Sponsored Programs Administration & Accounting

Updates
Compliance Corner
News Items
Funding Resources & Announcements
Selected Funding Opportunities
Deadline Links
Office Directory

External
Funding Advisor

May 2011

** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **


May 2011

As always, please allow extra time for our office to assist you in processing your grant proposals to avoid unnecessary delays or missed deadlines.

REMINDER: Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Updates
Updates from the Director

As another very busy spring semester leads to a potentially busier summer of administering awarded projects and writing proposals for new funding, we wish to provide a few reminders and updates.

First, please recall last month's newsletter article on Responsible Conduct of Research training and on our more detailed monitoring of cost transfers (Agency Transaction Vouchers (ATVs)). You may find that and other past articles at http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/newsletter.html.

Second, we wish to remind everyone writing proposals that our Facility and Administration (F&A) rate calculation {also called Overhead or Indirect Cost} changes effective July 1, 2011. The new rate is based on Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC) and there are six potential percentages depending on the type of sponsored project you are pursuing and where the work will be conducted. For additional information, please contact Sponsored Programs at 568-6872 or review the information on our website at http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/indirectcosts.html.

Finally, please plan ahead to avoid payment processing issues on June 30th. Although most sponsored program funding is not "lost" on June 30th like Departmental funds are, Finance must close the books on this year and open the books on the 2012 fiscal year. This year's process also involves a significant Finance system upgrade. Accordingly, expenditure needs between June 17th and July 8th may encounter unusual processing delays. Your planning and cooperation will be appreciated.

Have a great summer and we look forward to working with you.

return to the top of the page

Compliance Corner

Compliance News

Institutional Review Board (IRB) Review and Federally Funded Research
Be aware that granting agencies require IRB review of parts of the grant application applicable to the use of human subjects to ensure consistency between the activities approved by the IRB and activities described within the proposed application. Some agencies may further require additional tasks of the IRB before funds can be accepted by the University. The requirements are different between granting agencies, thus specific information as to what the IRB may need should be provided for within the sponsor guidelines. It is important that the investigator inform the IRB early in the process of possible funding and to facilitate submission of an IRB application for prior review and approval of receiving the notice of grant award.

return to the top of the page

News Items
News Items

Grantsmanship tip for NIH applicants:

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) recently published four funded applications and their summary statements. These R01 applications are being offered as sound examples for new investigators as well as experienced investigators who are new to the shorter format with a 12-page Research Strategy.

return to the top of the page

Funding Resources & Announcements - "HOT" LINKS
Please visit the "funding sources" link at the following website for program listings and searchable databases.

http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/calendar09.html

return to the top of the page

Selected Funding Opportunities
FUNDING OPPORTUNITY LINKS
U.S. Department of State

One Beat

Open Competition for Professional Exchange Programs - ECA/PE/C-11-01

National Science Foundation

Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST)

Domestic Nuclear Detection Office-National Science Foundation Academic Research Initiative (ARI)

Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (TUES)

Workforce Program in the Mathematical Sciences

Petrology and Geochemistry

Evolutionary Processes

Biomolecular Dynamics, Structure, and Function

Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program

Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21)

Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

Biotechnology, Biochemical, and Biomass Engineering (BBBE)

Energy for Sustainability

Research in Engineering Education

Grand Challenges in Global Health Initiative

Grand Challenges Explorations

National Endowment for the Humanities

Challenge America Fast-Track

Department of Defense

ENGAGE: Learning to Solve Problems, Solving Problems to Learn - DARPA-BAA-11-36

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust Preservation Fund

United Engineering Foundation

Grants

Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research

Post-Ph.D. Research Grants

International Collaborative Research Grants

International Symposia

National Institutes of Health

Translational Research to Help Older Adults Maintain their Health and Independence in the Community (R01)

Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) Grants - (R15)

Limited Competition for the Global Research Initiative Program, Behavioral/Social Sciences (R01)

National Historical Publications and Records Administration

Electronic Records Projects

Publishing Historical Records

Department of Education

Education Research

Special Education Research: Social and Behavioral Outcomes to Support Learning

William T. Grant Foundation

Scholars Program

National Research Council

Research Associateship Programs (RAP)

American Honda Foundation

Institutional Grants for Youth and Science Education

Timken Company Charitable Trust

Charitable Grants

Office of Naval Research

STEM for K-12, Higher Education

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Unique and Innovative Space Technology

Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) - 2011

United States Institute of Peace

2011 Annual Grant Program

Kress Foundation

Conservation Grants Program

History of Art Grants Program

Digital Resources Grant Program

National Security Agency

Young Investigators Grant

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities

Open Grant Program

Discretionary Grants

American Astronomical Society

Small Research Grants

RGK Foundation

Grants

return to the top of the page

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Open Competition for Professional Exchange Programs - ECA/PE/C-11-01

  • The Office of Citizen Exchanges (ECA/PE/C), Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), announces an open competition for grants to conduct the 2011 professional exchange programs. This opportunity is designed to bring young foreign professionals to the United States for four-week to six-week-long fellowships in organizations related to their field of work, followed by American counterparts who will travel overseas for reciprocal fellowships. Projects should take place over the course of one to two years, and engage up-and-coming and mid-level government or civil society professionals who will effect positive change in their institutions and communities through the following professional exchange programs: the Legislative Fellows Program, the Women's Empowerment Program, and the Young Entrepreneurs Program.
  • Funding:Approximate total funding is $8,300,000. Approximate number of awards is 15-20. The approximate average award is $400,000. The award amount will vary based on the program and location. There is no minimum or maximum percentage of cost sharing or matching funds required for this competition. However, the Bureau encourages applicants to provide maximum levels of cost-sharing and funding in support of its programs. Overhead and administrative costs in the proposal budget, including salaries, honoraria and subcontracts for services, should be kept to a minimum. The number of participants and actual project days should be maximized. Proposals that employ other creative techniques to increase or stretch funding dollars, such as home-stays for foreign participants, and funding or in-kind support from other public and private partners, will be deemed more competitive. Proposals in which the administrative costs do not exceed 25% of the total requested ECA grant funds will be more competitive. Applicants are strongly encouraged to cost share a portion of overhead and administrative expenses. Cost-sharing, including contributions from the applicant, proposed in-country partner(s), and other sources should be included in the budget request. Proposal budgets that do not reflect cost sharing will be deemed not competitive on this criterion.
  • Web: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-03-17/html/2011-6276.htm
  • Deadline: May 12, 2011

One Beat

  • The Cultural Programs Division of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) announces an open competition for a series of 2-4 week group programs for approximately 55-65 young (average age 19-35) foreign musicians and music professionals from selected countries that will highlight artistic collaboration, improvisation, mentoring, and professional training opportunities. One Beat is a programmatic refinement of the existing Fiscal Year 2010 Cultural Visitors program. The original Cultural Visitors Program was initiated in Fiscal Year 2005 and targeted key countries in the Muslim world and on priority youth audiences in those countries. Vital to the innovative use of the arts in foreign policy are the elements of artistic collaboration, audience engagement, professional enrichment, and artistic production. By concentrating on music, One Beat seeks to combine these elements into cohesive group programs which enhance cross-cultural understanding and demonstrate democratic values such as collaboration, cohesion, and innovation to strengthen the leadership and professional potential of the participants as well as enrich their American counterparts. The program should seek innovative ways to incorporate new media to enhance the program offerings and extend the impact of the program.
  • Funding: Pending the availability of funds, ECA will provide approximately $1,000,000 to the award recipient to implement this program through a cooperative agreement. The agreement will cover project activities from September 1, 2011 to September 30, 2013.
  • Web: http://exchanges.state.gov/grants/open2.html; http://exchanges.state.gov/media/pdfs/rfgps/rfgp-one-beat.pdf
  • Deadline: May 16, 2011
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST)

