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Honors Courses - Fall 2015

This list is not official and is subject to change. Classes may be cancelled or added prior to the beginning of the semester. Check MyMadison for the most accurate information.

This list does not reflect whether a class is open or closed for enrollment. Check MyMadison for the most accurate enrollment information.

search Honors classesTips for searching for Honors GenEd classes on MyMadison: 

  • Leave the "Subject" field blank
  • For "Course Number," select "contains" from the drop down menu and enter "H" in the field
  • Click "Search"
  • HON 201E and 202E will not appear in this search. They must be searched separately using "HON" in the "Subject" field.

NEW FOR FALL 2015:

JMU has removed the "G" prefix from all General Education classes. These classes will now appear with normal subject headings.

  • Ex: GPOSC 225H is now POSC 225H; GENG 239H is now ENG 239H; and so on.

In a few select cases, a letter has been added to course identifiers to match departmental or program changes:

  • GMAD=SMAD; GCOM=SCOM; GSCI 101 & 104= ISCI; GSCI 121= PHYS 121

How will I know which courses fulfill General Education requirements?

The General Education Program Planner indicates courses which will fulfill GenEd requirements. General Education information is also available in the Undergraduate Catalog. Visit here for more information on this change.

Honors General Education

Cluster 1

PHIL 120H - Critical Thinking (3 credits)
Class #: 75657   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: William Knorpp   |   MWF 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM    |    Cleveland 0114
Class #: 75709   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: William Knorpp   |   MWF 1:25-2:15 PM    |    Cleveland 0114
An introduction to the techniques for analyzing and evaluating information in everyday experience. The functions of language will be discussed. Techniques for judging the strengths of arguments and the probable truth of the arguments' premises will be examined. This course does not meet the philosophy requirement for the B.A. degree. May not be used for major credit.

HIST 150H - Critical Issues in Recent Global History (3 credits)
Class #: 76650   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Mary Louise Loe   |   MoWe 2:30-3:45 PM    |    Duke 1041
Class #: 76651   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Mary Louise Loe   |   MoWe 4:00-5:15 PM    |    Duke 1041

This course examines issues in recent history as a means to introduce, develop and enhance critical thinking skills and to supplement writing, oral communication, library and computing skills objectives for General Education Cluster One. A seminar format allows for careful examination of issues in both oral and written formats. The course emphasizes the development and articulation of well-reasoned arguments in organized and grammatically acceptable prose. May be used for general education credit. May not be used for major credit.

SCOM 121H - Fundamental Human Communication: Presentations (3 credits)
Class #: 75888   |   Section: 0012   |   Instructor: Timothy Ball   |   MWF 9:05-9:55 AM    |    Harrison 2113
Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in a public environment. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive speeches. Public speaking required.

SCOM 122H - Fundamental Human Communication: Individual Presentations (3 credits)
Class #: 75917   |   Section: 008   |   Instructor: Annick Dupal   |   MWF 9:05-9:55 AM   |   Harrison 2102
Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in a public environment. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive speeches. Public speaking required.

SCOM 123H - Fundamental Human Communication: Group Presentations (3 credits)
Class #: 76064   |   Section: 0008   |   Instructor: Lori Britt   |   TuTh 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM   |   Harrison 1246
Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in small group and public communication contexts. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive presentations. Public speaking required.

WRTC 103H - Critical Reading and Writing (3 credits)
Class #: 75944   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Kevin Jefferson   |   MWF 9:05-9:55 AM   |   Harrison 2104
Fosters reflective, critical reading, writing, and research in public discourse, culture, humanities, technology, and science. Challenges students to consider cross-disciplinary modes of inquiry through multiple genres with an attention to enlightened, global citizenship. Emphasizes revising for rhetorical effectiveness. WRTC 103H fulfills the General Education Cluster One writing requirement and is a prerequisite for all WRTC courses numbered 200 or above.

