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Honors Courses - Spring 2016

This list is not official and is subject to change. Classes may be cancelled or added prior to the beginning of the semester. Check MyMadison for the most accurate information.

This list does not reflect whether a class is open or closed for enrollment. Check MyMadison for the most accurate enrollment information.

search Honors classesTips for searching for Honors GenEd classes on MyMadison: 

  • Leave the "Subject" field blank
  • For "Course Number," select "contains" from the drop down menu and enter "H" in the field
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  • HON 201E and 202E will not appear in this search. They must be searched separately using "HON" in the "Subject" field.

Honors General Education

Cluster 1

PHIL 120H - Critical Thinking (3 credits)
Class #: 15963   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: William Knorpp   |   MWF 10:10-11:00 AM    |    Moody 0107
Class #: 15971   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: William Knorpp   |   MWF 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM    |    Moody 0107
An introduction to the techniques for analyzing and evaluating information in everyday experience. The functions of language will be discussed. Techniques for judging the strengths of arguments and the probable truth of the arguments' premises will be examined. This course does not meet the philosophy requirement for the B.A. degree. May not be used for major credit.

HIST 150H - Critical Issues in Recent Global History (3 credits)
Class #: 16758   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Mary Louise Loe   |   MWF 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM    |    Jackson 0003
Class #: 16759   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Mary Louise Loe   |   MWF 12:20-1:10PM    |    Jackson 0105

This course examines issues in recent history as a means to introduce, develop and enhance critical thinking skills and to supplement writing, oral communication, library and computing skills objectives for General Education Cluster One. A seminar format allows for careful examination of issues in both oral and written formats. The course emphasizes the development and articulation of well-reasoned arguments in organized and grammatically acceptable prose. May not be used for major credit.

SCOM 121H - Fundamental Human Communication: Presentations (3 credits)
Class #: 16144   |   Section: 0012   |   Instructor: Timothy Ball   |   MWF 10:10-11:00 AM    |    Harrison 2101
Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in a public environment. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive speeches. Public speaking required.

SCOM 122H - Fundamental Human Communication: Individual Presentations (3 credits)
Class #: 16178   |   Section: 008   |   Instructor: Alyssa Reid   |   MWF 9:05-9:55 AM   |   Moody 0205
Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in a public environment. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive speeches. Public speaking required.

SCOM 123H - Fundamental Human Communication: Group Presentations (3 credits)
Class #: 16511   |   Section: 0008   |   Instructor: Alison Bodkin   |   TuTh 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM   |   Harrison 0112
Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in small group and public communication contexts. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive presentations. Public speaking required.

WRTC 103H - Critical Reading and Writing (3 credits)
Class #: 15791   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Karen McDonnell   |   MWF 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Harrison 2103
Fosters reflective, critical reading, writing, and research in public discourse, culture, humanities, technology, and science. Challenges students to consider cross-disciplinary modes of inquiry through multiple genres with an attention to enlightened, global citizenship. Emphasizes revising for rhetorical effectiveness. WRTC 103H fulfills the General Education Cluster One writing requirement and is a prerequisite for all WRTC courses numbered 200 or above.

Cluster 2

PHIL 101H - Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Class #: 15962   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: William O'Meara   |   TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM   |   Jackson 0002
Class #: 16174   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: William O'Meara   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   Jackson 0002
An introduction to the basic problems and concepts of philosophy, the nature of man and the self, ethics, theories of knowledge, philosophy of religion, etc., as revealed in the writings of the major philosophers.

ARTH 206H - Renaissance to Modern Art
Class #: 16695   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Laura Katzman   |   TuTh 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM   |   Duke 1041
Introduction to art and architecture of the world from the Renaissance through Modern ages. Includes European Renaissance, Baroque, Enlightenment, 19th and 20th centuries, as well as Asian and African arts.

MUS 206H - Introduction to Global Music (3 credits)
Class #: 16453   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Staff   |   TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM   |   Music Building 0318
A survey of various world music traditions, including those of Asia, the Pacific, Europe, Africa and the Americas. The course will focus on aesthetics, musical forms and styles, and the relationship between music and other arts. Emphasis will be placed on historical, religious, and cultural events and their influence on the creation and development of music.

