skills prior to beginning the internship and job application process. 

Finance students had the opportunity to learn about business etiquette at latest FMA event./////
06-scholarship-for-students-study-abroadtrue1459967548344lentilcnScholarship for Students Who Want to Study Abroad AvailableScholarship for Students Who Want to Study Abroad Available/news/ods/06-scholarship-for-students-study-abroadJMUsite://JMU/news/ods/06-scholarship-for-students-study-abroadlentilcn1459967497639lentilcn14599675279681459954800000Scholarship for Students Who Want to Study Abroad AvailableNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Disability Services/ods/indexsite://JMU/ods/indexJMUindexOffice of Disability ServicesOffice of Disability Services///_tags/source/student-affairs/Office of Disability ServicesJMUOffice of Disability Services

Attention registered students who wish to study abroad:

Apply here by April 15 to be considered. 

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05-disability-services-scholarships-availabletrue1459884349091lentilcnApplication for Scholarships for Students with Disabilities Available!Application for Scholarships for Students with Disabilities Available!/news/ods/05-disability-services-scholarships-availableJMUsite://JMU/news/ods/05-disability-services-scholarships-availablelentilcn1459883898101lentilcn14598842857621459864800000Application for Scholarships for Students with Disabilities Available!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Disability Services/ods/indexsite://JMU/ods/indexJMUindexOffice of Disability ServicesOffice of Disability Services///_tags/source/student-affairs/Office of Disability ServicesJMUOffice of Disability Services

Attention Registered Students: 

Please click here to see the scholarships for students with disabilities that are available for 2016-2017. 

Application Deadline: April 29, 2016

All students registered with ODS are welcome to apply!/////
04-05-2016_phibetakappatrue1459862798953pipermcCongratulations to our Phi Beta Kappa initiates!Congratulations to our Phi Beta Kappa initiates!/news/philrel/2016/03/04-05-2016_phibetakappaJMUsite://JMU/news/philrel/2016/03/04-05-2016_phibetakappapipermc1459862404824pipermc14598624048241459828800000Congratulations to our Phi Beta Kappa initiates!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsPhilosophy and Religion/philrel/indexsite://JMU/philrel/indexJMUindexPhilosophy and ReligionPhilosophy and Religion///_tags/source/college-of-arts-and-letters/philosophy-and-religionJMUphilosophy-and-religion

We are very proud of our majors and minors (see below) who were inducted into Phi Beta Kappa this year. As you can read on JMU's Phi Beta Kappa website, the national society "has established itself as the oldest and most prestigious honors society in America, and as a leading advocate for the liberal arts and sciences." Nice work!

Kayla Ashley Barker
Brandon Michael Cadran
Robert Eugene Graham III
James Henry Harkins
Rosealie Pearl Lynch
Aaron Michael Minnick
Rebecca Lynn Murray

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04-05-2016_cheungawardtrue1459862786220pipermcStudent Sarah Cheung wins best paper awardStudent Sarah Cheung wins best paper award/news/philrel/2016/03/04-05-2016_cheungawardJMUsite://JMU/news/philrel/2016/03/04-05-2016_cheungawardpipermc1459862306831pipermc14598623068311459828800000Student Sarah Cheung wins best paper awardNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsPhilosophy and Religion/philrel/indexsite://JMU/philrel/indexJMUindexPhilosophy and ReligionPhilosophy and Religion///_tags/source/college-of-arts-and-letters/philosophy-and-religionJMUphilosophy-and-religion

Sarah Cheung

Sarah Cheung won the Best Paper Author award at the William & Mary 2016 Undergraduate Philosophy Conference. Congratulations, Sarah!

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04-koubektrue1460571860031chandljlDr. Koubek, College of Education, Receives External FundingDr. Katya Koubek, Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Exceptionalities has been awarded $79,411.94 from Family Health International for the project entitled, ¿2016 English Access Microscholarship Teacher Trainer Workshop¿. Dr. Koubek¿s first award with JMU, she will be working to develop the teacher trainers¿ technical skills and capacity to train current and future Access teachers in areas of new teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) pedagogy, materials development (including technology), planning practicums, teacher evaluation and feedback methods such as peer observation. reschmmDr. Katya Koubek, Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Exceptionalities has been awarded $79,411.94 from Family Health International.education, English, training, workshop, teachers, multiculturalismDr. Katya Koubek, Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Exceptionalities has been awarded $79,411.94 from Family Health International for the project entitled, ¿2016 English Access Microscholarship Teacher Trainer Workshop¿. Dr. Koubek, College of Education, Receives External Funding/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/04/04-koubekJMUsite://JMU/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/04/04-koubekreschmm1459793990344reschmm14597951076721459742400000Dr. Koubek, College of Education, Receives External FundingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Sponsored Programs/sponsoredprograms/indexsite://JMU/sponsoredprograms/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/sponsoredprogramsJMUsponsoredprograms
Dr. Katya Koubek, Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Exceptionalities has been awarded $79,411.94 from Family Health International for the project entitled, "2016 English Access Microscholarship Teacher Trainer Workshop". Dr. Koubek's first award with JMU, she will be working to develop the teacher trainer's technical skills and capacity to train current and future Access teachers in areas of new teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) pedagogy, materials development (including technology), planning practicums, teacher evaluation and feedback methods such as peer observation. 

According to Dr. Koubek's proposal, "All workshops and activities are designed to have participants reflect on their own training practices in their home country and apply new English as a second language (ESL) pedagogy with an emphasis on student-centered methodology, teacher evaluation and feedback methods, civic awareness, leadership components, and instructional technology skills to a project-based assignment on teaching U.S. culture and values." 

Best of luck to Dr. Koubek as she proceeds with conducting interactive workshops and activities to meet her project goals! 

Published April 4, 2016


workshop group
Dr. Katya Koubek, Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Exceptionalities has been awarded $79,411.94 from Family Health International./////
04-greece-sending-migrants-backtrue1461013645157mcdonnkcGreece Begins Sending Migrants Back as E.U. Deal Takes EffectGreece Begins Sending Migrants Back as E.U. Deal Takes Effect/news/humanitarian/2016/04/04-greece-sending-migrants-backJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/04/04-greece-sending-migrants-backmcdonnkc1459789606785mcdonnkc14597896067851459742400000Greece Begins Sending Migrants Back as E.U. Deal Takes EffectNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarianView The New York Times article here. Written by Liz Alderman./////04-volunteer-valuetrue1459787796085scottabVolunteer Valuevolunteer, nonprofit, service, economics14597856000001472011200000Volunteer Value/news/abp/2016/04/04-volunteer-valueJMUsite://JMU/news/abp/2016/04/04-volunteer-valuescottab1459787731453scottab14597877820391459742400000Volunteer ValueNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsAlternative Break Program////_tags/source/student-affairs/Alternative Break ProgramJMUAlternative Break Program

The value of a volunteer is much higher than the average minimum wage. When we send out service breaks all over the country we save each agency over $1,000 for a few days of service. Want to learn specifics? Check out this article from The NonProfit Times!

We rise by lifting others.

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04-april-updatetrue1460565714382phill2mrApril 2016 UBO UpdateApril 2016 UBO Update/news/ubo/2016/04/04-april-updateJMUsite://JMU/news/ubo/2016/04/04-april-updatephill2mr1459785935810phill2mr14597859358101459742400000April 2016 UBO UpdateNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsUniversity Business Office/ubo/indexsite://JMU/ubo/indexJMUindexUniversity Business OfficeUniversity Business Office///_tags/source/administration-and-finance/uboJMUubo
  • Fall registration will open on Wednesday, April 6th. If you plan on registering for fall classes, please make sure to check your account beforehand and clear up any holds you may have. If you pay an outstanding balance the hold may not be released until the next business day.
  • Our office will be closed on Tuesday, April 12th, until 1 pm for a Finance area retreat.
  • CHOICES for incoming students will be on Friday, April 8th, and Monday, April 11th. We will have representatives at the Convocation Center in the morning to accept any admission deposits you may have. We will also be available from 8 am to 5 pm at our location in the Student Success Center.
  • If you have anyone that you wish to receive notifications about your account and to be able to speak with us about your account, please make sure to have them set up as an Authorized User in M3. You can find instructions for that here.
If you have any questions please contact our office at ubo@jmu.edu or by phone at 540/568-6505.
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04-john-caccavaletrue1461013645157mcdonnkcHumanitarian Affairs minor John Caccavale (JMU '12) featured in Harvard panelHumanitarian Affairs minor John Caccavale (JMU '12) featured in Harvard panel/news/humanitarian/2016/04/04-john-caccavaleJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/04/04-john-caccavalemcdonnkc1459781882964mcdonnkc14597819129771459742400000Humanitarian Affairs minor John Caccavale (JMU '12) featured in Harvard panelNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarian

John Tyler Caccavale, who graduated in 2012 with a major in Geographic Science and a minor in Humanitarian Affairs, was recently a member of a panel hosted by Harvard’s Advanced Training Program on Humanitarian Action (ATHA). The podcast presentation, titled Securing Access: Maintaining Presence and Proximity in Insecure Settings, was released on March 23, 2016. Others on the panel include representatives from the UN World Food Program, Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) and Humanitarian Outcomes. Listen to the podcast here. John responds to questions in Extended Segment 2 of the podcast. After studying French in Senegal and France, John will return to the U.S. to begin the Global MBA program at Johns Hopkins University.

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04-turkey-returning-refugeestrue1461013645157mcdonnkcTurkey 'illegally returning Syrian refugeesTurkey 'illegally returning Syrian refugees/news/humanitarian/2016/04/04-turkey-returning-refugeesJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/04/04-turkey-returning-refugeesmcdonnkc1459777147211mcdonnkc14597771472111459742400000Turkey 'illegally returning Syrian refugeesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarianView the article here on BBC.com./////11-cooper-grant-oldtrueDr. Idelle Cooper receives NSF grantDr. Idelle Cooper receives NSF grant/news/biology/2013/12/11-cooper-grant-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2013/12/11-cooper-grant-oldsubob1459771734164subob14597717341641423634400000Dr. Idelle Cooper receives NSF grantNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Congratulations to Biology’s Dr. Idelle Cooper, the recipient of a $321,057 NSF grant to support her research: “Evolution of color variation in Hawaiian damselflies: causal links for an ecological selection hypothesis.”

Dr. Idelle Cooper receives NSF grant/////
01-news-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlUndergraduate Summer ResearchUndergraduate Summer Research/news/biology/2015/02/01-news-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2015/02/01-news-oldsubob1459771699496subob14597716994961386136800000Undergraduate Summer ResearchNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Shvan Kareem

Did you know that undergraduate students in Biology do research over the summer too? Thanks to several generous gifts to the Department and the College, a small group of students has the opportunity to immerse themselves in research for several months each summer. The summer research scholarships can make all the difference to a student’s undergraduate experience. [Pictured: Shvan Kareem, who worked with Drs Slekar & Bloss this summer]. Read about their research.

Did you know that undergraduate students in Biology do research over the summer too? /////
05-libuit-oldtrueBio Grad Student Recognized for Spain FellowshipBio Grad Student Recognized for Spain Fellowship/news/biology/2016/01/05-libuit-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2016/01/05-libuit-oldsubob1459771629442subob14597716294421451973600000Bio Grad Student Recognized for Spain FellowshipNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Kevin Libuit

Kevin Libuit, a graduate student in the department of biology, was recognized in Madison Scholar for a bioinformatics research residency he participated in over the summer of 2015 at the Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Spain. He also gave a number of presentations in connection with the fellowship.

Kevin is working with Dr. James Herrick on transmissible antibiotic resistance in streams.

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01-harmon-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlFirst-year graduate student Pat Harmon meets president Alger at the 4-VA Grant Award Ceremony on Friday, Dec. 11First-year graduate student Pat Harmon meets president Alger at the 4-VA Grant Award Ceremony on Friday, Dec. 11/news/biology/2016/01/01-harmon-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2016/01/01-harmon-oldsubob1459771584117subob14597715841171451628000000First-year graduate student Pat Harmon meets president Alger at the 4-VA Grant Award Ceremony on Friday, Dec. 11News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

First-year graduate student Pat Harmon meets president Alger at the 4-VA Grant Award Ceremony on Friday, Dec. 11.  Pat is working with Associate Professor Christine May on a study to reveal the current relation between stream acidification and fish species richness in Appalachian streams.

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24-jarvis_cit-article-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlBiology's Lon Jarvis develops iPad/microscope technology link in microbiology laboratoryBiology's Lon Jarvis develops iPad/microscope technology link in microbiology laboratory/news/biology/2015/09/24-jarvis_cit-article-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2015/09/24-jarvis_cit-article-oldsubob1459771487295subob14597714872951443099600000Biology's Lon Jarvis develops iPad/microscope technology link in microbiology laboratoryNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Lon Jarvis, the Department of Biology's Scientific Computing Specialist has helped develop an exciting new interface between iPads and the new Zeiss wireless-capable Primo Star microscopes in Bioscience 3023, the Advanced Microbiology class laboratory. This laboratory services a number of microbiology courses including General Microbiology, Medical Microbiology, and Environmental Microbiology. Jarvis worked with Doug Gimbert of the Center for Instructional Technology's Classroom Technology Services.

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04-medical-innovations-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlStudents from 3 Different Majors Innovate TogetherStudents from 3 Different Majors Innovate Together/news/biology/2015/05/04-medical-innovations-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2015/05/04-medical-innovations-oldsubob1459771443403subob14597714434031367816400000Students from 3 Different Majors Innovate TogetherNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

On April 30th 2015, students from the first ever JMU Medical Innovations* class presented health solutions to local community members at the JMU X-Lab at the ICE House. Although the students came from three different departments—biology, engineering and nursing—they combined their individual strengths to come up with ideas for mitigating metabolic syndrome—a disorder which affects about 34% of Americans and increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Read more

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01-hillcrest-award-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlBiology Student Awarded Hillcrest Research ScholarshipBiology Student Awarded Hillcrest Research Scholarship/news/biology/2015/05/01-hillcrest-award-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2015/05/01-hillcrest-award-oldsubob1459771393681subob14597713936811430456400000Biology Student Anna Nordseth Awarded Hillcrest Research ScholarshipNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Anna Nordseth has received the Hillcrest Research Scholarship.   She is conducting observational studies in the tropical rainforests of Costa Rica during the summer of 2015 on an important non-timber forest product, Geonoma edulis, and continuing with an experimental greenhouse study when she returns.

Ms. Nordseth is a student in the research laboratory of Dr. Heather Griscom.

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16-enke-wmra-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlGenetic Research Studies the "On / Off" Switches for CancerGenetic Research Studies the "On / Off" Switches for Cancer/news/biology/2015/04/16-enke-wmra-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2015/04/16-enke-wmra-oldsubob1459771345509subob14597713455091429156800000Genetic Research Studies the "On / Off" Switches for CancerNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews/

Dr. Ray Enke of the Dept of Biology and the Center for Genome and Metagenome Studies was featured on WMRA Radio's "Morning Edition", "Here and Now", and "All Things Considered". You can hear it or read the transcript here.

Airing on Live Radio:

"The initial airings will take place during "Morning Edition," [Friday April 17, 2015] at 6:45 a.m. and 8:45 a.m. The piece can be heard again at 1:32 p.m., during "Here and Now," and at 5:44 p.m. during "All Things Considered." One additional airing will take place this Sunday [April 19] at 3:00 p.m. during "Second Look."

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07-phi-beta-kappa-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlThe Biology Dept. Congratulates its Phi Beta Kappa InducteesThe Biology Dept. Congratulates its Phi Beta Kappa Inductees/news/biology/2015/04/07-phi-beta-kappa-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2015/04/07-phi-beta-kappa-oldsubob1459771295488subob14597712954881428382800000Biology Dept. Congratulates its Phi Beta Kappa InducteesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology/////02-noaa-award-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlBiology Student Wins NOAA Hollings ScholarshipBiology Student Wins NOAA Hollings Scholarship/news/biology/2015/04/02-noaa-award-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2015/04/02-noaa-award-oldsubob1459771178637subob14597711786371427950800000Biology Student Amy Crandall Wins NOAA Hollings ScholarshipNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Biology undergraduate Amanda Crandall has been accepted into the prestigious National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Ernest F. Hollings scholarship program. With this award comes two years of tuition at JMU, plus a summer internship in 2016.

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17-blog-reminder-oldtrue1460571860031chandljlInternships & Summer Opportunities!Internships & Summer Opportunities!/news/biology/2015/02/17-blog-reminder-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2015/02/17-blog-reminder-oldsubob1459771117318subob14597711173181424152800000Internships & Summer Opportunities!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Students: there are some exciting summer research and internship opportunities available for you. See the Biology Departments "Summer Research Opportunities" blog for information. Better get crackin', though, as many of these have fast-approaching deadlines... .

Here are some current examples (from the blog):

Forestry Aid in Virginia National Forests

Employment Opportunities at Lollypop Farm, the Humane Society of Greater Rochester

Summer Research Experience in Coastal Biology at the University of North Florida

Summer Institutes for Training in Biostatistics

Summer Research Courses through Ecosystem Field Studies

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05-griscom-npr-chestnuts-oldtrueDr. Griscom on Christmas and the American Chestnut -- NPR Dec. 20thDr. Heather Griscom on Christmas and the American Chestnut -- NPR Dec. 20th/news/biology/2014/12/05-griscom-npr-chestnuts-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2014/12/05-griscom-npr-chestnuts-oldsubob1459543468852subob14595434688521418018400000Dr. Griscom on Christmas and the American Chestnut -- NPR Dec. 20thNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Bringing Back the American Chestnut, an NPR Interview with Dr. Heather Griscom

On "With Good Reason" December 20th.

WMRA, 90.7 FM and these NPR stations.


Most of the chestnuts roasting on open fires this winter are from Europe or Asia, not America. In the early 1900s, American chestnut trees from Maine to Georgia were largely wiped out by blight.
Heather Griscom (James Madison University) is helping to restore American chestnut trees and joins us for a sampling of holiday chestnut treats.

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05-gallagher-asm_poster_award-oldtrueTara Gallagher Wins American Society for Microbiology 'Best Poster' AwardTara Gallagher Wins American Society for Microbiology 'Best Poster' Award/news/biology/2014/12/05-gallagher-asm_poster_award-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2014/12/05-gallagher-asm_poster_award-oldsubob1459543432749subob14595434327491417759200000Tara Gallagher Wins American Society for Microbiology 'Best Poster'News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

A poster authored by Tara Gallagher, a graduate student in the department of biology, won the 'Best Poster Presentation' award at the November meeting of the American Society for Microbiology (Virginia Branch) meeting held at JMU on November 7th and 8th.

Her poster was co-authored by John Marafino, Brandi Volkers, Nicholas Minahan, Jason Floyd, Jade Irby, Dr. Kevin Caran, and Dr. Kyle Seifert.The title was "Antibacterial Activity of Triscationic Amphiphiles".

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21-harris-madagascar-oldtrueDr. Reid Harris speaks on amphibian conservation in MadagascarDr. Reid Harris speaks on amphibian conservation in Madagascar/news/biology/2014/11/21-harris-madagascar-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2014/11/21-harris-madagascar-oldsubob1459543389368subob14595433893681416592800000Dr. Reid Harris speaks on amphibian conservation in MadagascarNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

harris-madagascar

Professor Reid Harris delivers an address to an amphibian conservation meeting in Madagascar.  His lab works on strategies that mitigate the disease threat from a skin fungus that is decimating amphibians around the world.  Madagascar has about 500 species of frogs found no where else, and it is imperative to discover ways to protect them from the fungal disease before it arrives.

/_images/biology/images-2014/reid-harris-in-madagascar-716x954.jpgsite://JMU/_images/biology/images-2014/reid-harris-in-madagascar-716x954.jpgJMUreid-harris-in-madagascar-716x954.jpgReid Harris in Madagascar/_images/biology/images-2014/reid-harris-in-madagascar-419x558.jpgsite://JMU/_images/biology/images-2014/reid-harris-in-madagascar-419x558.jpgJMUreid-harris-in-madagascar-419x558.jpgReid Harris in Madagascar///_images/biology/images-2014/reid-harris-in-madagascar-419x558.jpgsite://JMU/_images/biology/images-2014/reid-harris-in-madagascar-419x558.jpgJMUreid-harris-in-madagascar-419x558.jpgReid Harris in Madagascar
02-bodkin-oldtrueBodkin obituarybodkin/news/biology/2014/11/02-bodkin-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2014/11/02-bodkin-oldsubob1459543356685subob14595433566851415293200000Retired Biology Professor and Arboretum Founder Passes AwayNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews/Biology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

bodkin image

Dr. Norlyn L. Bodkin, 77, of Harrisonburg died September 28th, 2014 at Sentara RMH after a brief illness with leukemia. He was the son of the late Joe P. Bodkin and Nellie Painter Bodkin, and was born in Rockingham Memorial Hospital.  He was raised on a farm in Upper Tract, WV. His elementary education was in a two-room school in Upper Tract and he graduated from Franklin High School (now Pendleton County High School). He earned his BA and MS degrees in Biology from West Virginia University and his Ph.D. in Systematic Botany from the University of Maryland at College Park.

He is survived by his wife, Susan Page Showalter Bodkin; two daughters, Marian Bodkin Rabeno of North Beach, MD and Dr. Anne Neville Murphy of Encinitas, CA; and his granddaughter, Katherine Linnea Murphy, a recent graduate of the University of California at Berkeley. Mary Evelyn Neville of Sugar Grove, WV is the mother of his daughters.  He is also survived by Page Bodkin’s children and their families, Rebecca and Steve Hanson of Fairfax, VA (with children Ava Rose and Nicolas), and Benjamin Branson Hottel of Harrisonburg (with children Amber, Matthew, Katie and Chloe). Two brothers, H. Garth Bodkin and Joe P. Bodkin, Jr. preceded him in death.

Dr. Bodkin started his college teaching career at Westminster College, New Wilmington, PA in 1962 and later came to James Madison University (then Madison College) teaching in the Department of Biology from 1964 until retirement from teaching in 1998. He taught a wide range of subjects throughout his tenure, with favorites being the botanical field courses. His outdoor field laboratories were distributed from the Coastal Plain in Virginia to the higher elevation and Canadian vegetation at Dolly Sods, WV. Students were introduced to a wide variety of courses including Plant Taxonomy, Flora of Virginia, Plant Ecology, Plant Communities and Plant Pathology. He was always proud that the students loved the fieldwork and that class enrollment was always full.

In 1977, Dr. Bodkin wrote a proposal for the development of an arboretum on the campus of James Madison University. Finally approved by the Administration, construction began in 1985. This was the origin of The Arboretum at James Madison University. He served as Director for the following 15 years and often said that he was a very lucky man, having two full time jobs. Besides teaching students, he thought of the Arboretum as his greatest accomplishment at JMU and he would smile when referred to as the "father of the arboretum".  Another botanical facility that he developed is the Department of Biology Herbarium, now located in the Bioscience Building on campus. An herbarium is a collection of preserved, pressed and dried plants mounted on sheets of special paper and stored in air tight herbarium cabinets. The collection of plants has grown from one cabinet in 1964 to over 20 cabinets, currently containing many thousands of plant specimens. Dr. Bodkin's botanical field trip classes and several graduate students collected pressed, dried, mounted and stored the plants in herbarium cabinets over a period of 36 years. This study and research facility is available to students and the public. The collection represents the flora of the mid-Appalachians.   

Dr. Bodkin was active in his field of study and belonged to a number of professional societies. He was a member of the American Society of Plant Taxonomists, the International Association for Plant Taxonomy, the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society, the Virginia Academy of Science and others. He was most proud of being elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London, the oldest natural history society in the World. He often remarked how enjoyable it was to attend a meeting at their headquarters on Piccadilly Street in London, and especially the post meeting retirement to one of London's famous pubs. He also spent a semester in London while on sabbatical and worked at the British Museum of Natural History in South Kensington separating John Clayton's 1700s collection of Virginia plants from the more than 4 million world plant specimens stored in their herbarium.

Dr. Bodkin led many field trips throughout the Appalachian area for a variety of civic organizations from Harrisonburg and Rockingham County.  One article described his trips as "botany at 60 miles per hour". For over 35 years, he was a leader at the Annual West Virginia Wildflower Pilgrimage, where he was a favorite among the flora aficionados. He also led Natural History Studies Tours for students and community members to the Galapagos Islands, the upper Amazon Rain Forest in Ecuador and to western Ireland. 

Dr. Bodkin received numerous awards and recognitions over his tenure at JMU including the Society of Landscape Architects Merit Award for Stewardship of the Land, Outstanding Achievement Award for Preservation of Natural Resources of our Country from National Conservation Committee of the Daughters of the American Revolution, JMU Board of Visitors Resolution for the Development of the JMU Arboretum, 1995-96 Distinguished Teacher Award in the College of Science and Mathematics, and the Faculty Distinguished Service Award for Outstanding Service to JMU.  In 2006 the Norlyn L. Bodkin Scholarship for Arboretum and Botanical Field Studies was established.  Each year it is presented to a deserving undergraduate or graduate student conducting botanical research in the Biology Department.  A new Narcissus (daffodil) variety, 'O'BODKIN' was hybridized and named for him by Brent Heath in honor of the first Director of the JMU Arboretum.  Numerous plaques in his honor adorn the walls of Jack Brown’s. 

Another professional accomplishment was locating and naming a new variety of trillium, the first named variety of this genus in the eastern United States in over 30 years. An article on this variety was published in "Brittonia" the Journal of the New England Botanical Club. The taxonomic treatment of this variety is included in Flora of North America, the comprehensive multi-volume publication on the vascular flora of North America north of Mexico.

Dr. Bodkin was an avid sportsman, enjoying tennis, golf, skiing, football, and basketball...He loved travel and had been as far as both the Artic and Antarctic Circles. He was a loyal and enthusiastic WVU Mountaineer.  But above all, he was proud of and loved his family.

His love of life, family, nature, a large and lively circle of friends, and Guinness was unbridled and infectious.

A memorial service was held at the Arboretum at James Madison University on Saturday, October 25th at 2pm.  Donations may be made in his honor to the JMU Arboretum, The Arthritis Foundation, or The American Cancer Society.

Retired Biology Professor and Arboretum Founder Passes/////
25-mcmullen-oldtrueDr. Conley McMullen, Governing Member of the Darwin Foundation General AssemblyDr. Conley McMullen, Governing Member of the Darwin Foundation General Assembly/news/biology/2014/09/25-mcmullen-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2014/09/25-mcmullen-oldsubob1459543262720subob14595432627201378443600000Dr. Conley McMullen, Governing Member of the Darwin Foundation GeneralNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Congratulations to Biology's Dr. Conley McMullen

Governing Member of the Charles Darwin Foundation General Assembly

www.darwinfoundation.org

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25-harris-oldtrueDr. Reid Harris named Director of International Disease Mitigation, Amphibian Survival AllianceDr. Reid Harris named Director of International Disease Mitigation, Amphibian Survival Alliance/news/biology/2014/09/25-harris-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2014/09/25-harris-oldsubob1459543211358subob14595432113581378443600000Dr. Reid Harris named Director of International Disease MitigationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Congratulations to Biology's Dr. Reid Harris

Named Director of International Disease Mitigation, Amphibian Survival Alliance

www.amphibians.org

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01-kcresawn-oldtrueDr. Kerry Cresawn featured in Madison MagazineDr. Kerry Cresawn featured in Madison Magazine/news/biology/2014/09/01-kcresawn-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2014/09/01-kcresawn-oldsubob1459543143681subob14595431436811378443600000Dr. Kerry Cresawn featured in Madison MagazineNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

Congratulations to Biology's Dr. Kerry Cresawn

Dr. Cresawn is featured in the Fall, 2014 issue of Madison Magazine, pp. 32-33.

The article is entitled "Preparing for the 21st Century Classroom".

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18-genomics-posters-oldtrueThe Genome Project Poster Session, March 2014The Genome Project Poster Session, March 2014/news/biology/2014/03/18-genomics-posters-oldJMUsite://JMU/news/biology/2014/03/18-genomics-posters-oldsubob1459542531982subob14595425319821378443600000The Genome Project Poster Session, March 2014News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsBiology/biology/indexsite://JMU/biology/indexJMUindexBiologyBiology///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/biologyJMUbiologybiologybiology

On March 6th, students in Dr. Ray Enke's genomics course presented posters on various genomics projects in the 2nd floor atrium of the Bioscience building.

See photos of the event here.

