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  • May 9: Graduate Commencement Ceremony
  • May 9: University Commencement Ceremony
  • May 10: College Commencement Ceremonies
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  • Apr 24: Jean Cash Lecture Series Speaker John Harrell
  • Apr 25: Logic and Reasoning Institute Colloquium
  • Apr 26: Morrison-Bruce Center's ColorBlast 5K
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News

Events

  • May 9: Graduate Commencement Ceremony
  • May 9: University Commencement Ceremony
  • May 10: College Commencement Ceremonies
  • More >

News

Events

  • May 9: Graduate Commencement Ceremony
  • May 9: University Commencement Ceremony
  • May 10: College Commencement Ceremonies
  • More >

News

Events

  • May 9: Graduate Commencement Ceremony
  • May 9: University Commencement Ceremony
  • May 10: College Commencement Ceremonies
  • More >

News

Events

  • May 9: Graduate Commencement Ceremony
  • May 9: University Commencement Ceremony
  • May 10: College Commencement Ceremonies
  • More >

Be the Change Profiles



G. Tyler Miller JMU's third president

G. Tyler Miller was probably a list maker. The oldest of JMU's presidents to assume the role, Miller had the bearing of an elder statesmen and was often seen pondering an issue or reading with the stem of a pipe gripped in his teeth. A graduate of Virginia Military Institute, JMU's third president came to Madison College in September 1949 with a specific list of objectives that, once again, would transform the college. Throughout his tenure, he was deliberate and determined. After spending 20 years as a career educator, Miller knew where Madison should go; and he got to work on his list. Miller recognized the importance of an independent graduate program, implemented it and checked that off his list. He expanded opportunities for teachers, reaffirming Madison's traditional role as Virginia's premier teachers college. Another check. In 1952, Miller purchased the remaining Newman Farm nearly quadrupling the campus. The Miller purchase remains the largest land acquisition in the school's history. Miller also fought for — and eventually won — one of the most important changes in the school's history: coeducation. Though it took 17 of his 21-year-tenure, Miller understood how important coeducation would be for the school's future. In the decades since Miller's 1970 retirement, his vision of graduate opportunities and coeducation has been resoundingly affirmed. He skillfully and successfully delivered Madison College to the edge of a future few could have imagined.

Tenure: 1949-1971
Name: Madison College