Cluster 2

PHIL 101H - Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
Class #: 75653   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Ann Wiles   |   TuTh 8:00-9:15 AM   |   Cleveland 0114
Class #: 75702   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Ann Wiles   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   Moody 0020
An introduction to the basic problems and concepts of philosophy, the nature of man and the self, ethics, theories of knowledge, philosophy of religion, etc., as revealed in the writings of the major philosophers.

THEA 210H - Introduction to Theatre (3 credits)
Class #: 76136   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Meredith Conti   |   MoWeFr 2:30-3:20 PM   |   Forbes Estes Center 1201
Study of the theatre as an art form. Emphasis on introducing students to a broad spectrum of theatrical activity and opinion. Consideration of the components that comprise a theatre event including acting, directing, design, costuming, lighting and playwriting. May not be used for major credit.

ENG 247H - Survey of American Literature: From the Beginning to the Civil War (3 credits)
Class #: 75420   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Matthew Rebhorn   |   MWF 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Keezell 0107
This course aims to explore the foundations of American Literature from its origins to, arguably, the most significant event in this country’s history—the American Civil War.  Helping to guide our exploration of the diverse literary texts constituting “American Literature” during this time period, we will be looking at the numerous formal, stylistic, and thematic ways in which all of these texts “contest,” or challenge, what it meant to be American. Exploring the rich texts of this course, therefore, from Puritan sermons to Enlightenment autobiographies, from Transcendental essays to slave narratives, we will not discover the “real” American experience beneath this era.  Rather, we will begin to see the ways in which these contests over the meaning of race, gender, history, class, and religion supplied the foundational energy that drove this country onto the national stage.

ENG 239H - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)
Class #: 75417   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Debali Mookerjea-Leonard   |   TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM   |   Keezell 0310
This course introduces students to representative works of South Asian literature, particularly the Indian subcontinent, produced over the course of the 20th century. It aims to cultivate an awareness of the historical, cultural, and intellectual contexts of writings from South Asia and the South Asian diaspora. Texts for the course have been selected from a range of genres, including the novel, short story, drama and poetry. Films will be used to provide a visual complement to the texts. Through close reading and analyses of literary texts, and discussions in class, the course endeavors to refine students' skills of critical thinking, reading and writing.

HON 202E - Global Cities: Life in Victorian London (3 credits)
Class #: 76361   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: John Butt   |   MWF 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM   |   Jackson 0102
Class #: 76363   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: John Butt   |   MWF 1:25-2:15 PM   |   Jackson 0102
This course is restricted to first-semester freshmen. First course in the Global Cities sequence. HON 201E must be completed in Spring 2016 in order to fulfill Cluster 2 requirements. 
Life in Victorian London is a cultural and social examintation of London from 1837 to 1901 examining the way people of all classes lived and worked. This course takes the Victorian city of London as a point of departure to explore the human experience in an interdisciplinary manner, looking at art, architecture, music, literature, technology, clothing, food, sports, and work conditions. Emphasis will be on drawing evidence from primary and secondary sources. Several quest lecturers will be brought in as experts on Jack the Ripper, clothing, and other topics. Numerous photographs of Victorian London sites, taken specifically for this course, will be used. The final exam is a hands-on project.

Cluster 3

MATH 220H - Elementary Statistics (3 credits)
Class #: 71930   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Lihua Chen   |   TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM   |   Burruss 0030
Descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, sampling, estimation and testing of hypotheses, regression, correlation and an introduction to statistical analysis using computers.

BIO 114H - Organisms (4 credits)
Class #: 71081   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Oliver Hyman   |   MWF 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM   |   Bioscience 1007
Class #: 73621   |   Section: 1001-LAB   |   Instructor: Andrea Pesce   |   M 12:30-3:20 PM   |   Bioscience 1025
An exploration of how diverse life forms carry out fundamental processes that sustain life, including acquiring and using essential molecules, growing and reproducing, responding to environmental stimuli and maintaining a stable internal environment. Labs will introduce students to the scientific method in a series of investigative lab and field experiences. Biology and biotechnology majors receive registration priority in the fall.