ENG 221H - Literature/Culture/Ideas (3 credits)
Class #: 16299   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: David Babcock   |   TuTh 11:00AM - 12:15PM   |   Keezell G009
TOPIC: LAW AND VENGEANCE. This course will take a thematic approach to literature by examining multiple literary texts that engage with a common course theme concerned with the human experience. Themes address cultural, political, social, religious, or philosophical aspect ideas through literature.

ENG 221H - Genre(s) (3 credits)
Class #: 16307   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Sharon Cote   |   TuTh 11:00AM - 12:15PM   |   Keezell G003
TOPIC: SPECULATIVE FICTION. An examination of representative works in a literary genre, in a set of related literary subgenres, or in both a literary genre and one or more closely connected genres in other humanities disciplines.

ENG 239H - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)
Class #: 16314   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Debali Mookerjea-Leonard   |   MoWe 2:30-3:45PM   |   Keezell 0307
This course introduces students to representative works of South Asian literature, particularly the Indian subcontinent, produced over the course of the 20th century. It aims to cultivate an awareness of the historical, cultural, and intellectual contexts of writings from South Asia and the South Asian diaspora. Texts for the course have been selected from a range of genres, including the novel, short story, drama and poetry. Films will be used to provide a visual complement to the texts. Through close reading and analyses of literary texts, and discussions in class, the course endeavors to refine students' skills of critical thinking, reading and writing.

HON 201E - Global Cities: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to Understanding Urbanization (3 credits)
Class #: 16552   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Mary Shira   |   MoWe 9:05-10:20 AM   |   Duke 2039
Class #: 16553   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Mary Shira   |   MoWe 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM   |   Duke 2039
This course is restricted to second-semester freshmen. Second course in the Global Cities sequence.
This course takes the city as a point of departure from which to explore the human experience in a trans-disciplinary manner.  Students will read from art history, history, urban planners, cinema studies, fiction writers and urban artist.  We will explore how and why cities came to be; the promises and pitfalls of urban living, with an emphasis on the cultural representation of global cities.  The emphasis is on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries although we explore other eras.

Cluster 3

ISCI 101H - Physics, Chemistry and the Human Experience (3 credits)
Class #: 16547   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: C Whisnant   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   Phys/Chem 2116
A survey of fundamental scientific ideas and principles, and ideas of chemistry and physics. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the development of these principles and their application in understanding the world around us.

Cluster 5

PSYC 101H - General Psychology (3 credits)
Class #: 16206   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Suzanne Baker   |   TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM   |   Miller 1107

A study of the nervous system, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, life span development, personality, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social psychology and the scientific method.

Honors Seminars

Honors seminars are recommended for sophomores and above but are open to second semester freshmen. For more information about Honors seminars, visit here.

HON 300 - Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Film (3 credits)
Class #: 13819   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Robert Bersson (Art & Art History)   |   Mo 5:15-8:15 PM   |   Duke 1041
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the most complex and seemingly intractable of all contemporary conflicts.  Ethnic, religious, and national identities, interwoven histories, and geo-political interests intersect and clash at the various fault lines.  As the second decade of the 21st century begins, there are clear signs that the conflict is reaching a climactic point that will lead either to resolution in a possible one- or two-state solution or to an increase in violence and other forms of confrontation. 

This seminar will employ the arts—architecture and community design, painting and sculpture, graphic design, music and music videos, documentary and feature film, and literature—as expressive and representative means to understand the conflict.  We will view the production, past and present, of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian artists and designers in Israel/Palestine and in the Diaspora.  Short stories, poems, memoirs, films and videos, songs and diverse works of visual art will be our vehicles to powerfully illuminate the conflict, its history, and its issues.

HON 300 - Contemporary U.S. (3 credits)
Class #: 12967   |   Section: 0003   |   Instructor: H. Gelfand (History Dept.)   |   MW 6:00-7:15 PM   |   Duke 2039
This course is designed as an interdisciplinary introduction to a variety of issues related to the United States in the present day.  The course is divided in to topical themes that address some of the major issues relevant to the people of the United States, their government, and the world beyond the nation¿s borders.  Within the 13 focused weekly topics are contemplations of larger subjects like culture, economics, politics, demography, history, sociology, and anthropology.  However, these 13 topics allow for a deeper examination in to a broader variety of issues:  wars, prisons, racism, violence, television, computers, foreign policy, feminism, political leadership, labor unions, organic agriculture, local sourcing of food, urbanization, poverty, industrial agriculture, racial profiling and preferences, food and cuisine, historic preservation, music, literature, sports, homosexuality, sexual harassment, journalism, architecture, cultural persistence, cultural adaptation, dance, collective remembrance and memorials, environmental business practices, conservative economic principles, the Occupy Movement, gay marriage, student protests, social activism, police brutality, eco-terrorism, environmental activism, urban environmental planning, education, religion, and recreation.

