JMURJ Volume Two


 

SUMMARY: One concern all college students face is not getting enough sleep. Army ROTC cadets wake up to this challenge every day.


ROTC slide

One concern all college students face is not getting enough sleep. Army ROTC cadets at James Madison University are no exception, as they add early morning Physical Training (PT) sessions to their already-full academic and social slates.

With so much to fit into just 24 hours, ROTC cadets can find it difficult, if not impossible, to get the proper sleep they need in order to make informed and competent decisions, stay emotionally and physically healthy, maintain good standing in school, and perform well in their ROTC training.

Joshua Wells addresses this issue in “The Effect of Sleep Deprivation on Cadet Performance and Behavior: A Proposal to Reform the ROTC Program at James Madison University,” offering  extended attention to sleep deprivation research and Army doctrine before proposing a controlled experiment to test a new approach to PT sessions that might address the issue here at JMU and beyond.

Wells, who studied Psychology and Military Science (ROTC) during his time at JMU, began the proposal as a capstone assignment and is delighted to finally see his paper published:  “It feels incredible to see all the hard work paying off! Throughout the publication process, JMURJ was quick to respond, was clear in their responses, and upheld a high level of professionalism.” The JMURJ Editorial Board feels the same way about Mr. Wells. Right back at you, Josh.

Wells’ submission was JMURJ’s first submission—of many, we hope—from JMU’s Military Science (ROTC) program.

Read Joshua Wells’ “The Effect of Sleep Deprivation on Cadet Performance and Behavior: A Proposal to Reform the ROTC Program at James Madison University” in Volume 3 of the James Madison Undergraduate Research Journal.

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Joshua Wells ('15) is from Eldersburg, MD. He majored in Psychology with a minor in Military Science (ROTC). While at JMU, you could typically find him volunteering, running, or sleeping somewhere on campus. This publication began as an assignment for his "Psychology of the Workplace" class (taken Fall '14). He is currently serving as a Second Lieutenant in the Virginia Army National Guard.

Published: Monday, February 1, 2016

Last Updated: Saturday, April 8, 2017

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