Education, Honors, Awards

  •  Director of the JMU LC/MS Undergraduate Teaching and Research Laboratory (since 2010)
  •  PKAL Summer Leadership Institute (2017)
  • Selected as a cohort participant in the Active Learning in Analytical Chemistry Workshop at Washington University (2017)
  • JMU Provost’s Faculty Scholarship Award (2017)
  • Received 1st place award from the Undergraduate Analytical Research Program, Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh (2009)
  • Achievement Award for Excellence in Teaching, Chapman University (2005)
  • Associate Professor, James Madison University (2010-present)
  • Associate Professor, Chapman University, Orange CA (2009-2010)
  • Assistant Professor, Chapman University, Orange CA (2002-2009)
  • Ph.D. Analytical Chemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee FL (2002)
  • B.S. Chemistry, Berry College, Rome GA (1998)

Research Interests

1. Ionization and characterization of acidic compounds by negative ion electrospray (ESI) mass spectrometry with emphasis on:

  • Effect of solvent and solution conditions on negative ion ESI response
  • Prediction of negative ion ESI response

2. Food metabolomics: Identification and quantitation of small molecules in complex food and agricultural samples by LC/MS

  • Effect of yeast strain and storage on the metabolomic profile of beer
  • Effect of temperature/processing on almond flavonoids

Research Description

Dr. Christine A. Hughey is an analytical chemist with expertise in mass spectrometry. Her lab uses LC/MS to study negative ion electrospray ionization fundamentals and to characterize small molecules in food (e.g., food metabolomics). In the food metabolomic work, methods with rigorous quality controls are developed to profile bio-active compounds and to monitor compositional changes due to processing and storage. The fundamental ESI work, which is funded by a NSF RUI grant (CHE 1307226), investigates the effect of analyte physiochemical properties and solution conditions on negative ion ESI response. To date, we have measured the response of 100+ diverse, small, acidic compounds in methanol and other solvents that vary in pH. We are now working with statisticians to build a model, based on machine learning, that identifies physicochemical properties that best predict negative ion response within, and across, compound classes. This work will lead to a better understanding of electrospray ionization fundamentals and will facilitate method development for our foodomic applications, which has included the profiling of nuts, fruits, chocolate and beer. Students who join Dr. Hughey’s research group are typically interested in analytical chemistry, food chemistry and/or forensics.

Funding

  • Provost Research Award, $5,000 (2017)
  • NSF RUI, $238,493 (2013-2018). Effect of solution conditions and analyte properties on negative ionelectrospray ionization response.

Selected Recent Publications (undergraduate authors underlined)