HON 300 - Viral Genomics (2 credits) 
Class #: 14420   |   Section: 0004   |   Instructor: Louise Temple-Rosebrook (ISAT)   |   MoWe 8:25-9:55 AM, Fr 9:05-9:55 AM   |   ISAT/CS 336
Class #: 17187   |   Section: 0008   |   Instructor: Louise Temple-Rosebrook (ISAT)   |   MoWe 3:35-5:10 PM, Fr TBA   |   ISAT/CS 336
This 2-semester course involves original research to find unique soil viruses that infect bacteria. Using tools from molecular biology and microbiology, students isolate their own virus from a soil sample they choose. The viruses are visualized by electron microscopy and the genome sequence of one of the new viruses is determined. In the second semester (Genomics) the genome sequence is analyzed for open reading frame (i.e. gene) determinations and likeness to other characterized viruses. The course includes research methods, proper experimental recordkeeping, bioethics, literature review, and practice in the oral and written communication of scientific findings.  The course will culminate in a public poster session to present new student findings. Prerequisite: HON 300 Viral Discovery, Fall 2015.

HON 300 - CHBS Senior Honors Writing Workshop (1 credit)
Class #: 14819   |   Section: 0005   |   Instructor: Lucy Green (University Writing Center)   |   TBA   |   TBA
This section is for students in the College of Health and Behavioral Sciences only who are enrolled in the final semester of the Senior Honors Project for Spring 2016. Contact the Honors Program for permission to enroll. This 1-credit course will provide structure, writing instruction, and a supportive community to CHBS students enrolled in the final semester of their Senior Honors Projects. In this interdisciplinary class, students will receive guidance on organizing and synthesizing their research, reflecting on their findings, and drafting, revising, and editing a scholarly or creative project. Students will discuss the practical and theoretical challenges of writing about research and will provide feedback on each other's works-in-progress. Ultimately, this class will help students envision, plan, and write a final "deliverable" for a real audience with the goal of publication or real world application.

HON 300 - James Madison University Undergraduate Research Journal (3 credits)
Class #: 16952   |   Section: 0006   |   Instructor: Kevin Jefferson & Steven Lunsford (WRTC Dept.)   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   Harrison 2246
Students serve on the James Madison Undergraduate Research Journal Editorial Board and collaborate to promote, publish, and share undergraduate scholarship from all JMU disciplines. Board members work within and across teams as they develop particular sets of skills: Marketing/Outreach editors network with university stakeholders, develop publicity initiatives, and create funding opportunities; Design editors use the Adobe Creative Suite and other software platforms to design layouts and art for publication in online and print formats; Editing editors correspond with student authors, coordinate the efforts of the JMURJ Faculty Review Board, and comprehensively edit text- and media-based submissions from disciplines across the university.

JMURJ is offered as a “normal” Honors seminar (HON 300), Area of Emphasis experiential seminar (HON 362), and 1, 2, or 3-credit Area of Emphasis practicum (HON 363). The course may be applied toward all experiential seminar practicum requirements in all Areas of Emphasis (Creativity, Global Studies, Leadership, Research, and Service) and may be repeated for credit.

NOTE: This course requires instructor consent. Interested students should submit a letter of interest. Check out http://www.jmu.edu/jmurj/about/information-and-letter-of-interest.pdf for information and instructions, and contact Scott Lunsford (lunsfoss@jmu.edu) with any questions.

HON 300 - Meeting of Two Worlds: Artistic and Cultural Exchange Between Renaissance Europe and the Islamic Empires (3 credits)
Class #: 16981   |   Section: 0007   |   Instructor: Sarah Brooks (Art & Art History)   |   MWF 1:25-2:15 PM   |   Duke 1041
The early modern period c. 1400-1700 witnessed tremendous engagement across the globe in terms of religion, art, and culture, and especially between the Islamic states of the east and the Christian empires of western Europe. In the wake of the first Christian Crusades, and driven by the engines of trade and commerce, cities and states around the Mediterranean Sea began to engage with one another in new and fascinating ways. Witness to this worldwide phenomenon are the buildings, monuments, and chronicles of the period which will serve as the focus of this seminar.