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01-foundation-winter-meetingtrue1461961983661subobJMU Foundation 2016 Winter Meeting1459538760000JMU Foundation 2016 Winter Meeting/news/foundation/2016/02/01-foundation-winter-meetingJMUsite://JMU/news/foundation/2016/02/01-foundation-winter-meetingphillieb1459539069703phillieb14595390697031459483200000JMU Foundation 2016 Winter MeetingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsFoundation/foundation/indexsite://JMU/foundation/indexJMUindexFOUNDATIONFOUNDATION///_tags/source/giving/foundationJMUfoundation

Foundation Board of Trustees Meeting – February 12, 2016

Committee meetings were held in the morning followed by a meeting of the full board.  Tom Schaeffer, Chief Executive Officer, updated the board on the proposed Hotel Madison and Shenandoah Valley Conference Center Project.  He reported progress made on annual goals such as enhancements to the fund accounting system, improved communication and visibility among constituents, the feasibility study underway for a possible real estate project, and preplanning for an upcoming Board retreat. Tom also announced the hiring of Beth Phillips as the new executive secretary.

Chief Financial Officer, Cheryl Lindsay presented the results of the 2015 NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments.  There were 812 colleges and universities that participated in the study.  The study indicated that the average five-year annualized return on investments for all participants, as of June 30, 2015, was 9.8%.   The Foundation’s annualized performance was consistent, coming in at 9.7%.   

Actions taken by the board included increasing the number of elected trustees to twenty-one, adding an opportunistic asset class to the endowment investment policy, and updating the Board Governance manual.    The board also took action to accept the financial audit report for the year ended June 30, 2015.

A presentation on the JMU Admission Process was provided by Ms. Donna Harper, VP for Access and Enrollment, along with Mr. Michael Walsh, Dean of Admissions.  After a short video, Ms. Harper and Mr. Walsh discussed the student selection process from over 22,000 received applications, challenges facing the admission office, scholarships, and STEM.  JMU’s graduation rate is one of the highest in the nation and is in the top 10 in the country for students going on to get Doctorate degrees in the fields of Science and Medicine.

Actions taken by the board included increasing the number of elected trustees to 21./////
01-grad-students-wins-5k-hackathon-prizetrue1459549416799smith2pjJMU Wins HACK CompetitionJMU Wins HACK Competition/news/grad/2016/04/01-grad-students-wins-5k-hackathon-prizeJMUsite://JMU/news/grad/2016/04/01-grad-students-wins-5k-hackathon-prizeesmailtb1459533686184esmailtb14595402609091459494000000JMU Team wins the Hackathon $5K Grand PrizeNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsGraduate School/CMS-redirects/graduate-school/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/graduate-school/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/graduate-school/graduate-schoolJMUgraduate-school

JMU Hack Team

On March 19th and 20th, students from JMU joined six other Virginia-based schools to participate in the 2nd Annual Hack competition in downtown Richmond. Under the direction of a faculty coach, these multi-disciplinary teams of 5-6 students were challenged to spend just 25 1/2 hours developing a technology to advance the health and improve the lives of family caregivers.

The team representing James Madison University, included two Occupational Therapy graduate students, Christie Briskey and Kiley Petencin, won the competition’s $5,000 Grand Prize, for “My Time”, an app to encourage and remind family caregivers to make and take time for leisure during the midst of the caregiver’s busy day. Additionally, the technology incorporates a transitional aide to assist the caregiver with grief if their loved one passes. 

The Hackathon challenge gave students an opportunity to create an innovative solution for a real world problem. With over 65 million family caregivers in the U.S. providing an average of 20-41 hours per week of care to their loved one, according to a National Alliance for Caregiving Study, finding ways to positively impact caregiver health is a growing opportunity to make a difference. “Family caregiving is truly the backbone of long-term care… making creation of tech solutions even more important to allow fewer caregivers to do more and to help care from a distance,” said Dr. Richard W. Lindsay, co-founder and namesake of the Lindsay Institute. Adrienne M. Johnson, executive director of SeniorNavigator explained, “While caring for a loved one can be gratifying, they are likely to be juggling caregiving along with jobs, children, and a host of other responsibilities.” The result of this juggling act is pervasive stress and a resulting downward spiral of health problems for many caregivers.

JMU’s team of students made a significant contribution to helping caregivers achieve greater balance and ensure they are taking care of themselves and their loved one. The esteemed panel of judges selected the grand prize, second place, and third place winners based on the technology’s originality, usability, feasibility, and how developed it was at the time of the presentation.

The team included two OT graduate students who helped develop the "My Time" app/////
02-msa-highest-cpa-pass-ratetrue1459549416799smith2pjGrad Accounting has Highest CPA Exam Pass RateGrad Accounting has Highest CPA Exam Pass Rate/news/grad/2016/04/02-msa-highest-cpa-pass-rateJMUsite://JMU/news/grad/2016/04/02-msa-highest-cpa-pass-rateesmailtb1459531436033esmailtb14595405740571459501200000JMU Graduate Accounting has highest CPA pass rateNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsGraduate School/CMS-redirects/graduate-school/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/graduate-school/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/graduate-school/graduate-schoolJMUgraduate-school
MSA graduate accounting students
The James Madison University (JMU) Masters of Accounting class of 2015 graduates had the highest pass rate ahead of 77 other universities.

READ MORE > MSA Students Achieve Highest CPA Exam Pass Rate

M.S. Accounting graduates had the highest pass rate according to NASBA/////
01-arkansastrue1459549416799smith2pjAir Force Bomb Squad Detonates Civil War-era LandmineAir Force Bomb Squad Detonates Civil War-era Landminewillli4bmAir Force Bomb Squad Detonates Civil War-era LandmineAir Force, bomb squad, Civil War, landmineAir Force Bomb Squad Detonates Civil War-era Landmine1459483200000Air Force Bomb Squad Detonates Civil War-era Landmine/news/cisr/2016/04/01-arkansasJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/04/01-arkansaswilli4bm1459524528596willi4bm14595245285961459486800000Air Force Bomb Squad Detonates Civil War-era LandmineNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"HOT SPRINGS, Ark. — An Air Force bomb squad safely detonated a Civil War-era land mine Thursday that prompted the evacuation of about 20 homes in Arkansas." (airforcetimes.com)

Read more.

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31-laostrue1459549416799smith2pjTurning Bombs Into SpoonsTurning Bombs Into Spoonswillli4bmTurning Bombs Into SpoonsLaos, unexploded bombs, unexploded ordnance, UXOTurning Bombs Into Spoons1459396800000Turning Bombs Into Spoons/news/cisr/2016/03/31-laosJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/03/31-laoswilli4bm1459524364966willi4bm14595243649661459400400000Turning Bombs Into SpoonsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"La lok Phengparkdee has been turning bombs into spoons since he was eight. He lives in Ban Napia and works with the relics of the secret war waged by the US in this tiny country while the world’s attention was focused next door on Vietnam." (theguardian)

Read more.

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01-mma-goes-to-ama-conferencetrue1459549416799smith2pjJMU's MMA "Minted its Future" at the 2016 AMA Collegiate ConferenceJMU's MMA "Minted its Future" at the 2016 AMA Collegiate Conference/news/cob/2016/04/01-mma-goes-to-ama-conferenceJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/04/01-mma-goes-to-ama-conferencelentilcn1459520136363lentilcn14595201699391459515600000JMU's MMA "Minted its Future" at the 2016 AMA Collegiate ConferenceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMarketing/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/college-of-business/marketingJMUmarketingCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

Courtesy of the Madison Marketing Association Members

Since the spring of 2015, the members of the Madison Marketing Association (MMA) have been anxiously waiting to attend an event many consider the highlight of their academic year: the American Marketing Association’s (AMA) Annual Collegiate Conference. Members of MMA, James Madison University’s chapter of AMA, further their marketing education through guest speakers, community events, social events and open forums with JMU faculty and marketing professionals. Their mission is to provide opportunities for students to learn and implement marketing principles through fundraisers, the annual networking banquet and the annual AMA Conference.

This year’s conference, which was hosted in New Orleans, La, gathered over 350 collegiate chapters to compete. JMU’s Madison Marketing Association set a chapter record this year sending 32 student members and two marketing faculty. The conference consisted of professional development events, marketing and sales competitions and numerous opportunities to network with marketing professionals.  

After arriving in New Orleans on March 16, 2016, the members worked as a team to set up MMA’s booth in preparation for the AMA Exhibit Competition. This particular event allowed each chapter to display its annual theme and promote itself to the other chapters. MMA’s theme was “The Godfathers of Business”, a play off of the movie The Godfather. The booth was decorated with a banner representing JMU, and followed a black and red theme. One member was hidden in the crowd dressed as “The Godfather” and students were told to find him, get a poker chip and receive a prize.

The first night concluded with an opening ceremony, welcoming a total of 1,695 attendees. This ceremony introduced many of the AMA staff and featured Peter Horst, Chief Marketing Officer of the Hershey Company, as a keynote speaker. Horst spoke about his rise to success and provided students with tips on how to drive marketing excellence, lead global innovation and stated that marketing is “the best job ever”. Following the opening ceremony, AMA kept chapters busy on Friday and Saturday, providing various professional events and competitions. Some of these included speakers, who spoke about how to make the college to career transition, establishing your target market, branding yourself and networking.

The conference hosted 17 corporate sponsors including The Hershey Company, Ebay, Sawtooth Software and Aerotek. Keynote speaker, Monica Skipper, presented at the competitions ceremony on Friday night. Skipper is responsible for brand experience marketing for FedEx and discussed her strategies on helping to take her brand to six continents. Many of our MMA members attended a Career Fair Luncheon and two participated in the ABC Supply Company Sales Competition. One MMA member, Alex Glaum, placed third out of 65 student participants!

On Saturday, March 19, it was time for the American Marketing Association’s Collegiate Conference to come to an end. The closing ceremony honored chapters with awards varying from Top Small Chapter to Student Marketer of the Year. The Madison Marketing Association’s members enjoyed a dinner with the other chapters and anxiously waited to hear their standing. JMU’s chapter has a long-standing history of placing as a top chapter at the conference based on the AMA’s judging of our success compared to other chapters. Members of the executive team this year worked hard to uphold these high standards of excellence and as a result, placed as a top collegiate chapter of the AMA, ranking within the Top 25 chapters.

The MMA looks forward to upholding their ranking at next year’s conference and will continue to provide students with opportunities to advance their knowledge and their future careers. 

32 marketing students attend AMA conference /////
15-summer-housingtrue1459549416799smith2pjSummer Housing14589072000001463400000000Summer Housing/news/orl/2016/04/15-summer-housingJMUsite://JMU/news/orl/2016/04/15-summer-housingbournemm1459456233196bournemm14594565262331458907200000Summer HousingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsResidence Life/CMS-redirects/residence-life/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/residence-life/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/student-affairs/residence-lifeJMUresidence-life

Interested in living on campus this summer? Summer Housing Contracts will be available on Friday, April 15th! 

Summer housing will be available from May 15 through July 23 for current JMU students enrolled in at least one summer class. Wayland Hall will serve as the summer residence hall at the cost of $100 per week. A meal plan of $110 per week is required.

Students who are interested in summer housing can complete a Summer Housing Contract through the Online Housing System beginning April 15.

Check our Summer Housing page for more information!
Summer Housing contracts will be available through the Online Housing System beginning April 15./////
31-paul-copley-distinguished-educator-awardtrue1459549416799smith2pjJMU's Paul Copley Receives Distinguished Educator AwardJMU's Paul Copley Receives Distinguished Educator Award/news/cob/2016/03/31-paul-copley-distinguished-educator-awardJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/31-paul-copley-distinguished-educator-awardlentilcn1459434876743lentilcn14594349554581459429200000JMU's Paul Copley Receives Distinguished Educator AwardNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessAccounting/CMS-redirects/accounting/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/accounting/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/accountingJMUaccountingCoB Faculty////cob/_cascade/_tags/facultyJMUfaculty

By Karen Doss Bowman

Accounting Professor, Paul CopleyPaul Copley, the KPMG professor of accounting at James Madison University (JMU), has received the 2016 Educator Award from the Washington, D.C. chapter of the Association of Government Accountants. The award is given in recognition of Copley’s significant contributions to the education and training of government financial managers.

Copley, who joined JMU’s faculty in 2004, has authored six textbooks on governmental and not-for-profit accounting. He also has served as editor of Research in Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting, an academic journal publishing research on the reporting and auditing of governments and not-for-profit entities.

Named a Super CPA by Virginia Business Magazine in past years, Copley was instrumental in developing the JMU’s CPA Boot Camp, which prepares new graduates for taking the CPA exam. It has been extremely successful: The JMU Masters of Accounting class of 2015 graduates had the highest pass rate out of 78 programs, with more than 20 graduates sitting for the exam. This outcome marks the second time that JMU’s program has had the highest pass rate, putting the College of Business ahead of distinguished business schools such as Wake Forest University, Baylor University, the University of Notre Dame and Brigham Young University.

“Professor Copley’s recognition is well-deserved,” says Tim Louwers, a KPMG professor of accounting and director of JMU’s School of Accounting. “The School of Accounting faculty have always appreciated his dedication to student and faculty success at James Madison University over the past 12 years.  It is nice to see that the rest of the accounting world has noticed as well.”
College of Business accounting professor receives award from Association of Government Accountants. /////
30-russiantrue1459549416799smith2pjSecond Group of Russian EOD Technicians Depart for PalmyraSecond Group of Russian EOD Technicians Depart for Palmyrawillli4bmSecond Group of Russian EOD Technicians Depart for PalmyraRussian, EOD, Syria, PalmyraSecond Group of Russian EOD Technicians Depart for Palmyra1459310400000Second Group of Russian EOD Technicians Depart for Palmyra/news/cisr/2016/03/30-russianJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/03/30-russianwilli4bm1459366619977willi4bm14593666199771459314000000Second Group of Russian EOD Technicians Depart for PalmyraNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"According to media reports, second team of Russian bomb disposal technicians has departed to Syria to take part in the demining operation in recently liberated ancient city of Palmyra." (sputniknews.com)

Read more.

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29-palmyratrue1459549416799smith2pjDemining Experts Remove Bombs and Landmines from PalmyraDemining Experts Remove Bombs and Landmines from Palmyrawillli4bmDemining Experts Remove Bombs and Landmines from PalmyraPalmyra, landmine, deminingDemining Experts Remove Bombs and Landmines from Palmyra1459224000000Demining Experts Remove Bombs and Landmines from Palmyra/news/cisr/2016/03/29-palmyraJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/03/29-palmyrawilli4bm1459366389700willi4bm14593663897001459227600000Demining Experts Remove Bombs and Landmines from PalmyraNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"A Syrian antiquities official says demining experts have so far removed 150 bombs planted by the Islamic State group inside the archaeological site in the historic town of Palmyra." (foxnews.com)

Read more.

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29-kandaltrue1459549416799smith2pjUXO Recovered From Riverbank in Kandal, CambodiaUXO Recovered From Riverbank in Kandal, Cambodiawillli4bmUXO Recovered From Riverbank in Kandal, CambodiaUXO, Kandal, CambodiaUXO Recovered From Riverbank in Kandal, Cambodia1459224000000UXO Recovered From Riverbank in Kandal, Cambodia/news/cisr/2016/03/29-kandalJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/03/29-kandalwilli4bm1459366271192willi4bm14593662711921459227600000UXO Recovered From Riverbank in Kandal, CambodiaNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Experts with the Cambodian Mine Action Centre on Sunday afternoon recovered an unexploded 227-kilogram bomb after it was discovered by residents in Kandal province’s Kbal Koh village." (phnompenhpost.com)

Read more.

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30-mad-x-labstrue1459858311523lentilcnMadXLabs Boost Student Business VenturesMadXLabs Boost Student Business Ventures/news/cob/2016/03/30-mad-x-labsJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/30-mad-x-labslentilcn1459345217329lentilcn14598582920231459342800000MadXLabs Boost Student Business VenturesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

For nearly two years, senior Luke Farrago and junior Ted Gilman operated their custom flag-printing business, University Customs, out of the apartment they share in Harrisonburg. But as the company grew, they realized the need to find a professional working space and have access to resources that would help them make better business decisions.

When Farrago and Gilman heard about MadXLabs, James Madison University’s (JMU) incubator for student startups, they immediately applied. Now, they use a co-working office space in Wilson Hall with other student entrepreneurs, and they enjoy the opportunity to collaborate with others.

“Being around like-minded people is a huge plus for us,” says Farrago, a business management major. “Being in a workspace where you’re not thinking about classes, but you’re focused on something you’re passionate about--and you’re surrounded by other people who have brilliant ideas--it’s huge. We can build off each other. It’s just the perfect environment for that.”

MadXLabs, sponsored by the Center for Entrepreneurship, offers essential resources to promote success for student ventures. The teams accepted into MadXLabs must have already  committed to an idea, invested some resources, established presales or prototypes and be prepared to launch a business within six months. During the semester-long program, students participate in monthly cohort meetings, provide bi-weekly progress reports and receive consultation with JMU’s Entrepreneurs-in-Residence. They also have 24/7 access to co-working space in the Ice House or in Wilson Hall and receive up to $1,000 discretionary funds for materials or consults to support concept development.  

According to the Center for Entrepreneurship website, the program--which is open to students from all majors on campus--encourages “the development of crucial skills, such as self-motivation and pacing, by helping teams establish milestones and requiring regular status reports, and by offering guidance regarding vetting and managing a startup portfolio.”

MadXLabs manager Chad Hard, a senior management major from Fairfax, Va. says that four other student businesses--in addition to University Customs--currently are involved: Arena LLC, an online recruiting venue for high school athletics; Verified Lifeguards, an online lifeguarding service; Be Free Beverages, offering low-calorie, low-carb alcoholic beverages; and Socialite, who created Clique, a one-stop shop to meet customer’s social media needs.

Hard says his coursework in JMU’s College of Business has prepared him to lead aspiring entrepreneurs. He enjoys the process of helping students write their business plans and develop their marketing strategies.  

“When I took courses such as Entrepreneurship and Venture Creation, I discovered that I had a passion for helping startup companies and for helping people with their creative ideas for businesses,” says Hard, who will start as a sales representative with the startup company, 5G Dispensing Systems, after graduating in May. “MadXLabs is an extremely valuable experience. We learn so much from each other just playing around with different ideas and seeing the viability of these things actually working and relating to real life. It’s a great hands-on learning experience.”

Entrepreneurs, Luke Farrago and Ted Gilman use MadXLabs to accelerate their startup./////
30-mif-teaches-valley-scholars-about-financetrue1459549416799smith2pjMIF Teaches Young Valley Scholars About the Fundamentals of InvestingMIF Teaches Young Valley Scholars About the Fundamentals of Investing/news/cob/2016/03/30-mif-teaches-valley-scholars-about-financeJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/30-mif-teaches-valley-scholars-about-financelentilcn1459344385275lentilcn14593443852751459342800000MIF Teaches Young Valley Scholars About the Fundamentals of InvestingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessFinance/CMS-redirects/finance/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/finance/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/financeJMUfinanceCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

In February, the Madison Investment Fund (MIF) visited with Valley Scholars at a local middle school to discuss investment knowledge and the benefits of college. The Valley Scholars Program was started at JMU in the fall of 2014 and provides select students from ages 13 to 18 with the opportunity to be the first in their family to attend college.

Fifteen students involved in MIF engaged 8th grade Valley Scholars in an activity that allowed young students to analyze and argue why a company should invest in a particular asset. This activity provided an opportunity to learn about the markets as well as a chance to connect with older JMU students.

“They excelled at connecting personally to the students, and relating to them,” said Shaun Mooney, director of the valley scholar program. “I always love working with College of Business (CoB) students, and appreciate the support we receive from faculty and staff from the college.”

MIF is a student-led organization that manages a portion of the James Madison University (JMU) endowment, which provides students with the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of investments and basics of financial theory.

MIF’s involvement with the Valley Scholars Program is another example of how CoB and JMU strive to engage with the Harrisonburg community.

Valley Scholars visit JMU and learn about finance from the Madison Investment Fund. /////
30-part-time-mba-rankings-us-news-and-world-reporttrue1459549416799smith2pjPart-Time MBA Program Makes a 26-Spot Jump in U.S. News & World Report RankingsPart-Time MBA Program Makes a 26-Spot Jump in U.S. News & World Report Rankings/news/cob/2016/03/30-part-time-mba-rankings-us-news-and-world-reportJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/30-part-time-mba-rankings-us-news-and-world-reportlentilcn1459343234082lentilcn14593432340821459339200000Part-Time MBA Program Makes a 26-Spot Jump in U.S. News & World Report RankingsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessMaster of Business Administration////cob/_cascade/_tags/departments/mbaJMUmba

By Matthew D'Angelo

The College of Business’ (CoB) part-time MBA program was ranked 55th by US News & World Report, a 26-spot jump from last year’s ranking.  

In order to be considered, the program must be accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The rankings are then based on five key criteria: average peer assessment scores, average GMAT scores, average undergraduate GPA, work experience and percentage of part-time enrollment.

The MBA program has seen recent progress thanks to its director, Tisha McCoy-Ntiamoah. McCoy-Ntiamoah said that the ranking is a selling point for potential students living near James Madison University (JMU) because they can get AACSB standard education without having to leave their job or drive long distances to take classes.

“The program is specific for working individuals,” McCoy-Ntiamoah said. “Students work full-time in their field while earning an MBA. Our students also have the advantage of employer benefit on tuition remission to afford cost.”

The major increase in ranking comes as a result of the college’s dedication to the MBA programs. The CoB is excited to see what the future holds for its graduate programs!

MBA Director, Tisha McCoy-Ntiamoah helps part-time MBA program grow./////
23-step-it-uptrue1460664156854subobStep It Up - New CommonHealth Program1455166800000Step It Up - New CommonHealth Program/news/humanresources/2016/03/23-step-it-upJMUsite://JMU/news/humanresources/2016/03/23-step-it-upschaefms1459267450929subob14606641422421458739800000Step It Up - New CommonHealth ProgramNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCommonhealth////humanresources/_cascade/tags/commonhealthJMUcommonhealthHuman Resources////_tags/source/administration-and-finance/human-resourcesJMUhuman-resources

JMU CommonHealth invites all faculty & staff to participate in our Spring Walking Challenge – STEP IT UP!  This competition will challenge everyone to get 10,000 steps in each day.

Visit the Step It Up website to learn more about this exciting new program!

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29-unhcr-redfines-roletrue1459777213597mcdonnkcUNHCR redefines role in Greece as EU-Turkey deal comes into effectUNHCR redefines role in Greece as EU-Turkey deal comes into effect/news/humanitarian/29-unhcr-redfines-roleJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/29-unhcr-redfines-rolemcdonnkc1459257567356mcdonnkc14592575673561459224000000UNHCR redefines role in Greece as EU-Turkey deal comes into effectNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarian
You probably heard the UNHCR withdrew some of its staff from the Greek islands after Sunday, March 20th. Here is the statement from the spokeswoman about that and the reasons why. Currently, the new arrivals are being treated like illegals, NOT as refugees. They are being kept in detention camps that only last week were hosting new arrivals granted freedom of movement. Now they are not able to leave these fenced in areas to buy extra food, etc. 
http://www.unhcr.org/56f10d049.html
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28-ios93bugtrue1459549416799smith2pjiOS 9.3 Contains A Bug That Cause Stalls and Crashes on Some PhonesThe latest version of iOS (9.3) contains a bug where opening links may cause crashes. We recommend not upgrading your phone's OS at this time. The latest version of iOS (9.3) contains a bug where opening links may cause crashes. We recommend not upgrading your phone's OS at this time. iOS 9.3 Bug on Newer Phones/news/sats/2016/03/28-ios93bugJMUsite://JMU/news/sats/2016/03/28-ios93bugbrownwc1459177057288brownwc14591774675051459173600000iOS 9.3 Contains A Bug That Cause Stalls and Crashes on Some PhonesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsStudent Affairs Technical Services/sats/indexsite://JMU/sats/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/student-affairs/satsJMUsatsproductivity/sats/indexsite://JMU/sats/indexJMUindexHomeHome///sats/_tags/productivityJMUproductivityProductivity and Productivity ToolsProductivity and Productivity Tools

[Update: while Apple has not reported a fix yet (likely to appear as iOS version 9.3.1), it is believed that the issue is related to either 3D Touch and/or having certain thrid-party apps installed on your device.  The Booking.com app appears to be one, but it is still uncertain what causes the crashing, or what class of apps causes the issue.]

There is a strange bug that has been reported for iOS version 9.3 (and some older versions) that are affecting a variety of iPhone models where trying to open links in Safari and a number of other apps either doesn't work, or causes the app or phone to crash, freeze, or hang.  While primarily occuring on both the iPhone 6s and the 6s Plus, it has been occasionally been reported on some older phones and iPad models as well.  If you significantly use an iPhone or iPad for work and to browse the web, we recommend not upgrading to iOS version 9.3 until the problem has been resolved by Apple.

For more details, read this 9to5mac.com article about the bug.

The latest version of iOS (9.3) contains a bug where opening links may cause crashes. We recommend not upgrading your phone's OS at this time. /////
28-refugees-greecetrue1459777213597mcdonnkcNew Boundaries Cut Volunteers Off From Migrants In GreeceNew Boundaries Cut Volunteers Off From Migrants In Greece/news/humanitarian/2016/03/28-refugees-greeceJMUsite://JMU/news/humanitarian/2016/03/28-refugees-greecemcdonnkc1459173730536mcdonnkc14591737305361459137600000New Boundaries Cut Volunteers Off From Migrants In GreeceNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHumanitarian Affairs/humanitarian/indexsite://JMU/humanitarian/indexJMUindexHumanitarian AffairsHumanitarian Affairs///_tags/source/cds/humanitarianJMUhumanitarianView the article here on npr.com./////25-lantztrue1460571860031chandljlDr. Lantz, College of Science and Mathematics, Recieves External FundingDr. Chris S. Lantz, Professor in the Biology Department, has been awarded $445,500 from the National Institutes of Health for his proposal entitled, ¿Interleukin-3 Expression and Function in Blood-stage Malaria Infection in Mice¿. Dr. Lantz will be working with a team of students to determine the role of the protein Interleukin-3 in the immune response to the protozoan parasite Plasmodium. reschmmDr. Chris S. Lantz, Professor in the Biology Department, has been awarded $445,500 from the National Institutes of Health.national institutes of health, nih, malaria, research, external fundingDr. Lantz will be working with a team of students to determine the role of the protein Interleukin-3 in the immune response to the protozoan parasite Plasmodium. Dr. Lantz, College of Science and Mathematics, Recieves External Funding/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/25-lantzJMUsite://JMU/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/25-lantzreschmm1458914324032reschmm14589143240321458878400000Dr. Lantz, College of Science and Mathematics, Recieves External FundingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Sponsored Programs/sponsoredprograms/indexsite://JMU/sponsoredprograms/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/sponsoredprogramsJMUsponsoredprograms

Dr. Chris S. Lantz, Professor in the Biology Department, has been awarded $445,500 from the National Institutes of Health for his proposal entitled, “Interleukin-3 Expression and Function in Blood-stage Malaria Infection in Mice”. Dr. Lantz will be working with a team of students to determine the role of the protein Interleukin-3 in the immune response to the protozoan parasite Plasmodium. 

See the full article here: How a professor's malaria research has the attention of NIH, by Eric Gorton

Dr. Chris S. Lantz, Professor in the Biology Department, has been awarded $445,500 from the National Institutes of Health./////25-madison-scholarstrue1460571860031chandljlSpotlight Madison Scholars 1458882000000Spotlight Madison Scholars/news/academic-affairs/2016/03/25-madison-scholarsJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/03/25-madison-scholarsshifflml1458911250183shifflml14589120388571458910800000Spotlight Madison ScholarsOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairs

See what's going on with Madison Scholars:

Dr. Chris Lantz's Malaria Research has the attention of the NIH

Unlocking the Mysteries Behind Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

Mini-grant Program to Fund Faculty Initiatives that Exemplify the University's Vision 

See what's going on with Madison Scholars://///
24-msa-students-achieve-highest-cpa-exam-pass-ratetrue1459549416799smith2pjMSA Students Achieve Highest CPA Exam Pass RateMSA Students Achieve Highest CPA Exam Pass Rate/news/cob/2016/03/24-msa-students-achieve-highest-cpa-exam-pass-rateJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/24-msa-students-achieve-highest-cpa-exam-pass-ratelentilcn1458834613592lentilcn14593474945901458831600000MSA Students Achieve Highest CPA Exam Pass RateNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessAccounting/CMS-redirects/accounting/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/accounting/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/accountingJMUaccountingCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

MSA Ranks First in CPA Exam ScoresThe James Madison University (JMU) Masters of Accounting class of 2015 graduates had the highest pass rate out of 78 programs with more than 20 graduates sitting for the exam. This outcome marks the second time that JMU’s program has had the highest pass rate. Our program had the same results in 2010. According to data from the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA), the 27 alumni sitting for the exam had a 95.2% pass rate and an average score of 85.8. These statistics put JMU ahead of 77 other universities, including Wake Forest University, Baylor University, the University of Notre Dame and Brigham Young University. Congratulations to the Masters of Accounting graduates and faculty for this outstanding achievement. 

