Department of Chemistry

Dr. John W. Gilje, Head

Professors

Atkins, Crowther, DeGraff, DeVore, Downey, Gilje, Leary, F. Palocsay, Voige

Associate Professor

D. Amenta

Assistant Professors

MacDonald, Norwood

Adjunct Professor

J. Sullivan

Course Descriptions: Chemistry and Interscience Research

The Department of Chemistry offers the Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Arts degrees for a major in chemistry with concentrations in the following areas:

The programs are designed to provide the student with theoretical and practical instruction in chemistry and related areas leading to careers in chemistry, medicine, dentistry, paramedical areas, forensic sciences, chemical engineering and other technology based careers. The department also recognizes its responsibility in providing courses for the nonscientist who needs some basic understanding of the principles of chemistry that apply to his or her chosen field.

Upon graduation a chemistry major is expected to have a basic mastery of four of the five principal divisions of chemistry -- analytical, inorganic, organic and physical. An understanding of biochemistry, the fifth division, is strongly encouraged. In addition to this broad foundation, the well-prepared student should have taken advanced chemistry courses and upper-level courses in the other sciences and mathematics. It is particularly important that the formal course work be augmented with non-classroom experience via independent study or research projects.

All programs in the major are structured to build on the education and training the student receives in course work taken early in his or her academic career. The liberal arts, calculus, physics and general chemistry courses form the foundation. As the student progresses through the curriculum, faculty members expect greater independence and responsibility by the student in problem solving and critical thought. Laboratory experiences develop skills in collecting and analyzing data; working on projects as a group member; keeping a laboratory notebook and writing technical reports; communicating technical information orally; and retrieving information from the chemical literature. Early in his or her stay at JMU, the student learns to recognize that chemistry is an international enterprise that impacts and is impacted by society. The CHEM 481-482 sequence provides an important bridge between undergraduate course work and graduate or work environments. Each student conducts a comprehensive, electronic retrieval-based literature search, writes an extensive technical paper and presents his or her work orally to the department in a professional meeting format. Since research and the discovery of new knowledge are integral parts of chemistry as a discipline, every chemistry major completes courses in which the research components of active learning, independent study and creative thinking are incorporated. The student who is considering post-graduate study in chemistry or biochemistry is especially encouraged to additionally participate in an independent, laboratory-based research experience guided by a faculty mentor.

Freshmen who intend to major in chemistry take a placement test in mathematics to determine the mathematics course in which they should enroll. Entering freshmen with a good background in high school chemistry are encouraged to take the department's exemption exam in general chemistry.

Program Options

The basic chemistry curriculum consists of a core of courses which is required of all majors. In addition to the core, each student should select the courses listed under the concentration which most closely corresponds to his or her career objectives. These three concentrations and other options are listed below. Additional information can be obtained from the department head or the student's departmental adviser.

Please note that all chemistry majors have calculus, physics and technical writing requirements which must be fulfilled.

Credit
Core Courses Hours
CHEM 131-132. General Chemistry I-II 6
CHEM 135L. Special General Chemistry Lab 1
CHEM 136L. Special General Chemistry Lab 2
CHEM 270. Inorganic Chemistry I 3
CHEM 331. Physical Chemistry I 3
CHEM 341-342. Organic Chemistry Lecture 6
CHEM 351. Analytical Chemistry 4
CHEM 361. Biochemistry I 3
CHEM 387L-388L. Integrated Inorganic/ 4
Organic Laboratory
CHEM 481-482. Literature and Seminar I-II 2
34

Concentration I:American Chemical Society Accredited Programs

The American Chemical Society certifies graduates in three programs.

ACS Certified Degree Requirements

CHEM 352. Instrumental Analysis
CHEM 352L. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
CHEM 432. Physical Chemistry II
CHEM 438L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory
Chemistry core courses

Program-Specific Courses

CHEM 470. Inorganic Chemistry II

BIO 380. General Microbiology
BIO 480. Molecular Biology
CHEM 362. Biochemistry II
CHEM 366L. Biochemistry Laboratory

This program also meets the recommended undergraduate degree requirements of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for a major in biochemistry.

Courses described under "Initial Secondary Teaching License"

The well-prepared student is encouraged to take as many of the additional departmental offerings as possible as electives with particular attention being given to junior and/or senior research projects. In addition, a sound background in physics, mathematics and technical writing is encouraged and includes, as a minimum, the following courses:

Credit
Hours
ENG 398. Technical Writing 3
MATH 235-236. Analytic Geometry and 8
Calculus I-II
PHYS 240-250. University Physics I-II 6
PHYS 140L-150L. General Physics Laboratory 2

These courses may not be taken credit/no-credit.

Concentration II: General

Students with the following career goals may consider this concentration.

Students following the general concentration must take, in addition to the core courses, the following:

Credit
Hours
CHEM 336L. Applied Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1
CHEM 352. Instrumental Analysis 3
CHEM 352L. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory 2
ENG 398. Technical Writing 3
MATH 235-236. Analytic Geometry 8
and Calculus I-II 1
PHYS 240-250. University Physics I-II 1 6
PHYS 140L-150L. General Physics Laboratory 2
Upper division chemistry lecture elective 3

1 Students electing the general concentration are urged to take the same physics and mathematics courses recommended under Concentration I; however, in special cases, MATH 205-206 and PHYS 140-150 can be substituted with approval of the student's department adviser.