  • The ITEST program responds to current concerns and projections about the growing demand for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals in the U.S. and seeks solutions to help ensure the breadth and depth of the STEM workforce. ITEST supports the development, implementation, testing, and scale-up of implementation models. It also supports research studies to address questions that point to solutions for building a strong, competent STEM workforce. A variety of possible approaches to supporting the future STEM workforce and to building students' capacity to participate in that important workforce may be implemented and studied. ITEST projects must include students and may include teachers. The target audience is kindergarten through high school age, and projects may focus on any content area related to the STEM workforce. Projects that explore the impact of robotics competitions are of special interest; specifically, ITEST is placing emphasis on proposals to design and implement robotics competitions, and to study their effectiveness as a means of engaging students in learning STEM content and 21st Century skills.
  • Types of ITEST Projects
    Scale-up
    projects implement and test models that prepare students for the STEM and information and communications technology (ICT) workforce of the future in a large-scale setting, such as at state or national level. A scale-up project must be based on evidence of demonstrated success from an existing strategy targeting students or teachers.
    Strategies
    projects are targeted at students and/or teachers. These projects design, implement, and evaluate models for classroom, after-school, summer, virtual, and/or year-round learning experiences. The strategies are intended to encourage students' readiness for, and their interest and participation in, the STEM and ICT-intensive workforce of the future. Strategies proposals must describe the anticipated contributions to the research knowledge base about STEM career preparation in addition to immediate impacts on participants.
    Research
    projects enrich the understanding of issues related to growing the STEM workforce. Projects may conduct efficacy and effectiveness studies of intervention models; conduct longitudinal studies of efforts to engage students in the STEM areas; develop instruments to assess engagement, persistence, and other relevant constructs of student motivation; or conduct studies to identify predictors of student inclination to pursue STEM career trajectories. The program is especially interested in projects that target students from groups that are underserved and underrepresented in STEM and ICT-intensive careers, including those residing in rural and economically disadvantaged communities.
  • Funding: $300,000-$2,150,000; Estimated total program funding is $20,000,000 for 20 to 30 awards.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5467&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund
  • Deadline: May 13, 2011

Domestic Nuclear Detection Office-National Science Foundation Academic Research Initiative (ARI)

  • The ARI is a joint Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) and National Science Foundation (NSF) program seeking novel cross-cutting research that will enable the nation's ability to prevent and respond to nuclear or radiological threats. This continuing program intends to expand its scope this year to include research in response and recovery from nuclear or radiological attack, with emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches. This year's solicitation topics will encompass two broad areas. First are investigations in new technologies, concepts or approaches to enhance the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture (GNDA) that in turn will lead to improved capabilities for the detection and interdiction of nuclear or radiological threat materials or devices. Second are investigations to aid in the effective response and recovery from nuclear or radiological events at the local, state and Federal level, to include investigations in nuclear forensics. Primary objectives of ARI include advancing fundamental knowledge in the above areas and developing intellectual capacity in fields relevant to long-term advances in these areas.
  • Funding: $58,000,000 over a five-year period from 2011 to 2015 for ARI solicitations to be awarded through NSF and DNDO. In FY 2011, 7-8 new awards are expected to be made, not to exceed $400,000 annually per award for a maximum duration of five years with a maximum total award size of up to $2,000,000, inclusive of both direct and indirect costs.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503223
  • Deadline: May 23, 2011

Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (TUES)

  • The Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (TUES) program seeks to improve the quality of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education for all undergraduate students. This solicitation especially encourages projects that have the potential to transform undergraduate STEM education, for example, by bringing about widespread adoption of classroom practices that embody
    understanding of how students learn most effectively. Thus transferability and dissemination are critical aspects for projects developing instructional materials and methods and should be considered throughout the project's lifetime. More advanced projects should involve efforts to facilitate adaptation
    at other sites. The program supports efforts to create, adapt, and disseminate new learning materials and teaching strategies to reflect advances both in STEM disciplines and in what is known about teaching and learning. It funds projects that develop faculty expertise, implement educational innovations, assess learning and evaluate innovations, prepare K-12 teachers, or conduct research on STEM teaching and learning. It also supports projects that further the work of the program itself, for example, synthesis and dissemination of findings across the program. The program supports projects representing different stages of development, ranging from small, exploratory investigations to large, comprehensive projects.
  • Funding: $35.8 million for 94-108 awards.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5741
  • Deadline: May 27, 2011 (Type 1); January 13, 2012 (For Type 2 and 3 proposals and for TUES Central Resource Project proposals. However, TUES Central Resource Project proposals for small focused workshops may be submitted at any time after consulting with a program officer.)

Workforce Program in the Mathematical Sciences

  • The long-range goal of the DMS Workforce Program is to increase the number of well-prepared U.S. citizens, nationals, and permanent residents who successfully pursue careers in the mathematical sciences and in other NSF-supported disciplines. Among intermediate goals to this end are improvements in recruitment, retention, education, and placement of trainees in the mathematical sciences. The program's primary interest is in activities centered on education through research involvement for trainees at the undergraduate through postdoctoral educational levels. Activities that broaden participation in the mathematical sciences are of significant interest to the Division of Mathematical Sciences.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503233
  • Deadline: June 15, 2011

Petrology and Geochemistry

  • The Petrology and Geochemistry Program supports basic research that address the formation and evolution of our planet using petrological and geochemical characteristics of Earth materials in the crust, mantle, and core. Proposals in this program generally address the petrology and high-temperature geochemistry of igneous and metamorphic rocks (including mantle samples), mineral physics, economic geology, and volcanology. Proposals that bridge disciplinary boundaries or that include development of analytical tools for potential use by the broad community are also encouraged.
  • Funding: It is expected that there will be 40-60 awards annually with an estimated total program funding of $13,900,000 annually, pending availability of funds.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13683&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund
  • Deadline: July 6, 2011; January 6, 2012

Evolutionary Processes

  • The Evolutionary Processes Cluster supports research on microevolutionary processes and their macroevolutionary consequences. Topics include mutation, gene flow, recombination, natural selection, genetic drift, assortative mating acting within species, speciation, and long-term features of evolution. These investigations attempt to explain causes and consequences of genetically-based change in the properties of groups of organisms (at the population level or higher) over the course of generations as well as large-scale patterns of evolutionary change, phylogeography, origin and maintenance of genetic variation, and molecular signatures of evolution at the population or species level. The cluster seeks to fund projects that are transformative -- that is, those that will change the conceptual bases of evolutionary biology and have broad implications for future research. Both empirical and theoretical approaches are encouraged. The Cluster is comprised of two programs, Evolutionary Genetics and Evolutionary Ecology (described below); proposals should be submitted to one of these programs.
    Research on evolutionary patterns and processes is supported across the Biological Sciences Directorate. The following, general guidelines are provided to help you find the most appropriate program for your research interests. Proposals addressing molecular genetic mechanisms or the structure, maintenance, expression, transfer, and stability of genetic information in DNA, RNA, chromosomes, and proteins and how those processes are regulated are considered by the Genes and Genome Systems Cluster (Division of Molecular and Cellular Biology). The evolution of physiological or developmental mechanisms is covered by programs in the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems. We recognize that research topics may cross disciplinary and administrative boundaries; the Evolutionary Processes Cluster frequently co-reviews projects with each of these clusters or programs. Program Officers stand ready to answer more specific questions about the best program for your particular research plans.
    Evolutionary Genetics Program: The Evolutionary Genetics Program supports research that investigates the genetic bases of micro- and macroevolutionary processes and their effects on the evolution of genotypes and phenotypes. Both adaptive and non-adaptive processes and their effects will be considered. Within this context, appropriate topics of investigation include (but are not limited to) population and quantitative genetic examination of the processes responsible for the evolution of complex phenotypes; processes maintaining genetic variation; how the properties of genes (number, arrangement, and pattern) and their interactions influence evolutionary processes at the population level or above; the evolution of genetic architecture; and multi-species comparisons of aspects of development.
    The Evolutionary Ecology Program supports research on the evolutionary causes and consequences of ecological interactions (intra-specific, interspecific, and with the abiotic environment). Appropriate topics of investigation include the selective pressures imposed by abiotic or biotic environments and the evolutionary responses to these pressures; the causes and consequences of phenotypic plasticity; life-history evolution; the evolution of interspecific relations (predator-prey, competition, cooperation, mutualism, parasitism, symbiosis); the ongoing evolution of biodiversity; dynamics of natural and sexual selection; and the phylogenetic bases of community assembly.
  • Funding: Estimated total program funding is $15,663,000.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503421&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund
  • Deadline: July 9, 2011; January 9, 2012

