A-to-Z Index

EYH at James Madison University 
Saturday, March 21, 2015, 9:30am-3:15pm

 

2014 Student WorkSHOPs

This year, we are excited to offer more workshops and more variety than ever before!  Thank you to all of our workshop leaders who make this possible. 

When you register for EYH, you will indicate your top 8 choices of workshops in order of preference.  Please be aware that you may not get your top 3 choices.  Registering early will improve your chances of being placed in your top choices, but it is not always possible because of the schedule and the number of participants.

 

  1. 3D PRINTING: THE WAVE OF THE FUTURE   

    3D printers give a new and exciting way to produce all sorts of physical objects and, in particular, gives us a way to visualize mathematics as never before. We will talk about the process of 3D printing including types of printing and how we produce the files we print as well as discuss the mathematical objects themselves. The workshop will include 2 actual 3D printers in the process of printing as well as a chance to view numerous samples of previously printed objects and participants can even take a little bit of the future home.

    Dr. Rebecca Field, Associate Professor of Mathematics, JMU

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  3. AN HOUR OF CODE WITH SCRATCH

    Have you ever wondered how computer games are built? How the cartoon characters in a computer animation jump, laugh or interact with other characters? In this session, you will have hands-on experience with designing your own imaginary world of animation and games with the help of "Scratch". Scratch is a free computer programming language that is designed by MIT specifically to allow people to quickly begin creating their own interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art. As you create and share your animation projects, you will learn important computational and problem solving ideas - all while having lots of fun.

    Dr. Nathan Sprague, Associate Professor of Computer Science, and Ms. Nancy Harris, Lecturer of Computer Science, JMU

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  5. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE HUMAN HEART

    In one day, the average heart beats approximately 100,000 times and can pump as much as 2,000 gallons of blood! In this workshop, we will examine the structure of the heart and discuss how it actually works. We will also learn how to read EKGs and discuss common heart conditions.

    Dr. Jessica A. Newnam-Baicy, Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology, and Dr. T.J. Hynd, Lecturer of Biology, JMU

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  7. BREAKING PASTA 

    When you press on both ends of a spaghetti noodle hard enough, it will break. But what happens in the instant right before it breaks? We'll do some experiments and then use a high-speed camera to catch every instant, not seen with the naked eye. Can math help us predict where the noodles break, and how many pieces they break into? Come see for yourself how a high-speed camera can reveal the mathematics behind noodles breaking!

    Dr. Roger Thelwell, Associate Professor of Mathematics, JMU

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  9. CODING WITH FINCH ROBOTS

    Come learn to code! Using Finch robots and Python code, you and a partner will program the Finch to do a dance, avoid obstacles or follow a light. In this workshop you will learn what coding is all about while controlling the actions of the Finch. No experience necessary…anyone can do IT!

    Ms. Nancy Harris, Lecturer of Computer Science, JMU

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  11. ENGINEERING CANDY BRIDGES   

    Have you ever wondered how a bridge is capable of supporting a lot of weight? Engineers must make sure bridges can withstand large loads so that multiple cars and people can cross over them at the same time. In this workshop we will explore the strength of shapes and how they relate to the structure of bridges as well as other engineering concepts. Using candy and toothpicks, workshop participants will design and build bridges that can hold the weight of a candy bar (and yes, you can eat it afterwards!).

    Dr. Jacquelyn K. Nagel, Assistant Professor of Engineering, JMU, and The Society of Women Engineers at JMU

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  13. ESTIMATING THE UNSEEN

    We’ve all heard about species being endangered. If endangered species are rare, how do scientists know how many individuals are left? We will do a mark-recapture experiment on ladybugs and then estimate population size based on the proportion of individuals we capture and then recapture. We will also examine models of extinction time for our population of beetles.

    Dr. Patrice Ludwig, Assistant Professor of Biology, JMU

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  15. HOW DO WIND TURBINES WORK?

    The wind is all around us, and wind turbines can make use of wind energy and turn it into electricity! Come to this workshop and learn how wind turbines work, including the major parts of a turbine. After understanding how they work, you will have the opportunity to design, create, and build your own blades for a wind turbine! You will compete to see which blade designs can produce the most energy. We’ll also talk about what kinds of careers are available in the wind industry.

    Ms. Deanna McPeak, Outreach Coordinator, Virginia Center for Wind Energy, JMU

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  17. HOW LIKELY ARE YOU TO DEVELOP TYPE II DIABETES?