ISCI 104H - Scientific Perspectives (1 credit)
Class #: 76028   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: C Whisnant   |   Th 9:30-11:20 AM   |   Phys/Chem 2324
A study of topics selected to allow students to participate in scientific problem-solving approaches to knowledge.

Cluster 4

POSC 225H - U.S. Government (4 credits)
Class #: 75352   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Andreas Broscheid   |   MoWe 2:30-3:35 & 4:00-5:15 PM   |   Miller 2180
4-5:15pm meets periodically. An examination of institutions, processes and intellectual concepts which structure American political activity. The interaction of the political system with the changing American society and America's changing role in world affairs are also treated. The course provides an introduction to quantitative methodology.

Cluster 5

HTH 100H - Personal Wellness (3 credits)
Class #: 75774   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: David Wenos   |   MWF 10:10-11:50 AM - 8 week second session   |   TBA
Emphasizes lifestyle behaviors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention. General areas affecting health status are identified. Suggestions are made as to how health-related behaviors, self-care and individual decisions contribute to health and influence dimensions of wellness.

PSYC 101H - General Psychology (3 credits)
Class #: 75577   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Jessica Irons   |   MoWe 2:30-3:45 PM   |   Maury 0201
Class #: 76704   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Monica Reis-Bergan   |   TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM   |   Miller G002

A study of the nervous system, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, life span development, personality, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social psychology and the scientific method.

HON 100: Honors First Year Seminar

This course is restricted to first-semester Track I Honors students.

HON 100 is a one-credit hour, credit/no credit course that meets once each week. Each section of the course is taught by two upper-level Honors students. HON 100 introduces incoming Track I students to the Honors Program and to JMU. Students learn about the goals, expectations, and programs offered through Honors; are introduced to a wide range of resources available at JMU; and get to know their fellow Honors students.

HON 100 is required for all incoming Track I Honors freshmen. Students can choose the section that best fits their schedule.

HON 100 - Honors First Year Seminar (1 credit)
Class #: 74616   |   Section: 0001   |   Tu 9:30-10:20 AM   |   Miller 2104
Class #: 74617   |   Section: 0002   |   Th 9:30-10:20 AM   |   Miller 2104
Class #: 74618   |   Section: 0003   |   Tu 12:30-1:20 PM   |   Miller G027
Class #: 74619   |   Section: 0004   |   Th 12:30-1:20 PM   |   Miller G027
Class #: 74620   |   Section: 0005   |   Tu 3:30-4:30 PM   |   Miller G027
Class #: 74621   |   Section: 0006   |   Tu 5:00-5:15 PM   |   Miller 2104
Class #: 74622   |   Section: 0007   |   Mo 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Miller 2104
Class #: 74623   |   Section: 0008   |   We 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Miller 2104
Class #: 74624   |   Section: 0009   |   Mo 12:20-1:10 PM   |   Keezell 0307
Class #: 74625   |   Section: 0010   |   We 12:20-1:10 PM   |   Keezell 0307
Class #: 74626   |   Section: 0011   |   Mo 1:25-2:15 PM   |   Miller G027
Class #: 74627   |   Section: 0012   |   We 1:25-2:15 PM   |   Miller G027
Class #: 74628   |   Section: 0013   |   Mo 2:30-3:20 PM   |   Miller 2104
Class #: 74629   |   Section: 0014   |   We 2:30-3:20 PM   |   Miller 2104
Class #: 74630   |   Section: 0015   |   Mo 3:35-4:25 PM   |   Moody 0020

Honors Seminars

Honors seminars are recommended for sophomores and above but are open to second semester freshmen. For more information about Honors seminars, visit here.

