College of Education

Ramadan – The Islamic Holy Month of Fasting

By Xixëllonjë Nebihu


 
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SUMMARY: For Muslims, Ramadan is a month dedicated to self-control and reflection. It always falls in the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, which is based on the moon's phases. This year Ramadan began on April 2nd and will end on May 2nd.


For Muslims, Ramadan is a month dedicated to self-control and reflection. Fasting is thought to be a technique to purify the soul and develop empathy for those who are hungry and less fortunate in the world. It is commemorated as the month when Muhammad (the prophet) received the first revelations of the Quran, Muslims' holy book. One of Islam's five pillars is fasting. Muslims fast from dawn to dusk every day throughout the month of Ramadan. They are not allowed to eat, drink, smoke, engage in sexual activity, think or speak in cruel or impure ways, or participate in destructive behavior. Ramadan always falls in the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, which is based on the moon's phases. Ramadan began on April 2nd and will end on May 2nd this year. The end of Ramadan is marked by Eid al-Fitr, a three-day festival that is one of Islam's main holidays.

Zareen Rahman, an assistant professor in the College of Education who moved from Pakistan to New Jersey to earn her Master's degree and PhD in mathematics education, talks about her experience being a Muslim and fasting throughout Ramadan. Ramadan, she says, is an exciting time. Zareen breaks the fast with dates, which is a traditional way. Dr. Rahman states that she is in a different mindset for the entire month of Ramadan, "It really cleanses me. I know that whatever I am going through in my life, it's like a switch; it resets you." She has set several goals for this Ramadan that she hopes to achieve: being less furious, being more accepting of herself and the environment, and complaining less. She claims that Ramadan is a mindfulness journey. It means being at her best, mindful from dawn to dusk. Ramadan is a gift to her.

Rahman300.jpgZareen is eternally motivated. Fasting is about more than just hunger or thirst. It's all about exhibiting the finest behaviors. Through an internal monologue, she keeps herself motivated throughout Ramadan. She considers her personal goals and assesses whether or not she has achieved them; if her goals are accomplished at the end of the day, she congratulates herself and encourages herself to do more of them. It's a motivational balancing act. Ramadan represents her spirituality and self-control.

How can you support Muslims during Ramadan? - Feel free to drink or eat in front of Muslims without feeling bad. When scheduling meetings, remember that sunset is a good time to meet. Respect those who are fasting, including your peers, colleagues, staff, and faculty. Discuss Ramadan with a Muslim who is fasting. Participate in the Ramadan spirit of giving to those in need. Happy Ramadan to all Muslims in our community and beyond! Zareen is eternally motivated. Fasting is about more than just hunger or thirst. It's all about exhibiting the finest behaviors. Through an internal monologue, she keeps herself motivated throughout Ramadan. She considers her personal goals and assesses whether or not she has achieved them; if her goals are accomplished at the end of the day, she congratulates herself and encourages herself to do more of them. It's a motivational balancing act. Ramadan represents her spirituality and self-control.

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Published: Monday, April 11, 2022

Last Updated: Friday, April 22, 2022

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