    Epidemiology is scientific study of the causes, progression and onset of disease development within a given population. Knowledge of both statistics and biology are needed to understand epidemiology of any disease. This session will explain how probability theory is used to examine how different epidemiologic factors (such as smoking, genetics, lack of exercise, and diet) affect the odds of developing Type II Diabetes. In the United States almost 8.3 % of the population has Type II Diabetes, and about 79 million people (25%) are pre-diabetic and likely to develop diabetes if they don’t change their habits. Diabetes develops because of a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Through studying these complex interactions epidemiologists can learn major disease causes and use them to help prevent the continued increase in Type II Diabetes in America.

    Dr. Nusrat Jahan, Associate Professor of Statistics, and Dr. Terrie Rife, Associate Professor of Biology, JMU

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  19. IT'S MORE THAN "JUST" BIOLOGY: EXPLORING SCIENCE, TECH, ENGINEERING, & MATH APPLICATIONS TO HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Are you interested in the health sciences? Have you ever wondered how you’ll use all the science and math knowledge and skills you’ve gained in a health sciences career? Join faculty and students from the Health Sciences as we explore answers to these questions using fun hands on activities.

    Ms. Pamela Bailey, PA-C, Associate Professor of Health Sciences, Dr. Amy Russell Yun, OTD, Assistant Professor of Health Sciences, Gabriella Ciampi, MOTS, Andrea Keller, MOTS, Nicole Lamoureux, MOTS, Brittany Miner, MOTS, Stefani Sangiovani MOTS, and the Physician Assistant Student Society (PASS), JMU

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  21. LET'S MAKE A DEAL! : THE MONTY HALL PROBLEM

    The Monty Hall problem is a classic, often misunderstood, and heavily debated probability problem. It was named for Monty Hall, a TV game show host. In the problem, a contestant chooses from three doors, one of which has a prize. After the contestant makes her initial choice, the host opens one of the other losing doors and then gives the contestant the option of switching to the other closed door. Should she switch? We will play the game for candy prizes, discuss the history, and determine the best strategy to maximize the odds of winning.

    Ms. Colleen Watson, Instructor of Statistics, JMU

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  23. OCEANS AND OUR CLIMATE

    The ocean makes up 70% of the Earth’s surface. It acts like a great insulator for the Earth, storing heat and moving it around the planet. The ocean also traps gases, like carbon dioxide, that change the way our atmosphere captures heat. But, how do ocean currents move, where do they hide the heat and gases, and what impact does that have on climate? Winds move the thin surface layer of water, but more than 90% of the ocean is deep water that has no contact with the atmosphere. What causes the deep ocean currents to move? Come join us as we explore these questions by creating water solutions that mimic the real ocean current system.

    Dr. Shelley Whitmeyer, Instructor of Geology & Environmental Science, JMU

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  25. SMARTPHONES AND CYBER ALERT

    With the popularity of smartphones and social networking, more people are using them to share photos and videos with friends and family. What exactly are you sharing? In some instances, you may not realize that you are letting others know where you live and your habits. This workshop provides a simulated demonstration of how smartphones share information such as your location, date/time, and travel patterns.

    Dr. Edna Reid, Associate Professor of Integrated Science and Technology, and Dr. Emil Salib, Professor of Integrated Science and Technology, JMU

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  27. THE KINETICS OF GROSS GUACAMOLE

    Have you ever found that the guacamole, bananas, or apple slices you left on your plate too long have turned an unappetizing brown color? We will discover why this happens and how to prevent it by using a combination of familiar foods and equipment used in science labs at JMU in a kitchen chemistry experiment.

    Dr. Kerry Cresawn, Assistant Professor of Biology, JMU, and Ms. Leisha Martin, JMU

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  29. TOUR OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM

    Using JMU's Science on a Sphere exhibit, we can take a virtual tour of the Solar System. Join us for an exciting tour of the 4 terrestrial and the 4 Jovian planets. Short of actually traveling to each of these planets, seeing a projection of these surfaces on the Sphere is the next best thing. Science on a Sphere (SOS) is a sphere-shaped, visualization tool that was developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    Dr. Shanil Virani, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Planetarium Director, JMU

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  31. WATCHING WORMS WIGGLE

    Did you know there are itty-bitty (the size of a speck of dust) worms living pretty much everywhere in your environment? How do these little critters survive? How do they find food and evade predators? Using simple mathematics and a few microscopes, we will to attempt to answer the burning questions: How fast can a worm wiggle?

    Dr. Eva Strawbridge, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, JMU

     

  32. WHERE IN THE WORLD IS CARMEN CHEMISTRY?

    Do you like solving a mystery? The chemistry of some foods and cooking can help one locate where someone may be and what they may be investigating. Come and explore to see if you can solve the mystery of where Carmen Chemistry may be and what mystery she may be investigating.

    Dr. Iona Black, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, JMU, and the JMU American Chemical Society Student Chapter