Concentration III: Chemistry/Business

This program is designed for business-oriented chemistry students preparing for careers in patent law, technical sales, technical service and related areas. Students following the chemistry/business concentration must take, in addition to core courses, the following:

Credit
Hours
ACTG 241. Financial Accounting 3
ACTG 242. Managerial Accounting 3
CHEM 336L. Applied Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1
ECON 201. Principles of Economics (Micro) 3
ECON 202. Principles of Economics (Macro) 3
ENG 398. Technical Writing 3
FIN 345. Managerial Finance 3
MATH 205-206. Introductory Calculus I-II 6
MGT 300. Management Principles 3
MKTG 380. Principles of Marketing 3
PHYS 140-150. College Physics I-II 6
PHYS 140L-150L. General Physics Laboratory 2
Chemistry or approved science courses 5

Although business electives may be taken by students in this concentration, the total number of business credit hours may not exceed 27.

Applied Chemistry/Chemical Engineering Program

Students who supplement a B.S. degree program in chemistry with additional courses in mathematics, computer science and physics can enter a fast track program at a collaborating engineering school and receive the Master of Science in chemical engineering in 18 to 24 months.

The chemistry department has an adviser specifically to help students with this option. Interested students should check with the department head for referral.

Chemistry Minor

The requirements for a chemistry minor are 24 credit hours in chemistry distributed as follows:

CHEM 131-132. General Chemistry I-II
CHEM 131L-132L. General Chemistry Laboratories
Choose from the following:
CHEM 221-221L. Concepts of Organic Chemistry
with Laboratory
CHEM 341-342-346L. Organic Chemistry Lecture
with Laboratory
CHEM 331. Physical Chemistry I
Choose from the following:
CHEM 336L. Applied Physical Chemistry
Laboratory
CHEM 432. Physical Chemistry II with
CHEM 438L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM 351. Analytical Chemistry
An approved elective such as:
CHEM 270. Inorganic Chemistry I
CHEM 355. Geochemistry of Natural Waters
CHEM 361. Biochemistry I

In order to complete this program, prerequisite courses in mathematics and physics are required.

Biochemistry Minor

See page 191 for the description of the interdisciplinary biochemistry minor.

Initial Secondary Teaching License

In addition to the liberal studies and academic major requirements, chemistry majors desiring secondary teacher licensure must complete the following as a part of their program:

Credit
Hours
EDUC 360. Foundations of American Education 3
(junior year)
EDUC 370. Instructional Technology (junior year) 3
EDUC 410. Multicultural Education (senior year) 1
EDUC 416. School Discipline and Classroom 1
Management (senior year)
HTH 370. The School Health Program 2
(any appropriate time)
PSYC 270. Psychology for Teachers of the 3
Pre-adolescent and Adolescent Child 1
(sophomore year)
READ 414. Reading and Writing in the 1
Content Areas (senior year)
SEED 371I. Clinical Techniques, Natural Science 3
Methods (normally in first semester
of senior year)
SEED 381. Field Experience (Practicum) in 3
Secondary Education (normally in first semester
of senior year)
SEED 480. Student Teaching (senior year) 12
SPED 402. Teaching Mildly Disabled Students 1
in Regular Classes (senior year)

1 PSYC 160 is a prerequisite for PSYC 270.

Chemistry majors must also complete a course in biology and a course in geology.

It is necessary to be admitted to the teacher education program prior to enrolling in professional education courses. See pages 147-148 in this catalog for admission procedures to the teacher education program.

Students seeking licensure are encouraged to consult regularly with an education adviser.

Credit by Examination

The chemistry department offers credit by examination for CHEM 131 and 132, General Chemistry I-II. Students who want permission to take the examination must apply to the department head. Details regarding approval to take the examination and examination dates will be provided when the application is received.

Typical Program for a Major in Chemistry (B.S. Degree)

Credit
Freshman Year Hours
CHEM 131-132. General Chemistry I-II 6
CHEM 135L-136L. Special General Chemistry 3
Laboratory
CS 100. Introduction to BASIC 2
MATH 235-236. Analytic Geometry and 8
Calculus
Liberal studies courses 12
31
Credit
Sophomore Year Hours
CHEM 270. Inorganic Chemistry I 3
CHEM 341-342. Organic Chemistry Lecture 6
CHEM 387L-388L. Integrated Inorganic/ 4
Organic Laboratory
PHYS 240-250. University Physics I-II 6
PHYS 140L-150L. General Physics Laboratory 2
Liberal studies courses 9
30
Credit
Junior Year Hours
CHEM 331. Physical Chemistry I 3
CHEM 351. Analytical Chemistry 4
CHEM 352-352L. Instrumental Analysis 5
with Laboratory
CHEM 481. Literature and Seminar I 1
ENG 398. Technical Writing 3
Liberal studies courses 14
30
Credit
Senior Year Hours
CHEM 361. Biochemistry I 3
CHEM 432. Physical Chemistry II 3
CHEM 438L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 2
CHEM 482. Literature and Seminar II 1
Liberal studies courses 6
Chemistry electives 4
Electives 11
30

College of Science and Mathematics Directory

Undergraduate Catalog Contents


1996-97 Undergraduate Catalog
Last reviewed: 30 November 1996
Information Publisher: Division of Academic Affairs
James Madison University