Department of English

Dr. Peter J. Hager, Acting Head

Professors

Brice-Finch, Cash, R. Cohen, M. Facknitz, Foley, Frederick, J. Gabbin, Geary, Hawthorne, Hoskins, Jeffrey, Nickels, Nostrandt, Ruff

Associate Professors

J. Eby, S. Facknitz, Farrar, Federico, Gilliatt, Hager, B. Johnson, McNallie, Morley-Mower, R. Nelson, Wszalek

Assistant Professors

Favila, Ferreira, Gumnior, Kutchins, McDonald

Course Descriptions: English

The program offered by the Department of English is designed to prepare students to enter graduate study; to prepare them for the teaching profession; and to serve as basic preparation for many professions in which skillful use of language is important, for example, law, publishing, free-lance writing, creative writing, journalism, public relations, broadcasting, government, advertising and business. The program builds upon the skills introduced in the liberal studies program in several ways. Our writing courses enable students to receive advanced instruction in writing styles ranging from expository writing to creative and technical writing, and courses in literature and language promote general communication skills through frequent written assignments and oral reports. These courses also help students in mastering advanced skills in analytical and critical thinking. Information access skills are developed and enhanced through the research papers that are typically required in major courses and through the requirement noted below that all students take two courses specifically designated for research instruction. These separate skills are addressed not only in the classroom but also through independent studies, honors theses and internships. The program additionally offers to all students, wherever their professional and vocational interests lie, an appreciation of the great literary heritage of Western civilization, with particular emphasis upon British and American literatures; however, the program also promotes global awareness and the appreciation of cultural diversity through numerous opportunities for world or multicultural studies. The goal is that, through the humanistic study of a variety of literature, students will obtain a better understanding of themselves, their culture and other cultures with which they must invariably come into contact. A senior requirement ensures that each major will have a final capstone experience through courses designed to integrate the earlier training and focus it toward postgraduate needs and opportunities.

Major in English

Students majoring in English earn the B.A. degree, except in the case of the third track listed below.

The English department offers the following tracks for the English major:

Minor in English

The minimum requirement for a minor in English is 18 credit hours beyond ENG 101-102. At least nine hours must be taken in courses at the 300 level or above.

A minor in English will not meet requirements for the Secondary Teaching License.

English Concentrations

The department recommends that students choose a variety of courses covering contemporary and earlier literature, as well as period, genre and linguistics courses. Specifically, all students must include in their program the following:

Credit
Core Courses Hours
ENG 235. Survey of English Literature: 3
From Beowulf to the 18th Century
ENG 236. Survey of English Literature: 3
18th Century to the Modern Period
Choose one course from each of the following 12
categories listed below: 1
Genre:
ENG 302. Special Topics in Literature and Language (when content is appropriate)
ENG 307. Medieval Literature
ENG 310. Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century British Literature (when content is appropriate)
ENG 320. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature (when content is appropriate)
ENG 325. Romantic Poetry
ENG 327. The Gothic: Change and Continuity
ENG 330. The 19th-Century English Novel
ENG 335. Modern and Contemporary Poetry
ENG 336. Modern and Contemporary Drama
ENG 339. Modern and Contemporary British Novel
ENG 352. The American Novel to 1914
ENG 353. Modern and Contemporary American Fiction
ENG 360. Major Black Writers
ENG 412. Special Topic Seminar
(when content is appropriate)
Author(s):
ENG 302. Special Topics in Literature and Language (when content is appropriate)
ENG 373. Anglo-Irish Literature (when content is appropriate)
ENG 410. Major British or American Authors
ENG 451. Chaucer
ENG 455. Shakespeare
ENG 458. Shakespeare on the Page and Stage in London
ENG 461. Milton
Multicultural Studies:
ENG 238. Survey of World Literature: From the Ancient World Through the Renaissance
ENG 239. Survey of World Literature: From the Renaissance Through the Modern Age
ENG 260. Survey of African-American Literature
ENG 302. Special Topics in Literature and Language (when content is appropriate)
ENG 305. Mythology
ENG 360. Major Black Writers
ENG 365. Women's Literature
ENG 373. Anglo-Irish Literature
ENG 405. Studies in Comparative Literature
ENG 412. Special Topic Seminar (when content is appropriate)
ENG 421. Studies in Caribbean Literature
Period:
ENG 302. Special Topics in Literature and Language (when content is appropriate)
ENG 307. Medieval Literature
ENG 310. Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century British Literature
ENG 320. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature
ENG 325. Romantic Poetry
ENG 329. Victorian Literature
ENG 330. The 19th-Century English Novel
ENG 335. Modern and Contemporary Poetry
ENG 336. Modern and Contemporary Drama
ENG 339. Modern and Contemporary British Novel
ENG 345. Pre-Twentieth-Century American Literature
ENG 352. The American Novel to 1914
ENG 353. Modern and Contemporary American Fiction
ENG 355. Southern Literature
ENG 360. Major Black Writers
ENG 403. Studies in Old English
ENG 412. Special Topic Seminar (when content is appropriate)
English electives (nine credit hours must be 15
on or above the 300 level)
33

