"Gandhi, King, Ikeda: A Legacy of Building Peace"

"Gandhi, King, Ikeda: A Legacy of Building Peace" is an internationally renowned exhibit extolling humanist virtues and its champions. Though Gandhi, King, and Ikeda each came from different ethnic and religious backgrounds, they have all shared a common vision. They have each, in their respective lifetimes, fought for nonviolence, human rights, and world peace: Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi led the campaign against the colonial rule of the British Empire, Martin Luther King, Jr. fought against the injustices and prejudice built against people of color in America, and Daisaku Ikeda encourages millions of civilians in the world to live a life of dignity and to work for world peace.

Gandhi, King, and Ikeda are men who have lived with principle and who have based their action on nonviolent means. The unique idea of having the three figures together as an exhibit is of particular significance because it reminds us that peace and justice exist beyond all human-laid boundaries. The exhibit provides a holistic look at Gandhi's, King's, and Ikeda's respective nonviolence movements and their accomplishments and contributions to world peace.

The exhibit was on display at the Carrier Library of James Madison University from September 19 through October 21, 2005.

The exhibit was free and open to the public.

The exhibit was co-sponsored by the Martin Luther King, Jr. International Chapel at Morehouse College in Atlanta and the Soka Gakkai International-USA.

Support for hosting the exhibit was provided in part by JMU Center for Multicultural Student Services, General Education Program, and Office of International Programs.


"Mahatma Gandhi in the Service of Humanity"

"Mahatma Gandhi in the Service of Humanity" is a collection of some characteristic photographs of Gandhi as part of the celebrations of his 125th birth anniversary. The photographs show some of the principal and significant facets of his personality; a unique reference from his childhood, his studies in England, his activities in South Africa, his struggle for Indian independence, and incidents involving many leaders.

The exhibit was on display at the Carrier Library of James Madison University from October 2 through November 5, 2006.

The exhibit was free and open to the public.

The exhibit was co-sponsored by the Gandhi Memorial Center in Washington, D.C.

Support for hosting the exhibit was provided in part by JMU Center for Multicultural Student Services, College of Arts and Letters, Cross Disciplinary Studies, Department of Philosophy and Religion, General Education Program, and International Programs.

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