JMU ranks first in 2015 CPA exam pass rate statistics released by NASBA/////
24-emerging-creatives-rise-summittrue1459549416799smith2pjPromoting Resilience: JMU Business Students Attend Emerging Creatives Student SummitPromoting Resilience: JMU Business Students Attend Emerging Creatives Student Summit/news/cob/2016/03/24-emerging-creatives-rise-summitJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/24-emerging-creatives-rise-summitlentilcn1458834171956lentilcn14591695242541458831600000Promoting Resilience: JMU Business Students Attend Emerging Creatives Student SummitNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

Two Students Attend Emerging Creatives Student SummitTwo James Madison University (JMU) business students were among seven selected from the University to attend the 2016 Emerging Creatives Student Summit, RISE: Forging Resilient Communities. Junior marketing majors Anna Eiring and Michael Alexander Morris attended the conference,which was focused on developing creative, sustainable solutions to boost economic development and improve quality of life in U.S. communities and abroad. Sponsored by a2ru (Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities), the conference was held March 9-11 at the University of Michigan.

This is the first year that business and engineering students were invited to participate in the conference with art students. Participants were divided into teams to work on projects with potential to transform and revitalize communities. At the same time, they developed skills and knowledge that could be applied to their campus communities.

“JMU offers experiential learning opportunities that take students out of the classroom and into new experiences beyond campus life,” says Carol Hamilton, director of JMU’s Center for Entrepreneurship, which provided the scholarships allowing Eiring and Morris to attend the conference. “Students are invited to explore different fields of study, work with diverse thinkers and engage in transformative, interdisciplinary experiences at the local, state, national and global levels.”

Eiring, of Smithfield, Va., who also is pursuing a minor in writing, rhetoric and technical communication, adds:  “This conference gave us a chance to really get outside of our comfort zones and gain knowledge just by experiencing new things and meeting new people.”

Morris was inspired listening to the experiences of people who had used their talents and skills to make their communities better through projects such as public art displays or public transportation improvements. He believes the JMU community can benefit in similar ways when students from different majors are encouraged to collaborate to solve problems.

“When different people from different backgrounds come together with a common goal--whether it be cleaning up litter on campus or trying to help the less fortunate in our community--the possibilities become both broader and more attainable,” says Morris, of Branchburg, N.J., who is a music industry minor. “By sponsoring this trip, JMU not only showed me that it wants me to succeed as a student and later in life, but it really helped broaden my mind in a unique way. After meeting so many diverse, intelligent and motivated students, I feel I've gained a perspective that I never would have otherwise. I am confident in saying that the inspiration and motivation I got out of this summit could not have been taught in a classroom.”
Summit brings students from different disciplines together to promote creativity in their communities./////
24-jackson-rainey-business-plan-competition-2016true1459549416799smith2pjPlanning for Success: Oak Bar Takes First Place at the 2016 Jackson-Rainey Business Plan CompeititionPlanning for Success: Oak Bar Takes First Place at the 2016 Jackson-Rainey Business Plan Compeitition/news/cob/2016/03/24-jackson-rainey-business-plan-competition-2016JMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/24-jackson-rainey-business-plan-competition-2016lentilcn1458833324127jacobssp14595288311611458831600000Planning for Success: Oak Bar Takes First Place at the 2016 Jackson-Rainey Business Plan CompeititionNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

Winners of the 2016 Jackson-Rainey Business Plan Competition

By Karen Doss Bowman

For 38 James Madison University (JMU) students who took the COB 300 course, the final rite of passage was completed on Saturday, March 19 with the 14th annual Jackson-Rainey Business Plan Competition. The team that pitched The Oak Bar, a single pour wine kiosk that provides local wines to festivals, events and private parties, received the top prize. Team members Emily Platt, Carly Marx, Lindsay Combs, Justin Koch, Christopher Snow and Ruotian Zhang--all juniors--will split more than $5,500 in scholarships.

The six teams that competed were the last ones standing after several rounds of judging over 100 business plans created by their peers during one of last year’s three sections of COB 300--a required, 12-credit course that integrates the fundamentals of finance, management, marketing and operations. The course develops entrepreneurs and business leaders by allowing students to apply concepts learned in the classroom to real-world scenarios.

This year’s prizes and scholarships totaled over $25,000, generously provided by JMU graduates and former Executive Advisory Council members Wayne Jackson, Class of ‘85, and Don Rainey, Class of ‘82. In addition to the first-place winners, this year’s proposed businesses were: Dune Buddies, a manufacturer of motorized beach wheelchairs and other assistive medical devices (2nd place); Button Box, LLC, an eCommerce children’s clothing rental subscription box service (3rd place); TranSolar, LLC, an eco-friendly solar panel installation company that provides a way to leverage fuel-saving technologies by transforming solar energy into power for semi-trucks (4th place); SunCharged, LLC, a manufacturer of solar backpacks that charge electronic products stored inside (5th place); and Greenlease, LLC, a company that leases plots outside of Minneapolis, Minn. for individuals to grow organic produce for personal consumption (6th place).

Emily Platt, a member of the winning team, received the Ferguson Top Female Leader Award, which was made possible by a gift from former business plan competition participant, Katherine Ferguson, Class of ‘04.  Platt was also one of four participants that received an MVP award; the other MVP winners included Sebastian Salinas, Erin Desbiens and Ben Whitney. Other awards included: the Accenture Innovation Award for the best idea to TranSolar LLC; the Team Award to Button Box LLC; and the Audience Choice Award to both Dune Buddies and The Oak Bar.

Beyond the opportunity to win cash prizes and scholarships, the Jackson-Rainey Business Plan Competition provides students with professional experience in a setting that resembles a venture capital fair in which aspiring entrepreneurs pitch ideas to potential investors. Students develop poise and confidence while gaining valuable coaching and constructive feedback from seasoned business leaders.

Management professor Fernando Pargas, the COB 300 coordinator, says that the business plan competition, as well as the COB 300 course in general, instill the knowledge and cultivate the leadership skills that put JMU business graduates ahead of the pack.

“In business, every decision, every strategy involves all four of these disciplines,”Pargas says. “We believe that business is holistic, and the business plan component is a tool that helps students understand how these four disciplines impact each other. As a result, our students are better suited to think about the bigger picture and to understand the interconnections of business as a whole. This course and the business plan competition prepare our students to be effective business leaders in the future.”

2016 Competing Teams:

1st Place - The Oak Bar

  • Emily Platt, Carly Marx, Lindsay Combs, Justin Koch, Christopher Snow, Ruotian Zhang

2nd Place - Dune Buddies

  • Katie Leeser, Jonathon Mimm, Chris Parsons, Jack Peterson, Sebastian Salinas, Anton Zeltser

3rd Place - Button Box, LLC

  • Erin Desbiens, Amy Edler, Caitlin Fuchs, Russell Levine, Taylor Perretti, Shirali Shah, Ryan Talento

4th Place - TranSolar, LLC

  • Jacob Bowen, CK Esche, Lauren Field, Matthew Hobson, Timothy McNeish, Reza Saadvandi, Jennifer Zackoff

5th Place - SunCharged, LLC

  • Ryan Goldrick, Rachel Kirbabas, Ryan Miller, Joe Passariello, Brian Presler, Rachel Reinhardt

6th Place- Greenlease, LLC

  • Andrew Bass, Gina Bavagnoli, Steve Hildner, Jake Kirby, Sean O’Rourke, Ben Whitney

Judges:

  • Don Rainey, General Partner, Grotech Ventures

  • Mike Battle, President, Battle Resource Management, Inc.

  • Katherine Ferguson, Vice President of Business Development, Cooley LLP

  • Lois Forbes, Former Senior Vice President, Forbes Development and LBJ Limited

  • Wayne Jackson, CEO, Sonatype

Top six teams out of over 100 teams compete in the Jackson-Rainey Business Plan Competition/////
03-23-a-newstrue1459549416799smith2pjJMU-U.Va. Expand Research into Antibiotic Resistant BacteriaJMU-U.Va. Expand Research into Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria/news/csm/03-23-a-newsJMUsite://JMU/news/csm/03-23-a-newsnealeap1458756339645nealeap14587563396451458709200000JMU-U.Va. Expand Research into Antibiotic Resistant BacteriaNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Science and Mathematics/csm/indexsite://JMU/csm/indexJMUindexScience and MathematicsScience and Mathematics///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/college-of-science-and-mathematicsJMUcollege-of-science-and-mathematics

To read this article, please go to:  http://www.jmu.edu/news/2016/03/21-herrick-antibiotic-resistance.shtml

JMU-U.Va. Expand Research into Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria/////
03-23-newstrue1459549416799smith2pjHow a Professor's Malaria Research Has the Attention of NIH How a Professor's Malaria Research Has the Attention of NIH /news/csm/03-23-newsJMUsite://JMU/news/csm/03-23-newsnealeap1458756000901nealeap14587560009011458709200000How a Professor's Malaria Research Has the Attention of NIH News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Science and Mathematics/csm/indexsite://JMU/csm/indexJMUindexScience and MathematicsScience and Mathematics///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/college-of-science-and-mathematicsJMUcollege-of-science-and-mathematics

To read this article, please go to:  http://www.jmu.edu/news/2016/03/22-chris-lantz-nih-grant.shtml

How a Professor's Malaria Research Has the Attention of NIH /////
22-japantrue1459549416799smith2pjJapan Helping Cambodia Clear LandminesJapan Helping Cambodia Clear Landmineswilli4bmJapan Helping Cambodia Clear LandminesJapan, Cambodia, landminesJapan Helping Cambodia Clear Landmines1458619200000Japan Helping Cambodia Clear Landmines/news/cisr/2016/03/22-japanJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/03/22-japanwilli4bm1458660834939willi4bm14586608349391458622800000Japan Helping Cambodia Clear LandminesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"In this Japan special edition of Focus, we went to Cambodia to see first-hand how Japan’s support in the de-mining process has helped bring peace and safety to local communities. Decades of war have left their mark on the Southeast Asian country, believed to still be home to millions of landmines and other unexploded devices." (euronews.com)

Read more.

/////
GandhiFesttrue1460571860031chandljlGandhiFEST 2016GandhiFEST 2016/news/gandhicenter/2016/04/GandhiFestJMUsite://JMU/news/gandhicenter/2016/04/GandhiFestbeitzetd1458658016488beitzetd14586581670251459627200000The JMU Gandhi Center and Mad4U present GandhiFEST!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsGandhi Center/gandhicenter/indexsite://JMU/gandhicenter/indexJMUindexGandhi Center HomeGandhi Center HomeJMU Gandhi Center home pageJMU Gandhi Center home pageJMU Gandhi Center home pagehome page for JMU Gandhi Center///_tags/source/academic-affairs/gandhicenterJMUgandhicenter

The JMU Gandhi Center and Mad4U present GandhiFEST!

The intent of this music festival is two-fold: to educate attendees on historic challenges and successes during the Civil Rights and Anti-War Movements, as well as to acknowledge contemporary issues within the ongoing quest for peace, justice, and nonviolence; and to celebrate the ongoing work therein through music, spoken word, and human collaboration. To this end, musicians and speakers from various disciplines will take turns sharing the stage to connect specific issues to the broader themes of the festival.

Facebook events page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1014322171946885/

JMU's first GandhiFEST!/_images/gandhicenter/12439053_10154114874278319_6920788671561257402_n.jpgsite://JMU/_images/gandhicenter/12439053_10154114874278319_6920788671561257402_n.jpgJMU12439053_10154114874278319_6920788671561257402_n.jpgGandhi Fest/_images/gandhicenter/12439053_10154114874278319_6920788671561257402_n.jpgsite://JMU/_images/gandhicenter/12439053_10154114874278319_6920788671561257402_n.jpgJMU12439053_10154114874278319_6920788671561257402_n.jpgGandhi Fest///
21-turkeytrue1459549416799smith2pjTurkey to Clear Landmines Along BorderTurkey to Clear Landmines Along Borderwilli4bmTurkey to Clear Landmines Along BorderTurkey, landmines, borderTurkey to Clear Landmines Along Border1458532800000Turkey to Clear Landmines Along Border/news/cisr/2016/03/21-turkeyJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/03/21-turkeywilli4bm1458587517867willi4bm14585875178671458536400000Turkey to Clear Landmines Along BorderNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"At a time of increasing threats along its borders, Turkey is proceeding to fulfill its obligations to an international mine clearance treaty. Defense Minister İsmet Yılmaz told lawmakers that the work to clear landmines on the country's eastern borders will start in April. He said more than 222,000 landmines will be cleared, and the country aims to conclude mine clearance operations all across Turkey by 2022." (dailysabah.com)

Read more.

/////
21-bgs-selected-as-honorable-mentiontrue1459549416799smith2pjBeta Gamma Sigma Selected as Honorable Mention Beta Gamma Sigma Selected as Honorable Mention /news/cob/2016/03/21-bgs-selected-as-honorable-mentionJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/21-bgs-selected-as-honorable-mentionlentilcn1458574682748lentilcn14585746981791458572400000Beta Gamma Sigma Selected as Honorable Mention News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Annamarie Nyirady

The James Madison University (JMU) Beta Gamma Sigma (BGS) Chapter has been selected as an Honorable Mention winner for the Outstanding Chapter Awards, placing fourth out of over 560 chapters worldwide. The chapter will be recognized at the BGS Dean’s Luncheon at the International Conference and Annual Meeting (ICAM) in Boston on April 3, 2016.

The Outstanding Chapter Award recognizes chapters that exhibit excellent performance. As an Honorable Mention winner, BGS will be receiving a $500 scholarship, along with an additional scholarship for an outstanding student member. 

Members of BGS will receive recognition at the BGS Dean's Luncheon at the International Conference in April. /////
21-phil-bennett-profiletrue1459549416799smith2pjStaying Connected: Philip Bennett Offers Professional Expertise to Support JMU's College of BusinessStaying Connected: Philip Bennett Offers Professional Expertise to Support JMU's College of Business/news/cob/2016/03/21-phil-bennett-profileJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/21-phil-bennett-profilelentilcn1458571920561lentilcn14593476061711458568800000Staying Connected: Philip Bennett Offers Professional Expertise to Support JMU's College of BusinessCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Alumni////cob/_cascade/_tags/alumniJMUalumni

By Karen Doss Bowman

Phil BennettPhilip Bennett, Class of ‘92, is grateful for the career preparation he received as a student in James Madison University’s (JMU) College of Business (CoB). These days, he’s sharing his professional expertise with the university, both as a member of the CoB Advisory Council and as a lead campus recruiter for KPMG, seeking to hire JMU’s most talented business students for his employer.

According to Bennett, JMU is one of about 30 colleges and universities nationwide where KPMG has focused recruiting efforts for full-time positions, as well as internships and externships. JMU CoB graduates are considered poised and ready to become star employees upon graduation.

“I have the opportunity to get to campus more often than most alumni, and I really feel plugged into what’s happening at the College of Business,” says Bennett, of Richmond, Va. who earned a B.B.A. in accounting. “JMU students are well-rounded and socially adept. They are smart, but they also can hold a conversation. They are the kind of people you want to be around. At KPMG, we are looking for graduates who are smart, but who also know how to talk to clients, work productively in teams and be self-motivated. That part is hard to teach in the classroom. That’s where attracting the right students and creating the right environment for them to practice these crafts is important to their success after college. JMU excels at that.”

Bennett joined KPMG, one of the world’s Big Four accounting firms, upon graduation from JMU. A Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and Certified Information Systems Auditor, Bennett is the national service line risk management partner for KPMG’s IT Advisory practices, including Technology Enablement and Cyber Security. He has worked with numerous high-profile clients, including the American Red Cross, CarMax, Sirius XM Radio and The World Bank.

Bennett has served on JMU’s School of Accounting Executive Advisory Council and the CIS Advisory Council, and is the immediate past chair of the Richmond Symphony Board of Directors. He and his wife, Tara, have two children: Lauren, 10, and Henry, 6.  

Looking back on his time as a student at JMU, Bennett appreciates that then, just as now, the CoB upheld high academic standards that prepare students for professional and personal success.

“I had to work hard to get through my classes in the College of Business, but I’ve grown to appreciate my professors more over time,” says Bennett, who earned a master’s degree in management information systems from the University of Virginia. “Working hard to do the coursework creates discipline and exercises the parts of the brain that need it. Back then, I was trying to get through school, but now I realize my professors had an impact on me by making me work hard and by caring about me.”

He pauses and adds, “It makes me want to come back.”         

KPMG"s Philip Bennett gives back to his alma mater by providing students with professional expertise./////
21-theresa-clarke-profiletrue1459549416799smith2pjThe Art of the Exchange: JMU Professor Fascinated with the Always-Changing World of MarketingThe Art of the Exchange: JMU Professor Fascinated with the Always-Changing World of Marketing/news/cob/2016/03/21-theresa-clarke-profileJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/21-theresa-clarke-profilelentilcn1458569439255lentilcn14585695849321458568800000The Art of the Exchange: JMU Professor Fascinated with the Always-Changing World of MarketingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMarketing/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/college-of-business/marketingJMUmarketingCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Faculty////cob/_cascade/_tags/facultyJMUfaculty

By Karen Doss Bowman

Theresa ClarkeTheresa Clarke’s passion for marketing began when she was a child running lemonade stands, helping her sister sell Girl Scout cookies and working in her father’s retail store. Intrigued by the complexities of “helping two parties make a satisfying exchange with one another,” Clarke became a marketing scholar who enjoys nurturing the talents of her students at JMU.

“These early experiences helped me uncover my passion for marketing,” says Clarke, who joined the College of Business (CoB) faculty as a marketing professor in 2001. “Since that time, I have explored marketing theoretically and practically, over many years to where marketing is operating today—in a complex, data-driven, digital, mobile and global environment. It’s a dynamic and exciting field.”

A pioneer in the development of interactive marketing courses at both JMU and Old Dominion University, where she previously was a professor, Clarke strives to make the difference for her students by giving them hands-on opportunities to practice the fundamentals of marketing. In her MKTG 477: Internet Marketing Practicum course, for example, students develop and run online advertising campaigns for businesses or non-profit organizations as they compete in the Google Online Marketing Challenge. 

“The students are so excited to learn and do something real,” says Clarke, who has been published in numerous academic journals and is co-editor of Advances in Electronic Marketing. “They get to run a live campaign for a business, and that gets them really excited. I love working with students in that particular dynamic. We end up helping small businesses or non-profits with their marketing, so it’s really a win-win for the students and the businesses they work with. I find that kind of teaching very gratifying.”

Clarke was a finalist for the 2016 State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) Outstanding Faculty Award. She also received the O’Hara Leadership Award from the Direct Marketing Association of Washington Educational Foundation (DMAW/EF) for her efforts to incorporate direct interactive marketing in the classroom. Clarke, who holds the Wampler-Longacre Eminent Scholars Professorship in Marketing, was the 2008 CoB Madison Scholar and a two-time recipient of the CoB’s Kenneth Bartee Innovation in Teaching Award.

Clarke, whose research is focused on pay-per-click advertising, social media marketing and marketing education, is faculty adviser for the Madison American Advertising Federation. She also coaches students in the Marketing EDGE and DMAW/EF integrated marketing communications competitions, advises undergraduate research and honors projects, and mentors a new faculty member at JMU.

In every encounter with students—in the classroom or during private office appointments—Clarke emphasizes the importance of lifelong learning. She strives to give students the tools and resources to continually enhance their skills, grasp new technologies and techniques, and network with other professionals in the field.

“In marketing, it’s important to understand that we operate in a very dynamic and highly networked environment, and if students want to become successful marketers, they must commit to lifelong learning,” says Clarke, who enjoys spending free time with her husband Bud and 9-year-old son Irvine. “I can teach students the foundational concepts, but because things change so rapidly in marketing, learning should never end.”

Dr. Theresa Clarke pushes herself and her students to success. /////
21-milestrue1460571860031chandljlDr. Miles, College of Integrated Science and Engineering, Receives External FundingDr. Jonathan J. Miles, Professor in the Integrated Science and Technology Department, has been awarded $23,000 from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for his Wind for Schools Wind Application Operation Plan. Dr. Miles will be working with Ms. Remy Pangle, Associate Director and Education and Outreach Coordinator for Virginia Center for Wind Energy, and a team of undergraduate JMU students to facilitate wind energy work force development by providing educational programming and hands on wind technology learning opportunities at both the university and K-12 level and to maintain and support host schools in turbine maintenance, turbine data communication improvement, curricula development, teaching activities, and potential support of new host schools.reschmmDr. Jonathan J. Miles, Professor in the Integrated Science and Technology Department, has been awarded $23,000 from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.renewable, energy, wind, power, sustainability, external funding, wind for schools, Dr. Jonathan J. Miles, Professor in the Integrated Science and Technology Department, has been awarded $23,000 from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for his Wind for Schools Wind Application Operation Plan. Dr. Miles will be working with Ms. Remy Pangle, Associate Director and Education and Outreach Coordinator for Virginia Center for Wind Energy, and a team of undergraduate JMU students.Dr. Miles, College of Integrated Science and Engineering, Receives External Funding/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/21-milesJMUsite://JMU/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/21-milesreschmm1458567786752reschmm14600483252991458532800000Dr. Miles, College of Integrated Science and Engineering, Receives External FundingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Sponsored Programs/sponsoredprograms/indexsite://JMU/sponsoredprograms/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/sponsoredprogramsJMUsponsoredprograms

Dr. Jonathan J. Miles, Professor in the Integrated Science and Technology Department, has been awarded $23,000 from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for his Wind for Schools Wind Application Operation Plan.  Dr. Miles will be working with Ms. Remy Pangle, Associate Director and Education and Outreach Coordinator for Virginia Center for Wind Energy, and a team of undergraduate JMU students to facilitate wind energy work force development by providing educational programming and hands on wind technology learning opportunities at both the university and K-12 level and to maintain and support host schools in turbine maintenance, turbine data communication improvement, curricula development, teaching activities, and potential support of new host schools. Wind for Schools Logo

The Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory started the Wind for Schools program in Fiscal Year 2005 in Colorado resulting in one school small turbine project and many lessons learned.  Now, twelve states are funded under the Wind for Schools program including Virginia. The Wind for Schools program strives to develop in-state technical assistance capacity through the development of Wind Application Centers located at colleges or universities in each state, in order to educate engineers in wind applications analysis and develop knowledge/skill sets that will make them more valuable to a growing wind workforce. The Wind for Schools program also seeks to educate students in wind energy and inspire them to pursue renewable energy areas of learning/careers past high school. Lastly, the Wind for Schools program would like each of the participating schools to introduce a “community” to wind energy, providing opportunities for wind discussions with audiences beyond the classroom.

Best of luck to Dr. Miles, Ms. Pangle, and their team of students as they proceed to support university and K-12 wind educational efforts and help create more sustainable communities!

Published March 21, 2016

Dr. Jonathan J. Miles, Professor in the Integrated Science and Technology Department, has been awarded $23,000 from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory./////
18-parkertrue1460571860031chandljlDr. Parker, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External FundingDr. Michael (Rocky) Parker, Assistant Professor of the Biology Department, has been awarded $79,332 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, for his proposal entitled, ¿Characterization of Brown Treesnake Sex Pheromone.¿ Dr. Parker will be working with researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a team of undergraduate JMU students to determine the identity of the female brown treesnake sex pheromone and whether it is controlled by the female hormone, estrogen. reschmmDr. Michael (Rocky) Parker, Assistant Professor of the Biology Department, has been awarded $79,332 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.biology, agriculture, treesnake, guam, snakeDr. Parker will be working with researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a team of undergraduate JMU students to determine the identity of the female brown treesnake sex pheromone and whether it is controlled by the female hormone, estrogen. Dr. Parker, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External Funding/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/18-parkerJMUsite://JMU/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/18-parkerreschmm1458327783972reschmm14583299813661458273600000Dr. Parker, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External FundingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Sponsored Programs/sponsoredprograms/indexsite://JMU/sponsoredprograms/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/sponsoredprogramsJMUsponsoredprograms

Dr. Michael (Rocky) Parker, Assistant Professor of the Biology Department, has been awarded $79,332 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, for his proposal entitled, "Characterization of Brown Treesnake Sex Pheromone." Dr. Parker will be working with researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a team of undergraduate JMU students to determine the identity of the female brown treesnake sex pheromone and whether it is controlled by the female hormone, estrogen. 

According to Dr. Parker's proposal, "The brown treesnake, Boiga irregularis, has negatively impacted the native animal ecology of Guam at multiple levels, especially primary and secondary predators. Brown treesnakes were successful when they invaded Guam because they had no natural predators and an abundant prey supply. Targeting their reproduction is a primary goal for managing this invasive predator. The key characteristic mediating courtship and mating in the brown treesnake is the female's sex pheromone. Recent work in another snake species, the red-sided garter snake, demonstrated that males given estrogen produce female pheromone and become extremely attractive to wild males. Further, estrogen-implanted male brown treesnakes may be capable of disrupting normal reproductive behavior in the field. We may also be able to increase the trapping efficiency on Guam by using sex pheromones that we are isolating from this species as lures." 

Best of luck to Dr. Parker and his team as they proceed with their research! 

Published March 18, 2016

Dr. Michael (Rocky) Parker, Assistant Professor of the Biology Department, has been awarded $79,332 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture./////
18-dsu-facilitatortrue1459549416799smith2pjYou Can Be A Dukes Step Up! Facilitator1458316800000You Can Be A Dukes Step Up! Facilitator/news/healthcenter/2016/02/18-dsu-facilitatorJMUsite://JMU/news/healthcenter/2016/02/18-dsu-facilitatorjonesvw1458325578220jonesvw14583255782201458316800000You Can Be A Dukes Step Up! FacilitatorNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHealth Center/healthcenter/indexsite://JMU/healthcenter/indexJMUindexUHC HomeUniversity Health Center Home///_tags/source/healthcenterJMUhealthcenterHealth CenterHealth Center

Mark your calendars to attend an interest session and learn more.  

We are seeking dynamic, energetic student leaders.  Make a difference and be a Dukes Step Up! facilitator during 1787.  

Interested?  Read More.

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18-newtrue1459549416799smith2pjNew Technology for Landmine DetectionNew Technology for Landmine Detectionwilli4bmNew Technology for Landmine Detectionlandmine, detection, technologyNew Technology for Landmine Detection1458273600000New Technology for Landmine Detection/news/cisr/2016/03/18-newJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/03/18-newwilli4bm1458311302443willi4bm14583180296641458277200000New Technology for Landmine DetectionNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization & Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"In Colombia, large areas are teeming with mines that are almost impossible to detect with traditional methods. In collaboration with partners from South America, engineers at the German Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Technical University Ilmenau are developing a new mine clearance technology, based on ground penetrating radar. In the long run, they are aiming at creating a handheld device that will detect different mine types on rough terrain without fail and which can be used in the same way as metal detectors. The Ruhr-Universität's science magazine Rubin has published a detailed report on the project." (phys.org)

Read more.

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18-fukumuratrue1460571860031chandljlDr. Fukumura, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External FundingDr. Keigo Fukumura, Assistant Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department, has been awarded $44,413 from NASA for his proposal entitled, ¿X-Ray Absorbers as Probes of AGN Unification.¿ Dr. Fukumura will be working with Dr. Sean T. Scully, Associate Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department, and a team of undergraduate JMU students.reschmmDr. Keigo Fukumura, Assistant Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department, has been awarded $44,413 from NASA for his proposal.astronomy, physics, NASA, x-ray, wind, external funding, awardDr. Fukumura will be working with Dr. Sean T. Scully, Associate Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department, and a team of undergraduate JMU students to explore the observed UV/X-ray absorbers of diverse populations of active galaxies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind model around supermassive black holes by UV/X-ray spectroscopic analyses. Dr. Fukumura, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External Funding/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/18-fukumuraJMUsite://JMU/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/18-fukumurareschmm1458310256327reschmm14583104355401458273600000Dr. Fukumura, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External FundingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Sponsored Programs/sponsoredprograms/indexsite://JMU/sponsoredprograms/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/sponsoredprogramsJMUsponsoredprograms

Dr. Keigo Fukumura, Assistant Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department, has been awarded $44,413 from NASA for his proposal entitled, "X-Ray Absorbers as Probes of AGN Unification." Dr. Fukumura will be working with Dr. Sean T. Scully, Associate Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department, and a team of undergraduate JMU students to explore the observed UV/X-ray absorbers of diverse populations of active galaxies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind model around supermassive black holes by UV/X-ray spectroscopic analyses. This grant is a 3-year project in collaboration with people at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and University of Maryland. During the three year span (2016-2019) Dr. Fukumura and Dr. Scully will be awarded a total fo $144,870. 