Biomolecular Dynamics, Structure, and Function

  • This Cluster supports fundamental research in the areas of molecular biophysics and biochemistry. The cluster gives high priority to the creative projects that address the relationships between structure, function, and dynamics in studies of individual biomolecules and their complexes by an integrated approach of theory, computation, and experimental methods such as NMR, X-ray crystallography, EPR, and optical spectroscopy including single molecule methods. The cluster encourages research projects that are designed to discover and define general principles of macromolecular structure, dynamics, and mechanisms, as well as projects that will develop cutting-edge technologies in the context of biological questions relevant to the cluster. The cluster also encourages multi-disciplinary research at the interface of biology with physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, and engineering. Funding priority is given to proposals that identify critical gaps in our understanding, propose imaginative experiments to fill the gaps, and promise high-impact breakthroughs in the following areas: structure and dynamics of biomolecules; biomolecular interactions and mechanisms; and energy transduction: photosynthesis and biological electron transfer.
  • Funding: It is expected that there will be 70 awards with an estimated total program funding of $14,000,000.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503609&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click
  • Deadline: July 12, 2011

Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program

  • CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.
    PECASE: Each year NSF selects nominees for the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from among the most meritorious recent CAREER awardees. Selection for this award is based on two important criteria: 1) innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology that is relevant to the mission of the sponsoring organization or agency, and 2) community service demonstrated through scientific leadership, education or community outreach. These awards foster innovative developments in science and technology, increase awareness of careers in science and engineering, give recognition to the scientific missions of the participating agencies, enhance connections between fundamental research and national goals, and highlight the importance of science and technology for the Nation's future. Individuals cannot apply for PECASE. These awards are initiated by the participating federal agencies. At NSF, up to twenty nominees for this award are selected each year from among the PECASE-eligible CAREER awardees who are most likely to become the leaders of academic research and education in the twenty-first century. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy makes the final selection and announcement of the awardees.
  • Funding: The estimated number of awards is 600 per year. Anticipated funding amount is $220,000,000 per year to new and continuing CAREER awards. This amount is approximate, includes new and continuing increments, and is subject to availability of funds. Funding for CAREER awards is contained within research and education program allocations. Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.
    The minimum CAREER award size is $400,000 for a five-year period for all directorates except for the Directorate of Biological Sciences (BIO) and the Office of Polar Programs (OPP). For proposals submitted to BIO and OPP, the minimum award size is $500,000 over five years. Before preparing a CAREER proposal, PIs are strongly encouraged to contact their disciplinary program director or the appropriate CAREER contact to discuss budget requests for their proposed CAREER activities, and typical funding levels for their discipline. Many programs and Directorates prefer to make more awards by funding CAREER proposals closer to the minimum award size. Proposers should also review the list of recent CAREER awards made in their discipline for guidance on average award size.
    In addition to PI salary, support for other Senior Personnel is not permitted, either in the primary budget or in any subawards. All other allowable costs, as described in the Grant Proposal Guide, are permitted. Allowable costs include funds for postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, undergraduate students, summer salary, education or outreach activities, support for an evaluator, travel and subsistence expenses for the PI and U.S. participants when working abroad with foreign collaborators, and consultant expenses. In some cases, it may be appropriate to include academic year salary support for the PI on a CAREER budget (for example, PIs who have heavy teaching responsibilities or who must conduct field work during the academic year). Proposers should talk to the cognizant Program Director about their individual case.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2011/nsf11690/nsf11690.htm
  • Deadline: Biological Sciences, Computer and Information Science and Engineering, Education and Human Resources, Office of Cyberinfrastructure: July 25, 2011; Engineering: July 26, 2011; Geosceinces, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Social Behavioral and Economic Sciences, Office of Polar Programs: July 27, 2011

Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21)

  • The Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) program aims to build a computationally savvy 21st century workforce that positions the US to demonstrate a leadership role in the global economy. Innovations in computing and more broadly, information technology (IT), drive our economy, underlie many new advances in science and engineering, and contribute to our national security. Projected job growth in IT is very strong .Despite these very positive indicators, student interest in computing has declined dramatically over the last decade. For example, the percentage of college freshmen indicating an intent to major in computing has declined overall by 70% in the last decade; for women, the decline was 80% (HERI, 2000-2009). Recent data show that student interest in computing majors has fallen behind projected job openings by a factor of five and a half (ACT, 2010).
    The CE21 program seeks to reverse this troubling trend by engaging larger numbers of students, teachers, and educators in computing education and learning at earlier stages in the education pipeline. While interventions in primary education are within scope, the CE21 program focuses special attention on activities targeted at the middle and high school levels (i.e., secondary education) and in early undergraduate education.The goals of the CE21 program are to: Increase the number and diversity of K-14 students and teachers who develop and practice computational competencies in a variety of contexts; and increase the number and diversity of early postsecondary students who are engaged and have the background in computing necessary to successfully pursue degrees in computing-related and computationally-intensive fields of study. The program seeks to increase computational competencies for all students, regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, disability status, or socioeconomic status, and regardless, too, of eventual career choices. By promoting and enhancing computing K-14 education, the CE21 program seeks to increase interest in computing as a field in its own right, and also to better prepare students for successful careers in other computing-intensive fields.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503582&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click
  • Deadline: Planning proposals ONLY: July 28, 2011

Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

  • STS considers proposals that examine historical, philosophical, and sociological questions that arise in connection with science, engineering, and technology, and their respective interactions with society. STS has four components:
    1. Ethics and Values in Science, Engineering and Technology (EVS),
    2. History and Philosophy of Science, Engineering and Technology (HPS),
    3. Social Studies of Science, Engineering and Technology (SSS),
    4. Studies of Policy, Science, Engineering and Technology (SPS).
    The components overlap, but are distinguished by the different scientific and scholarly orientations they take to the subject matter, as well as by different focuses within the subject area. STS encourages the submission of hybrid proposals that strive to integrate research involving two or more of these core areas.
    STS provides the following modes of support:
      • Scholars Awards,
      • Standard Research Grants and Grants for Collaborative Research,
      • Postdoctoral Fellowships,
      • Professional Development Fellowships,
      • Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants,
      • Small Grants for Training and Research,
      • Conference and Workshop Awards,
      • Other Funding Opportunities.
  • Funding: It is expected that there will be 40 awards with an estimated total program funding of $9,000,000.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2008/nsf08553/nsf08553.htm
  • Deadline: August 1 , 2011

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

  • The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. This solicitation features two mechanisms for support of student research: (1) REU Sites are based on independent proposals to initiate and conduct projects that engage a number of students in research. REU Sites may be based in a single discipline or academic department, or on interdisciplinary or multi-department research opportunities with a coherent intellectual theme. Proposals with an international dimension are welcome. A partnership with the Department of Defense supports REU Sites in DoD-relevant research areas. (2) REU Supplements may be requested for ongoing NSF-funded research projects or may be included as a component of proposals for new or renewal NSF grants or cooperative agreements. Undergraduate student participants in either Sites or Supplements must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States or its possessions.
  • Funding: $67,700,000 for 1,850 awards.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5517&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund
  • Deadline: August 24, 2011