HON 300 - James Madison University Undergraduate Research Journal (3 credits)
Class #: 47238   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Kevin Jefferson & Steven Lunsford (WRTC Dept.)   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   Harrison 2246
Students collaborate to publish the online undergraduate research journal JMURJ. Students taking the course serve as editorial board members, who act in a number of capacities: outreach, acquisitions, and marketing; editing in all its forms, from comprehensive editing to copyediting and proofreading; and publication and design. Editorial board members gain experience in defining and publishing a growing university-wide academic research journal; collaborating with a diverse group of enthusiastic, skilled editorial board members; and working with people and texts from various fields. NOTE: This course requires instructor consent. Interested students should submit a short letter of interest to the instructors. Download letter of interest instructions.

HON 300 - Psychology of Sexual Diversity (3 credits)
Class #: 74059   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Kristen Davidson (Psychology Dept.)   |   Mo 5:30-8:00 PM   |   Memorial Hall 7370
The focus of this course is primarily on the psychological perspectives of sexual orientation, including underserved sexual minority populations. The theories, research and concepts presented will focus on sexual orientation and expression with a particular emphasis on the impact and short and long-term effects on the emotional, psychological and social development and well-being of LGBT populations.

HON 300 - Sherlock Holmes and the Proliferation of Meanings (3 credits)
Class #: 74060   |   Section: 0003   |   Instructor: Mark Raymond (English Dept.)   |   TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM   |   Miller 2109
This class will investigate the cultural history of Sherlock Holmes, reading the “canonical” novels and stories by Conan Doyle and examining some key aspects of the massive body of extra-authorial material dealing with Holmes: commentaries, pastiches, parodies, imitations, adaptations, continuations, appropriations, films and “fan fiction.” Secondary readings will range from Michel Foucault to Michael Chabon. Investigating detective fiction within an interdisciplinary context, we will ask:  How is knowledge produced? How is information accessed, contained and controlled? How do we understand material traces in the present as belonging to a larger temporal frame?

HON 300 - Viral Discovery (2 credits)
Class #: 74071   |   Section: 0004   |   Instructor: Louise Temple-Rosebrook (ISAT)   |   MoWe 8:25-9:55 AM & Fr 9:05-9:55 AM   |   Rooms: MoWe TBA; F ISAT/CS 0336
This 2-semester course involves original research to find unique soil viruses that infect bacteria. Using tools from molecular biology and microbiology, students isolate their own virus from a soil sample they choose. The viruses are visualized by electron microscopy and the genome sequence of one of the new viruses is determined. In the second semester (Genomics) the genome sequence is analyzed for open reading frame (i.e. gene) determinations and likeness to other characterized viruses. The course includes research methods, proper experimental recordkeeping, bioethics, literature review, and practice in the oral and written communication of scientific findings.  The course will culminate in a public poster session to present new student findings. You must enroll in Viral Genomics in Spring 2016 in order to earn full credit for this Honors seminar.

HON 300 - Modern Freedom (3 credits)
Class #: 74297   |   Section: 0005   |   Instructor: Spencer Leonard (History Dept.)   |   MWF 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Keezell 307
This course is in the tradition of "great books" seminars. The class sets aside disciplinary concerns to zero in on the modern concept of freedom, a concept that feeds into a number of contemporary university disciplines: Anthropology, Economics, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, and Sociology, to name only the most obvious. The course readings are substantial selections or complete works by major authors. The course begins by an integrated discussion of the emergence and flourishing of freedom thinking in European philosophy in the Age of Revolution, and the subsequent crisis of freedom in the latter half of the 19th century. Beginning with the Rousseauvian "discovery" of the modern concept of freedom as mankind's self-transformability in history we will over the course of many weeks trace that concept's elaboration within the high liberal tradition of the Scottish Enlightenment, German Idealism, and post-Napoleonic liberalism. Marx will then be discussed as an attempt of advancing or renewing this tradition in what he takes to be the crisis conditions of the industrial revolution, i.e. endemic unemployment. Marx thus allows for discussion a certain approach to what seems the exhaustion of liberalism by the mid-19th century. This same question will be further explored in the two final readings of the semester, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Max Weber.