Congratulations to Dr. Fukumura and Dr. Scully for receiving this grant award and best of luck to the team as they proceed with their research!

Published March 18, 2016

Dr. Keigo Fukumura, Assistant Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department, has been awarded $44,413 from NASA for his proposal. /////
22-battle-between-fbi-and-appletrueThe Battle Between the FBI and Apple1456160280000The Battle Between the FBI and Apple/news/cs-BACKUP/2016/02/22-battle-between-fbi-and-appleJMUsite://JMU/news/cs-BACKUP/2016/02/22-battle-between-fbi-and-applesujaj1458229622265sujaj14582296222651455771600000The Battle Between the FBI and AppleNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseComputer Science/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cs/archivessite://JMU/cs/archivesJMUarchivesComputer Science - News ArchivesComputer Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/computer-scienceJMUcomputer-scienceCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUcise

HARRISONBURG, Va. (WHSV) 

JMU computer science professor Dr. Hossain Heydari discusses Apple's refusal to help the FBI hack into an iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernadino terrorists. 

See the video on WHSV TV3

JMU computer science professor Dr. Hossain Heydari discusses Apple's refusal to help the FBI hack into an iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernadino terrorists. /////
11-jmu-students-lead-the-way-on-roboticstrueJMU Students Lead the Way in Robotics1455203580000JMU Students Lead the Way in Robotics/news/cs-BACKUP/2016/02/11-jmu-students-lead-the-way-on-roboticsJMUsite://JMU/news/cs-BACKUP/2016/02/11-jmu-students-lead-the-way-on-roboticssujaj1458229622176sujaj14582296221761455166800000JMU Students Lead the Way in RoboticsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseComputer Science/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cs/archivessite://JMU/cs/archivesJMUarchivesComputer Science - News ArchivesComputer Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/computer-scienceJMUcomputer-scienceCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUcise

Just a decade ago, the concept of autonomous robots was still largely limited to research, but ongoing rapid advancements in the field have introduced the possibility of using robots in our day to day lives.  The recently established robotics minor in the Department of Computer Science is giving students an opportunity to participate in this revolution.  

Students in CS 354: Introduction to Autonomous Robots, taught by Dr. Nathan Sprague, worked in teams on a semester-long project to program robots that can operate independently in an unstructured environment.  In December, a competition was held to put their robots to the test.

In the weeks leading up to the competition, teams practiced by making dry runs in the robotics lab. Several details of the competition were withheld from participants until the day of the event.  While students knew their robots would have to navigate around obstacles on their own and find victims of a simulated radiation leak, they were not given the layout of the competition area or told the specific number of victims. Student teams were allowed just eight minutes to use their robots to locate as many victims as possible.

One group, Nic McCullough (’16) and Joey Neidigh (’16), located all of the victims in just seven minutes.  Friends since fourth grade, the two had worked on other projects together at JMU but found the robotics project especially rewarding. “I probably spent 20 hours a week on this project last semester. We were there all the time; it turned into something that was a lot of fun”, Neidigh remarked. “Dr. Sprague gave us checkpoints and tasks throughout the semester. They were very helpful for breaking up the work,” McCullough noted.  

Reflecting on the competition, Sprague said, “Overall, the event was a success. I’m very happy with the way it went. Every group stepped up and worked hard. Some groups developed very successful solutions. I plan to do something similar next time I teach CS 354.”

McCullough and Neidigh are currently participating in an independent study in robotics and will attend the SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education with Sprague in March.  They will present on ways schools can incorporate robotics courses into their curriculum.

 

Just a decade ago, the concept of autonomous robots was still largely limited to research, but ongoing rapid advancements in the field have introduced the possibility of using robots in our day to day lives./////
11-cs-students-enhance-skills-in-competitive-programmingtrueCS Students Enhance Skills in Competitive Programming1455201900000CS Students Enhance Skills in Competitive Programming/news/cs-BACKUP/2016/02/11-cs-students-enhance-skills-in-competitive-programmingJMUsite://JMU/news/cs-BACKUP/2016/02/11-cs-students-enhance-skills-in-competitive-programmingsujaj1458229622066sujaj14582296220661455166800000CS Students Enhance Skills in Competitive ProgrammingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseComputer Science/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cs/archivessite://JMU/cs/archivesJMUarchivesComputer Science - News ArchivesComputer Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/computer-scienceJMUcomputer-scienceCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUcise

By: Dina Manco

Each year, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) holds a programming contest for collegiate students across the globe. On November 7, four teams of three JMU students tested their programming and group collaboration skills in the Mid-Atlantic USA Regional Collegiate Programming Contest. The competition was sponsored by IBM and held at Radford University.

JMU students who attended were in the Competitive Programming Club or enrolled in CS 280: Programming Challenges where they are given practice problems to prepare for the competition.

Assistant Professor and Competitive Programming coach Dr. Mike Lam comments, “We don’t give them all the answers in class. So they have to go and figure out how to solve them on their own in many cases, and that’s something that is really important to employers. You don’t want an employee [who is] just going to sit there and wait for their boss to give them the solution. You want an employee that is able to take a problem and go find a solution for it.”

At the Radford competition, teams from local universities were in attendance while other competitions were held simultaneously at respective sites in D.C., eastern Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, and West Virginia. There were a total of 185 teams in the region.

The students are given five hours to solve a series of computer programming problems using C++ or Java; the goal is to solve as many problems as possible in the least amount of time. Once a team solves a problem, they submit their work electronically to judges comprised of computer science-related professors. They are judged alongside teams from every site in the Mid-Atlantic Region. If a team’s answer is wrong, they may attempt to fix it and re-submit, but each incorrect submission adds twenty minutes to their scoring time. Therefore, if a team submits an incorrect product but later answers correctly, a different team who answered correctly with their first submission fifteen minutes after them will be ranked higher.

Teams at the ACM competition will typically solve up to two problems out of the eight or nine ACM provides. The first place winner of the Mid-Atlantic USA Regional Contest is guaranteed to move onto the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest World Finals in Thailand. While the JMU teams did not place in the competition this year, they acquired beneficial skills from participating.

Junior CS major Matthew Petty says, “I feel like [the competition] made me a better programmer and a better interview candidate too, because a lot of the tech companies you go to—they want to hear your thought process. So being in a team environment where you have to explain your solution to two other teammates before they’ll accept it is very important for you becoming a better speaker.”

Assistant Professor and Competitive Programming coach Dr. Chris Mayfield comments, “I think all of these skills transfer to other courses students take and ultimately into their careers, because everyone works with other people. In the CS industry, you’re often building large systems in teams of people, you need to be able to prioritize how you go about building the system, in what order, and when you need help you have to figure out what questions to ask and whom to ask the question…[Students] feel like it really brought a lot of things together that aren't explicitly taught in a content course.”

Students who attended the ACM competition this year will be eligible to compete again next fall. With experience and more practice, the JMU teams will be much stronger candidates for the 2016 Mid-Atlantic title.

Each year, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) holds a programming contest for collegiate students across the globe. ///_images/cs/story-images/comp-program-story-172x103.jpgsite://JMU/_images/cs/story-images/comp-program-story-172x103.jpgJMUcomp-program-story-172x103.jpgCS Students Enhance Skills in Competitive Programming//
06-news-cs-connects-with-employerstrueCS Department Connects Students to Leading Tech Employers1452106500000CS Department Connects Students to Leading Tech Employers/news/cs-BACKUP/2016/01/06-news-cs-connects-with-employersJMUsite://JMU/news/cs-BACKUP/2016/01/06-news-cs-connects-with-employerssujaj1458229621796sujaj14582296217961452056400000CS Department Connects Students to Leading Tech EmployersNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseComputer Science/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cs/archivessite://JMU/cs/archivesJMUarchivesComputer Science - News ArchivesComputer Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/computer-scienceJMUcomputer-science

By: Dina Manco

In November 2014, the Computer Science (CS) Department began the Industrial Partners Program (IPP), an initiative to connect students with employers for internships and job opportunities. Participating companies make an annual donation that supports student and faculty research as well as allow the companies to hold tech talks and information sessions on the JMU campus. The program also hosts a CS job fair in the fall and spring exclusively for the partners to recruit students the major. 

CS Department Head Sharon Simmons adds, “Our intention is not to have a large partners program. I think right now we have 11 members…So our goal is not to be big, but keep a close connection with industry as well as to our students.” A few partners invested in the program include Accenture, CapTech Consulting, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Ltd, and Excelacom Inc. Required donations for companies to join IPP are based on their size and range from $1,500 to $3,000.

JMU CS students are competitive candidates for employment due to their training in computer programming and advanced technical skills. Excelacom Talent Acquisition Consultant Alexis Dalton says, “[Excelacom is] an IT Management Consulting firm, and our goal is to hire computer science majors who will ultimately provide technological knowledge to improve our client’s business process. The students have a solid understanding of SDLC, C++, C#, Java, and SQL.  These are technical skill sets that we look for in our technical analysts.”

Excelacom has hired several students as a result of IPP. Dalton remarks, “The faculty and staff have cultivated relationships with employers and are able to reach us directly.  This benefits the students in regards to curriculum and career opportunities.  It not only equips them with the knowledge to be competitive in the job market but also gives them an inside connection at some of the leading tech firms.”

Any student that has declared computer science as their major is eligible to attend IPP events. The IPP program has received positive feedback from the participating companies and related events are well attended by the CS student body. Simmons hopes for the program to continue its success by expanding post-graduate opportunities for JMU students.

In November 2014, the Computer Science (CS) Department began the Industrial Partners Program (IPP), an initiative to connect students with employers for internships and job opportunities. /////
17-gem-fair-with-ceetrue1459549416799smith2pjThe Mini-Economy: GEM Fair Offers Hands-On Economic Education to Local Elementary and Middle School Students The Mini-Economy: GEM Fair Offers Hands-On Economic Education to Local Elementary and Middle School Students /news/cob/2016/03/17-gem-fair-with-ceeJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/17-gem-fair-with-ceelentilcn1458229444188lentilcn14593394901041458226800000The Mini-Economy: GEM Fair Offers Hands-On Economic Education to Local Elementary and Middle School Students News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessEconomics/CMS-redirects/economics/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/economics/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/economicsJMUeconomicsCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Annamarie Nyirady

GEM Fair 2016The annual Global Entrepreneurship Marketplace (GEM) Fair brought together nearly 300 local elementary and middle school students to learn about economics in a simulated international marketplace. The March 9 event, that provided hands-on experience to supplement classroom economics lessons, was hosted by Union Bank & Trust and held in James Madison University’s (JMU) Festival Conference Center.    

Each participating classroom formed a Mini-Economy, a simulated society with its own flag, currency and governing system. The GEM currency is modeled after the European monetary unit, the euro. Students bring in products to buy and sell, competing for awards recognizing the best product, marketing strategy, customer service and currency design. Additionally, three students are nominated to receive the Outstanding Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award.

Local teachers are trained by the JMU Center for Economic Education (CEE) to facilitate the creation of each Mini-Economy, which focuses on advancing their understanding of economics and the private enterprise system. By doing so, the CEE aims to pass on this knowledge to the next generation of young entrepreneurs. The event also has been successful in strengthening ties between area schools and the University, while leading to some excellent teacher training and grant opportunities. Additionally, the CEE’s experience resulted in a journal publication that helps centers for economic education in other areas start and maintain their own GEM Fairs to benefit students in their communities.

“Entrepreneurship education can start early in grade school, but it can't be done with class work alone,” says JMU economics professor William Wood, CEE director. “Kids have to get hands-on experience, and the GEM Fair lets them do that in a great venue. We love getting several hundred kids in to see what JMU can offer. They're mostly grade schoolers, but it's never too early to start recruiting new dukes!”

Local teachers join together to teach students about economics/////
21-news-unhr-press-releasetrueRepresentative from the UNHR will speak about the Current Global Refugee Crisis1445437500000Representative from the UNHR will speak about the Current Global Refugee Crisis/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/10/21-news-unhr-press-releaseJMUsite://JMU/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/10/21-news-unhr-press-releasesujaj1458227368328sujaj14582273683281445400000000Representative from the UNHR will speak about the Current Global Refugee CrisisNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsIntelligence Analysis/ia/indexsite://JMU/ia/indexJMUindexISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis ProgramISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis Program/ia/archivessite://JMU/ia/archivesJMUarchivesIntelligence Analysis - News ArchivesIntelligence Analysis - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/intelligence-analysisJMUintelligence-analysisCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUcise

By: Stephen Roddewig (’18)

“This is a global crisis – it affects us all.  First and foremost, nobody should be forced to flee from their homes or risk everything in the hopes of finding safety and security.  Everyone deserves basic rights and protections.” Brian Reich, Project Director – the Hive

As of June of this year, 59.5 million people have been displaced from their homes across the globe, according to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) (http://www.unhcr.org/558193896.html). From World War II onward, the UNHCR has worked to help displaced refugees across the globe, but never before has the issue reached such a level. Recent news has focused on the emergencies in Europe, but the refugee crisis extends beyond the Middle East and Europe into Africa, Latin America, and South America. The issue truly has become global in scale.

As part of an initiative to raise awareness, Brian Reich, Project Director for the Hive, will be presenting about the global refugee crisis at James Madison University. “The Hive is a special projects unit of USA for UNHCR/UNHCR focused on getting more Americans to engage with the global refugee crisis,” said Reich. Its focus is on spreading awareness and promoting engagement, using data to identify prospective supporters in communities, and unlocking the resources of the US market to provide support and advocacy for international refugees. Overall, according to Reich, “We are looking at transforming behavior, expanding the number of people who are aware of and committed to addressing the refugee crisis, and more.”

Reich will focus on the role we, as JMU Students and Americans, can play in helping to support the millions of refugees worldwide. “I will talk a lot about the role that Americans can play in addressing the refugee crisis – and what it will take to get more people to become knowledgeable and committed to a global crisis of this kind.”

Awareness is the first step towards progress, and without more involvement, this crisis will not be solved on its own. “We are not going to address this crisis unless more Americans, and people from all different backgrounds and perspectives, become involved,” said Reich, adding, “My hope is to spark interest, to demonstrate the many different ways that people can get involved and help.”

The United States is already involved in aiding international refugees. According to Reich, “The United States is already the largest donor to UNHCR and refugee relief efforts around the globe. We also accept more refugees for resettlement than any other country. This is already an issue that Americans are involved with, and committed to helping address.” But in the face of such staggering numbers of displaced people, more help is needed. Involvement and change starts at the individual level, and for us, that means starting here on campus.

In particular, JMU and its students have great potential to make a difference in this current crisis, according to Reich. “JMU students can be leaders, can provide new thinking and innovations that will help to address the crisis, and get more Americans to engage.” The global refugee crisis provides us as a campus and a nation a chance to show how we can help address international issues. “This is a massive opportunity, and a great challenge – and I think JMU students are up to the task of meeting that challenge.”

The presentation will be given on October 23 at 3:00 p.m. in ISAT/CS 236. All students and faculty are welcome.

As part of an initiative to raise awareness, Brian Reich, Project Director for the Hive, will be presenting about the global refugee crisis at JMU on October 23rd./////
15-news-moia-spotlighttrueStudent Organization Spotlight: Military and Operational Intelligence Association (MOIA)1444934700000Student Organization Spotlight: Military and Operational Intelligence Association (MOIA)/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/10/15-news-moia-spotlightJMUsite://JMU/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/10/15-news-moia-spotlightsujaj1458227368180sujaj14582273681801444881600000Student Organization Spotlight: Military and Operational Intelligence Association (MOIA)News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsIntelligence Analysis/ia/indexsite://JMU/ia/indexJMUindexISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis ProgramISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis Program/ia/archivessite://JMU/ia/archivesJMUarchivesIntelligence Analysis - News ArchivesIntelligence Analysis - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/intelligence-analysisJMUintelligence-analysis

The James Madison University Military and Operational Intelligence Association (MOIA) is a relatively new organization within the Department of Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT) Intelligence Analysis Program (IA). According to Andy Dove, a senior Intelligence Analysis major and founder and president of MOIA, the organization was founded just over a year ago and has already seen impressive growth and accomplishments.

MOIA was founded as a professional development organization for students interested in careers in government, law enforcement, and the military. “We understand that, especially in this industry, it’s very competitive. Our primary focus is preparing our members for careers in IA,” explained Dove. Whether they are performing training exercises, attending interview panels with industry professionals, or participating in resume workshops, members in the club receive practical experience and advice directly from experts. According to Dove, MOIA also functions as a support group where students can share their interests.

In addition to workshops and hands-on experience, members receive access to information resources, such as industry news, campus recruiting events, and job announcements, as well networking opportunities directly from department advisors and professors. The organization provides a unique opportunity to network with professionals so students understand what to expect from the industry and how they can maximize their impact once they enter the field. Members also gain access to exclusive events organized by MOIA.

The organization meets twice a month in the ISAT/HHS building and focuses on professional development, community service, and social gatherings. “Social gatherings are a good way to get to know members outside of meetings and have some fun,” said Dove. He also emphasized MOIA’s dedication to give back to the community that’s given to them. “A lot of our community service is dedicated towards helping veterans, supporting the military community and first responders.”

Upcoming events include: volunteering in the upcoming Veteran’s Day events in Harrisonburg, including a parade and luncheon for veterans; contributing to Operation Gratitude, a non-profit organization that sends care packages to military personnel deployed overseas during the holidays and hosting a 5K for the Wounded Warrior Project.

There are no major or class requirements to join. “Anyone is welcome,” said Dove. “We recognize that people from all different studies might be interested in IA careers, so we are committed to growing that base.” MOIA is in its second year and already has over 50 student members. 

For more information, be sure to check out MOIA’s Be Involved page (https://beinvolved.jmu.edu/organization/intel), or like their page on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/JMU-Military-and-Operational-Intelligence-Association-MOIA-820697337982916/timeline/). Feel free to email moiajmu@gmail.com with any questions.

By Stephen Roddewig ('18) JMU CISE
Published October 15, 2015

MOIA was founded as a professional development organization for students interested in careers in government, law enforcement, and the military./////
12-news-afceatrueStudent Organization Spotlight: AFCEA1444669260000Student Organization Spotlight: AFCEA/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/10/12-news-afceaJMUsite://JMU/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/10/12-news-afceasujaj1458227368018sujaj14582273680181444622400000Student Organization Spotlight: JMU Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA)News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsIntelligence Analysis/ia/indexsite://JMU/ia/indexJMUindexISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis ProgramISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis Program/ia/archivessite://JMU/ia/archivesJMUarchivesIntelligence Analysis - News ArchivesIntelligence Analysis - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/intelligence-analysisJMUintelligence-analysis

Among the many international organizations that maintain chapters at James Madison University, one stands out in the Department of Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT). The JMU Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) is one chapter of the international AFCEA organization. The mission of the AFCEA, according to the organization’s website (http://www.afcea.org/mvc.asp), is “increasing knowledge through the exploration of issues relevant to its members in information technology, communications, and electronics for the defense, homeland security and intelligence communities.”

On the university level, the JMU chapter focuses on making students aware of both the public and private sector opportunities in intelligence, technology, business, consulting, and more. According to Allison Beich, a senior Intelligence Analysis major with a minor in Geographic Science and president of the JMU AFCEA chapter, “Our student chapter plays a role in this by bridging the gap between students in academia and these industries listed in the mission statement.”

JMU AFCEA focuses on connecting students with speakers from these different industries to provide a larger picture of the intelligence field. “We have had people come and talk from the National Security field from places such as FBI, NGA, Former ODNI employee, CIA, defense contractors, etc. as well as business related speakers from Intel, Microsoft, etc.” said Beich. The chapter has many contacts, and the speakers are decided based on the members’ interests. This provides great networking opportunities. In addition, JMU AFCEA also hosts Career Academy Series workshops, which provide hands-on experience to develop professional skills such as writing resumes, interviewing, and job searching.

The chapter meets once a month on Mondays at 8:00 p.m. in the ISAT/HHS building. The meeting is dedicated to discussing upcoming events on a national level hosted by the larger AFCEA organization, as well as other events involving intelligence. In addition, the meeting focuses on events on the campus level, such upcoming as speakers and Career Academy Series workshops.

Anyone can join JMU AFCEA, regardless of major. Beyond practical skills and connections, members of JMU AFCEA receive a subscription to AFCEA International’s Signal Magazine, which provides even more resources and news about opportunities in the intelligence field. Members also receive invitations to events hosted by Young AFCEANs, an outreach program for young professionals in the field. Finally, according to Beich, “Employers know about AFCEA and may be a member already, so having this on your resume really makes you stand out.”

JMU AFCEA focuses on building its members’ skills and opportunities, but this doesn’t keep the chapter from giving back to the Harrisonburg community. “Even though this is a professional development club, we also like to have fun and help out the community,” said Beich. One particular example is the chapter’s Community Outreach Event for students in Harrisonburg High School. A committee from JMU AFCEA puts together critical thinking exercises for the students to complete and teaches methods of analysis. “It is a great way to reach out and educate young future college students of the topic of IA,” said Beich.

For more information, be sure to check out JMU AFCEA’s Be Involved webpage (https://beinvolved.jmu.edu/organization/jmuafcea) or contact the organization through their email (jmuafcea@gmail.com). To join the JMU chapter of AFCEA, register through the AFCEA website (http://www.afcea.org/membership/individual.asp#tab3). The membership fee is $15.

By Stephen Roddewig ('18) JMU CISE
Published October 5, 2015

Among the many international organizations that maintain chapters at James Madison University, one stands out in the Department of Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT). /////
05-tao-faculty-spotlighttrueFaculty Spotlight - Dr. Qingjiu Tom Tao1444070760000Faculty Spotlight - Dr. Qingjiu Tom Tao/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/10/05-tao-faculty-spotlightJMUsite://JMU/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/10/05-tao-faculty-spotlightsujaj1458227367871sujaj14582273678711444017600000Faculty Spotlight - Dr. Qingjiu Tom TaoNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsIntelligence Analysis/ia/indexsite://JMU/ia/indexJMUindexISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis ProgramISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis Program/ia/archivessite://JMU/ia/archivesJMUarchivesIntelligence Analysis - News ArchivesIntelligence Analysis - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/intelligence-analysisJMUintelligence-analysisCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technology

“This is one of the very few professions that you’re actually really happy that your student will go farther than you. It’s the greatest profession in the world.” Dr. Qinqjiu Tom Tao

Dr. Tom TaoDr. Qingjiu Tom Tao was first interested in Competitive Intelligence in 1994, when the concept was first introduced in China. Over two decades later, he brings his experience and expertise to the Intelligence Analysis Program within the ISAT Department at James Madison University. Currently, Tao teaches as an Assistant Professor for the Intelligence Analysis Program (IA), focusing on the field of Competitive Intelligence (CI). “Competitive Intelligence is the ear and eyes of the organization,” said Tao. “What Competitive Intelligence does is to provide decision-makers timely, accurate, and reliable information and recommendations. This will, if implemented correctly, avoid a lot of mistakes in the business world.”

Tao earned his Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering with honors from the Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1991. Three years later, he received his Master of Science degree from the same university. His formal education culminated in 2004 with a Ph.D. in Strategic Planning and Public Policy from the University of Pittsburgh’s Katz Graduate School of Business, with a major field in Strategic Management and a minor field in International Business. Before coming to JMU in 2009, Tao worked as an industry analyst and deputy chief editor for the China Aero-Information Center and taught as an Assistant Professor of Management at Lehigh University, College of Business and Economics at Lehigh University.

Tao’s research centers on business strategies and Competitive Intelligence in emerging market economies. This began with the first-ever survey of CI professionals on a national level in China, conducted by himself and Dr. John Prescott (University of Pittsburgh) from 1999-2000. “This paper was a pioneering piece in studying CI behaviors of managers in an emerging market context,” explained Tao. The work of Tao and Prescott has been the basis for following research projects in related areas. Currently, Tao is working on survey of Competitive Intelligence practitioners in China and Japan. Tao is undertaking this project in cooperation with a professor from Peking University in Beijing and the Japanese Society of Competitive Intelligence.

In addition to his research, Tao is also actively involved in the business world of Competitive Intelligence. “I believe in practicing what you preach,” said Tao. He has served on three different editorial boards for CI-related journals, and attends and participates in multiple conferences based around Competitive Intelligence. His experience and knowledge has even gained the notice of policy makers. “I was honored to have the chance to testify before a congressional commission (U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission) in 2008 on the development of China’s auto industry and its potential impact on the American market.”

 His research and work in the field of Competitive Intelligence means that Tao brings valuable connections and experience to his students. In particular, his private sector perspective setting provides unique insight. “My business training approach should complement an IA student’s existing intelligence training very well,” said Tao. He has leveraged his industry connections to benefit his students through hands-on experience; “This semester I’m helping one Fortune 100 company to work with our students on some real projects.”

Having begun his educational and professional experiences in China, Tao also brings an international edge to the program. “My connections with leading Chinese institutions such as Peking University will also give IA students the chance to interact with the best CI students in China and study the business practices of emerging Chinese multinational corporations.” In the coming years, Tao hopes these connections will allow him to create an exchange program for international Competitive Intelligence students to encourage a global perspective.

Looking to the future, Tao sees the need further growth of the competitive intelligence field in formal education. “Competitive Intelligence is critical to business decision making, and yet very few business schools in the U.S. and in the world have dedicated classes on CI.” Pointing to the success of the national security side of the IA program, Tao believes that JMU can position itself to be the premium leader in the Competitive Intelligence field. He hopes to play an active role in this expansion, saying, “JMU is one of the few universities that offers a degree program dedicated to CI, and it is my job and desire to further develop the program into an internationally-known CI education center.”

By Stephen Roddewig ('18) JMU CISE
Published October 5, 2015

Dr. Qingjiu Tom Tao was first interested in Competitive Intelligence in 1994, when the concept was first introduced in China./////
17-news-sm-bus-cyber-sec-workshoptrueHelping small businesses become more aware of cyber security threats1447878720000Helping small businesses become more aware of cyber security threats/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/11/17-news-sm-bus-cyber-sec-workshopJMUsite://JMU/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/11/17-news-sm-bus-cyber-sec-workshopsujaj1458227367580sujaj14582273675801447822800000Helping small businesses become more aware of cyber security threatsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsIntelligence Analysis/ia/indexsite://JMU/ia/indexJMUindexISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis ProgramISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis Program/ia/archivessite://JMU/ia/archivesJMUarchivesIntelligence Analysis - News ArchivesIntelligence Analysis - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/intelligence-analysisJMUintelligence-analysisComputer Science/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cs/archivessite://JMU/cs/archivesJMUarchivesComputer Science - News ArchivesComputer Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/computer-scienceJMUcomputer-scienceIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technologyCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseResearch and Scholarship/research/indexsite://JMU/research/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/research-and-scholarshipJMUresearch-and-scholarship

Small business owners, employees, staff, and JMU faculty came together on October 30, 2015 at James Madison University to participate in the First Cyber Security Awareness Workshop for Small Businesses. The workshop was a joint effort between the College of Integrated Science and Engineering and the College of Business at JMU, the Shenandoah Valley Small Business Development Center (SBDC), and the Shenandoah Valley Technology Council (SVTC).

PHOTO: Patricia Toth of NISTPatricia Toth, IT Specialist with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), delivered the keynote address. She opened with illuminating statistics, framing the issue for the audience of local business professionals. “There are approximately 28 million small businesses in the United States and the average cost of a cybercrime incident for a small business is $82,000. Attackers see small businesses as an easy way in,” said Toth. She offered solutions but indicated that no risk can be completely eliminated. In the case of cybercrime, the risk is much higher than many businesses realize.

Dr. Edna Reid, Intelligence Analysis professor, moderated the panel discussion focusing on JMU outreach initiatives in cyber security.  Computer Science Professor, Dr. Hossain Heydari provided an example of outreach that the university provides. “Students from our Cyber Defense and Computer Forensics provide assistance to local businesses. We often send students to help small companies whose networks have been compromised.  Our students can help them to recover files lost in cyber-attacks,” explained Heydari.

Following the panel discussion, the Cyber Defense Club gave a demonstration on cyber security at work. Students located a suspicious file on the sample machine and showed the audience how to remove it and searching for other malicious code or applications that may have also been installed.