Biotechnology, Biochemical, and Biomass Engineering (BBBE)

  • The Biotechnology, Biochemical, and Biomass Engineering (BBBE) program supports fundamental engineering research that advances the understanding of cellular and biomolecular processes (in vivo, in vitro, and/or ex vivo) and eventually leads to the development of enabling technology and/or applications in support of the biopharmaceutical, biotechnology, and bioenergy industries, or with applications in health or the environment. Quantitative assessments of bioprocesses are considered vital to successful research projects in the BBBE program.
    Fundamental to many research projects in this area is the understanding of how biomolecules and cells interact in their environment, and how those molecular level interactions lead to changes in structure, function, phenotype, and/or behavior. The program encourages proposals that address emerging research areas and technologies that effectively integrate knowledge and practices from different disciplines, and effectively incorporate ongoing research into educational activities.
    Research projects of particular interest in BBBE include, but are not limited to:
    • Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology
    • Quantitative systems biotechnology
    • Tissue engineering and stem cell culture technologies
    • Protein engineering/protein design
    • Development of novel "omics" tools for biotechnology applications
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501024&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund
  • Deadline: September 15, 2011

Energy for Sustainability

  • The Energy for Sustainability program supports fundamental research and education that will enable innovative processes for the sustainable production of electricity and transportation fuels. Processes for sustainable energy production must be environmentally benign, reduce greenhouse gas production, and utilize renewable or bio-based resources that are abundant in the United States. The most abundant and sustainable source of renewable energy is the sun. The Energy for Sustainability program emphasizes two themes which harness solar energy to make fuels and electrical power: biofuels & bioenergy, and photovoltaic solar energy. In addition, this program also supports research in wind and wave energy, sustainable energy technology assessment, and fuel cells.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501026
  • Deadline: September 15, 2011

Research in Engineering Education

  • The Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC) seeks to enable a world-leading system of engineering education, equally open and available to all members of society, that dynamically and rapidly adapts to meet the changing needs of society and the nation's economy. Research areas of interest include, but are not limited to:
    1. Increasing our understanding of how engineering students learn and the capacity that supports such discovery. Fundamental research is encouraged on how engineering is learned, including engineering epistemologies and identities; and how to evaluate or operationalize aspects of engineering thinking, doing, and knowing.
    2. Understanding how to increase the diffusion and impact of engineering education research. Research projects are sought that discover how to improve the process by which engineering education research is translated into practice; how to accomplish organizational and cultural change in institutions of engineering education that leads to improved learning outcomes; or identifying and overcoming barriers to widespread adoption of engineering education research. Research projects that partner with other engineering education stakeholders (e.g. private companies, NGOs, or professional societies) to measure the value and impact of engineering education research on practice are also sought.
    3. Understanding engineering education in broader, organizing frameworks such as innovation, globalization, complex engineered systems, or sustainability. Research in this theme explores learning from perspectives and contexts that cut across disciplines and in which learners integrate expertise from multiple fields. Research projects that align with this theme include discovering processes to effectively teach engineering students to succeed in such environments or "eco-systems"; discovering key concepts and principles of educating engineers within such frameworks; or exploring factors such as teamwork, communication, or identity formation in such environments.
    4. Diversifying pathways to and through engineering degree programs. Research projects that align with this theme explore how engineering programs can engage and develop students with a broad range of backgrounds, interests, and experiences; investigate how real world experiences germane to engineering--such as military service or being a "maker"--impact, improve, or accelerate learning; or investigate how to fundamentally restructure courses, curricula, or programs to substantially boost student success, especially for under-represented populations.
  • Funding: Most projects will be funded at approximately $100,000 per year. Projects which anticipate other funding levels should discuss the proposed project with a cognizant program officer before submission.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503584&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click
  • Deadline: September 16, 2011
GRAND CHALLENGES IN GLOBAL HEALTH INITIATIVE

Grand Challenges Explorations

  • Grand Challenges Explorations fosters innovation in global health research. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has committed $100 million to encourage scientists worldwide to expand the pipeline of ideas to fight our greatest health challenges.
    Topics for Grand Challenges Explorations Round 7 are:
    • The Poliovirus Endgame: Create Ways to Accelerate, Sustain and Monitor Eradication
    • Create the Next Generation of Sanitation Technologies
    • Create Low-Cost Cell Phone-Based Solutions for Improved Uptake and Coverage of Childhood Vaccinations
    • Design New Approaches to Cure HIV Infection
    • Explore Nutrition for Healthy Growth of Infants and Children
    • Apply Synthetic Biology to Global Health Challenges
  • Funding: Initial grants of $100,000 are awarded two times a year. Successful projects have the opportunity to receive a follow-on grant of up to $1 million. The Foundation anticipates funding approximately sixty awards each round although this number is dependent on the quality of proposals received.
  • Web:http://www.grandchallenges.org/Explorations/Pages/Introduction.aspx
  • Deadline: May 19, 2011
NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

Challenge America Fast-Track

  • The Challenge America Fast-Track category offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations -- those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. Age alone (e.g., youth, seniors) does not qualify a group as underserved; at least one of the underserved characteristics noted above also must be present. Grants are
    available for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development.
  • Funding: $10,000 each.
  • Web: http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/GAP12/Challenge.html
  • Deadline: May 26, 2011

Preservation and Access Education and Training Grants

  • The Preservation and Access Education and Training program is central to NEH's efforts to preserve and establish access to cultural heritage resources. Thousands of libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country maintain important collections of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art and material culture collections, electronic records, and digital objects. The challenge of preserving and making accessible such large and diverse holdings is enormous and the need for knowledgeable staff is significant and ongoing. Preservation and Access Education and Training grants help the staff of cultural institutions, large and small, obtain the knowledge and skills needed to serve as effective stewards of humanities collections. Grants also support educational programs that prepare the next generation of conservators and preservation professionals, as well as projects that introduce the staff of cultural institutions to recent improvements in preservation and access practices.
  • Funding: Awards normally are for two years. Grants to regional preservation field service organizations typically range from $50,000 to a maximum of $250,000 per year. For all other applicants, the maximum award is $125,000 per year. Successful applicants will be awarded a grant in outright funds, federal matching funds, or a combination of the two, depending on the applicant's preference and the availability of NEH funds. Matching funds are released when a grantee secures gift funds from eligible third parties.
    Although cost sharing is not required, NEH, is rarely able to support the full costs of projects approved for funding. In most cases, NEH grants cover no more than 80 percent of project costs.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/pet.html
  • Deadline: June 30, 2011
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

ENGAGE: Learning to Solve Problems, Solving Problems to Learn - DARPA-BAA-11-36

  • DARPA is soliciting proposals for innovative research in educational systems that will ENGAGE young students (Pre-K - Grade 3) in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) studies while conducting research into the best methods and practices for teaching these topics. Specifically, an educational game-based approach is being sought that will analyze game-play across thousands of players to determine the best approaches for teaching specific STEM topics while taking into account individual learning styles, demographics and other factors identified by the game to impact learning. These educational games must meet the highest industry standards for quality and engagement while incorporating the best pedagogical practices and clearly focusing on the ability to measure and identify metrics critical to teaching STEM topics, as well as to see if the lessons learned within the game generalize to the classroom.
  • Funding:The level of funding for individual awards made under this BAA has not been predetermined and will depend on the quality of the proposals received and the availability of funds. The ENGAGE research effort under this solicitation is estimated at $8 million of funding over a period of approximately three years. Multiple awards are anticipated.
  • Web:http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=74334
  • Deadline:May 27, 2011
NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION

National Trust Preservation Fund

  • Grants from National Trust Preservation Funds (NTPF) are intended to encourage preservation at the local level by providing seed money for preservation projects. These grants help stimulate public discussion, enable local groups to gain the technical expertise needed for particular projects, introduce the public to preservation concepts and techniques, and encourage financial participation by the private sector. A small grant at the right time can go a long way and is often the catalyst that inspires a community to take action on a preservation project.
  • Funding: Grants generally range from $500 to $5,000. The selection process is very competitive. Applicants are encouraged to develop proposals carefully and to complete the application form with the assistance and guidance of the National Trust regional office serving their state. The review process is generally completed within six weeks of the application deadlines, and applicants are notified in writing once the review process is complete.
  • Web: http://www.preservationnation.org/resources/find-funding/grants/
  • Deadline: June 1, 2011; October 1, 2011; February 1, 2012
UNITED ENGINEERING FOUNDATION

Grants

  • The United Engineering Foundation advances the engineering arts and sciences for the welfare of humanity. It supports engineering and education by, among other means, making grants .Grants should be consistent with advancing engineering. The UEF Board of Trustees evaluates and judges proposals in view of the UEF mission, the perceived ability of the proposal and proposer(s) to further that mission, and the available funding. While all proposals meeting established deadlines and page limitations will be considered, certain UEF preferences should be understood by proposers:
    • Broad-based, interdisciplinary proposals that further the engineering profession as a whole are preferred.
    • Multiple-year proposals are welcome, but funding is awarded for a single year only. Proposals for subsequent years follow procedures identical to that of single-year proposals. No commitment for funding of subsequent years of a multiple-year project should be inferred from funding of a prior year.
    • Projects that are outside "business as usual" of the proposing organization are preferred.
    • Technical research proposals and proposals by individuals are seldom accepted.
  • Funding: It is anticipated that the total funding available for 2012 will be in the $700,000 to $750,000 range.
  • Web: http://www.uefoundation.org/grants.html
  • Deadline: June 1, 2011
WENNER-GREN FOUNDATION FOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH

International Collaborative Research Grants

  • The International Collaborative Research Grant (ICRG) supports international research collaborations between two or more qualified scholars, where the principal investigators bring different and complementary perspectives, knowledge, and/or skills to the project. Supplemental funds are also available to provide essential training for academic research participants in ICRG-funded projects (co-applicants, students, as well as other professional colleagues). By encouraging international collaborations, the grant contributes to the development of an international anthropology that values and incorporates different national perspectives and resources. By providing training funds, the grant helps to build capacity in countries were anthropology may be under-resourced.
  • Eligibility: Proposals must involve collaboration between two or more researchers of different nationalities who are working in different countries. Each researcher must hold a doctorate or equivalent qualification in anthropology or a related discipline. Scholars are eligible without regard to institutional or departmental affiliation.
  • Funding: The grants are for a maximum of $30,000 for the research project. Proposals which include the optional training element can have an increased funding request up to a maximum of $35,000, of which no more than $10,000 can be for essential training purposes. Under special circumstances grants can be renewed to support longer-term research projects.
  • Web: http://www.wennergren.org/programs/international-collaborative-research-grants
  • Deadline: June 1, 2011; December 1, 2011

Post-Ph.D. Research Grants

  • Post-Ph.D. Research Grants are awarded to individuals holding a Ph.D. or equivalent degree to support individual research projects. The program contributes to the Foundation's overall mission to support basic research in anthropology and to ensure that the discipline continues to be a source of vibrant and significant work that furthers our understanding of humanity's cultural and biological origins, development, and variation. The Foundation supports research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields. Applicants applying for a Post-Ph.D. Research Grant may also chose to be considered simultaneously for the Osmundsen Initiative (see the Foundation's web site).
  • Funding: Post-Ph.D. Research Grants provide a maximum of US $20,000 and the Osmundsen Initiative supplement provides up to an additional $5,000
    for a maximum grant of US $25,000.
  • Web: http://www.wennergren.org/programs/post-phd-research-grants
  • Deadline: November 1, 2011

International Symposia

  • Since the 1950's the Foundation has convened more than 130 symposia on topics of broad interest to anthropology. These symposia involve a small group of invited scholars who meet for intensive discussion and debate. The Symposia are based on a format that was developed and refined at Burg Wartenstein, the Foundation's European conference center from 1958 to 1980. Today's meetings continue the Burg Wartenstein model and are held at a variety of sites in the U.S. and abroad. Symposia topics are either initiated by the Foundation or selected from submitted proposals on the basis of the importance and timeliness of the topic, the promise of meaningful exchange among scholars representing diverse perspectives and fields, and the potential for opening up new approaches to significant problems. Symposia are administered and fully supported (both financially and logistically) by the Foundation. Wenner-Gren International Symposia have resulted in a number of landmark volumes, including "Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth" (1956); "Background to Evolution in Africa" (1967); "Cloth and Human Experience" (1989); and "Tools, Language, and Cognition in Human Evolution" (1993). Between 2002 and 2010, twelve symposia were published in The Wenner-Gren International Symposium Series (Berg Publishers). From 2010 onward, symposia publications will appear as supplementary issues of Current Anthropology. Academic publication is changing rapidly and the Foundation believes that Wenner-Gren symposia publications will reach a wider audience and have a greater impact in journal format.
  • Web: http://www.wennergren.org/programs/international-symposia
  • Deadline: Anytime
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

Translational Research to Help Older Adults Maintain their Health and Independence in the Community (R01)

  • The National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the Administration on Aging (AoA) invite applications using the R01 award mechanism for translational research that moves evidence-based research findings towards the development of new interventions, programs, policies, practices, and tools that can be used by community-based organizations to help elderly individuals remain healthy and independent, and living in their own homes and communities. The goal of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support translational research involving collaborations between academic research centers and community-based organizations with expertise serving the elderly (such as city and state health departments, city/town leadership councils, and Area Agencies on Aging) that will enhance our understanding of practical tools, techniques, programs and policies that communities across the nation can use to more effectively respond to needs of their aging populations.
  • Funding: This FOA will use the R01 award mechanism. Application budgets are not limited, but need to reflect actual needs of the proposed project. The maximum period is five years. Cost sharing is not required. Applicants requesting $500,000 or more in direct costs in any year (excluding consortium F&A) must contact NIH program staff at least 6 weeks before submitting the application and follow the Policy on the Acceptance for Review of Unsolicited Applications that Request $500,000 or More in Direct Costs as described in the SF 424 (R&R) Application Guide.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-123.html
  • Deadline: June 5, 2011; October 5, 2011; February 5, 2012

Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) Grants - (R15)

  • The AREA program will enable qualified scientists to receive support for small-scale research projects. These grants are intended to create a research opportunity for scientists and institutions otherwise unlikely to participate extensively in NIH programs to support the Nation's biomedical and behavioral research effort. It is anticipated that investigators supported under the AREA program will benefit from the opportunity to conduct independent research; that the grantee institution will benefit from a research environment strengthened through AREA grants and furthered by participation in the diverse extramural programs of the NIH; and that available students will benefit from exposure to and participation in scientific research in the biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences.The AREA program is a research grant program and not a training or fellowship program. Active involvement of undergraduate and graduate students in the proposed research is encouraged, and reviewers will consider whether the proposed project will expose undergraduate (preferably, if available) and graduate students to meritorious research. However, the application should not focus on training objectives and training plans should not be provided.
  • Funding: Applicants may request a maximum of $300,000 total direct costs plus applicable Facilities & Administrative (F&A)/indirect costs for the entire project period of up to three years. Note when a consortium is involved, the $300,000 direct cost limit is exclusive of consortium F&A costs. These can be requested in addition to the $300,000 direct costs limit.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/area.htm
  • Deadline: June 25, 2011; October 25, 2011; February 25, 2012