HON 300 - Gender Issues in Science: A Critical Look at the Human Aspects of Science (3 credits)
Class #: 17376   |   Section: 0009   |   Instructor: Louise Temple-Rosebrook (Biotechnology)   |   TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM   |   ISAT/CS 0246
In this seminar, we look at the current status and history of the human enterprise we call "Science." We address some of the many inequities created by science and the impact those have on what science gets funded, what questions are asked, what information is available to who, how this model of knowledge development happened over time. This is an interdisciplinary course that looks at the scientific process, science practitioners, and science students through the lens of gender analysis. Students read literature, lead discussions, perform experiments, and analyze both data and processes, to address the effects of educational systems on the preparation and careers of scientists, the influence of politics and culture on scientific inquiry, and the effects of critiques grounded in gender analyses on understanding the scientific process.

HON 332 - Global Studies II: Global Challenges and the Future of Work in the 21st Century: Envisioning the Next Fifty Years (3 credits) 
Class #: 16545   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructors: Philip Frana and Jared Diener (Honors Program)   |   MoWe 2:30-3:45 PM   |   Duke 2039

In this presidential election cycle, candidates extol the virtues of education, economic growth, and job creation as keys to the future. But what does a quality education look like in the twenty-first century? Where can we squeeze out additional profits amid calls for sustainable environmental practices? What will the jobs of the future look like? Are we prepared for the next global or international economy? Emerson once wrote: “Don’t waste life in doubts and fears; spend yourself on the work before you, well assured that the right performance of this hour’s duties will be the best preparation for the hours and ages that will follow it.” Is this all the reassurance we need?

In this class you will engage in self-directed study of the future of work, the future of education, and the future global economy. We will study the past, present, and future of great global challenges; the importance of service, civic engagement and leadership; and the need for creativity in making a difference in the world.

** This is an Area of Emphasis course that is open to all Honors students. Permission to enroll is not required.

 

Areas of Emphasis

These seminars are restricted to sophomore students who are currently enrolled in an Area of Emphasis. Students should enroll in a seminar that is eligible for their area. Students must complete both Area of Emphasis courses to receive Honors seminar credit. Please direct any questions to Jared Diener, Honors Academic Advisor, dienerjl@jmu.edu.


HON 322 - Leadership II: American Women at War (3 credits) 
AREA(S): Leadership; Global Studies
Class #: 16532   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Amelia Underwood (Military Science Dept.)   |   W 4:40-7:10 PM   |   Miller 2140

This course invites students to engage a series of issues about the role of women in the United States military. This course will examine the contributions and experiences of women who have served during times of war to include the American Revolution, the U.S. Civil War, World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf War(s). Also included in the scope of this course is an examination of how women in military service, both past and present, are an instrument for societal change in America, specifically in promoting the cause of women's rights. Students will study an extensive collection of primary and secondary sources, as well as have an opportunity to hear firsthand from women veteran speakers. A visit to the American Women's Military Memorial at Arlington Cemetary is also on the agenda.


HON 322 - Leadership II: Leadership in Practice (3 credits) 
AREA(S): Leadership
Class #: 16540   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Bradley Newcomer (Honors Program)   |   Th 2:00-4:30 PM   |   Maury G002

This seminar will ask students in the leadership area to continue their leadership development through reflective practice. Each student is required to be engaged throughout the semester in an approved leadership role or activity. Students will work individually, with one another, and with the seminar instructors through readings, reflective writings, and regular meetings. This leadership experience will build off of the previous semester's study of leadership and help students to develop new leadership skills.

NOTE: Students will need to have an approved leadership position in place for the spring semester. Students will be contacted prior to the spring semester regarding their intended leadership role or activity. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange their own leadership experience prior to the beginning of the semester.


HON 332 - Global Studies II: Global Citizenship in a Service-Learning Context (3 credits) 
AREA(S): Creativity; Global Studies; Leadership; Research; Service
Class #: 16535   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Felix Wang (Study Abroad)   |   W 4:00-6:30 PM   |   Harrison 2112

This course is offered during the spring semester and focuses on the concept of “global citzenship” in the context of an international service-learning trip. Students will travel to the Dominican Republic (DR) and engage in an intensive service-learning project over spring break. The course seeks to address definitions and issues of global citizenship, development and service, using the service-learning experience as an aid to learning within the course. Students will also experience/learn about contemporary social, political, cultural and economic conditions within the DR, through service-learning, structured outings, cultural events, guest speakers, coursework and course readings and assignments. Ongoing structured reflection will provide a way for all participants to discover, articulate, integrate and act on what they learn from their experiences. The Honors Program will offer limited funding for travel costs to the DR.