Cyber security can be overwhelming for small businesses. By offering this workshop, JMU has helped to alleviate some of the confusion and provide strategies for confronting the threat of cybercrime in the local community.  Because the reception of the workshop was so positive, JMU will organize additional workshops in the future.

Small business owners participated in the First Cyber Security Awareness Workshop at JMU./////
03-news-study-abroad-signaporetrueJMU students have opportunity to study abroad in Singapore1446580740000JMU students have opportunity to study abroad in Singapore/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/11/03-news-study-abroad-signaporeJMUsite://JMU/news/ia-BACKUP/2015/11/03-news-study-abroad-signaporesujaj1458227367321sujaj14582273673211446526800000JMU students have opportunity to study abroad in SingaporeNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsIntelligence Analysis/ia/indexsite://JMU/ia/indexJMUindexISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis ProgramISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis Program/ia/archivessite://JMU/ia/archivesJMUarchivesIntelligence Analysis - News ArchivesIntelligence Analysis - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/intelligence-analysisJMUintelligence-analysisCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technology

Students from JMU will have a new opportunity to study abroad this year. Dr. Edna Reid, Associate Professor in the Intelligence Analysis Program (IA) at JMU is leading a four-week program study-abroad program in Singapore. Terrorism, Cyber Intel, and Socio-Cultural Issues, is scheduled for May 16 through June 16, 2016 and will focus on the growing threat of international terrorism and the emerging field of cyber intelligence from an international perspective.

Reid was first inspired to host the study-abroad program after studying the emerging opportunities and challenges in international cyber intelligence in 2014. Singapore is ranked as one of the most wired and cyber-ready nations in the world and internationally ranked the highest in terms of average per capita loss per victim of cybercrime.

In May 2015, Reid traveled to Singapore to give seminars and a workshop on cyber intelligence. “While there, I received briefings about how the Singapore government is making cyber security one of its economic hubs for development.  They are inviting cyber security companies to set up their Asian headquarters in Singapore and the government has established the Cyber Security Agency (CSA), to help oversee industry development, strategy, education, and protect critical public sectors,” said Reid. She sees this growth as a teaching opportunity that aligns well with the IA program – to employ coursework and underlying research that addresses major local, national, and global challenges.

Students will have the opportunity to analyze and map cyber attack capabilities of terrorist groups in Southeast Asia onto social-cultural characteristics of the region. They will be able to expand their cultural awareness and knowledge by focusing on information security developments, cyber security policies, workforce training and a culture of cyber security. They will also engage in guest lectures, participate in round table discussions with local organizations, discover Singapore cyber smart-city developments through local tours, and spend time collaborating with local students at the Temasek-IBM Polytechnic Security Operations Centre (SOC).

The program is open to all majors, though they must be approaching their junior or senior year to apply. Graduate students can also apply. For more information about the program, visit the study-abroad website.

Dr. Edna Reid, Associate Professor in the Intelligence Analysis Program (IA) at JMU is leading a four-week program study-abroad program in Singapore./////
01-local-help-for-global-refugeestrueLocal Help for global refugees1456846080000Local Help for global refugees/news/gs-BACKUP/2016/03/01-local-help-for-global-refugeesJMUsite://JMU/news/gs-BACKUP/2016/03/01-local-help-for-global-refugeessujaj1458222915659sujaj14582229156591456808400000Local Help for global refugeesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsGeographic Science/gs/indexsite://JMU/gs/indexJMUindexGeographic ScienceGeographic Science/gs/archivessite://JMU/gs/archivesJMUarchivesGeographic Science - News ArchivesGeographic Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/geographic-scienceJMUgeographic-scienceCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technologyIntelligence Analysis/ia/indexsite://JMU/ia/indexJMUindexISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis ProgramISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis Program/ia/archivessite://JMU/ia/archivesJMUarchivesIntelligence Analysis - News ArchivesIntelligence Analysis - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/intelligence-analysisJMUintelligence-analysis

By: Stephen Roddewig "18

In 2014, an estimated 42,500 people became refugees every day, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. The refugee crisis extends from South America to the Middle East and beyond. In response to the global emergency, James Madison University (JMU) has been involved in the effort to provide aid for refugees and other immigrants coming to Harrisonburg. Dr. Mary Kimsey, a professor in the Geographic Science (GS) Program and co-coordinator of the Minor in Humanitarian Affairs, has over 24 years of experience with local efforts to help refugees.

“Refugees have been coming to the area for decades,” said Kimsey. Many Kurds, Iraqis, Ukrainians, Ethiopians and people of many other nationalities have resettled in Harrisonburg and the surrounding areas. According to Kimsey, the first immigrants she assisted were Cubans who came through the local refugee office. She helped them adjust to their new environment. “Some of them now work in JMU’s Dining Services, one is now a branch manager with a bank, and another works with immigrants in a social services office,” Kimsey said.

Kimsey’s experience with helping refugees extends to her students’ efforts. “Through the courses in Geographic Science that I teach, I have had hundreds of students tutor refugees in local schools and in their homes.” For example, when teaching the course Human Geography: The Cultural Landscape, Kimsey assigned a service project to her students that involved tutoring sessions arranged through the Refugee Resettlement Office. The project provided students with experience related to course work concerning issues facing refugees, and benefitted the students on a personal level. “The students have almost always had memorable or even life-changing experiences,” said Kimsey. “I have heard many times ‘they are just like us.’”

In addition, a student in the Humanitarian Affairs minor along with other students established the Relief for Refugees Club in fall semester, 2015. According to the club president Amanda Bressner, the founders were inspired after taking Critical Reading and Writing “during which we learned about refugees from around the world and multiple stories of human rights violations. With the immense refugee population in Harrisonburg, we all decided we wanted to do something to make a difference.” The club was formed to provide basic necessities for those in need. Already, the club has held a coat and blanket drive for Syrian refugees, and more fundraising events are planned for spring semester. “We’ve had an enormous amount of student and faculty interest,” said Bressner. Kimsey advised Bressner during the formation of the club, and hopes to play an active role in the future as the club builds further ties with the Harrisonburg community.

PHOTO: Justin and ReinaA former GS student and alumnus, Justin White, recently returned from a trip to Lesbos, Greece. On the island, White helped guide boats loaded with Syrian refugees to safe landings on the shore and responded to any emergencies on the boats, including administering life-saving techniques to passengers who fell into the water. White leveraged the skills he learned as a lifeguard and a volunteer firefighter. “These are a strong people with a lot of integrity,” said White. “I hope I could act as strong if I had to leave my home.” White is a former student of Kimsey and said that she had a great influence on his life. “She helped me to think in a worldly way,” said White. He hopes to continue to go on relief trips to help those in need. “It’s become a routine to consciously participate in global affairs.”

Volunteering in the local community is another way students can make an impact on the larger crisis. “We are always ready and willing to donate items and money, but sometimes our time is just as important, if not more so,” said Kimsey. Existing volunteer organizations, such as Skyline Literacy, offer great opportunities to aid local immigrants and refugees, Kimsey suggests. Even the friendship of students can benefit immigrants in the surrounding community. “Refugees sometimes feel isolated and often would like more contact with the local population,” said Kimsey.

JMU is responding to the crisis by focusing on educating students about refugee issues. In October, Dr. Tim Walton hosted Jim Hershberger, the Director of the Refugee Resettlement Office, to give a presentation to his Selected Topics in Intelligence Analysis course. Hershberger was accompanied by a young Eritrean refugee, who told his story of leaving his country only to be imprisoned in a neighboring state.

In a time of heightened fear and suspicion, awareness and education are vital to understanding critical issues and deciding how to respond. “When we want to respond financially, we need to investigate organizations thoroughly before making a contribution,” said Kimsey. Supporting regional organizations, such as the Refugee Resettlement Office, and student organizations, such as the Relief for Refugees club, can make a great impact in the lives of refugees and immigrants. Above all else, students and faculty must stay informed. “We must keep up with the news by reading and listening to a variety of news sources,” said Kimsey, “in order to make informed decisions about the many critical situations in the world around us.”

Justin White ('10) will be on campus Monday, March 21, 2016 at 5 p.m. in Harrison Hall, Room 2015 to talk more about the refugee crisis and his first hand account in Lesbos, Greece.

In response to the global emergency, James Madison University (JMU) has been involved in the efforts to provide aid for refugees and other immigrants to Harrisonburg.///_images/gs/global-refugee-story/refugee-banner-1-172x103.jpgsite://JMU/_images/gs/global-refugee-story/refugee-banner-1-172x103.jpgJMUrefugee-banner-1-172x103.jpgLocal Help for Global Refugees//
28-satellite-images-spatial-history-newstrueSatellite images, maps of the past reveal 'spatial history' of the community1441305120000Satellite images, maps of the past reveal 'spatial history' of the community/news/gs-BACKUP/2015/08/28-satellite-images-spatial-history-newsJMUsite://JMU/news/gs-BACKUP/2015/08/28-satellite-images-spatial-history-newssujaj1458222913944sujaj14582229139441440734400000Satellite images, maps of the past reveal 'spatial history' of the communityNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsGeographic Science/gs/indexsite://JMU/gs/indexJMUindexGeographic ScienceGeographic Science/gs/archivessite://JMU/gs/archivesJMUarchivesGeographic Science - News ArchivesGeographic Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/geographic-scienceJMUgeographic-science

2015 Spatial History Public Square Logo

Have you noticed how a detailed map can draw you into the world it represents?

Two JMU professionals are capitalizing on that pull to create an online interactive map-based resource for Harrisonburg. Supported by a $4,000 grant from the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, Dr. Kevin L. Borg, an associate professor of history, and Bradley A. Andrick, GIS coordinator in Facilities Management and a 2014 graduate of JMU’s geographic science program, are hard at work stitching together today’s satellite imagery and century-old Sanborn maps, which were risk-evaluation resources for the U.S. fire insurance industry beginning in 1867.

Their project, “Spatial History in the Public Square: Maps, Images & Archives in the Community,” is important because it will allow users to fade between detailed historical maps of the city and 21st century imagery to see clearly the geographic changes in the city within the last century. Equally important, Borg and Andrick plan to share the technical building process of their resource with other communities interested in creating their own spatial history documentation.

Texts, photographs and other historical resources will further populate the map layers. Work on the VFH-supported part of the project will continue throughout the fall semester.


Dr. Kevin L. Borg, an associate professor of history, and Bradley A. Andrick, GIS coordinator in Facilities Management and a 2014 graduate of JMU¿s geographic science program, are hard at work /////
28-innovative-prgm-wins-awardtrueInnovative Program Wins Governor's Award1443472440000Innovative Program Wins Governor's Award/news/gs-BACKUP/2015/09/28-innovative-prgm-wins-awardJMUsite://JMU/news/gs-BACKUP/2015/09/28-innovative-prgm-wins-awardsujaj1458222913685sujaj14582229136851443412800000Innovative Program Wins Governor's AwardNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsGeographic Science/gs/indexsite://JMU/gs/indexJMUindexGeographic ScienceGeographic Science/gs/archivessite://JMU/gs/archivesJMUarchivesGeographic Science - News ArchivesGeographic Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/geographic-scienceJMUgeographic-scienceCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technologyResearch and Scholarship/research/indexsite://JMU/research/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/research-and-scholarshipJMUresearch-and-scholarship

By: Daniel Vieth

While high-stakes tests dominate the high school landscape, students (particularly by their senior year) are yearning to see if there’s more to their education. For example, students are introduced to cutting-edge technologies, but don’t get the chance to see how they can use these technologies to make a difference in their communities. This has been the driving force behind JMU’s Geospatial Semester, a program that has, for the past 11 years, given thousands of Virginia high school students the chance to learn about and use cutting-edge geospatial technologies. The Geospatial Semester was recently recognized for its success at the annual Commonwealth of Virginia Innovative Technology Symposium (COVITS) in Richmond, receiving a prestigious Governor’s Technology Award for the Innovative Use of Technology in Education.

The COVITS is an annual gathering of Virginia’s government information technology (IT) leaders, looking at the future of IT solutions through guest speakers and workshops. This past year, the symposium presented the Governor’s Technology Award to 18 different organizations in nine categories, including Innovative Use of Open Data, Best Citizen Portal, and Cross-Boundary Collaboration. “It’s refreshing to see this model recognized at a time when one might characterize education as frequently being rigid and uniform,” said Paul Rittenhouse, one of the managers of the Geospatial Semester along with Kathryn Keranen. “It’s also pleasing to see the program recognized at an industry conference, rather than just within education circles. I believe this speaks to the genuine success of the program.”

The Geospatial Semester is an innovative partnership between JMU and multiple school districts across Virginia where high school teachers collaborate directly with JMU faculty members to bring different geospatial technologies like GIS, GPS and remote sensing into the classrooms. “[The JMU faculty] each have a set of schools that we visit once a month to support and teach current lessons, observe, and develop student projects,” explained Rittenhouse. “It’s a flexible model intended to accommodate the variety of different styles, issues, and interests of all the classrooms in participating schools.” Through this, students have the chance to earn dual-enrollment credit at JMU for the projects they complete inside and out of the classroom, with over 3,000 students already earning credit since the program started 11 years ago. Many of these projects have even been recognized with a variety of awards, while others have been featured at the ESRI International GIS User’s Conference.

The Governor’s Technology Award is an acknowledgment of the incredible work that all the participants have put into this program. “[The award] is a wonderful recognition of the great work of teachers and students in Virginia high schools,” added Dr. Bob Kolvoord, Dean of the College of Integrated Science and Engineering and co-founder of the Geospatial Semester. “They’re exploring cutting-edge technologies and applying them in new and innovative ways. We’re proud to be a continuing partner in the Geospatial Semester.” 

While high-stakes tests dominate the high school landscape, students are yearning to see if there's more to their education./////
10-news-creating-spatial-thinkerstrueCreating Spatial Thinkers1447192920000Creating Spatial Thinkers/news/gs-BACKUP/2015/11/10-news-creating-spatial-thinkersJMUsite://JMU/news/gs-BACKUP/2015/11/10-news-creating-spatial-thinkerssujaj1458222913288sujaj14582229132881447131600000Creating Spatial ThinkersNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsGeographic Science/gs/indexsite://JMU/gs/indexJMUindexGeographic ScienceGeographic Science/gs/archivessite://JMU/gs/archivesJMUarchivesGeographic Science - News ArchivesGeographic Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/geographic-scienceJMUgeographic-scienceIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technologyCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUcise

Article by: Lindsey Tilton Mitchell, Trajectory Magazine, 2015, Issue 4

James Madison University partners with Virginia High Schools to promote GIS.

In an effort to introduce high school seniors to career opportunities in the geospatial sciences, James Madison University’s (JMU) integrated science and technology department offers Geospatial Semester, a dual enrollment program between the university and high school GIS programs throughout Virginia.

High school seniors learn geospatial technologies from their home school while earning college credit. JMU provides participating schools with Esri ArcGIS software so they can complete their projects on the same software GIS professionals use. Additionally, JMU faculty visits the high schools periodically to observe student progress and to serve as mentors for the students’ final projects.

JMU’s Geospatial Semester began in 2005, and more than 3,000 students across 15 Virginia school districts have since completed the program.

“It’s a way to jump-start students in preparation for college and to develop skills like project management,” said Dr. Bob Kolvoord, dean of JMU’s College of integrated science and engineering and a professor of integrated science and technology. “If you give students a different experience it allows them to do creative projects using these [GIS] tools.”

Kolvoord said Geospatial Semester teaches basic GIS skills and how to apply those skills to assignments and small projects, which include learning how to use Trimble GPS devices and ArcGIS software to collect and map data and apply it to real life scenarios. Students then create a final project to present and defend to JMU faculty.

Students have the freedom to work with any organization they choose for their final project. In the past, seniors have worked with the United States Geological Survey, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Loudoun County government, Shenandoah National Park, Mary Baldwin College, and many others. After successfully completing the program, students receive transferable college credit.

“The final project helps their presentation skills and ability to think beyond what their work means,” Kolvoord said. “It’s about developing more spatial thinkers. This is not simply about training GIS mechanics, but to have students explore GIS problems.”

Tara Meadows, a social studies teacher at Luray High School in Luray, Va., said the high school has participated in Geospatial Semester since 2006. She said the program has been invaluable and has helped Luray High School’s GIS course become a success.

“The Geospatial Semester is a nontraditional, unique experience for high school seniors,” Meadows said. “It is a refreshing class format that gives students ownership in the learning experience.”

Many 2015 high school awardees of USGIF’s Scholarship Program participated in Geospatial Semester—one of whom is Christina Bohnet, a graduate from South Lakes High School in Reston, Va. and currently a freshman at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Mich. As a double major in geography and Japanese, Bohnet said Geospatial Semester was the reason she decided to continue her education in geography.

“I found I have an aptitude for geography through the program, and my teacher was very supportive and helpful to me in my learning,” Bohnet said. “One of my favorite parts of the course was the field trip my school organized to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. I got a lot of feedback from the analysts there, and my final project was well-received.”

In 2015, Geospatial Semester won the Governor’s Technology Award for Innovative Use of Technology in Education, which recognized the program’s overall achievements and innovative partnerships with Virginia high schools.

See the original article in Trajectory Magazine

 

In an effort to introduce high school seniors to career opportunities in the geospatial sciences, JMU's ISAT Department offers Geospatial Semester/////02-isat-alum-finds-path-in-military-medicinetrueISAT alum finds path in military medicine1456865400000ISAT alum finds path in military medicine/news/isat-BACKUP/2016/03/02-isat-alum-finds-path-in-military-medicineJMUsite://JMU/news/isat-BACKUP/2016/03/02-isat-alum-finds-path-in-military-medicinesujaj1458221981537sujaj14582219815371456894800000ISAT alum finds path in military medicineNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technology

By: Dina Manco

As a member of the first Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT) graduating class, Ron Yeaw (‘97) has applied his skills in a variety of careers over the past eighteen years. While he has primarily worked for Army defense contractors, his roles have expanded in continuum with his experience. He is currently employed as the Clinical Workflow Project Manager at Northrop Grumman. PHOTO: Ron Yew

Yeaw works within the military medicine division of the defense contractor. He states, “I was very lucky in the fact I really found my niche and the direction I want to take my life early on. Finding my voice in military medicine helped me find a passion I didn’t know was there; but with my mom being a nurse and my father being a naval officer it made sense. ISAT was a booster rocket that pushed me up as I moved from staff to senior management.”

As one of the first ISAT graduates, Yeaw says the success of his class was crucial to the branding of the department. His undergraduate experience was highly collaborative with professors in order to guide the direction of future courses. “We would come to find out years later, that our professors at the time were only ever a few weeks ahead of us designing the curriculum. It was an amazing journey we all shared.” The ISAT program gave Yeaw the ability to develop the problem solving and communication skills he uses day to day in his career.

His primary role with contractors has been working to implement and enhance electronic health record systems for the US military. This endeavor has relocated him to countries across Asia and Europe. He lived in Germany for four years before returning to the United States in 2013, receiving the Superior Civilian Service medal while stationed there; the 3rd highest award a civilian can receive in the Army.

PHOTO: YeawBecause of his education he is able to communicate the technical components of programs in layman’s terms to coworkers and clients. “I’ve been in the same career field since the day I left JMU. Very quickly the holistic approach to solving problems developed through my ISAT degree helped me stand out from the crowd, and fill the void between technical staff and management,” he states.

The advice of his ISAT professors enabled Yeaw create the map of his career. Yeaw urges students to utilize the opportunities available in the department to consider what path in Integrated Science and Technology best suits them and their future aspirations. “ISAT points you in a general direction, but finding your own specific career is up to you. Your professors and the ISAT alumni can help guide you along this road, please reach out to them.”

 “My career in program management has given me a way to complete the cycle in my life to mentor and facilitate the next generation…It’s interesting to look back on my career and find a narrative. I met my wife at JMU. I got my career at JMU. It has been a very successful story.”

Yeaw is in the process of securing internships at Northrop for JMU students and will speak at the ISAT Senior Symposium in April.

As a member of the first ISAT graduating class, Ron Yeaw ('97) has applied his skills in a variety of careers over the past eighteen years.///_images/isat/yeaw-alum-2016/yeaw-thumb-172x103.jpgsite://JMU/_images/isat/yeaw-alum-2016/yeaw-thumb-172x103.jpgJMUyeaw-thumb-172x103.jpgISAT Alum Finds Path in Military Medicine//
24-changeisreel-group-encourages-sustainable-lifestyletrueChangeIsReel group encourages sustainable lifestyle1456938480000ChangeIsReel group encourages sustainable lifestyle/news/isat-BACKUP/2016/02/24-changeisreel-group-encourages-sustainable-lifestyleJMUsite://JMU/news/isat-BACKUP/2016/02/24-changeisreel-group-encourages-sustainable-lifestylesujaj1458221981245sujaj14582219812451456290000000ChangeIsReel group encourages sustainable lifestyleNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technologyGeographic Science/gs/indexsite://JMU/gs/indexJMUindexGeographic ScienceGeographic Science/gs/archivessite://JMU/gs/archivesJMUarchivesGeographic Science - News ArchivesGeographic Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/geographic-scienceJMUgeographic-science

Natalie Lavery | contributing writer | The Breeze

ChangeIsREEL is an interactive website created in September by the National Science Foundation Collective. The NSF Collective is a group of eight JMU employees who work under integrated science and technology professor Eric Pappas. This group of social activists works on many different projects annually, including ChangeIsREEL.

The NSF Collective creates weekly videos on different aspects of sustainability and how to better balance daily living.

Lauren Wheeler, a junior geographic sciences major and a video producer for the ChangeIsREEL website, describes sustainability as taking thoughts and aligning them with actions.

“These thoughts must be your own and not what society is telling you to be; you are your own person and you need to stand up for that,” Wheeler said.

Not only does this website allow individuals to find themselves, it enforces the idea that success must come from the individual level.

“The only way to take control of your life and reach that sustainable personality is to look inside and start coming to terms with yourself,” Pappas said. “Everyone looks for answers on the outside when actually you have to look to yourself.”

Despite the inevitability of change starting with the individual, the NSF Collective wants the viewers to actually learn from its site. 

“We want them to be interested and actually want them to work on themselves,” Wheeler said. The videos do not have a real purpose if you are not in a place of accepting the inevitability of change.” 

 For example, its video on internal vs. external locus of control stated that everyone is a victim of their environments, and that regaining a sense of internal locus of control is the only way to regain control of one’s personal life.

The five areas of sustainability that ChangeIsREEL focuses on are physical sustainability, intellectual sustainability, emotional sustainability, social sustainability and philosophical sustainability. The members of the NSF collective made it clear that not one of these aspects can be sustained by itself; they are all interconnected.

One of the top videos posted to the website clearly demonstrates this idea. At first glance, the video is about how to make a pizza. After viewing this video, the audience quickly learns that not only did the video teach them about pizza, its message also mainly revolved around relationships. The NSF collective used the idea of making pizza to subtly show the audience how to maintain their relationships, connecting the two aspects of sustainabilityRead more in the JMU Breeze

Using the power of media, members of ChangeIsREEL are working to increase knowledge about sustainability. ///_images/isat/the-breeze-news/changeisreel-172x103.jpgsite://JMU/_images/isat/the-breeze-news/changeisreel-172x103.jpgJMUchangeisreel-172x103.jpgChangeisReel//
11-news-decker-martindale-isat-alumtrueISAT Offers Graduates Numerous Opportunities1452536880000ISAT Offers Graduates Numerous Opportunities/news/isat-BACKUP/2016/01/11-news-decker-martindale-isat-alumJMUsite://JMU/news/isat-BACKUP/2016/01/11-news-decker-martindale-isat-alumsujaj1458221980938sujaj14582219809381452488400000ISAT offers graduates numerous opportunitiesNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technologyCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUcise

By: Brett Seekford

As they were working on their senior capstone project in Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT), Amanda Martindale and Julianne Decker developed interests that would influence their decisions about life after college. During their senior year, they worked as a thesis team at Avalon Acres Farm and Polyface Farm. While they were building biochar-production units and heat transfer systems on these farms, they already had their sights set on the future. The insights they gained from this experience shaped their different career paths.

As she prepared for graduation, Martindale was unsure of what she wanted to do with her degree. Developing an interest in food sourcing through her work at Avalon Acres and Polyface, she began to think her career should involve food production. Martindale soon began working at Waterpenny Farm in Sperryville, Virginia. After establishing a background in farming, she moved with her fiancée to his family farm, Oak Shade Farm, and began working with him. She has since realized that organic farming is her passion: "Industrial agriculture is one of the most environmentally destructive practices that occurs in our country, and I hope that by growing food in a healthier way I am contributing to the movement away from this extractive type of farming."

PHOTO: Amanda MartindaleNow essentially running a sub-business under the Oak Shade Farm name, Martindale and her fiancée are leasing land from his family so they can grow plants and produce to sell at the local market. They also have over 200 laying hens, raise shiitake mushrooms, and manage honeybees. She sees her experiences as an ISAT major still helping her today. "I learned a lot about working with other people in effective ways, which is essential when running a business with my partner and frequently working with other family members," Martindale said. "The ISAT curriculum also helped me develop time management skills that I use daily when prioritizing tasks and planning my work day. I also use a lot of Excel, which I couldn't have done without the ISAT 151 lab!"

PHOTO: Julianne DeckerDecker, meanwhile, had a fairly straightforward career path as she looked toward graduation. At numerous job fairs, she noticed one prospective employer always in attendance: Deloitte Consulting, LLP. No matter the event – case study challenges, résumé workshops, in-class presentations — Deloitte was involved in some capacity. One of the "Big Four" companies, meaning the four largest international professional services, Deloitte is a firm that specializes in tax, audit, financial advisory, consulting, and enterprise risk services. Decker applied to work at Deloitte, and after a rigorous application process that included a three-part interview, she was offered a position with the company during the fall of her senior year. She began working immediately after graduation, currently assisting a federal agency by leading a small team to improve program management.

Decker attributes her success to her experiences as an ISAT major. "I feel I was able to stand out in comparison to other qualified JMU students due to my extensive list of experiences stemming from the ISAT curriculum. Not only did I have hands-on farming and construction experience from my senior thesis, I also had proposal/business development, leadership, and financial/project management skills," she said. "I can honestly say that ISAT instilled the confidence and skills necessary for me to start and succeed in my career in a renowned company."PHOTO: Biochar

Both women, despite having established different careers, found success. "I know everyone says this, including your parents, but truly enjoy and appreciate your time in college and as an ISAT student," Decker said. "As I progressed throughout my college career, I utilized the opportunity to dabble in the various sector work and determine what I truly was interested in pursuing – the environment. I would not trade the knowledge, experiences, and relationships I gained from being part of such a unique and humbling opportunity."

Martindale hopes students develop a passion and find a job that makes them happy. "Think about what kind of job will really make you happy. Everybody is different, and while higher-paying office based jobs may be ideal for many people, they are not for everyone," she said. "Talk to professors about your future, especially the ones you are close to. [One of my professors] really helped give me the confidence I needed to direct my path toward something I loved."

The ISAT major has been instrumental in the successes enjoyed by Decker and Martindale and shows that a degree in ISAT can open doors to many different careers.

As they were working on their senior capstone project in ISAT, Amanda Martindale and Julianne Decker developed interests that would influence their decisions about life after college///_images/isat/isat-alum-martindale-decker-story/biochar-unit-172x103.jpgsite://JMU/_images/isat/isat-alum-martindale-decker-story/biochar-unit-172x103.jpgJMUbiochar-unit-172x103.jpgISAT alums Amanda Martindale and Julianne Decker with Biochar Team//
16-williamstrue1460571860031chandljlDr. Williams, College of Health and Behavioral Studies, Receives External FundingDr. Jacqueline A. Williams, Professor in the Kinesiology Department, has been awarded $30,000 from the Virginia Department of Education for ¿The 2016 Health & Physical Activity Institute¿. Dr. Williams, along with JMU students, will be working to support a high-quality health and physical education content/teaching summer institute. reschmmDr. Jacqueline A. Williams, Professor in the Kinesiology Department, has been awarded $30,000 from the Virginia Department of Education. Kinesiology, health, physical, activity, education, students, summerDr. Williams, along with JMU students, will be working to support a high-quality health and physical education content/teaching summer institute. Dr. Williams, College of Health and Behavioral Studies, Receives External Funding/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/16-williamsJMUsite://JMU/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/16-williamsreschmm1458158555849reschmm14583109119911458100800000Dr. Williams, College of Health and Behavioral Studies, Receives External FundingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Sponsored Programs/sponsoredprograms/indexsite://JMU/sponsoredprograms/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/sponsoredprogramsJMUsponsoredprograms

Dr. Jacqueline A. Williams, Professor in the Kinesiology Department, has been awarded $30,000 from the Virginia Department of Education for “The 2016 Health & Physical Activity Institute”. Dr. Williams, along with JMU students, will be working to support a high-quality health and physical education content/teaching summer institute.HPAI

“JMU has been fortunate to obtain funding to host the institute every summer since 2003. The institute has grown in attendance to host over 330 Virginia teachers each summer. By hosting the institute at JMU our students can attend and 10 students are selected each year to be ambassadors. The ambassadors assist with all aspects of the conference. In addition, the institute attracts many alumni who are currently teaching to head back to JMU. The Department of Kinesiology has been fortunate to have such a collaborative relationship with the Virginia Department of Education”, Dr. Williams.  