Limited Competition for the Global Research Initiative Program, Behavioral/Social Sciences (R01)

  • This FOA issued by the Fogarty International Institute (FIC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Office on Women's Health, the Office of the Director (ORWH), the Office of Dietary Supplements, the Office of the Director (ODS), and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) encourages Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to conduct behavioral and social sciences research relevant to global health. This program is intended to promote productive development of foreign investigators from low- and middle-income countries (LMIC's), trained in the U.S. or in their home countries through an eligible NIH funded research or research training grant/award. It is expected that this program will stimulate research on a wide variety of high priority health-related issues in those countries, and to advance NIH efforts to address important global health issues.
  • Funding: The total amount to be awarded is $325,000 and the anticipated number of awards is six. Because the nature and scope of the proposed research will vary from application to application, it is anticipated that the size and duration of each award may also vary. The total amount to be awarded and the number of awards will depend upon the quality and costs of the applications received. Budgets for direct costs of up to $50,000 per year and project duration of up to 5 years may be requested for a maximum of $250,000 direct costs over a 5-year project period.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-10-280.html
  • Deadline: January 10, 2012; January 10, 2013
  • AIDS Deadline: March 10, 2011; March 9, 2012; March 8, 2013
NATIONAL HISTORICAL PUBLICATIONS AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

Electronic Records Projects

  • The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a part of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), supports projects that promote the preservation and use of America's documentary heritage essential to understanding our democracy, history, and culture. The Commission seeks proposals that will increase the capacity of archival repositories to create electronic records archives that preserve records of enduring historical value. The NHPRC supports efforts by archivists and records managers to meet the challenges of electronic records. Projects must involve institutions that have already established archives and records management programs. We seek applications for start-up or collaborative projects:1. Start-up projects: Develop the capacity of institutions to prepare to capture and preserve electronic records, through program planning; OR 2. Collaborative projects: Establish and/or improve electronic records archives by engaging in effective and innovative collaborations. Most electronic records archives depend upon collaboration among archivists, record managers, and information technology specialists. Only a few organizations have all the required expertise, making training, collaboration and recruitment of new personnel essential components of electronic records archives. We strongly encourage applicants to include professional development components necessary for the success of the project. These may consist of basic or advanced electronic records and digital preservation training for archives staff, agency records managers, high level administrators, information technologists, and others. Projects cannot establish electronic document management systems that only manage born-digital records with limited retention periods. Projects in this category cannot digitize historical records. Applicants who wish to digitize records should refer to the Digitizing Historical Records announcement. Applications requesting support for these activities will be considered ineligible in this program.
  • Funding: A grant normally is for 1 to 3 years and up to $300,000. The Commission expects to make up to 6 grants in this category, for a total of up to $600,000. Cost sharing is required. It is the financial contribution the applicant pledges to the cost of a project. Cost sharing can include both direct and indirect expenses, in-kind contributions, non-Federal third-party contributions, and any income earned directly by the project. The NHPRC will provide up to 50 percent of the total project costs.
  • Web: http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/electronic.html
  • Deadline: June 9, 2011

Publishing Historical Records

  • The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a part of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), supports projects that promote supports projects that promote the preservation and use of America's documentary heritage essential to understanding our democracy, history, and culture. This funding category has two application deadlines. This announcement is for Colonial and Early National Period Projects (those preparing publications whose documents fall predominantly prior to 1820). An additional funding opportunity will be published in June 2010 for New Republic through the Modern Era Projects (those preparing publications whose documents fall predominantly after 1820).The Commission seeks proposals to publish historical records of national significance. Projects may focus on the papers of major figures from American life or cover broad historical movements in politics, military, business, social reform, the arts, and other aspects of the national experience. The historical value of the records and their expected usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project .Grants are awarded for collecting, describing, preserving, compiling, editing, and publishing documentary source materials. The NHPRC does not fund proposals to purchase historical records; it also does not fund proposals to publish the papers of anyone who has been deceased for fewer than ten years .Eligible Activities Include:Scholarly documentary editions in printed and bound volumes. Scholarly documentary editions in online and other formats. Image editions in online, microfilm, and other formats. Conversion of existing print and microfilm editions to electronic publications. Combinations of the above. A publishing project that has received NHPRC support can apply for a grant for a new or subsequent stage of that project. These proposals must demonstrate that they have successfully completed the performance objectives associated with previous NHPRC grant awards. Proposals must be substantially updated, including a description of the new activities and a justification of the new budget. The applicant must describe the extent to which the project met its performance objectives under its most recent grant. Applicants not previously funded may apply for a grant to begin a historical documents publishing project. These applications are considered with other proposals and will be judged by the same criteria as others in that competition. All applicants should be aware that the application process is highly competitive.
  • Funding: Applicants may apply for funding up to three years. Applicants should be aware that the Commission normally awards grants on an annual basis; subsequent funding is conditioned on previous years' project performance. Award amounts ordinarily range from $20,000 to $250,000 annually. The Commission expects to make as many as 35-40 grants in this category, for a total of up to $4,500,000. In accordance with Federal regulations, the Commission reserves, for Federal Government purposes, a royalty-free, non-exclusive, and irrevocable license to reproduce, publish, or otherwise use the work and authorize others to reproduce, publish, or otherwise use the work that results from each grant. The Commission requires that grant recipients acknowledge NHPRC grant assistance in all publications and other products that result from its support. Cost sharing is required. Cost sharing is the financial contribution the applicant pledges to the cost of a project. Cost sharing can include both direct and indirect expenses, in-kind contributions, non-Federal third-party contributions, and any income earned directly by the project. The Commission ordinarily provides no more than 50 per cent of total project costs for Publishing Historical Records projects.
  • Web: http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/publishing.html
  • Deadline: Colonial and Early National Period: July 7, 2011; New Republic through the Modern Era: October 6, 2011
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Education Research

  • The central purpose of the institute's research grant programs is to provide parents, educators, students, researchers, policymakers, and the general public with reliable and valid information about education practices that support learning and improve academic achievement and access to education opportunities for all students. In carrying out its grant programs, the institute provides support for programs of research in areas of demonstrated national need.
    Under the two education research competitions, the National Center for Education Research (NCER) will consider only applications that address one of the following education research topics:
    1. Reading and Writing
    2. Mathematics and Science Education
    3. Cognition and Student Learning
    4. Effective Teachers and Effective Teaching
    5. Social and Behavioral Context for Academic Learning
    6. Improving Education Systems: Policies, Organization, Management,
    and Leadership
    7. Early Learning Programs and Policies
    8. English Learners
    9. Postsecondary Education and Adult Education
    10. Education Technology
  • Web: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=76153
  • Deadline: June 23, 2011

Special Education Research: Social and Behavioral Outcomes to Support Learning

  • The purpose of the Social and Behavioral Outcomes to Support Learning (Social/Behavioral) research grant program is to contribute to the prevention or amelioration of behavior problems in students with or at risk for disabilities and concomitantly, improve their academic outcomes. The long-term outcome of this program will be an array of tools and strategies (e.g., assessments, interventions) that have been documented to be effective for preventing behavior problems and improving the behavioral, emotional, social skills, and likewise, the academic performance of students with or at risk for disabilities from kindergarten through Grade 12. Research supported through this program must be relevant to education in the United States.
  • Funding: The maximum length of the award period varies by goal. The maximum length of the award period for each goal ranges from two to five years. The size of the award depends on the goal and scope of the project. Awards pursuant to this request for applications are contingent upon the availability of funds and the receipt of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. The number of projects funded under a specific topic and goal depends upon the number of high-quality applications submitted to that topic and goal. The Institute does not have plans to award a specific number of grants under each particular topic and goal.
  • Web: http://ies.ed.gov/funding/ncser_rfas/ncser_socialbeh.asp
  • Deadline: Letter of Intent (not mandatory, but requested): July 21, 2011; Proposal: September 22, 2011
WILLIAM T. GRANT FOUNDATION