HON 300 - The Artificial Other (3 credits)
Class #: 76226   |   Section: 0006   |   Instructor: Philip Frana (Honors)   |   MWF 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Room: TBA
In this class we will examine how people imagine and interact with digital technology. My hope is that by observing the otherness of past and current ideas about technologies and information systems, we will achieve a certain critical distance from our own concerns. This critical distance will help us make informed and creative choices, now and in the future. In this seminar, we will appreciate the relative uniqueness of human intelligence and the reinvention of ourselves in a computational universe. We’ll examine sources of human and machine anomie and equilibration in contemporary times, and exhume the machine metaphors defining life. We’ll re-imagine our humanity in a world of artificial intelligences, confront various calls for a “post-biological universe,” and explore opportunities for computer-aided creativity.

HON 300 - American Pulp (3 credits)
Class #: 76227   |   Section: 0007   |   Instructor: Brooks Hefner (English Dept.)   |   TuTh 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM   |   Student Success Center 4042
The term “pulp” conjures up images of popular trash, the detritus of literary history. However, popular literature has always been a clearinghouse for cultural anxieties and experimentation in literary genres. Though popular writers—often paid by the word—are often caricatured as “fiction factories,” the work they produced offers a complex window into questions about class, race, gender, sexuality, region, nation, and cultural value. While some writers sought to escape the stigma of the popular, others thrived in the popular publishing environment, producing works at a phenomenal rate. This course traces the history of popular and sensational writing in the United States through a number of genres and contexts, from the Revolutionary Era to the McCarthy Era. Along the way, we’ll encounter “seduction novels,” “city mysteries,” dime novels, adventure tales, pulp magazines, and sensational paperbacks from the 1950s. We will investigate the contexts—both literary and historical—of these works and consider the reading communities that consumed them, often in ways wholly antithetical to how we tend to read works of literature in an English classroom. In addition to critical writing, and presentations, students will do extensive work with pulp magazines from the Carrier Library’s Special Collections.

HON 300 - Rhetorics of the Animal (3 credits)
Class #: 76232   |   Section: 0008   |   Instructor: Alex Parrish (WRTC)   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   Jackson 0003
Thus this course will examine the rhetorical border zones that exist between human and nonhuman animals. These borders, we will see, can be fluid, and history shows us that as we discover more about animal cognition and behavior, the lines that separate our species must be constantly moved in order to keep up the appearance of absolute difference. We will explore in this seminar what it means to be a human, an animal, and a person. Animality will be explored through its representation in literature and science, and human and nonhuman animals will be studied as persuasive beings, companions, friends, family members, and subjects of scientific experiment. In so doing, we will expose the blurriness of the terms under which our social lives are constructed – concepts we interrogate will include human rights, altruism, intentionality, and property, hopefully bringing us to a better understanding of what it means to be a person, an animal, or both. 

HON 300 - Teaching Assistant for HON 100 (3 credits)
Teaching assistants are selected by application only in the spring semester.

Areas of Emphasis

Area of Emphasis courses are reserved for 1st semester sophomores only. Non-1st semester sophomores who enroll in these classes will be automatically removed without notification.

Honors students in Tracks I and II have the option of fulfilling the Honors seminar requirement through an Area of Emphasis. Students begin the course sequence in the fall semester of the sophomore year by selecting an intro course in one of five areas:

In the spring semester, students will take a second seminar in their area, followed by a 1-credit practicum experience in the junior year. Note that you must complete both semesters of the sophomore year seminar sequence in order for the fall class to count toward the Honors Seminar requirement.  Otherwise, the fall class will count toward your Honors elective credits. Completion of the junior practicum is not part of your seminar requirement. It is only required if you would to be certified as having completed the area.

For more information, visit the Area of Emphasis section of the website. 