Best of luck to Dr. Williams and her team as they promote health and physical education this summer!

Click here to view highlights and more photos from the 2015 Health and Physical Activity Institute! 

Published March 16, 2016

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Dr. Jacqueline A. Williams, Professor in the Kinesiology Department, has been awarded $30,000 from the Virginia Department of Education. /////
16-walk-for-hopetrue1458148535512capleyaeColleges Unite for Harrisonburg's Walk for HopeOn Saturday, April 2nd, the 5th annual Walk for Hope will be hosted at James Madison University! walk for hope, counseling center, depression, suicideColleges Unite for Harrisonburg's Walk for Hope/news/successcenter/2016/03/16-walk-for-hopeJMUsite://JMU/news/successcenter/2016/03/16-walk-for-hopecapleyae1458146020054capleyae14581485206341458144000000Colleges Unite for Harrisonburg's Walk for HopeNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsStudent Success////_tags/source/student-affairs/student-successJMUstudent-successStudent Success Center/successcenter/indexsite://JMU/successcenter/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/student-affairs/student-success-centerJMUstudent-success-centerStudent Success Center/successcenter/indexsite://JMU/successcenter/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/student-affairs/student-success-centerJMUstudent-success-center

By: Allison Capley (’16), Student Affairs Technical Services

Walk for Hope logoOn Saturday, April 2nd, the 5th annual Walk for Hope will be hosted at James Madison University! Walk for Hope is an event that encourages students from James Madison University, Blue Ridge Community College, Bridgewater College, and Eastern Mennonite University to come out and raise awareness about depression and suicide. 

This event is free and is sponsored by the Austin Frazier Memorial Fund, JMU, EMU, Bridgewater College, and Blue Ridge Community College. To register, visit the event’s website to identify which school you are representing. The walk is open to the public, so you do not have to be a student to participate. Remember to register so that you can pick up your FREE Walk for Hope t-shirt at check in! This year, 800 participants are anticipated to join in.

Check in will begin at 11:30am on the JMU campus at the Student Success Center plaza. The walk will begin at 12:00pm and it will cover 1.3 miles throughout JMU’s campus. At 12:30pm, JMU Godwin Gym will be the finishing point, and any attendees who were unable to participate in the walking portion of the event can meet up and join at the gym. From 12:30pm–3:00pm, speakers, creative arts activities, refreshments, and resources will be provided in Godwin. Motivational speakers Angela Carter and Erin Casey are the will be making speeches during this year’s event. Activities include origami fish for strength and well-being, a kids area, symbols of hope quilt, and remembrance stones.

Walk for Hope mascotsThe Walk for Hope is a great way to participate in raising awareness and show your support for those with depression and mental illness. Janice Lewis, a Staff Counselor at the JMU Counseling Center, is a representative for the event and states, “Walk for Hope offers an opportunity for our colleges to unite together to not only raise awareness about depression and suicide, but to engage in a dialogue around mental health and offer messages of hope to our community. It is always a powerful experience to see students and community members supporting one another.”

The core of the event centers on joining people together and uniting representatives from all 4 universities in the area to promote education on depression and suicide. Don’t miss out; even Francis the therapy dog from the Counseling Center will be a participant!

For general parking at the event, use the Grace Street Parking Deck, Cantrell Avenue (Martin Luther King Jr. Way) lot, or Warsaw Parking Deck. A parking map of JMU’s campus can be found here. Parking citations will be issued to those violating designated parking guidelines.

For more information on the Walk for Hope, you can visit the event’s website or “like” the event’s Facebook page. Additionally, the JMU Counseling Center provides both individual and group counseling to JMU students struggling with personal and/or interpersonal issues common to a college population. Outreach efforts like the Walk for Hope focus on preventative care and maximize the potential of all students to benefit from the academic environment and experience. To make an appointment with the Counseling Center, call 540-568-6552.

On Saturday, April 2nd, the 5th annual Walk for Hope will be hosted at James Madison University! /////
17-jmu-recognized-by-time-magazine-in-stem-programstrueJMU recognized by Time Magazine for excellence in science, technology, engineering and math programs1456168140000JMU recognized by Time Magazine for excellence in science, technology, engineering and math programs/news/cise-BACKUP/2016/02/17-jmu-recognized-by-time-magazine-in-stem-programsJMUsite://JMU/news/cise-BACKUP/2016/02/17-jmu-recognized-by-time-magazine-in-stem-programssujaj1458139075171sujaj14581390751711455685200000JMU recognized by Time Magazine for excellence in science, technology, engineering and math programsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUciseComputer Science/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/computer-science/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cs/archivessite://JMU/cs/archivesJMUarchivesComputer Science - News ArchivesComputer Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/computer-scienceJMUcomputer-scienceGeographic Science/gs/indexsite://JMU/gs/indexJMUindexGeographic ScienceGeographic Science/gs/archivessite://JMU/gs/archivesJMUarchivesGeographic Science - News ArchivesGeographic Science - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/geographic-scienceJMUgeographic-scienceIntelligence Analysis/ia/indexsite://JMU/ia/indexJMUindexISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis ProgramISAT Department - Intelligence Analysis Program/ia/archivessite://JMU/ia/archivesJMUarchivesIntelligence Analysis - News ArchivesIntelligence Analysis - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/intelligence-analysisJMUintelligence-analysisIntegrated Science and Technology/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/integrated-science-and-technology/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/isat/archivessite://JMU/isat/archivesJMUarchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News ArchivesIntegrated Science and Technology - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/integrated-science-and-technologyJMUintegrated-science-and-technology/

By: Bjorn Johnson | The contributing writer for The Breeze

Time MONEY recently named JMU to its top 25 list of accessible colleges for aspiring scientists and engineers, with the list's criteria including early-career median salary for science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors and also admissions rates.

"These are schools that accept at least two-thirds of their applicants, have good graduation rates and have science graduates who report to PayScale.com that they earn at least $50,000 within five years of graduation," Kim Clark, the author of MONEY's list, said. "We then ranked the schools according to MONEY's overall value ranking, which balances quality, affordability and outcomes."

Bob Kolvoord, the dean of JMU's College of Integrated Science and Technology, has kept ISAT focused on combining strong technical skills with practical applications as well as learning about key technologies and the social context that they are a part of.

"Some folks have studied energy and have created wind energy firms," Kolvoord said, adding that other students have studied topics like the environment or biotechnology and now work at places such as the National Park Service or firms in the laboratory.

Andrew Hawley, a 2013 JMU alumnus who graduated with an ISAT degree, is an example of just one of the many career paths available to ISAT majors. Employed as a government contractor in Northrop Grumman's federal aviation division, Hawley is currently working on an application that houses the Federal Aviation Administration's aeronautical information, making it readily available to pilots, the Department of Defense, airlines and the public.

According to Hawley, JMU's ISAT program prepared him well for his job because of the hands-on labs he participated in. Read more

Time MONEY recently named JMU to its top 25 list of accessible colleges for aspiring scientists and engineers, with the list's criteria including early-career median salary for science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors and also admissions ra/////
10-news-wmra-eng-bikestrueJMU Program Custom-Designs Bikes for the Disabled1449756420000JMU Program Custom-Designs Bikes for the Disabled/news/cise-BACKUP/2015/12/10-news-wmra-eng-bikesJMUsite://JMU/news/cise-BACKUP/2015/12/10-news-wmra-eng-bikessujaj1458139073881sujaj14581390738811449723600000JMU Program Custom-Designs Bikes for the DisabledNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Integrated Science and Engineering/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary/cise/archivessite://JMU/cise/archivesJMUarchivesCISE - News ArchivesCISE - News Archives//_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/ciseJMUcise

For some, a bicycle means an affordable and environmentally friendly way to commute. For others, it’s the excitement of speedy descents down rugged mountain trails. But for one JMU professor, being able to ride a bicycle meant he could be an athlete -- and now, for one Harrisonburg teen, it’s a promise of independence.  WMRA's Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports. Read more on the WMRA website.

For some, a bicycle means an affordable and environmentally friendly way to commute. For others, it¿s the excitement of speedy descents down rugged mountain trails. But for one JMU professor, being able to ride a bicycle meant he could be an athlete./////
16-stjohntrue1460571860031chandljlDr. St. John, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External FundingDr. Kristen St. John, Professor in the Geology and Environmental Science Department, has been awarded $93,633 from the National Science Foundation for the ¿Geoscience Education Research (GER) Community Synthesis and Planning Project.¿ Dr. St. John describes this as a community-building endeavor. She will be managing community efforts to synthesize geoscience education research findings, improve access to research findings, and develop resources to support the growing geoscience education research community. reschmmDr. Kristen St. John, Professor in the Geology and Environmental Science Department, has been awarded $93,633 from the National Science Foundationgeology, environmental, external funding, grants, awards, national science foundation, researchDr. Kristen St. John, Professor in the Geology and Environmental Science Department, has been awarded $93,633 from the National Science Foundation for the ¿Geoscience Education Research (GER) Community Synthesis and Planning Project.¿ Dr. St. John, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External Funding/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/16-stjohnJMUsite://JMU/news/sponsoredprograms/2016/03/16-stjohnreschmm1458135702195reschmm14581592402201458100800000Dr. St. John, College of Science and Mathematics, Receives External FundingNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Sponsored Programs/sponsoredprograms/indexsite://JMU/sponsoredprograms/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/sponsoredprogramsJMUsponsoredprograms/

Dr. Kristen St. John, Professor in the Geology and Environmental Science Department, has been awarded $93,633 from the National Science Foundation for the “Geoscience Education Research (GER) Community Synthesis and Planning Project.” Dr. St. John describes this as a community-building endeavor. She will be managing community efforts to synthesize geoscience education research findings, improve access to research findings, and develop resources to support the growing geoscience education research community. strength of evidence diagram

According to Dr. St. John’s proposal, “This project is focused on advancing geoscience education research and strengthening the Geoscience Education Research (GER) community of practice. Digitizing decades of past print-only articles in the Journal of Geoscience Education (JGE) will increase access to foundational GER studies, and expand the timeframe and number of studies for inclusion in GER literature reviews for a JGE theme issue on Synthesize Results and Defining Future Directions of GER. In addition, the 2016 workshop will bring geoscience education researchers together to discuss GER findings and prioritize GER community needs. It will foster sharing of ideas and planning for future research projects and collaborations. By designing an online GER toolbox, we are developing a resource that addresses a GER community need. By drawing from findings in the collections of theme issue papers, from results of a broadly disseminated survey of geoscience education researchers and practitioners, and from the 2015 and 2016 GER workshops, we will be able to identify key outcomes from GER, research gaps, and critical needs of the GER community of practice. This synthesis can be used to help prioritize the next steps in GER, to improve research approaches and foster collaborations, and ultimately improve teaching and learning in the geosciences.“

Best of luck to Dr. St. John as she proceeds with her project!

Published March 16, 2016

Dr. Kristen St. John, Professor in the Geology and Environmental Science Department, has been awarded $93,633 from the National Science Foundation/////
15-daw-2016true1459549416799smith2pj7th Annual Disability Awareness Week: JMU Community Raises Awareness About Inclusion and Equity7th Annual Disability Awareness Week: JMU Community Raises Awareness About Inclusion and Equity/news/ods/15-daw-2016JMUsite://JMU/news/ods/15-daw-2016lentilcn1458065378747lentilcn145806537874714580648000007th Annual Disability Awareness Week: JMU Community Raises Awareness About Inclusion and EquityNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsOffice of Disability Services/ods/indexsite://JMU/ods/indexJMUindexOffice of Disability ServicesOffice of Disability Services///_tags/source/student-affairs/Office of Disability ServicesJMUOffice of Disability Services

The Office of Disability Services (ODS) at James Madison University (JMU) is hosting the 7th Annual Disability Awareness Week March 28 through April 1 to raise awareness of issues that surround students with disabilities and to continue to facilitate an environment of inclusion and equity at JMU. The events this year center around promoting student self-efficacy and their role in creating their own stories of success. Members of the JMU community are invited to listen to speakers and participate in activities that will broaden their understanding of disability on the individual and community level. Both students with disabilities and without should leave DAW with a feeling of “I've Got This” and an ability to recognize what it means to be an individual with a disability and an ally.

Kicking off Disability Awareness Week is a keynote address from Paralympic athlete, Josh Sundquist. The Harrisonburg native strives to use humor in order to combat preconceived notions about disability and encourages audiences to reassess their perception of disability.  Sundquist’s presentation will be held on Monday, March 28 in the Wilson Auditorium at JMU at 7:00 p.m. The event is open to the public so parking will be available at the Warsaw Parking Deck on Main Street.

As the week progresses, ODS in collaboration with the Center for Multicultural Student Services (CMSS) and the Orientation Office have arranged for The Dear World Project to conduct photo shoots and present at JMU. Dear World, an interactive event that allows students, faculty and staff to connect with one another, encourages participants to write their stories on their skin, which allows themselves and others to reflect on the subtlety and power in listening and reflecting on one another’s stories. The JMU community is welcome to come get their photo taken on Tuesday, March 29 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the JMU Student Success Center, Room 1075. They are also invited to come to the Dear World Finale on Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. in the Wilson Auditorium at JMU.

On Wednesday, March 30, the Adapted Sports Showcase co-sponsored by UREC, the Department of Kinesiology and The Hart School of Hospitality, Sport and Recreation Management will provide the opportunity to participate in adapted sports like wheelchair basketball and Goalball in the Godwin Gym from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Also on Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. join ODS’ Peer Access Advocates (PAA) and CMSS’ D.E.E.P Impact in their dialogue series in Room 1075 of the JMU Student Success Center in a discussion on Disability within our Campus and Community.

Got a tough question for the Office of Disability Services (ODS)? Bring it to the Disability Awareness Week Faculty Open House on Thursday, March 31 from 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Join us for a panel discussion and heavy hors d'oeuvres to address faculty questions about ODS, disability accommodations, legal expectations and challenges in the academic environment. Panelists include the director of ODS, Valerie Schoolcraft, occupational therapy faculty member, Amy Yun and Susan Wheeler, University Counsel.  Panelists will address a variety of questions, including the following:

  • What are the options when accommodations don’t the course?
  • How are academic standards upheld while accommodating students?
  • How can accommodations for absences be provided to some students while being fair to all students?

Bring questions and colleagues to the panel!

Join Chef Rob from D-Hall also on Thursday as he demonstrates how to cook two simple affordable meals that are made without the Big-8 allergens and gluten while also utilizing adaptive cooking tools. Participants will receive information on managing food allergies and intolerances. Both sessions will have a limited number of seats, so please RSVP to jehrinhm@jmu.edu to attend Session 1 at 2:30 p.m. or Session 2 at 3:30 p.m. The sessions will be held at Entrance 6 of D-Hall.

Faculty and staff are invited to register for CAMMO training in creating accessible material in Microsoft Office. Participants will learn to use the resources built into Microsoft Office 2013 to create materials that are accessible to people with disabilities. Please pre-register in MyMadison for IT160 on Friday, April 1 at 10:00 a.m. in JMAC 4, Room 101.

The Office of Disability Services at James Madison University is hosting the 7th Annual Disability Awareness Week March 28 through April 1 to raise awareness of issues that surround students with disabilities at JMU. /////
03-newstrueGrowing Assessment: Dr. S. Jeanne Horst¿s Influence at James Madison University Growing Assessment: Dr. S. Jeanne Horst¿s Influence at James Madison University /news/cars/03-newsJMUsite://JMU/news/cars/03-newsyangsx1457547494913yangsx14575474949131378443600000Display NameNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsDisplay Name////_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/sassJMUsass

Growing Assessment: Dr. S. Jeanne Horst’s Influence at James Madison University

By Elizabeth R. H. Sanchez (‘15M)

Dr. S. Jeanne Horst of the Center of Assessment and Research Studies (CARS) began working at James Madison University (JMU) in 2012 after years of performing data analyses for a mental health agency and teaching a collage of undergraduate psychology courses. Her impressive 11-page curriculum vita includes a variety of accolades and publications. In 2015, Horst received the Outstanding Contributions in Teaching Award from the JMU Psychology Graduate Student Council; most recently, first year doctoral student Heather Harris and Horst published “A Brief Guide to Decisions at Each Step of the Propensity Score Matching Process” in Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation. The article is just one step towards mastering propensity score analysis of observational data—a professional goal for Horst and a statistical analysis that Harris is studying. As Harris stated,  “our research…can sometimes require mental jumping jacks, but [Horst is] always quick to learn difficult concepts and then discuss them with me. She's taught me a lot about independent learning and how to work through difficult problems…her tenacity is contagious.”

When forming assessment consulting relationships with student affairs and academic programs on campus, Horst recognizes the oftentimes-apprehensive intuitions surrounding assessment practices. According to Horst, many faculty and staff initially believe that they are the ones that she is evaluating; that somehow their worth and value are dependent on the success of assessment practices. It may come as a surprise to Horst’s consultants that her work lies in improving student learning; in changing the way assessment data are used; in encouraging faculty to ask the right questions; in helping programs understand what students are gleaning from the curriculum. Indeed, Horst might not fit the stereotype of a higher education statistician and assessment practitioner. In fact, although she teaches inferential and multivariate statistics courses, she has an appreciation for all modes of inquiry. Her passion lies in taking creative strides to help faculty identify and understand what their students should be and are learning—and improving student learning. “Sometimes,” Horst mentions, “assessment questions can be best answered with a qualitative approach” and “other situations are best served by mixed methods.” As she summarized, “I don’t think assessment is one-size-fits-all.”

Working with a multitude of university constituents could easily become burdensome, but Horst thoroughly enjoys assisting faculty and staff in assessment cycles—and she does so with grace and ease. “I have the privilege of working with people all over the JMU campus,” she brought up right away, “In doing so, I get to talk with them about what they want to see in their students.” Horst later changed her language to “our students,” a logical transition given the fact that she became a CARS employee in part because she is able to teach and mentor graduate students as well as help programs improve. Harris indicated that Horst “has a talent for meeting people (both clients and students) where they are and explaining difficult concepts simply” and also a unique “willingness to listen” that makes her in integral member of CARS.  

In consulting, teaching, and learning herself, Horst avidly supports a growth mindset. On her desk sat a copy of Carol Dweck’s Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, which explains that success is sometimes dependent on how we approach challenges. One semester, Horst took up learning blues guitar in order to remind herself the importance of believing that a set of new skills can be learned through practice and patience. Currently, she audits a course to help one JMU academic program with a learning improvement initiative. “I’m realizing how much I don’t know,” Horst explained, “it’s a blast.”

When asked what advice she’d give students, Horst replied, “…within reason, take on a variety of opportunities that come your way. Take risks,” and, “learn all that you can while you are here. You’ll never be in such a rich environment.” Being keenly aware of, and an advocate for, the student experience at JMU comes naturally for Horst; known at CARS as simply “Jeanne.” “I cannot say enough good things about Jeanne. She is a wonderful person and I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with her,” Harris wrote for a faculty appreciation day in 2016, and later commented, “At first, Jeanne may seem like the most encouraging professor a student could ever have. However, after taking two classes with her, I have learned that it's not that simple. Jeanne has high expectations for students. She sets the bar high, then provides an exceptional amount of support and scaffolding.” Another student mentioned “[Horst gets] me excited about things I have never heard of and [inspires] me to learn more and do more.” While it’s only been 4 short years since she has become a member of CARS, Horst’s positive influences radiate throughout campus. Harris, who stated “over the past two and a half years, Jeanne has become the most significant influence on my professional life and my growth as an academic. Her mentoring style pushes me to grow…” is just one example of how Dr. Jeanne Horst contributes to the overall richness of James Madison University.

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07-irs-1095true1460580752764hajdaslkIRS 1095-C Forms Have Been Mailed1421154000000IRS 1095-C Forms Have Been Mailed/news/humanresources/2016/03/07-irs-1095JMUsite://JMU/news/humanresources/2016/03/07-irs-1095hajdaslk1457372965391hajdaslk14605807152351457372700000IRS 1095-C Forms Have Been MailedNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHuman Resources/humanresources/indexsite://JMU/humanresources/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/humanresourcesJMUhumanresources

IRS 1095-C Forms Have Been Mailed

Form 1095-C is an IRS form that provides information regarding health coverage for you and your dependents during calendar year 2015. 1095-C forms have been mailed from the Department of Human Resource Management to state health plan participants’ home addresses as a requirement of the Affordable Care Act.

Please note that the 1095C form is not needed to file your taxes and does not have to be attached to your tax return.

https://www.irs.gov/Affordable-Care-Act/Individuals-and-Families/Health-Care-Law-and--You

 

This information is adapted from the IRS website and provided by the Department of Human Resource Management:

Form 1095-C Tax Information for Employees

https://www.dhrm.virginia.gov/docs/default-source/benefitsdocuments/ohb/form-1095c---information-for-employees---affordable-care-act-and-taxes.pdf?Status=Temp&sfvrsn=2


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Human Resources
humanresources@jmu.edu
540/568-6165
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07-tiaa-traditionaltrue1460580752764hajdaslkQuestions about Income Options in Retirement and TIAA Traditional?1421154000000Questions about Income Options in Retirement and TIAA Traditional?/news/humanresources/2016/03/07-tiaa-traditionalJMUsite://JMU/news/humanresources/2016/03/07-tiaa-traditionalschaefms1457371027292schaefms14573712551891457370900000Questions about Income Options in Retirement and TIAA Traditional?News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHuman Resources/humanresources/indexsite://JMU/humanresources/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/humanresourcesJMUhumanresources

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Wine Price Building, Inspirations Training Room

Plan to attend this informative workshop on March 23, 2016 facilitated by a TIAA-CREF representative where you can learn the following:

  • Income options from TIAA-Traditional
  • Benefits of creating a lifetime income stream
  • Specifics on how this amplifies an income base in retirement and increases the longevity of an overall portfolio
  • Comparisons to other asset classes (fixed income, bonds)
  • Protects against outliving income as people are having longer lifespans

Note: This workshop is capped at 16 participants.

Total Workshop Time: 1.5 Hours

Pre-requisites: None

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03-aayae2016true1459549416799smith2pjNinth Annual Area Youth Art Exhibition - 201614571070800001483160400000Ninth Annual Area Youth Art Exhibition - 2016/news/coe/2016/03/03-aayae2016JMUsite://JMU/news/coe/2016/03/03-aayae2016clemenrg1457107132893clemenrg14571077326451456812000000Ninth Annual Area Youth Art Exhibition - 2016College of Education/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/college-of-education/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-education/college-of-educationJMUcollege-of-educationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsThe Ninth Annual Youth Art Exhibition - 2016 went on display in Memorial Hall. See an introduction to this exhibit and come to see the talent of local artists in area schools.Ninth Annual Area Youth Art Exhibition///news/coe/2016/03/thumbnail.jpgsite://JMU/news/coe/2016/03/thumbnail.jpgJMUthumbnail.jpgthumbnail.jpg//04-zika-virustrue1460580752764hajdaslkZika Virus Information for JMU Staff1421154000000Zika Virus Information for JMU Staff/news/humanresources/2016/03/04-zika-virusJMUsite://JMU/news/humanresources/2016/03/04-zika-virushajdaslk1457101180483subob14606556986351457101800000Zika Virus Information for JMU StaffNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHuman Resources/humanresources/indexsite://JMU/humanresources/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/humanresourcesJMUhumanresources

Planning a trip soon? Want to learn more about a health issue of growing concern?

We hope this information will help you to understand the Zika Virus and to ensure safe travel to Zika-affected areas:

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Human Resources
humanresources@jmu.edu
540/568-6165
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26-european-day-of-languagestrue1459549416799smith2pjLinguistic Learning Creates Global Impact on a Local ScaleLinguistic Learning Creates Global Impact on a Local Scale/news/eupolicystudies/2016/03/26-european-day-of-languagesJMUsite://JMU/news/eupolicystudies/2016/03/26-european-day-of-languagescravercm1457079506921cravercm14570795069211411704000000Linguistic Learning Creates Global Impact on a Local ScaleNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsEuropean Union Policy Studies/eupolicystudies/indexsite://JMU/eupolicystudies/indexJMUindexM.A. in Political ScienceM.A. in Political Science<meta name="google-site-verification" content="4RqNQ3wv5_q89I7pLE6nDzPA0xoWzKbXVQEwCei5zt8" />///_tags/source/college-of-arts-and-letters/european-union-policy-studiesJMUeuropean-union-policy-studies

European Day of Languages

EUPS Students Meredith Gillet, Claudia Salvador and Jason Martinez presenting for students
at Liceo Linguistico Peano in Florence.


JMU seeks to be the model for the engaged university – engaged with ideas and the world. Realizing, in its 35th year of sending students abroad, that the obligations of civic engagement extend well beyond the borders of the United States, EUPS students recently visited Florentine high schools to celebrate the European Day of Languages.

EUPS students stood in front of multiple groups of 16-18 year-old pupils and gave presentations about the value of linguistic culture and language learning in the European Union. In its 13th year, the European Day of Languages provided a unique opportunity for JMU and Italian students alike, encouraging all participants to engage with and learn from each other and to appreciate the value of studying foreign languages.

The EU’s motto, “United in diversity,” highlights the rich variety of cultural backgrounds throughout Europe. Organized in 2001, the European Day of Languages strives to celebrate this diversity and to educate EU citizens on the opportunities of multilingualism. The EU has 24 officially recognized languages and more than 60 indigenous regional and minority languages. Programs such as the Lifelong Learning Program, Comenius, and Erasmus are just a few of the many EU-sponsored initiatives designed to educate and train young citizens in the language arts.

James Madison University ranks second in the nation for student study abroad, and for students in the M.A. program in political science with a concentration in European Union Policy Study (EUPS), the European Day of Languages provides an innovative perspective on the value of language in the Europe community. Studying the Italian language themselves, EUPS students are able to experience first-hand the value of multilingualism and how it can open professional, academic, and social doors. For many EUPS students, who have been in Florence since late August, the Day of Languages was a terrific opportunity to experience community beyond the classroom, the Uffizi, and the Ponte Vecchio.

“It was an incredibly humbling experience to talk to [high school] students from another country,” EUPS student Erin Strek shared. “It was amazing seeing these kids who know very little English interacting and participating, even though I knew they were nervous to speak a language that isn’t their native language. It was probably one of my favorite things in the program so far.”

Additionally, the European Day of Languages gave participants the chance to see the EU in action. “What struck me about my group,” noted EUPS student Kelcie Melino, “is that as a bunch of 16 year olds, most them already spoke more than one language. We had a tri-lingual student as well. I think that really says something about European youth and education.” Melino was impressed with the Italian and broader European emphasis on broad language studies. In a typical Florentine high school, it is not uncommon for students to take courses two foreign languages, and many students continue studying multiple languages at the university level.

Umberto Eco, the well-known Italian author once said that “the language of Europe is translation.” Perhaps. But the European Day of Languages and the EU’s broader support of language learning and development are helping Europe move toward a future where the need for translation is less acute and Europeans are able to converse with each other—and with those from outside of the continent—in multiple tongues. For information on the European Day of Languages and broader European language initiatives, see http://edl.ecml.at

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04-inclement-weathertrue1459549416799smith2pjInclement Weather Hours for Friday, March 4Inclement Weather Hours for Friday, March 4/news/healthcenter/2016/03/04-inclement-weatherJMUsite://JMU/news/healthcenter/2016/03/04-inclement-weatherjonesvw1457025121591jonesvw1457025121591Inclement Weather Hours for Friday, March 4News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHealth Center/healthcenter/indexsite://JMU/healthcenter/indexJMUindexUHC HomeUniversity Health Center Home///_tags/source/healthcenterJMUhealthcenterHealth CenterHealth Center

Due to inclement weather and JMU closing, all scheduled appointments at the UHC are cancelled and no fees will be charged to your account for your missed appointment.

Please call the University Health Center at 540.568.6178 and choose option #2 the next business day that JMU is open to reschedule your appointment.

Our Urgent Care will be open from 10am until 2pm; we will take patients for urgent care needs such as minor fractures, sprains, stitches and other immediate medical problems (additional information about UHC Urgent Care may be found at http://www.jmu.edu/healthcenter/StudentCare/urgent-medical-care.shtml).