HON 332 - Global Studies II: Global Challenges and the Future of Work in the 21st Century: Envisioning the Next Fifty Years (3 credits) 
AREA(S): Creativity; Global Studies; Leadership; Research; Service
Class #: 16545   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructors: Philip Frana and Jared Diener (Honors Program)   |   MoWe 2:30-3:45 PM   |   Duke 2039

In this presidential election cycle, candidates extol the virtues of education, economic growth, and job creation as keys to the future. But what does a quality education look like in the twenty-first century? Where can we squeeze out additional profits amid calls for sustainable environmental practices? What will the jobs of the future look like? Are we prepared for the next global or international economy? Emerson once wrote: “Don’t waste life in doubts and fears; spend yourself on the work before you, well assured that the right performance of this hour’s duties will be the best preparation for the hours and ages that will follow it.” Is this all the reassurance we need?

In this class you will engage in self-directed study of the future of work, the future of education, and the future global economy. We will study the past, present, and future of great global challenges; the importance of service, civic engagement and leadership; and the need for creativity in making a difference in the world.

** This course is open to all Honors students.


HON 342 - Scientific Research II: Research in Practice (3 credits)
AREA(S): Research
Class #: 16536   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Michael Deaton (ISAT)   |   TIME: TBA   |   ROOM: TBA

At this point research emphasis students may be eager to start active participation in a research program. A second semester “Research in Practice” experience will help to bridge the gap between coursework and independent research with a faculty mentor.  At the end of the fall semester of their sophomore year, research emphasis students will identify a sponsor faculty member with which to work throughout the upcoming spring semester on a literature-based reading and review process.  Specifically, students will read and discuss scholarly literature selected by the faculty sponsor and relevant to said faculty member’s research program question/goals. Weekly faculty/student meetings to discuss the assigned literature will be expected.  By the end of the semester, students will produce a mini-review of the field.  Throughout the semester students will also work to experience and assimilate into the culture of the faculty sponsor’s research group by attending group meetings/social events and shadowing faculty or advanced research students. To facilitate reflection and connections back to skills introduced in the HON 341: Scientific Research I seminar, students will meet throughout the semester with other research emphasis students for focus group conversations and discussions about their experiences.

NOTE: Some students will find that a course similar to HON 342 exists within their home department. In this case, students should enroll in their departmental course facsimile and apply for an Honors Option within this course to fulfill their second semester Area of Emphasis requirement. One of the Honors Option activities must include meeting with the rest of the "Research In Practice" student cohort. If a similar course does not exist within any given home department, students within this department should enroll directly in HON 342. No Honors Option paperwork will be required in such a case. 

Regardless if students are completing a Research in Practice internship experience by taking a departmental course with an Honors Option or directly enrolling in HON 342, all students will need to secure a faculty member (in addition to the Area of Emphasis Coordinator) to sponsor and mentor their work.  Arrangements with faculty sponsors must be made prior to the end of the fall semester. A faculty sponsor may also serve as a current or future independent research advisor.  In the event that independent research is ongoing, work in fulfillment of the second semester Research Emphasis requirement must be distinct from and in addition to that of the student’s independent research expectations. 


HON 352 - Service & Civic Engagement II (3 credits)
AREA(S): Service; Leadership; Creativity
Class #: 16539   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Walter Ghant (Community Service-Learning)   |   TBA   |   TBA

James Madison University’s mission statement challenges students to be meaningfully engaged with the campus and the community. This Service and Civic Engagement course will focus on the application of civic engagement between individuals, on campus, and with the larger community. Students will work as a class to develop, create, and execute community engagement initiative(s). Students will apply theories and models previously introduced in their first semester seminars to not only conceptualize, but also execute an applied project based on community engagement. This is an experiential course and students are encourages and expected to think outside classroom boundaries.