Scholars Program

  • The Scholars Program is a professional development program for early-career researchers in the social, behavioral, or health sciences. The program differs from traditional research grants in that it supports career development. The foundation is particularly excited about applicants who already have a promising track record, but seek a qualitative shift in their trajectory as researchers. The foundation encourages Scholars to be ambitious in their research endeavors by tackling important questions that will advance theory, policy, and practice for youth and to do so with an expanded array of expertise that includes different methods, disciplinary perspectives, and content knowledge. Applicants identify areas in which they seek to expand their expertise, and propose five-year research plans to develop it. The foundation recognizes that early-career researchers often have few supports and incentives to take measured risks with their work, and we view mentors as providing important assistance. Applicants are asked to create mentoring plans that will aid them in acquiring new expertise and producing stronger work.
  • Funding:Every year, four to six William T. Grant Scholars are selected and each receives $350,000 distributed over a five-year period.
  • Web:http://www.wtgrantfoundation.org/funding_opportunities/fellowships/william_t__grant_scholars/william_t_grant_scholars
  • Deadline: July 6, 2011
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

Research Associateship Programs (RAP)

  • The mission of the NRC Research Associateship Programs (RAP) is to promote excellence in scientific and technological research conducted by the U.S. government through the administration of programs offering graduate, postdoctoral, and senior level research opportunities at sponsoring federal laboratories and affiliated institutions.
  • Eligibility: The mission of the NRC Research Associateship Programs (RAP) is to promote excellence in scientific and technological research conducted by the U.S. government through the administration of programs offering graduate, postdoctoral, and senior level research opportunities at sponsoring federal laboratories and affiliated institutions.
  • Funding: An NRC Research Associate receives a stipend from the National Research Council while carrying out his or her proposed research. Stipends for Associates are limited to the amounts set forth by the NRC and the sponsoring federal laboratory and any other arrangement, formal or informal, between an applicant and laboratory personnel for additional monies or other considerations is strictly prohibited. A group health-insurance program is required for Associates and is optional for dependents. A relocation reimbursement will be determined for each awardee.
  • Web: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/pga/rap/
  • Deadline: August 1, 2011; November 1, 2011
AMERICAN HONDA FOUNDATION

Institutional Grants for Youth and Science Education

  • The Foundation's mission is to help meet the needs of American society in the areas of youth and scientific education by awarding grants to nonprofits, while strategically assisting communities in deriving long-term benefits. The American Honda Foundation engages in grant making that reflects the basic tenets, beliefs and philosophies of Honda companies, which are characterized by the following qualities: imaginative, creative, youthful, forward-thinking, scientific, humanistic and innovative. The Foundation supports youth education with a specific focus on the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects in addition to the environment. .
  • Funding: The grant range is from $20,000 to $60,000 over a one-year period.
  • Web: http://corporate.honda.com/america/philanthropy.aspx?id=ahf
  • Deadline: August 1, 2011; November 1, 2011
TIMKEN COMPANY CHARITABLE TRUST

Charitable Grants

  • The Timken Company Charitable Trust seeks to improve the quality of life in the communities where its associates live and work by providing funding in the following areas: arts, education, and community and economic development.
  • Geographic Area: Company operations in Virginia. All requests for support should be discussed with a local Timken representative prior to application.
  • Funding: In 2009, the trust awarded more than $1 million in charitable grants .
  • Web: http://timken.com/en-us/about/citizenship/CharitableTrust/Pages/CharitableTrustGrantGuidelines.aspx
  • Deadline: September 1, 2011
OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH

STEM for K-12, Higher Education

  • The Office of Naval Research (ONR) requests applications for the Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics for K-12 and Institutions of Higher Education grant opportunity. The goal of the program is to foster an interest in, knowledge of, and study in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics nationwide to ensure an educated and well-prepared workforce, which meets the naval and national competitive needs. The initiative's five program goals are to: inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers (grades K-10); engage students in STEM-related hands on learning activities using Navy content (grades 3-12); educate students to be well-prepared for employment in STEM disciplines in the Navy or in supporting academic institutions or the Naval contractor community (higher education); employ and develop Naval STEM professionals; and collaborate across Naval STEM programs to maximize benefits to participants and the Navy.
  • Funding: Estimated average grant range is up to $200,000 per year.
  • Web: http://grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=55774
  • Deadline: September 30, 2011
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

Unique and Innovative Space Technology

  • The Game Changing Technology Division (GCT), within NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) is soliciting executive summaries, white papers, and proposals for research and development (R&D) for technology that is innovative and unique and promises to enable revolutionary (game-changing) improvements to the efficiency and effectiveness of the USA's space capability. Novel (unique) capabilities are sought that address NASA Space Technology Grand Challenges or any of the 14 Technology Areas (TAs) identified in NASA's draft Space Technology Roadmap and listed below:
    TA01 Launch Propulsion Systems
    TA02 In-Space Propulsion Technologies
    TA03 Space Power and Energy Storage
    TA04 Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems
    TA05 Communication and Navigation
    TA06 Human Health, Life Support and Habitation Systems
    TA07 Human Exploration Destination Systems
    TA08 Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems
    TA09 Entry, Descent and Landing Systems
    TA10 Nanotechnology
    TA11 Modeling, Simulation, Information Technology and Processing
    TA12 Materials, Structures, Mechanical Systems and Manufacturing
    TA13 Ground and Launch Systems Processing
    TA14 Thermal Management Systems
  • Funding: Between 5 and 10 awards are anticipated, for a total of all awards up to $5 million per year. Individual awards can be for up to 3 years, but are limited to a total of $3 million over 3 years. Awards are subject to availability of appropriated funds. The following types of funding instruments may be awarded: procurement contract, grant, cooperative agreement, or other transaction (Inter-agency or Intra-agency only). If an institution of higher education or other not-for-profit organization is selected to receive a grant or cooperative agreement, cost sharing is not required, although NASA can accept cost sharing if it is voluntarily offered (see the Grants Handbook, Section B, Provision 1260.123, "Cost Sharing or Matching"). If a commercial organization is selected to receive a grant or cooperative agreement, cost sharing is typically required unless the commercial organization can demonstrate that it does not expect to receive substantial compensating benefits for performance of the work. If this demonstration is made, cost sharing is not required but may be offered voluntarily (see also Section D, Provision 1274.204, of the Grants Handbook).
  • Web: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={B038DDD9-9361-A4A8-06AD-38A2650D03EF}&path=open
  • Deadline: Other (submit an Executive Summary): September 30, 2011; White paper: November 1, 2011, Full Proposal: January 3, 2012

Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) - 2011

  • This NASA Research Announcement (NRA) solicits proposals for supporting basic and applied research and technology across a broad range of Earth and space science program elements relevant to one or more of the following NASA Research Programs: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics. This ROSES NRA covers all aspects of basic and applied supporting research and technology in space and Earth sciences, including, but not limited to: theory, modeling, and analysis of SMD science data; aircraft, stratospheric balloon, suborbital rocket, and commercial reusable rocket investigations; development of experiment techniques suitable for future SMD space missions; development of concepts for future SMD space missions; development of advanced technologies relevant to SMD missions; development of techniques for and the laboratory analysis of both extraterrestrial samples returned by spacecraft, as well as terrestrial samples that support or otherwise help verify observations from SMD Earth system science missions; determination of atomic and composition parameters needed to analyze space data, as well as returned samples from the Earth or space; Earth surface observations and field campaigns that support SMD science missions; development of integrated Earth system models; development of systems for applying Earth science research data to societal needs; and development of applied information systems applicable to SMD objectives and data.
  • Funding: Awards range from under $100K per year for focused, limited efforts (e.g., data analysis) to more than $1M per year for extensive activities (e.g., development of science experiment hardware).
  • Web: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={AEF75D0F-2272-7DE7-D52A-295B47C8F5CF}&path=open
  • Deadline: Notice of Intent to propose: Present-February 8, 2012; Proposals Due: Now - April 30, 2012.
UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEACE

