CoB Honors Program Revisions Allow Students to be More Creative


 

The College of Business is working to enhance its Honors Program. Honors students are required to take honors courses and do an Honors Project, which is traditionally a thesis. The CoB wants to change that; the CoB Honors Program is under revision with the goal of increasing student’s interest in their project and then increasing the probability that they will finish their Honors Project.

“The main part of this is that we want to allow for these collaborative projects, we want to allow for article-based projects, article-based thesis…and we are also thinking of looking at creative projects, which would involve more reflective work,” said Dr. Andre Neveu, the Honors Faculty Fellow for the CoB.

With the opportunity to do new and different types of Honors Projects, Neveu is hoping that more students will graduate with honors. There are around 160 students in Track 1 and 2 of the CoB Honors Program, which means that they were admitted into the Honors Program as a high school student or after their freshman year. But, because writing a thesis is so demanding, very few CoB Honors students graduate with honors. Only six students graduated with honors in the CoB in 2013, and five in 2014.

“I think there is a really, really rewarding part of doing work on your own or collaboratively with other students or faculty where you really get a kind of in depth learning about a project or a field,” said Neveu. “It gives you that something to talk about in a job interview.”

With the new types of Honors Projects, the CoB Honors Program is stretching the creative boundaries of a traditional Honors Project and is allowing their students to hone in on something that they are really interested in.

For more information about the CoB Honors Program or the Honors Project, please contact Andre Neveu at neveuax@jmu.edu

Published: Monday, November 17, 2014

Last Updated: Wednesday, June 8, 2016

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