HON 362 - Creativity II: Creativity, Collaboration, Communications, and Problem Solving in Multidisciplinary Teams (3 credits)
AREA(S): Creativity; Leadership; Service
Class #: 16537   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructors: Elizabeth Armstrong and Jonathan Spindel   |   Th 7:00-9:00 PM   |   ISAT/CS 0136

Creativity, collaboration, and communication across disciplines are the building blocks of multidisciplinary innovation. Students in this class will learn techniques and skills necessary to work in multidisciplinary teams. Through team-based experiences and exercises, students will develop their skills and advance their abilities to solve diverse time and material constrained problems. Students will learn elements of creative problem solving through exercises in team building, group presentation and creative expression, and design process. Students will practice concepts of team communications and the mechanisms of creative processes as applied to problem solving in multidisciplinary teams. In-class exercises designed to challenge students across a wide range of areas including technical, mechanical, structural architectural design, theatrical, literary and fine arts, scientific exploration and improvisation provide a framework for both faculty-led and peer-based instruction.


HON 362 - Creativity II: James Madison University Undergraduate Research Journal (3 credits) 
AREA(S): Creativity; Global Studies; Leadership; Research; Service
Class #: 16942   |   Section: 0003   |   Instructors: Kevin Jefferson & Steven Lunsford (WRTC)   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   Harrison 2246

Students serve on the James Madison Undergraduate Research Journal Editorial Board and collaborate to promote, publish, and share undergraduate scholarship from all JMU disciplines. Board members work within and across teams as they develop particular sets of skills: Marketing/Outreach editors network with university stakeholders, develop publicity initiatives, and create funding opportunities; Design editors use the Adobe Creative Suite and other software platforms to design layouts and art for publication in online and print formats; Editing editors correspond with student authors, coordinate the efforts of the JMURJ Faculty Review Board, and comprehensively edit text- and media-based submissions from disciplines across the university.

JMURJ is offered as a “normal” Honors seminar (HON 300), Area of Emphasis experiential seminar (HON 362), and 1, 2, or 3-credit Area of Emphasis practicum (HON 363). The course may be applied toward all experiential seminar practicum requirements in all Areas of Emphasis (Creativity, Global Studies, Leadership, Research, and Service) and may be repeated for credit.

NOTE: This course requires instructor consent. Interested students should submit a letter of interest. Check out http://www.jmu.edu/jmurj/about/information-and-letter-of-interest.pdf for information and instructions, and contact Scott Lunsford (lunsfoss@jmu.edu) with any questions.

** HON 363 - Creativity III: JMURJ Practicum (1, 2, or 3 credits) 
AREA(S): Creativity; Global Studies; Leadership; Research; Service
Class #: 16945; 16947; 16948   |   Sections: 0001; 0002; 0003   |   Instructors: Kevin Jefferson & Steven Lunsford (WRTC)   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   Harrison 2246

JMURJ is offered as a 1, 2, or 3 credit practicum for Area of Emphasis students in all areas. Interested students should submit a letter of interest. Check out http://www.jmu.edu/jmurj/about/information-and-letter-of-interest.pdf for information and instructions, and contact Scott Lunsford (lunsfoss@jmu.edu) with any questions.


HON 300 - Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Film (3 credits)
AREA(S): Global Studies
Class #: 13819   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Robert Bersson (Art & Art History)   |   Mo 5:15-8:15 PM   |   Duke 1041

Students enrolled in this "normal" Honors seminar will complete the second semester requirement of the Global Studies Area of Emphasis sequence. Seats in this course are available to all Honors students. 

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the most complex and seemingly intractable of all contemporary conflicts.  Ethnic, religious, and national identities, interwoven histories, and geo-political interests intersect and clash at the various fault lines.  As the second decade of the 21st century begins, there are clear signs that the conflict is reaching a climactic point that will lead either to resolution in a possible one- or two-state solution or to an increase in violence and other forms of confrontation. 

This seminar will employ the arts—architecture and community design, painting and sculpture, graphic design, music and music videos, documentary and feature film, and literature—as expressive and representative means to understand the conflict.  We will view the production, past and present, of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian artists and designers in Israel/Palestine and in the Diaspora.  Short stories, poems, memoirs, films and videos, songs and diverse works of visual art will be our vehicles to powerfully illuminate the conflict, its history, and its issues.


Honors Seminars Abroad
AREA(S): Global Studies

Participation in any of the 2016 Honors Seminars Abroad will complete the second semester requirement of the Global Studies Area of Emphasis sequence.