  • Giersch, G.E.W.; Boyett, J.C.; Hargens, T.A.; Luden, N.D.; Saunders, M.J.; Daley, H.; Hughey, C.A.; El-Sohemy, A.; Womack, C.J. The effect of the CYP1A2 -163 C>A polymorphism on the metabolism of caffeine and effect on performance. J. Caffeine Research, submitted.
  • Mattilla, J.M.; Blackard, R A.; Odenkirk, M.T.; Lucas, S.K.; Hughey, C.A. Effect of functional groups on the decarboxylation of benzoic acids during in-source collision induced dissociation. Int. J. Mass Spectrom., submission pending.
  • Boyett, J.C.; Giersch, G.E.W.; Womack, C.J.; Saunders, M.J.; Luden, N.D.; Hughey, C.A.; Daley, H.M. Time of day and training status both impact the efficacy of caffeine for short duration cycling performance. Nutrients. 2016, 8(10), pi:E639.
  • Hughey, C. A.;McMinn, C. M.; Phung, J. "Beeromics: from quality control to identification of differentially expressed compounds in beer" Metabolomiocs, 2016, 12. DOI:10.​1007/​s11306-015-0885-5
  • Umile, T.P.; McLaughlin, P.J.; Johnson, K.R.; Honarvar, S.; Blackman, A.L.; Teotonio. T.L.; Davis, R.W.; Burzynski, E.A.; Hearn, G.W.; Lagalante, A.F.; Hughey, C.A.; Minbiole, K.P.C. Nonlethal amphibian skin swabbing of cutaneous natural products for HPLC fingerprinting, Analytical Methods, 2014, 6, 3277-3284.
  • Barrett, A.; Hughey, C.A.; Straut, C.; Howell, A.; Ndou, T.; Dai, Z.; Kaletune, G. Inhibition of α-amylase and glucoamylase by proanthocyanidins and condensed tannins isolated from grape, pomegranate, cranberry and cocoa. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, 2013, 61, 1477–1486.
  • Huffman, B.A.; Poltash, M.L.; Hughey, C.A. "Effect of polar protic and polar aprotic solvents on negative ion electrospray ionization and chromatographic separation of small acidic molecules." Analytical Chemistry, 2012, 84, 9942-9950.
  • Barrett, A.; Hughey, C.A.; Straut, C.; Howell, A.; Ndou, T.; Dai, Z.; Kaletune, G. "Inhibition of α-amylase and glucoamylase by proanthocyanidins and condensed tannins isolated from grape, pomegranate, cranberry and cocoa." Submitted to Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, June 2012.
  • Hughey, C.A.; Janusziewicz, R.; Minardi, C.S.; Phung, J.; Huffman, B.A.; Reyes, L.; Wilcox, B.E.; Prakash, A. "Distribution of almond polyphenols in blanch water and skins as a function of blanching time and temperature.",  Food Chemistry, 2012, 131, 1165-1173.  DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.09.093
  • Teets, A.S.; Minardi, C.S.; Sundararaman, M.; Hughey, C.A.; Were, L.M.  “Extraction, identification and quantification of flavonoids in electron beam irradiated almond skin powder,” Journal of Food Science, 2009, 74, C298-305, DOI: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2009.01112.x
  • Hughey, C. A.; Minardi, C. S.;  Galasso-Roth, S. A.; Paspalof, G. B.; Mapolelo, M. M.; Rodgers, R. P.; Marshall, A. G.; Ruderman, D. L. “Naphthenic acids as indicators of crude oil biodegradation in soil, based on semi-quantitative ESI FT-ICR MS,” Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 2008, 22, 3968-3976. DOI: 10.1002/rcm.3813
  • Hughey, C.A.; Wilcox, B.E.; Minardi, C. S.; Takehara, C. W.; Sundararaman, M.; Were, L. M. “Capillary liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for the rapid identification and quantification of almond flavonoids,” Journal of Chromatography A, 2008, 119, 259-265. DOI: 10.1016/j.chroma.2008.03.079
  • Prasetyo, M., Chia, M., Hughey, C. A., Were, L. M.  “Utilization of electron beam irradiated almond skin powder as a natural antioxidant in ground top round beef,” Journal of Food Science, 2008, 73, T1-T6. DOI: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2007.00553.x
  • Hughey, C. A.; Galasso, S. A.; Zumberge, J. “Detailed compositional comparison of acidic NSO compounds in biodegraded reservoir and surface crude oils by negative ion electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry,” Fuel, 2007, 86, 758-769. DOI: 10.1016/j.fuel.2006.08.029
  • Hughey, C. A.; Rodgers, R. P.; Marshall, A. G.; Walters, C. C.; Qian, K.; Mankiewicz, P. “Acidic and neutral polar NSO compounds in Smackover oils of different thermal maturity revealed by electrospray high field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry." Organic Geochemistry, 2004, 35, 863-880. DOI: 10.1016/j.orggeochem.2004.02.008
  • Hughey, C. A.; Rodgers, R. P.; Marshall, A. G. “Resolution of 11,000 chemically distinct components in a single electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrum of crude oil,” Analytical Chemistry, 2002, 74, 4145-4149. DOI: 10.1021/ac020146b.
  • Qian, K.; Robbins, W. K.; Hughey, C. A.; Cooper, H. J.; Rodgers, R. P.; Marshall, A. G. “Resolution and identification of 3000 crude acids in heavy petroleum by negative-ion microelectrospray high-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry,” Energy and Fuels, 2001, 15, 1505-1511. DOI: 10.1021/ef010111z
  • Hughey, C. A.; Hendrickson, C. L.; Rodgers, R. P.; Marshall, A. G.; Qian, K. "Kendrick mass defect spectrum: A compact visual analysis for ultrahigh-resolution broadband mass spectra," Analytical Chemistry, 2001, 73, 4676-4681. DOI: 10.1021/ac010560w

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