The Urgent Care entrance is externally located on the corner of the Student Success Center at the intersection of Mason Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Way.

If you need urgent care after our hours of operation, visit one of the following healthcare centers in Harrisonburg:

Due to inclement weather and JMU opening late, all scheduled appointments at the UHC between the hours of ____ to ______ will be cancelled and no fees will be charged to your account for your missed appointment.

Please call the University Health Center at 540.568.6178 and choose option #2 when JMU opens to reschedule your appointment.

General Medicine, Pharmacy, and The Well will open at            .

Scheduled medical appointments will begin at        .

Our Urgent Care will open at ________; we will take patients for urgent care needs such as minor fractures, sprains, stitches and other immediate medical problems (additional information about UHC Urgent Care may be found at http://www.jmu.edu/healthcenter/StudentCare/urgent-medical-care.shtml).

The Urgent Care entrance is externally located on the corner of the Student Success Center at the intersection of Mason Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Way.

If you need urgent care outside our hours of operation, visit one of the following healthcare centers in Harrisonburg:

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03-march-updatetrue1457021566998phill2mrMarch UBO UpdateMarch UBO Update/news/ubo/2016/03/03-march-updateJMUsite://JMU/news/ubo/2016/03/03-march-updatephill2mr1457021329640phill2mr14570215451701456981200000March UBO UpdateNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsUniversity Business Office/ubo/indexsite://JMU/ubo/indexJMUindexUniversity Business OfficeUniversity Business Office///_tags/source/administration-and-finance/uboJMUubo
  • Late fees were placed on accounts with outstanding tuition, room, and board charges on Monday, January 29th.
  • Our office will be closed on Friday, March 11th per the university's closing schedule.
  • Summer registration will open on Monday, March 21st, so if you plan on attending summer classes and have a hold on your account please pay the balance as soon as possible.
  • The final day to adjust your April installment of the payment plan is Tuesday, March 29th.
    • This is the final installment payment for the spring 2016 installment payment plan.
  • If you have anyone that you wish to receive notifications about your account and to be able to speak with us about your account, please make sure to have them set up as an Authorized User in M3. You can find instructions for that here.
If you have any questions please contact our office at ubo@jmu.edu or by phone at 540/568-6505.
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26-hm211true1459549416799smith2pjHM 211 Brewery Trip .jpgTitleHM 211 Brewery Trip .jpg/news/hartschool/2016/02/26-hm211JMUsite://JMU/news/hartschool/2016/02/26-hm211jettonce1456945511384jettonce14569461848791456462800000HM 211 Visit Pale Fire Brewing CompanyNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHart School of Hospitality, Sport and Recreation Management/hartschool/indexsite://JMU/hartschool/indexJMUindexHart School of Hospitality, Sport and Recreation ManagementHart School of Hospitality, Sport and Recreation ManagementSchool of Hospitality, Sport & Recreation Management has two undergraduate programs and a graduate program. The first is Hospitality Management and the second is Sport & Recreation Management. The graduate program is Sport Recreation Leadership.SHSRM, Hospitality, Hospitality Management, HM, Sport & Recreation Management, SRM, Sport Management, Sport & Recreation Leadership, SRL, Sport and Recreation Management, Sport and Recreation LeadershipjettonceSchool of Hospitality Sport & Recreation Management///_tags/source/college-of-business/hart-school-of-hospitality-sport-and-recreation-managementJMUhart-school-of-hospitality-sport-and-recreation-management

HM 211 TripHM 211 Overview of Hospitality Management course visited Pale Fire Brewing Company to look at the beverage aspects of the hospitality industry.  The students toured the facility and learned about the ingredients, the different stages, equipment, production and shelf life, and much more from JMU alum and Head Brew Master, Jamie Long.

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01-kyle-sweeney-msa-studenttrue1459549416799smith2pjA CPA Brings Professional Experience to the ClassroomA CPA Brings Professional Experience to the Classroom/news/cob/2016/03/01-kyle-sweeney-msa-studentJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/03/01-kyle-sweeney-msa-studentlentilcn1456839457942lentilcn14568396223451456837200000A CPA Brings Professional Experience to the ClassroomNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsAccounting/CMS-redirects/accounting/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/accounting/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/accountingJMUaccountingMSA////cob/_cascade/_tags/departments/msaJMUmsaCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

MSA Student, Kyle SweeneyKyle Sweeney left behind a lucrative career at KPMG—one of the world’s top audit firms—to become a student again. A graduate student in James Madison University’s (JMU) School of Accounting, Sweeney was drawn to the quality of JMU’s academic programs and faculty.

“JMU’s School of Accounting has well-rounded faculty, most of whom worked in the corporate world before teaching,” says Sweeney, whose wife, Amanda Deerfield, is a visiting professor of economics in JMU’s College of Business. “Having worked as practicing accountants, they’ve seen the reality of what accountants do every day in the workplace. That improves the quality of instruction and career preparation they are able to offer their students.”

Sweeney, a CPA, has worked with JMU graduates in the corporate world and has been impressed with their expertise and professionalism. Aware of the JMU College of Business’ outstanding reputation, Sweeney thought the university would be a good fit for him. He enrolled in the one-year Master of Science in accounting program in the fall of 2015 and will graduate in May.

After receiving a bachelor’s degree—with a double major in accounting and piano performance—from Rider University in New Jersey, Sweeney was hired as a senior associate in KPMG’s Audit Department in August 2011. He worked at the firm for four years.

For Sweeney, going back to school has been a refreshing change of pace from the corporate world. While his course load is demanding, he enjoys the intellectual challenge of being a student. He also has many opportunities to share from his professional experiences in the classroom, illustrating theoretical concepts in a real-world context.

“I’ve already seen first-hand so many of the scenarios we’re studying in class,” says Sweeney, a graduate assistant who tutors for several accounting courses and is a substitute lecturer. “The courses provide a good reinforcement of what I learned in the professional world. Every now and then, a professor will ask me about my professional experiences, and I usually have a good story to share that can help other students better understand the concepts.”

Once Sweeney completes the graduate program, he hopes to work as a college-level lecturer for a year or so. After that, he plans to apply to pursue a Ph.D. in accounting or a law degree with an L.L.M. in taxation.

Sweeney enjoys connecting with students, and he believes teaching will allow him to use his own professional experiences to help launch their careers. Accounting in the professional world requires strong communication skills and problem-solving abilities, he explains, and these skills are critical for professors as well.

“The essential aspects of teaching appeal to me, and teaching accounting is an extension of these skills I’ve used in the business world,” Sweeney says. “I believe I can use those skills to help students better understand the realities of practicing accounting. In doing so, I can help them become successful in their careers.”

Sweeney adds that JMU’s accounting program is well-connected with potential employers, offering a wide range of opportunities for internships and jobs after graduation.

“For students who are preparing for the interview process, JMU can help them connect with some impressive employers—and they will be well-prepared to make a good impression,” Sweeney says. “JMU’s Master of Science in accounting program is broad in terms of what students are exposed to. They get a good glimpse of what they’ll experience in the professional world. JMU definitely is giving accounting students the tools they need to be successful in their future careers.”

Kyle Sweeney connects classroom lessons to real-world experiences/////
26-springbreakhourstrue1462822484815gibsonkjCommencement and May Break Hour ChangesCommencement and May Break Hour Changes/news/recreation/2016/03/26-springbreakhoursJMUsite://JMU/news/recreation/2016/03/26-springbreakhoursgibsonkj1456497889596gibsonkj14628224683641459145340000Commencement and May Break Hour ChangesUniversity Recreation/recreation/indexsite://JMU/recreation/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/recreationJMUrecreationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNews

UREC Hour Changes

  • Monday, May 9: CLOSED DUE TO WATER SUPPLY ISSUES
  • Tuesday, May 10 - Wednesday, May 11: 11:30am - 1:30pm, 5 - 7pm
  • Thursday, May 12: 9am - 3pm, 5-7pm
  • Friday, May 13: 11:30am - 1:30pm
  • Saturday, May 14 - Sunday, May 15: CLOSED

UPARK Hour Changes

  • Friday, May 6 - Sunday, May 15: CLOSED

UREC Homepage / Facebook / Twitter

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26-madison-scholarstrue1460571860031chandljlSpotlight Madison Scholars 1456466400000Spotlight Madison Scholars/news/academic-affairs/2016/02/26-madison-scholarsJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/02/26-madison-scholarsshifflml1456492930406subob14605616936831456462800000Spotlight Madison ScholarsOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairsNews Stories Homepage////_tags/source/academic-affairs/news-stories-homepageJMUnews-stories-homepage

See what's going on with Madison Scholars:

Wearable air quality sensors could benefit your health

Scientists prove the last part of Einstein's theory of relativity

Harris lab publishes paper on efforts to battle amphibian disease

See what's going on with Madison Scholars/////
24-alumni-newslettertrue1459549416799smith2pj2016 Alumni Newsletter2016 Alumni Newsletter/news/justicestudies/2016/02/24-alumni-newsletterJMUsite://JMU/news/justicestudies/2016/02/24-alumni-newslettermorri6ar1456342396999morri6ar145634239699914563368000002016 Alumni Newsletter Off the Presses!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsJustice Studies/CMS-redirects/justice-studies/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/justice-studies/indexJMUindexJustice StudiesJustice Studies///_tags/source/college-of-arts-and-letters/justice-studiesJMUjustice-studies

In anticipation of Justice Studies Alumni Day this April 15th, 2016, the most current alumni newsletter is now published. Information about this year's Alumni Day, personal pieces on new Justice Studies faculty, a spotlight article on a Justice Studies alumni, and more can be found in the newsletter! Printable copies are avalable in the JS office, or view the newsletter by clicking the link below. All Justice Studies students and anyone else interested are invited to attend this year's alumni day to learn about careers related to Justice Studies, gain networking opportunities, and seek advice from faculty and graduates!

See more: 2016 alumni newsletter

Teaser/////
24-newstrue1460571860031chandljlRemembering Ralph CohenRemembering Ralph Cohen/news/cohencenter/2016/02/24-newsJMUsite://JMU/news/cohencenter/2016/02/24-newskohlheel1456335940404kohlheel14563363148711456290000000Remembering Ralph CohenNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCohen Center/cohencenter/indexsite://JMU/cohencenter/indexJMUindexCohen Center for the Study of Technological HumanismCohen Center for the Study of Technological Humanism///_tags/source/cohencenterJMUcohencenter

It is with a heavy heart that we share this news. On Monday, Febrruary 22, our benefactor, founder, friend, and mentor Dr. Ralph Cohen passed away. Read his obituary here. In tribute to his memory, we've shared a letter penned by Cohen Center director, Larry Burton, below.

 

In 1981, I enrolled in a seminar called “Theories of Reading,” a required course in the University of Virginia’s Ph. D. program in English Language, Literature, and Pedagogy.  

The man behind “Theories of Reading” was Ralph Cohen, William Kenan Jr. Professor of English, founder and editor of New Literary History, whose books included   The Art of DiscriminationNew Directions in Literary HistoryStudies in Eighteenth Century British Art and Aesthetics, History and …Histories Within the Human SciencesThe Future of Literary Theory, and Studies in Historical Change.  About Cohen, I knew only what I heard from others.  He had been on leave for a year, which he spent as the Northrop Frye Professor of English at the University of Toronto.  He edited New Literary History, which he had founded in 1968; he was known among graduate students as one of the hardest working senior faculty, not resting on his international reputation but still racking up book after book, article after article.  Among graduate students, his support was widely sought, and when received, more greatly valued.  I was not sure at all what to expect from him or from “Theories of Reading.” 

Each Tuesday, we met him in his Wilson Hall office, a classroom converted for New Literary History.  While waiting in the hallway outside his office, we speculated on whether or not there would be a cleared off table around which all of us could sit.  Every nook, cranny, shelf, desk top, wall--indeed every square inch of space--contained piles of books and journals and essays.  Each Thursday he put one student in charge of what he termed “lab day,” held in a classroom in Old Cabell Hall, where the student taught a text to the rest of us in a way that exemplified a reading theory that had been under discussion. 

At the first class meeting, Cohen did not lecture but asked us why we had signed up for this particular seminar.  He was not killing time, or filling out the hour, or merely feigning interest in us.  He never wasted time or used classroom gimmicks.  The only reason he briefly interviewed each of us was to weigh our interests against his plans for the course, plans which none of us would fully understand until well into the semester.  When my turn came, I remember saying my only triumphs as a high school English teacher occurred when students gave self-reflexive responses to literature.  I was not looking for any special theory of reading, but I was hoping to learn ways of getting beyond self-reflexivity and allowing students to respond with whatever the literature meant to them.  Cohen did not say anything directly in response.  He continued speaking with each student. 

As a high school teacher, I developed an interest in reader-response criticism, and in an effort to arouse my students’ interest in A Separate PeaceHamlet, “Ozymandias,” and “The Road Not Taken,” I encouraged them to interpret texts in terms of their personal experiences.  I still tested them on plot, theme, poetic diction, and character, but I no longer put the same emphasis I once had on the historical period in which Shakespeare wrote or on the biography of Shelley.  The “text” was losing its importance not only to students but to my own teaching approaches, so what was I to do?  Was there a theory that accommodated these changes or applied to my circumstances?  Was the problem of student resistance unique to my experience or was there some explanation that Professor Cohen could provide?

Cohen assigned Louise M. Rosenblatt’s book on Literature as Exploration, which defended a transactional approach to reading, and essays by Wolfgang Iser on gaps in the literary text, by E. D. Hirsch Jr. on validity and interpretation, and by Norman Holland on the psychology of reading.  I was persuaded by Holland’s argument that “meaning” was a function of the connections readers made between texts and their lives.  But I was not prepared to defend Holland or my interest in his theory of reader response criticism, and therefore my defense of reader-response criticism withered under the force of Cohen’s questions.  “When reading, are you merely finding confirmation for what you already think and believe?  Is all that you find confined to what you, the reader, bring to the text?” 

Cohen did not discourage students from using historical periods, biography, intertextuality, gaps, reader-response, or genre, nor did he argue against any particular theory of reading. But he stressed that any theory informing our teaching must be justified to students.  When we squirmed and said we really didn’t think theory made a difference to a twelfth grader interpreting Hamlet, Cohen explained that denying the existence of a theory was in itself a theory.  Then he reiterated we must justify our way of reasoning and theorizing.  He made it clear there was a theoretical context at work every time readers construed words on a page, and he made us—and me, in particular—realize reading theory was connected to a system of language beyond any one text or even group of texts.  Teachers of literature needed to explain why reading mattered not only to an individual reader but also to critics and teachers who need to share critical vocabulary if they hoped to converse intelligently about the practices of reading and teaching. 

Cohen believed reader-response criticism was limited and incomplete, and I realized for myself why it was inadequate for my aims as a high school English teacher and as a Ph.D. student.  I don’t read Hamlet because the brilliant soliloquies express recognizable feelings, or Lord Jim because of the testing situations in which Jim finds himself and because I view defining moments of my experience as “testing situations,” or My Antonia because Willa Cather depicts aspects of farming life for which I yearn, or In Memoriam because Tennyson’s example of overcoming grief affirms my religious beliefs and helps me understand the grieving process I felt after losing my father to a heart attack when he was 58 and I was 22.  Before “Theories of Reading,” I would have supplied the aforementioned reasons for reading, but I went beyond these reasons as a result of Cohen’s teaching. 

The second class meeting was supposed to discuss Susan Suleiman’s book, The Reader in the Text:  Essays on Audience and Interpretation (Princeton UP, 1980), in which she reviews reader response theory, but halfway through the discussion, Cohen asked for our views on historical changes, and he queried whether we believed in a history of big changes or of small changes.  I remember thinking, “Where is he coming from?  Suleiman doesn’t talk about a theory of history in her chapter.  This is a course called ‘Theories of Reading,’ so why is he bringing up this idea?”  I distinctly recall the feeling of standing on the edge of a precipice looking into a yawing canyon as I listened to Cohen connect reader-response criticism to the theory of historical change.

 I can still hear him saying that what we emphasize in literature presupposes a view of historical change, and I remember thinking that I didn’t understand the connection, that I didn’t know what he was talking about.  I didn’t like it but I went along with him.  I found his words, coupled with the intensity of his delivery, to be intriguing.   Did I have a theory?  Does history follow any logic other than chronological unfolding of “great” events?  I had never heard another professor theorize like this about literary and historical change, I had never heard any other teacher argue that literary history and literary theory were more important than close readings and explication de texte.  I knew then that Cohen’s approach to teaching was entirely different from any that I had encountered. 

Over the course of fifteen weeks, I inventoried my assumptions, not only about historical change but also about my reading processes, and about other presuppositions I held regarding the purposes of writing, aims of education, functions of language, the place of genre, the roles of a teacher, the ethical dimensions of education, the nature of literary change, and the value of literary study.  I never, absolutely never imagined “Theories of Reading” altering my views to the extent that it did.  I learned that each theory of reading had its weaknesses.  It didn’t matter if I read from the perspective of multiculturalism, feminism, New Historicism, New Criticism, Deconstruction, GLBT, phenomenology, hermeneutics, structuralism, post-structuralism, or post-modernism.  What I gained, thanks to Cohen’s perspective, was a philosophical awareness of issues that influenced every reader and every theory of reading.  One course--the brainchild of Ralph Cohen--radically transformed me and my career. 

But I am making my point weakly.  Let me explain a few more of the philosophical issues that Cohen introduced to students enrolled that semester in “Theories of Reading.” 

The most profound issue involved the AIM that I as a teacher needed for each class that I taught.  This is not a simple concept.  It does not mean “purpose,” or “objective,” or “intention.”  It was more far-reaching, philosophically, than any of these terms.  Cohen often said, “You have to know your aim in teaching, and you have to justify this aim in terms of its advantage to your students.  Any time you justify an aim you are involved in the ethical dimension of teaching.” 

 “Ethical”?  I thought, “Isn’t all teaching ‘ethical’? Where is the ethical dimension on Bloom’s taxonomy of objectives?” But Cohen was not using a model of Piaget’s or Bloom’s or Barzun’s or Whitehead’s.  When he used “ethical,” he meant that teachers must select one point for emphasis or one point for students to “take away” from each class meeting.  Over and over, he asked us, “What is your aim, why did you select it, how is it to the advantage of your students, and what do you want them to take away from your class meeting?  Every act of teaching,” he said, “inevitably has an ethical dimension.”  He then repeated: “Your aim should be advantageous to the students, but you waste their time and yours if you can’t articulate your aim and justify it.” He urged us to announce our aim at the beginning of each class period. 

I remember a “lab” class devoted to Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep in which   Cohen disagreed with the student teacher’s elitist dismissal of the novel; he predicted that it and similar novels of the pot boiler genre would become part of the literary canon because of how well they captured Los Angeles in the 1940s.  While conceding many of his colleagues in the English department would reject it as unsophisticated or not part of the canon, Cohen argued for “appreciation” of the mystery novel and its depiction of a lost era and of a Southern California milieu.  Cohen also used “appreciation” as an aim of teaching A Midsummer’s Night Dream, because any other aim might be wasted on high school students who found Shakespeare boring or linguistically inaccessible. 

This led to another nuance of the ethical dimension of teaching.  When students resisted Shakespeare, Cohen said a teacher could either act like a parent and make them read it “because I told you so” or present reasons reading Shakespeare was to the students’ advantage. He cited the implications of their resistance, and illustrated it by stating that students who rejected Shakespeare on the basis of the difficult language should realize this response lumps them with a majority of students and further suggests that resistance might be a symptom of conformity to peer pressure of one’s group.  Many able students resisted Shakespeare because their friends did not like or approve, but their resistance cost them opportunities to individualize themselves and set themselves apart from the group.  If they wanted acceptance, then they could conform.  If they wanted respect, then they could resist following the herd mentality and tackle Shakespeare’s language.  One way of individualizing oneself, Cohen said, is through one’s ability to understand and use language.  “Show them the implications of their resistance” became a useful principle whenever students dismissed literature as “boring.” 

Cohen was not merely invoking the linguistic commonplace that a speaker’s language was a representation of that speaker’s world or the related commonplace that “language reveals identity” and marks one’s economic class or level of educational achievement.  Instead, Cohen argued that one’s use of language represents one’s attitudes toward growth and change.  Reading A Midsummer Night’s Dream, to stay with the example of Elizabethan English, changes a reader’s ability to give linguistic shape to experience.  It changes the reader, although the reader doesn’t think it does.  Language presupposes a speaker’s view of the world, presupposes the ability to understand oneself, presupposes interaction among speakers of the same language, and, thereby, presupposes that change results from interaction. 

As I listened to Cohen explain why it was useful to show students the implications of their resistance to Shakespeare’s language, I couldn’t help but flashback to my experiences as a young reader and nod in assent to the argument that reading Shakespeare was an experience that changed me, not only in the effects on my ability to understand the play on its own terms, but also in the effect that grappling with Elizabethan English altered the way I chose other courses (I gained confidence to read middle English, which led me to take a course on Chaucer) and improved my grades in all of my courses.  I felt a sense of increased independence from other English majors, not to mention increased independence from my non-English major friends and from friends of mine who didn’t attend college. 

Never had I imagined that “good teaching” would be such a difficult concept to master. I altered what I took from Cohen, who had received, altered, distorted, and improved upon what he incorporated from his teachers.  I didn’t yet fully understand everything Cohen said about a theory of historical change, or about ways in which genres change while retaining their identity.  But I realized that what mattered was what I selected, what I did with my selections, whether my students understood what I intended for them to understand, what they did with it.    They could ignore what I presented to them, select ideas that mattered to them, apply these ideas to new circumstances, and add new features to old features thus inserting new instances into the flow of time.  Learners make themselves.

When I entered the graduate English program, I did not realize I was searching for a teaching mentor, but clearly I was.  I needed a Socrates to quiz me and turn my thinking inside out and right side out again.  I couldn’t do this on my own.  There was no way I could manufacture on my own the kind of pedagogical infrastructure capable of sustaining the weight of all the curriculum guides, lesson plans, standards of quality, standards of learning, cultural literacy, grammar, usage, composition skills, and all the rest of the “stuff” that I was “given” to teach by somebody sitting on a book or on a curriculum committee that never seemed to acknowledge the ethical dimension of teaching, the teacher’s presuppositions regarding language, the question of what constitutes a “text,” what it takes to for students to adopt a teacher’s goals as their own, and how it happens that some students learn not to accept mediocrity as their target but instead aspire toward originality in their thinking and in their writing.  

My interests didn’t include the eighteenth century, Cohen’s area of literary specialization.  What did interest me was Cohen’s theoretical mind.  Regardless of the period, genre, or author, he possessed the knack for asking “releasing questions” such as “Why do we say what we do about a poem?” or “Why should we study literature?” He often linked questions such as “What is Romanticism?” “Is Romanticism something that is present only in a particular time period or is it present in every time period?”  “What is it that we identify as Romantic?  How is it related to the past?  How does a particular movement arise?”  But, given my interest in teaching, my favorite question was “Why do you teach literature aside from the fact that it’s a job for you?” because it not only made me confront my career choice but also because it forced me to identify values of mine that I wanted to express through teaching.  Asking the fundamental question of why I taught literature put me once again into the ethical dimension of education. 

All of these points stuck with me, and I became a better teacher as a result of studying under Cohen.  I listened and observed him take the class through issues that I never encountered in my previous graduate education, and I vowed that one day I would become the kind of teacher that he helped me to create in my imagination.  Under his watchful eye, I connected practical classroom problems to philosophical and theoretical contexts; for me, these were connections that I possibly had felt but probably never articulated for myself.  Cohen pushed and expanded our ways of thinking about pedagogy. We had to do the rest on our own. 

My intellectual development needed Cohen. I resisted the tight guidelines that told me what to teach and where I needed to take my students.  I refused to follow the same plans that a committee chose for me.  Once, before starting a tenth-grade teaching position, I was handled a three-inch notebook entitled The Curriculum Guide for Tenth-Grade English, which listed the books for the academic year, objectives for each grading period, points to be learned, behaviors to be achieved, and paper topics to be assigned.  Within the guide, each teacher was given freedom to emphasize crucial points, and I remember one of my colleagues devoted six weeks to teaching “the comma.”  I couldn’t follow this guide or abide by the approach to teaching English. At the other extreme, before the start of my very first teaching job, during my interview, I asked the principal for the curriculum guide, but he only smiled and told me to create my own.  The books for ninth grade English had been selected by a committee, and all ninth grade classes used them.  I could not add books but I was “free” to teach the way I decided was best for my students.  The school system dictated what should be taught but I chose how my students would learn.  I didn’t know where to begin.

Luckily for me, during one semester of fifteen weeks, I made connections between everyday, practical realities which I had faced in my high school classrooms and the intellectual questions which Cohen posed.  It became clear that he theorized teaching in ways that I doubt any of the seminar students had ever heard before.  I stopped writing lesson plans that separately targeted cognitive and affective behaviors and I started conceiving of “aims” that I had for each class meeting, each month, and term.  No matter how the seminar students conducted “lab sessions,” in which the works under discussion represented a hierarchy of literary genres from Wordsworth’s “Yew Trees,” Don QuixoteA Midsummer Night’s DreamLord JimThe Big Sleep, “The Purloined Letter,” and Joseph Andrews, we learned to select one major aim on which to concentrate and to defend this aim in our Tuesday discussions. 

What I also took away from Cohen was that content knowledge was crucial but that I couldn’t become a fully accountable teacher without learning more history, more literary knowledge, more philosophy, and more theory.  I couldn’t fully connect historical and literary forces, which I inherited but would never understand unless I brought my questions into conscious awareness, without deciding exactly how what I chose to emphasize was in fact advantageous to students.  Without articulating such advantages, I might as well return to my self-reflexive, throw-the-material-against-the-wall-and-see-what-sticks approach to teaching.  I refused to take that route.  Instead, I became intellectually accountable to an ideal of teaching larger than myself and more comprehensive than any single method of teaching or one school of criticism.

Of course, I sometimes speak in clichés regarding teaching, such as “Good teachers teach to their students.”  “Teachers influence eternity.”  “You start where the students are.”  But I internalized new beliefs.  I needed to construct or, as it were, reinvent myself as a teacher.  I didn’t have to teach the way I was taught or the way I was told to teach.  I had to create my teaching persona, and not imitate Cohen or any other teacher.  Inevitably, I would incorporate his ideas but I would inevitably alter them, too. 

Let me be clear that Cohen doesn’t favor one theory of reading over another.  He’s not dogmatic.  He’s a realist.  He is looking for interesting ideas in his students while continuing to analyze literature and culture in his inimitable way and unique style.  As a philosopher, Cohen’s vision of teaching is more comprehensive than seeing genres, generic continuities and discontinuities, permanence and impermanence, wholes and parts, constancy and change, order and disorder, structure and formlessness, content and process, the tensions between a fixed center and mutability.  He has never taken sides with the conservative interests in academia, the essentialists, the naysayers, the opponents to change, and the classicists.  He does not align himself with any camp or school of criticism.  Throughout his publications, he holds up a mirror to artists, their works of literature and art, and he channels seemingly inexhaustible energy into making readers rethink their established ideas, their interpretations set in stone, their understandings and their misunderstandings of the positions to which they are most deeply committed. 

At UCLA in the 1950s and 1960s and at the University of Virginia since 1968, Cohen attracted a following of graduate students, humorously called “Cohen-Heads” in the days of the “Cone Heads” on Saturday Night Live, to courses entitled “Genre,” “Theories of Literary History,” “Classic to Romantic,” and “Problems of Literary Theory.”  Students wrote dissertations under him and moved on to teaching careers across the United States.  I’m sure these courses were challenging in every sense of the word, but I doubt that they offered the same view of teaching methods that I enjoyed as a student in “Theories of Reading.”  There, Cohen raised the curtain, so to speak, to let students understand the questions he asked himself when planning a class. 

These days, in the second decade of he 21st century, Ralph Cohen is responsible for creating the Cohen Center for the Study of Technological Humanism.  He remains a mentor to me, to his other students, and to hundreds of scholars whom he has published, helped to publish, or published as co-authors.  I have interviewed him several times about his teaching philosophies and practices.  Although his former students invited him to speak at their colleges and universities, it’s unfortunate that more teachers haven’t had the privilege of watching Cohen elevate teaching into a philosophical inquiry where “why you teach” determines “what and how you teach.”  “Articulate your aims for the sake of the students,” he said every class meeting during the fifteen weeks of “Theories of Reading.”  Until that class, I never knew how to lift my sights above tedious, practical necessities and to create an invigorating, intellectual atmosphere that fans deepest instincts for learning.  Cohen is unforgettable.  He fans the fires of curiosity that burn within learners of all ages. 