2011 Annual Grant Program

  • The United States Institute of Peace requests proposals for the 2011 Annual Grant Competition. The grants support innovative peace building projects involving research, the identification of promising models and effective practices, the development of practitioner resources and tools, the development and delivery of education, training and dialogue program, and the production of films, radio programs, and the production of films, radio programs, and other media.
  • Funding: Average grants range from $50,000 to $120,000.
  • Web: http://www.usip.org/grants-fellowships/annual-grant-competition
  • Deadline: October 3, 2011
KRESS FOUNDATION

Conservation Grants Program

  • The Conservation program supports the professional practice of art conservation, especially as it relates to European art of the pre-modern era. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, exhibitions and publications focusing on art conservation, scholarly publications, and technical and scientific studies. Grants are also awarded for activities that permit conservators and conservation scientists to share their expertise with both professional colleagues and a broad audience through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, exhibitions that include a prominent focus on materials and techniques, and other professional events. Support for conservation treatments is generally limited to works from the distributed Kress Collection, and is coordinated through the Kress Program in Paintings Conservation at the Conservation Center of the New York University Institute of Fine Arts.
  • Funding: Competitive grants; Past grants awarded were $15,000 each.
  • Web: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/default.aspx?id=138
  • Deadline: October 15, 2011

History of Art Grant Program

  • The History of Art grant program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies. Grants are also awarded for activities that permit art historians to share their expertise through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, and other professional events.
  • Funding: Competitive grants; Past grants ranged from $2,700 to $72,500.
  • Web: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/default.aspx?id=142
  • Deadline: October 15, 2011

Digital Resources Grants Program

  • The Digital Resources program is intended to create incentives for historians of art and architecture, as well as archivists and librarians who support their work, to convert important existing information resources (especially key visual resources such as our major art history photo archives) to digital form. These resources will reach a vastly larger audience of specialists, teachers, and students online than they could ever reach previously, while also fostering new forms of research and collaboration and new approaches to teaching and learning. Support will also be offered for the digitization of primary textual sources (especially the literary and documentary sources of European art history); for promising initiatives in online publishing; and for innovative experiments in the field of digital art history.
  • Funding: Competitive grants; Past grants ranged from $25,000 to $95,000.
  • Web: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/default.aspx?id=150
  • Deadline: October 15, 2011
NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY

Young Investigators Grant

  • The National Security Agency (NSA) Mathematical Sciences Program (MSP) supports self-directed, unclassified research in the areas of Algebra, Number Theory, Discrete Mathematics, Probability, and Statistics. The program does not support research in cryptology. The Young Investigators Grant will be made on the basis of factors that demonstrate the scientific merit of the proposal, including (1) the prospect that the research will lead to important discoveries; (2) the prospect that the research will produce innovations or significant improvements in investigative methods, including methods of computation; (3) the investigator's scientific qualifications and accomplishments; and (4) the investigator's demonstrated awareness of previous approaches to the problem.
  • Eligibility: This award is available to promising investigators within ten years of receiving the Ph.D. Researchers receiving support from another funding agency are not eligible for NSA support for the same research proposal.
  • Funding: The basic award is a bottom line figure of $20,000 per year for each of two years. Awards cover the direct costs of up to two months of summer salary per year plus fringes, a small amount for travel and expenses, and a university payment in lieu of indirect cost of 15% of the direct costs. Subject to the same 15% in lieu of indirect, a young investigator proposal may also ask for graduate student support (other than tuition) not to exceed $5,000 per student per year, as well as limited funds for computer equipment, as long as the total costs of the project fall within $20,000
  • Web: http://pjm.math.berkeley.edu/nsa-ams/about/program/guidelines.html
  • Deadline: October 15, 2011
VIRGINIA FOUNDATION FOR THE HUMANITIES

Open Grant Program

Discretionary Grants

  • The Discretionary Grant Program allows VFH to make grants of up to $3,000 at any time during the year. These grants may be used to plan larger projects, or to carry out programs where only a modest amount of funding is required. Proposals are submitted online and must address all proposal requirements. For Discretionary Grants, funding decisions are normally made within four weeks following receipt of the application.
  • Funding: Up to $3,000 .
  • Web: http://www.virginia.edu/vfh/grants/opportunities.html#discretionary
  • Deadline: None; submit at any time.
AMERICAN ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY

Small Research Grants

  • The Small Research Grant (SmRG) Program is administered by the AAS Executive Office. The program is funded mainly by a grant from NASA. A small amount of additional funding may be provided by income from the AAS operating-reserve fund and/or by the Cecilia Payne and Sergei Gaposchkin Memorial Fund. The amount of money available during any proposal cycle depends on the sources of support available to the Society at that time. The purpose of the grants is to cover costs associated with any type of astronomical research.
  • Eligibility: Open to both US and international astronomers with a PhD or equivalent; graduate students are not eligible.
  • Funding: Awards range from $1,000 to a maximum of $7,000.
  • Web: http://aas.org/grants/smrg.php
  • Deadline: November 28, 2011
RGK FOUNDATION

Grants

  • The RGK Foundation awards grants in the broad areas of Education, Community, and Medicine and Health. The foundation's primary interests within the Education area include programs that focus on formal K-12 education (particularly mathematics, science, and reading), teacher development, literacy, and higher education.
  • Funding: The average grant amount is $25,000. Multi-year grants are rare; most grants are awarded for a one-year period.
  • Web:http://www.rgkfoundation.org/public/guidelines
  • Deadline: Continuous

return to the top of the page


Deadline Links

The following external links are funding deadlines organized by discipline. Please select the applicable discipline to access possible funding opportunities: (courtesy of The Grant Advisor Plus)

return to the top of the page



Office Directory

John Hulvey, Director of Sponsored Programs Administration and Accounting
MSC 5728, JMAC-6, Suite 26
hulveyjd@jmu.edu
x8-3725

Sponsored Programs Administration:
Pre-Award & Post-Award (Non-fiscal)

www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/
jmu_grants@jmu.edu
JMAC-6, Suite 26
MSC 5728

Phone: 568-6872; Fax: 568-6240

Sponsored Programs Accounting :
Post-Award (Grants & Contracts)

www.jmu.edu/acadaffairs/grant.shtml
JMAC-6, Suite 30
MSC 5713
Phone: 568-4623; Fax: 568-2397


Tamara Hatch, Associate Director
hatchtt@jmu.edu
x8-2350

Sally Dickenson, Grants Specialist
dickensr@jmu.edu
x8-2336

Zanetta Ford, Grants Specialist
fordzs@jmu.edu
x8-3558

Carolyn Strong, Research Coordinator
IRB & IACUC Contact
strongcd@jmu.edu
x8-2318

Tina Warner , Executive Assistant
warnertf@jmu.edu
x8-6872


Donna Crumpton
, Financial Administrator
crumptdl@jmu.edu
x8-8099

Brenda Seifried, Financial Administrator
wilburbc@jmu.edu
x8-2314

Kyra Shiflet, Financial Administrator
shiflekl@jmu.edu
x8-7108

return to the top of the page

Sponsored Programs Administration & Accounting
May 2011