Fall 2015 Areas of Emphasis Courses
Creativity

HON 361 - Creativity, Innovation, and Human Engagement (3 credits) 
Class #: 76282   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Mary Shira   |   TuTh 8:00-9:15 AM   |   Duke Hall 2037
This course explores basic concepts of creativity across the disciplines and within various cultures. Course content can include the study and analysis of creative expression; the application of theories and conceptual frameworks to notions of fruitful serendipity, intellectual insight, and imagination; and the various modes of creative cognition in individuals, groups, and experimental “thinking” machines. Individual instructors may draw especial attention to problems of creation in literary and artistic endeavors, the role of personality, creativity in scientific discovery, the physiology and neurology of creative ability, innovative teaching techniques, or the philosophy and psychology of creativity and human fulfillment.

Global Studies

HON 331 - Introduction to Global Studies (3 credits) 
Class #: 76274   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Felix Wang   |   TuTh 9:30-10:45 AM   |   Harrison 2111
Through this course, students will examine how people study and have perceived similarities, differences, and interdependencies among human societies. The course is interdisciplinary and incorporates the arts, social sciences, humanities, health, education, environmental and developmental studies, and more, all within an integrative, global framework. Materials and guest speakers will encourage discussions, introduce and engage students in new concepts, and promote critical thinking through current issues and case studies related global studies in order to become better global citizens.

Leadership

HON 321 - Exploring Leadership (3 credits) 
Class #: 76275   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Brian Charette, Jonathan Alger   |   Tu 3:00-5:30 PM   |   Student Success Center 4046
Class #: 76276   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Richard Showalter   |   TuTh 12:30-1:45 PM   |   Miller 2110
This course provides basic concepts of leadership and the essential skills required to become an effective leader. The course includes the study of leadership as well as the application of leadership theories, concepts, and skills. The student will be provided the opportunity for personal development through exercises in communication and leadership effectiveness. Objectives of the course are to understand leadership, know your own style and have a plan for developing your leadership. This course will examine what we know about the leadership practices that lead to effective team and organizational performance.

Research

HON 341 - Scientific Research I (3 credits) 
Class #: 76280   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Stephanie Stockwell   |   MoWe 8:40-9:55 AM   |   HHS 1203
The Scientific Research seminar is designed as an introduction to the nature of scientific inquiry and what it means to be a research scientist and effective communicator. Topics covered will be both theoretical and practical in nature. This course will have three main units of study: 1) Ways of knowing (e.g. identifying causation vs. correlation, critiquing the experimental process, and the appreciating the importance of using models), 2) Scientific communication (e.g. accessing, understanding, and writing scientific literature; understanding the manuscript submission, review, and revision process; and interfacing with conventional modes of oral communication), and 3) From theory to practice (i.e. establishing and fostering productive professional relationships, maintaining accurate and thorough record keeping, and working within the framework of conventional scientific standards). Through the exposure and analysis of these topics and issues, students will become prepared for a positive undergraduate research experience.

Service

HON 351 - Service and Civic Engagement (3 credits) 
Class #: 76283   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Cynthia Klevickis   |   Mo 3:35-6:05 PM   |   ISAT/CS 0246
This seminar is designed as an introduction to the nature of scientific inquiry and what it means to be a research scientist and effective communicator. Topics covered will be both theoretical and practical in nature. This course will have three main units of study: 1) Ways of knowing (e.g. identifying causation vs. correlation, critiquing the experimental process, and the appreciating the importance of using models), 2) Scientific communication (e.g. accessing, understanding, and writing scientific literature; understanding the manuscript submission, review, and revision process; and interfacing with conventional modes of oral communication), and 3) From theory to practice (i.e. establishing and fostering productive professional relationships, maintaining accurate and thorough record keeping, and working within the framework of conventional scientific standards). Through the exposure and analysis of these topics and issues, students will become prepared for a positive undergraduate research experience.