Thank you, Ralph. 

/_images/cohencenter/232399 Ralph Cohen Portraits-1009.jpgsite://JMU/_images/cohencenter/232399 Ralph Cohen Portraits-1009.jpgJMU232399 Ralph Cohen Portraits-1009.jpgRalph Cohen////
02-23-newstrue1459549416799smith2pj25 Great Colleges for Good Science Students25 Great Colleges for Good Science Students/news/csm/2016/02/02-23-newsJMUsite://JMU/news/csm/2016/02/02-23-newsnealeap1456234660062nealeap1456234660062145620720000025 Great Colleges for Good Science StudentsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Science and Mathematics/csm/indexsite://JMU/csm/indexJMUindexScience and MathematicsScience and Mathematics///_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/college-of-science-and-mathematicsJMUcollege-of-science-and-mathematics

"25 Great Colleges for Good Science Students", is an article written by Kim Clark and published by Time, Inc.

To read the article, go tp:  http://time.com/money/4203233/great-science-colleges-for-good-students/

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01-newstrueNews Article TitleNews Article Display Name/_cascade/base assets/microscopy/01-newsJMUsite://JMU/_cascade/base assets/microscopy/01-newssubob1456164088274subob1456164584152News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMicroscopy////_tags/source/college-of-science-and-mathematics/microscopyJMUmicroscopy/////22-marketing-students-conduct-admissions-focus-grouptrue1459549416799smith2pjFocusing on the Future: Marketing Students Conduct Social Media Focus Groups with FreshmanFocusing on the Future: Marketing Students Conduct Social Media Focus Groups with Freshman/news/cob/2016/02/22-marketing-students-conduct-admissions-focus-groupJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/22-marketing-students-conduct-admissions-focus-grouplentilcn1456151565705lentilcn14561515657051456146000000Focusing on the Future: Marketing Students Conduct Social Media Focus Groups with FreshmanNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMarketing/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/college-of-business/marketingJMUmarketingCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Colleen Lentile

At the start of the spring semester Dr. Andy Wood, head of the marketing department at James Madison University (JMU), chose three of his MKTG 430: Professional Selling students to participate in a project with Dean of Admissions, Michael Walsh. Marketing students, Elizabeth Norcott, Andrew Carlin and Ryan Talento in collaboration with Walsh conducted three focus groups for freshman at JMU. The focus groups concentrated on what social media platforms and online sources freshman use to gather information when they are deciding which university to attend.

“The benefit I received from the project was having the opportunity to work as a consultant to solve a real-world marketing problem,” said Talento. “It was a great experience for my resume, and helped demonstrate my knowledge of focus groups.”

The university and the Office of Admissions gained insight into which social media platforms are going to be the most effective and what types of content will be best received by prospective JMU students. Walsh and the students hope to continue coordinating focus groups in the future and getting more feedback on their social media strategies.

Marketing students coordinated with Michael Walsh to conduct three focus groups with freshman. /////
22-psc-internal-sales-competitiontrue1459549416799smith2pjThe Professional Sales Club Hosts Internal Sales Competition The Professional Sales Club Hosts Internal Sales Competition /news/cob/2016/02/22-psc-internal-sales-competitionJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/22-psc-internal-sales-competitionlentilcn1456149178365lentilcn14561502582821456146000000The Professional Sales Club Hosts Internal Sales Competition News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMarketing/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/college-of-business/marketingJMUmarketingCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Matthew D'Angelo

PSC Internal Sales Competition  PSC Internal Sales Competition  PSC Internal Sales Competition          

The Professional Sales Club at James Madison University’s (JMU) College of Business (CoB) sponsored an internal sales competition this past week where 25 students from a variety of majors had the opportunity to participate in video recorded professional sales role plays with employers from different companies acting as buyers. Judges watched the role plays and scored the students on categories such as professional introduction, uncovering needs and closing. The judges represented companies like ADP, First Data, Vorsight, Old Dominion Realty, Sherwin Williams, SAP, AKLU, Gartner, TEK Systems, Tom James, Ricoh, Fastenal and Memory Blue.

Students and buyers were given a role play and the student was tasked with attempting to “close” the sale within the 10 minute time frame. Afterward, while the scores were being calculated, students and buyers had the opportunity to network in Chandler Hall providing employers and students an opportunity to learn more about each other.

The top six contestants will now travel to Atlanta, Ga. for the national sales competition. The following students were selected as the top competitors: Nicole Asaban, Kyle Barry, Kemp Bartlett, Meghan Niski, Milo Rubin and Chase Rustand. Examples of the role plays are available on the Center for Professional Sales Role Play Samples link.  

The sales competition is another example of how JMU CoB students are using experiential activities to prepare themselves to make the difference.

Six students were chosen to compete at the national sales competition following the CoB internal sales competition./////
16-hiringtrue1459549416799smith2pjService Coordinator Hiring 2016 Service Coordinator Hiring 2016 /news/csl/2016/03/16-hiringJMUsite://JMU/news/csl/2016/03/16-hiringbiglinkm1455736212390brownbe14557405676201455736260000Service Coordinator Hiring 2016 News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCommunity Service Learning /csl/indexsite://JMU/csl/indexJMUindexCS-L HomeCS-L Home///_tags/source/student-affairs/Community Service LearningJMUCommunity Service Learning

The Community Service-Learning Office is hiring Service Coordinators for the 2016-2017 academic year!  Service Coordinators work as liaisons between the JMU community and nonprofit agencies within the Harrisonburg area.  The job entails working with professors, students, and other professionals to coordinator amazing service-learning experiences for the JMU community.  The Service Coordinator areas we will be hiring for are Disability Services, Youth Empowerment Services, and Aging and Health Services. Applications are due by March 16th by 4:00. 

Applications can be downloaded here: 2016-17 CSL Service Coordinator Application

Information sessions are:

Monday, February 29th at 11:30am in SSC, Suite 2100

Wednesday, March 2nd at 7:00pm in SSC, Suite 2100                                                                                                                                                             

Attendance to an information session will give your application priority.

 

If you have any questions, comments or concerns please email csl@jmu.edu with a subject line “Hiring-2016”.

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17-news-application-extendedtrue1459549416799smith2pjApplication Deadline Extended!Application Deadline Extended!/news/mems-malta/2016/02/17-news-application-extendedJMUsite://JMU/news/mems-malta/2016/02/17-news-application-extendedradochlm1455730771536radochlm14557307715361455253200000Application Deadline Extended!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsInternational Master's Program in Environmental Management and Sustainability/mems-malta/indexsite://JMU/mems-malta/indexJMUindexInternational Master's Program in Environmental Management and SustainabilityInternational Master's Program in Environmental Management and Sustainability///_tags/source/college-of-integrated-science-and-engineering/mems-maltaJMUmems-malta

The application deadline for the Malta Program has been extended to Monday, February 22nd, 11 pm Eastern Standard Time. All applications received by this time are guaranteed priority admission review.

The application deadline for the Malta Program has been extended to Monday, February 22nd, 11 pm Eastern Standard Time./////
17-sie-welcomes-new-memberstrue1459549416799smith2pjJMU Sigma Iota Epsilon Chapter Welcomes 10 New MembersJMU Sigma Iota Epsilon Chapter Welcomes 10 New Members/news/cob/2016/02/17-sie-welcomes-new-membersJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/17-sie-welcomes-new-memberslentilcn1455721004448lentilcn14558128432001455714000000JMU Sigma Iota Epsilon Chapter Welcomes 10 New MembersNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsManagement/cob/management/indexsite://JMU/cob/management/indexJMUindexBusiness - ManagementBusiness - Management///_tags/source/college-of-business/managementJMUmanagementCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

SIE Inductees-2016The James Madison University (JMU) chapter of Sigma Iota Epsilon (SIE), the national honorary and professional management fraternity, inducted 10 new members on Wednesday, Feb. 17.

The organization recognizes academic excellence in management studies while providing opportunities for management students to interact with practicing managers. Membership is extended by invitation-only to initiates with a minimum 3.25 GPA.

Mary Gowan, Ph.D., dean of JMU’s College of Business, spoke at the event to welcome the new members and encourage their continued achievements. A member of SIE, Gowan was instrumental in founding an SIE chapter at UNC Charlotte.

JMU’s SIE chapter, which was established last year, has hosted numerous activities to support the Department of Management and the College of Business during its first year, including an information session for freshmen and sophomores interested in the management major. SIE members participated in focus groups to offer feedback on curriculum changes in the management major and volunteered at Mercy House for the CoB MLK Day of Service. They also sponsored a resume review session for all management majors.

“It’s fantastic that we have an organization at JMU to recognize academic excellence in management,” says management lecturer Dan Zisk, who co-advises the JMU SIE chapter with Chris Roeder, also a lecturer in management. “Being part of this organization will allow our high-achieving management majors to apply the skills they are learning about in the classroom to an organizational setting.”

The newest inductees for JMU’s SIE chapter are:

Walker Aspinwall

Evan Beach

Lindsay Combs

Elizabeth Maiorana

Alex McGuire

Erick Morales

Jacob Necamp

Mac Outlaw

Emily Rawlings

Robert Ston

SIE welcomes new members/////
17-cee-redesigns-svap-websitetrue1459549416799smith2pjCenter for Economic Education Donates Service Hours to Local Autism OrganizationCenter for Economic Education Donates Service Hours to Local Autism Organization/news/cob/2016/02/17-cee-redesigns-svap-websiteJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/17-cee-redesigns-svap-websitelentilcn1455718548551lentilcn14557191278221455714000000Center for Economic Education Donates Service Hours to Local Autism OrganizationNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsEconomics/CMS-redirects/economics/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/economics/indexJMUindexSecondarySecondary///_tags/source/college-of-business/economicsJMUeconomicsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

William Wood works with CEE team to complete website project. The Shenandoah Valley Autism Partnership’s (SVAP) website received a digital makeover, thanks to staff and student assistants at James Madison University’s Center for Economic Education (CEE). After several weeks working on the project the cutover occurred on the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service celebrated by the College of Business (CoB) on Jan. 18.

The JMU team’s complete mobile-friendly redesign of the SVAP website is integrated with the organization’s Facebook page, providing the most up-to-date content for users. The project also involved a redesign of SVAP’s mass mailings, giving a consistent look and feel to all of the organization’s communication pieces. By offering their expertise to the organization, the JMU team has expanded SVAP’s ability to effectively reach the local community while remaining committed to its mission of serving people with autism spectrum disorder and their families.

SVAP website after its reconstruction“I was especially pleased that the students on our staff, Devin Boehmer and Melissa Burns, were able to help with this project,” says economics professor and director of the Center for Economic Education, William Wood. “They have gotten a great background in information systems at the College of Business, but nothing as practical as the launch and shakedown of a new website. There are always things you discover about a newly refreshed site when you do the big cutover -- no matter how much preparing you do. Devin and Melissa were able to help with finding and squashing the inevitable bugs.”

Devin Boehner and Melissa Burns lead JMU team in reconstructs SVAP website./////
02-16-2016_widmanabrahamprovostawardtrue1459549416799smith2pjDr. Widman Abraham wins Provost Summer Research AwardDr. Widman Abraham wins Provost Summer Research Award/news/philrel/2016/02/02-16-2016_widmanabrahamprovostawardJMUsite://JMU/news/philrel/2016/02/02-16-2016_widmanabrahamprovostawardpipermc1455656613381pipermc14556566133811455598800000Dr. Widman Abraham wins Provost Summer Research AwardNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsPhilosophy and Religion/philrel/indexsite://JMU/philrel/indexJMUindexPhilosophy and ReligionPhilosophy and Religion///_tags/source/college-of-arts-and-letters/philosophy-and-religionJMUphilosophy-and-religion

Dr. Danielle Widman Abraham

The Department would like to extend its warmest congratulations to Dr. Danielle Widman Abraham, who has been awarded a Provost's Summer Research Grant for her project "Islamic Philanthropy in the United States."  Congratulations! 

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02-16-16_philessaycontesttrue1459549416799smith2pj2016 Philosophy Essay Contest!2016 Philosophy Essay Contest!/news/philrel/2016/02/02-16-16_philessaycontestJMUsite://JMU/news/philrel/2016/02/02-16-16_philessaycontestpipermc1455656163415pipermc145565616341514555988000002016 Philosophy Essay Contest!News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsPhilosophy and Religion/philrel/indexsite://JMU/philrel/indexJMUindexPhilosophy and ReligionPhilosophy and Religion///_tags/source/college-of-arts-and-letters/philosophy-and-religionJMUphilosophy-and-religion

James Madison University Department of Philosophy & Religion

2016 PHILOSOPHY ESSAY CONTEST

Prize: $200


Deadline: March 28, 2016.

Essays may be on any topic in philosophy. 2,000 – 5,000 words.

Open to all JMU students enrolled spring semester 2016.

Submissions should indicate the name of professor, course, and semester submitted, if applicable. The name of the author should not appear anywhere in the essay.

Send as email attachment to philosophyessaycontest@gmail.com.

No prize will be awarded if in the judgment of the judges no deserving entries are submitted.

For any questions, please contact Dr. Thonas Adajian at adajiatr@jmu.edu

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16-hr-case-competition-with-bridgewatertrue1459549416799smith2pjStudents from JMU and Bridgewater Collaborate in HR Case CompetitionStudents from JMU and Bridgewater Collaborate in HR Case Competition/news/cob/2016/02/16-hr-case-competition-with-bridgewaterJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/16-hr-case-competition-with-bridgewaterlentilcn1455639485752lentilcn14558036817001455627600000Students from JMU and Bridgewater Collaborate in HR Case CompetitionNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsManagement/cob/management/indexsite://JMU/cob/management/indexJMUindexBusiness - ManagementBusiness - Management///_tags/source/college-of-business/managementJMUmanagementCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Matthew D'Angelo

Dr. Leduc and the winners of the SHRM Case Competition. On Friday, Feb. 5, College of Business (CoB) and Bridgewater College (BC) management students participated in an Human Resources Case Competition at James Madison University. The competition, organized by JMU faculty member Dr. Laura Leduc, called for collaboration between both schools as multiple teams presented in front of a board of judges for a chance to win a Kindle.  

“I feel like it was a good experience,” said Jacob Conley, a JMU management major. “I’m a senior and it’s something Dr. Leduc was passionate about and I wanted to be a part of it. Maybe in the future we can compete regionally.”

The students involved met two weeks prior to the competition to strategize about their solutions. After their meeting, students from both schools worked closely with one another up until the date of the competition. This kind of collaboration between both colleges is reflective of the kind of experience the CoB hopes to provide its students.

Conley’s experience is one that he believes will prepare him well for what his future holds.

“All of these case competitions are great because they provide critical thinking skills,” said Conley. “We’re given a problem, and we have to find a solution. I think that critical thinking skills will translate well into the business world.”

Conley went on to say that while this competition provided students with valuable career experience, it also served as a good opportunity for the management program, which hopes to compete in the SHRM competition next year.

Dr. Laura Leduc hosts HR Case Competition, provides students with invaluable experience/////
16-management-resume-linkedin-reviewtrue1459549416799smith2pjThe Standout Resume: Management Students Get Help Writing Resumes That Get NoticedThe Standout Resume: Management Students Get Help Writing Resumes That Get Noticed/news/cob/2016/02/16-management-resume-linkedin-reviewJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/16-management-resume-linkedin-reviewlentilcn1455638242235lentilcn14557213029651455627600000The Standout Resume: Management Students Get Help Writing Resumes That Get NoticedNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsManagement/cob/management/indexsite://JMU/cob/management/indexJMUindexBusiness - ManagementBusiness - Management///_tags/source/college-of-business/managementJMUmanagementCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman and Annamarie Nyirady

Management Resume and LinkedIn ReviewGetting noticed is critical to any job search, and that starts with a strong resume.

James Madison University’s chapter of the Sigma Iota Epsilon (SIE) Honors Fraternity, the national honorary and professional management fraternity, hosted a resume and LinkedIn review on Feb. 3 to help students majoring in management showcase their experiences and skills for potential employers. Co-hosted by JMU’s chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the event drew nearly 70 freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors.

After submitting their resume for a peer review, each student was given the opportunity for a one-on-one session with management faculty members who offered invaluable advice for developing competitive resumes. Additionally, students from the SHRM chapter offered tips for producing effective LinkedIn pages.

The event offered an opportunity for students to connect with their peers within the same major, as well as to build relationships with faculty members, says Chris Roeder, the SIE faculty adviser. They received invaluable advice specific to careers in management.

“The students received multiple perspectives on what makes a great resume,” Roeder says.  “They normally wouldn’t have easy access to multiple people reviewing their resumes at one time. Every major has a slightly different criteria as far as the skill set that employers want to see, and the students who participated received a unique management perspective.”

SIE hosts resume and LinkedIn review for students/////
16-weathertrue1459549416799smith2pjInclement Weather Hours for Tuesday, February 16Inclement Weather Hours for Tuesday, February 16/news/healthcenter/2016/02/16-weatherJMUsite://JMU/news/healthcenter/2016/02/16-weatherjonesvw1455589939161jonesvw1455590014025Inclement Weather Hours for Tuesday, February 16News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsHealth Center/healthcenter/indexsite://JMU/healthcenter/indexJMUindexUHC HomeUniversity Health Center Home///_tags/source/healthcenterJMUhealthcenterHealth CenterHealth Center

Due to inclement weather and JMU closing, all scheduled appointments at the UHC are cancelled and no fees will be charged to your account for your missed appointment.

Please call the University Health Center at 540.568.6178 and choose option #2 the next business day that JMU is open to reschedule your appointment.

Our Urgent Care will be open from 10am until 2pm; we will take patients for urgent care needs such as minor fractures, sprains, stitches and other immediate medical problems (additional information about UHC Urgent Care may be found at http://www.jmu.edu/healthcenter/StudentCare/urgent-medical-care.shtml).

The Urgent Care entrance is externally located on the corner of the Student Success Center at the intersection of Mason Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Way.

If you need urgent care after our hours of operation, visit one of the following healthcare centers in Harrisonburg:

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12-shrm-luncheontrue1459549416799smith2pjJMU SHRM Chapter Hosts Lunch to Bring Together Students, Local ProfessionalsJMU SHRM Chapter Hosts Lunch to Bring Together Students, Local Professionals/news/cob/2016/02/12-shrm-luncheonJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/12-shrm-luncheonlentilcn1455292835950lentilcn14558043350161455285600000JMU SHRM Chapter Hosts Lunch to Bring Together Students, Local ProfessionalsNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsManagement/cob/management/indexsite://JMU/cob/management/indexJMUindexBusiness - ManagementBusiness - Management///_tags/source/college-of-business/managementJMUmanagementCoB Faculty////cob/_cascade/_tags/facultyJMUfacultyCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Karen Doss Bowman

Dean Mary Gowan with studentsJames Madison University’s (JMU) chapter of the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) recently hosted a luncheon, inviting members of the local professional chapter, Shenandoah Valley SHRM, and  Bridgewater College’s SHRM chapter.

Guest speaker, Mary Gowan, Ph.D., SHRM-SCP, SPHR, dean of the College of Business (CoB) spoke on “Thinking and Measuring Strategically: A Primer for HR Professionals.” She emphasized the importance of strategically structuring HR practices and decision-making to match the organization’s goals.

The event, held in the Montpelier Room of E-Hall, drew nearly 60 local human resources professionals and 20 students from JMU and Bridgewater College, according to management professor Laura Leduc, faculty adviser for JMU’s SHRM chapter.

Dean Mary Gowan speaking at SHRM LuncheonKatie Miller, a student majoring in human resources and the director of marketing for JMU’s chapter of SHRM, appreciated the opportunity to network with local professionals.

“I really liked being able to sit with people from the Shenandoah Valley SHRM chapter and getting to know professionals that work around the valley,” Miller says.

Bridgewater and JMU come together for SHRM luncheon./////
12-marketing-town-halltrue1459549416799smith2pjStudents and Faculty Introduced to New Ideas and Opportunities at Marketing Town HallStudents and Faculty Introduced to New Ideas and Opportunities at Marketing Town Hall/news/cob/2016/02/12-marketing-town-hallJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/12-marketing-town-halllentilcn1455291656619lentilcn14552916566191455282000000Students and Faculty Introduced to New Ideas and Opportunities at Marketing Town HallNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsMarketing/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/college-of-business/marketingJMUmarketingCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessCoB Faculty////cob/_cascade/_tags/facultyJMUfacultyCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

By Anne Delafield

Marketing is a collaborative, dynamic field and the Department of Marketing is committed to helping students rise to the top of their disciplines. The department held its first-ever Town Hall Meeting on Feb. 1, bringing together faculty and students to celebrate their achievements, share ideas for improving courses and provide information about the many opportunities available to help students sharpen their marketing skills and network with practitioners in the field.

According to department chair Dr. Andy Wood, numerous internship opportunities are available, and a new mentorship program is available to CoB students. Students were introduced to numerous professional development organizations that operate within the department, including the Madison Marketing Association, the Professional Sales Club, Pi Sigma Epsilon, DECA and the Madison American Advertising Federation. Suggestions for improving marketing courses included the addition of marketing concepts to the College of Business’ 10 core business courses and the expansion of topics covered in upper-level marketing courses.

Marketing Town Hall informs students about new internship opportunities and a new mentorship program. /////
12-silverback-strategies-adwords-test-challengetrue1459549416799smith2pjJMU Students Among Winners of 2016 Silverback Strategies AdWords Test Challenge JMU Students Among Winners of 2016 Silverback Strategies AdWords Test Challenge /news/cob/2016/02/12-silverback-strategies-adwords-test-challengeJMUsite://JMU/news/cob/2016/02/12-silverback-strategies-adwords-test-challengelentilcn1455289218522lentilcn14552911987321455282000000JMU Students Among Winners of 2016 Silverback Strategies AdWords Test Challenge News/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCollege of Business/cob/indexsite://JMU/cob/indexJMUindexBusinessBusiness///_tags/source/college-of-business/college-of-businessJMUcollege-of-businessMarketing/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexsite://JMU/CMS-redirects/marketing/indexJMUindexJMU JoblinkJMU Joblink///_tags/source/college-of-business/marketingJMUmarketingCoB Students////cob/_cascade/_tags/studentsJMUstudents

Silverback Strategies AdWords 2016The second class meeting in Theresa Clarke’s MKTG 477 course is a doozy. It’s final exam day. Before her students even choose their favorite seats, they spend the holiday break preparing for the spring semester course by studying for intense exams covering the intricacies of digital marketing platform Google AdWords.

The early final test schedule ensures that Clarke’s students have the foundational knowledge they need to compete in the Google Online Marketing Challenge (GOMC), the focal project of the digital marketing course. The annual global competition enables students to experience and create real online marketing campaigns using Google AdWords and Google+. More than 100,000 students have participated over the past eight years, and JMU is always a top contender.

Clarke’s students are highly motivated for the exam in part because of a unique partnership she has built with Silverback Strategies, an Alexandria-based digital marketing firm known for its AdWords expertise. For two years, the agency has sponsored the “Silverback Strategies AdWords Test Challenge,” encouraging strong exam preparation by providing great prizes to top scoring students. Prizes this year included bags of Google swag, a Google Chromecast and an iPad Mini.

The following JMU students were winners of the 2016 Silverback Strategies AdWords Test Challenge:

·         Jacob Shibley, a senior from New Kent, Va., achieved the highest final exam score.

·         Jacob Brown, a senior from Ashburn, Va., earned the second highest final exam score.

·         Maianh Phan, a senior from Falls Church, Va., achieved the third highest final score.

·         Alexander Adley, a senior from Pittsburgh, Pa., was first in the class to achieve AdWords Certification.

The Silverback team, which includes quite a few JMU alumni, has worked with Clarke and her students since the GOMC began. They join her students every year on campus to share advice, experiences and guidance about digital marketing and working with Google platforms. Several of her College of Business students are recruited by Silverback to join their search team.

“Agency partners like Silverback bring so much value to this course every year – a lot more than just cool prizes,” says Clarke. “They impact my students by providing insights, mentoring and a vital perspective on what it’s like to do marketing for a living.”  

Armed with AdWords expertise, Clarke’s students now face an even bigger test. Her five GOMC teams are currently developing online advertising campaigns that will be run for real-world nonprofits. Global winners of the GOMC will be announced by August. Good luck to our JMU teams!

Dr. Theresa Clarke coaches students to become adept at Google AdWords and digital marketing./////
12-ombudstrue1460571860031chandljlNew Faculty OmbudspersonJMU has a new Faculty Ombudsperson. Faculty Ombudsperson Faculty Ombudsperson1455256800000New Faculty Ombudsperson/news/academic-affairs/2016/02/12-ombudsJMUsite://JMU/news/academic-affairs/2016/02/12-ombudsshackekl1455286929740shackekl14595413625301455253200000New Faculty OmbudspersonOffice of the Provost/academic-affairs/indexsite://JMU/academic-affairs/indexJMUindexHomeHome///_tags/source/acadaffairsJMUacadaffairs

Dr. Charles Blake will take over the role of Faculty Ombudsperson, effective August 15, 2016. Dr. Blake currently serves as the academic unit head for the Department of Political Science. 

For more information on the role of the Ombudsperson, refer to the Academic Affairs website.

JMU has a new Faculty Ombudsperson. /////
09-malitrue1459549416799smith2pjLandmine Kills Three Soldiers in Central Mali Region of MoptiLandmine Kills Three Soldiers in Central Mali Region of Moptiwilli4bmLandmine Kills Three Soldiers in Central Mali Region of MoptiMali, Mopti, landmine, soliderLandmine Kills Three Soldiers in Central Mali Region of Mopti1454994000000Landmine Kills Three Soldiers in Central Mali Region of Mopti/news/cisr/2016/02/09-maliJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/02/09-maliwilli4bm1455209807557willi4bm14552098075571454997600000Landmine Kills Three Soldiers in Central Mali Region of MoptiNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization &amp; Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"Three Malian soldiers were killed when their vehicle hit a landmine in the central region of Mopti, officials say. Two others were wounded and taken to a hospital, the defence ministry said in a statement. No group has claimed responsibility for the device. Mali has been threatened by various armed groups and has fought Islamist rebels in the north for a number of years. The incident happened in Mondoro, next to the border with Burkina Faso, the statement said." (bbc.com)

Read more.

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22-kerrytrue1459549416799smith2pjJohn Kerry to Discuss UXO on Laos TripJohn Kerry to Discuss UXO on Laos Tripwilli4bmJohn Kerry to Discuss UXO on Laos TripLaos, Kerry, UXOJohn Kerry to Discuss UXO on Laos Trip1453438800000John Kerry to Discuss UXO on Laos Trip/news/cisr/2016/01/22-kerryJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/01/22-kerrywilli4bm1455209418106willi4bm14552094181061453442400000John Kerry to Discuss UXO on Laos TripNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization &amp; Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR HomeCISR HomeCISR envisions a world where people can build prosperous futures free from the repercussions of conflict and disaster.Every day, CISR works around the world with post-conflict communities to promote recovery, rebuilding and resilience.post-conflict recovery, mine risk education, UXO, conventional weapons destruction cwd, to walk the earth in safety, landmines, ERW, Mine Action, Journal, Ken Rutherford, CISRCISR's staff and network of experts have served practitioners and those affected by conflict and trauma through countless personal exchanges, publications, conferences and trainings, including landmine/UXO management and peer support programs.///_tags/source/centers-and-institutes/center-for-international-stabilization-and-recoveryJMUcenter-for-international-stabilization-and-recovery

"VIENTIANE, Laos — More than 40 years later, it is still a regular event in the countryside. A child picks up what looks like a toy, a farmer hits a buried shell with a shovel, or a villager tries to snag some scrap metal — and an American bomb explodes. Hundreds of people are killed or wounded each year by the remnants of the United States’ bombing campaign in Laos." (bostonglobe.com)

Read more.

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27-eodtrue1459549416799smith2pjNew EOD Warrior Foundation Office: Niceville, FLNew EOD Warrior Foundation Office: Niceville, FLwilli4bmNew EOD Warrior Foundation Office: Niceville, FLEOD, EOD Warrior FoundationNew EOD Warrior Foundation Office: Niceville, FL1453870800000New EOD Warrior Foundation Office: Niceville, FL/news/cisr/2016/01/27-eodJMUsite://JMU/news/cisr/2016/01/27-eodwilli4bm1455208625664willi4bm14552086256641453874400000New EOD Warrior Foundation Office: Niceville, FLNews/news/indexsite://JMU/news/indexJMUindexJMU News JMU News ///_tags/Featured Items/NewsJMUNewsCenter for International Stabilization &amp; Recovery/cisr/indexsite://JMU/cisr/indexJMUindexCISR Home