1 Although a course may be listed under multiple categories, it may be credited to only one category.

Literature

In consultation with their advisers, students should choose courses in addition to the core offerings that will lead to a coherent view of the scope and development of British and American literature.

Writing

In addition to taking the core courses, students with a strong interest in developing various writing skills should emphasize in their program appropriate electives from the following courses:

Creative Writing Courses

ENG/THEA 347. Playwriting
ENG 391. Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 481. Literary Form
ENG 491. Advanced Creative Writing

Technical Writing Courses

ENG 397. Special Topics in Technical Writing
ENG 398. Technical Writing
ENG 430. Advanced Technical Writing
ENG 485. Technical Editing
Choose one of the following:
ENG 401. Workshop: Cultural and Professional Studies in English and American Language and Literature
ENG 490. Special Studies in English (where content is appropriate)

Initial Secondary Teaching License

In addition to the liberal studies requirements, English majors desiring secondary teacher licensure must take the core courses listed above, and include among their electives the following:

ENG 396. Advanced Composition
ENG 420. English Grammar
Choose one of the following:
ENG 455. Shakespeare
ENG 458. Shakespeare on the Page and Stage in London (if not taken as part of the core courses)

English majors desiring secondary teacher licensure must also complete the following courses:

Credit
Hours
EDUC 360. Foundations of American Education 3
(junior year)
EDUC 370. Instructional Technology (junior year) 3
EDUC 410. Multicultural Education (senior year) 1
EDUC 416. School Discipline and Classroom 1
Management (senior year)
LSEM 254. Literature for Adolescents 3
HTH 370. The School Health Program 2
(any appropriate time)
PSYC 270. Psychology for Teachers of the 3
Pre-adolescent and Adolescent Child 1 (sophomore year)
READ 414. Reading and Writing in the 1
Content Areas (senior year)
SEED 371B. Clinical Techniques, English Methods 3
(normally in first semester of senior year)
SEED 381. Field Experience (Practicum) in 3
Secondary Education (normally in first semester of senior year)
SEED 480. Student Teaching (senior year) 12
SPED 402. Teaching the Mildly Handicapped 1
(senior year)

1 PSYC 160 is a prerequisite for PSYC 270.

It is necessary to be admitted to the teacher education program prior to enrolling in professional education courses. See pages 147-148 for admission procedures to the teacher education program.

Students desiring secondary teacher licensure must so specify when conferring with their English adviser. They are also encouraged to consult regularly with an education adviser.

Typical Program for a Major in English (B.A. Degree)

Credit
Freshman Year Hours
ENG 101-102. Reading and Composition 6
Foreign language courses 1 6-8
Liberal studies courses 17
29-31
Credit
Sophomore Year Hours
ENG 235. Survey of English Literature: 3
From Beowulf to the 18th Century
ENG 236. Survey of English Literature: 3
18th Century to the Modern Period
Foreign language courses 1 6
Liberal studies courses 2 15
Philosophy course 3 3
30
Credit
Junior YearHours
English electives 12-15
Other electives 12-18
27-30
Credit
Senior Year Hours
English electives 9
Other electives 22
31

1 Completion of an intermediate level foreign language is required for the B.A. degree (usually six hours if begun at the intermediate level) unless the language requirement is satisfied by an exemption test.

2 These should include ENG 247, Survey of American Literature: From the Beginning to the Civil War; and ENG 248, Survey of American Literature: From the Civil War to the Modern Period.

3 Any philosophy course satisfies the philosophy requirement for the B.A. degree.

After declaring a major in English, the student should consult with an English adviser to plan a course of study.

College of Arts and Letters Directory

Undergraduate Catalog Contents


1996-97 Undergraduate Catalog
Last reviewed: 30 November 1996
Information Publisher: Division of Academic Affairs
James Madison University