History


Department of History
*HIST 101. World History to 1650. 3 credits.
A survey of important historical developments from prehistoric times to the mid-17th century. Emphasis is given to the rise and decline of great global civilizations and to their lasting contributions to humanity.
*HIST 102. World History Since 1650. 3 credits.
A survey of important historical developments from the mid-17th century to the present. Emphasis is given to the growth of nationalism, the development of colonialism and to global events, problems and conflicts of the present century.
HIST 201. Europe to 1789. 3 credits.
An examination of Europe from 1000 to 1789 with emphasis on the formation of indigenous European institutions through the rise of national monarchies, the Renaissance, Reformation, age of exploration, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. Emphasis is given to the intellectual developments of Europe that created a dynamic modern civilization.
HIST 202. Europe 1789 to the Present. 3 credits.
An examination of Europe from 1789 to the present with emphasis upon the democratic and industrial revolutions, the rise of nation states, building of global empires, World War I, the Russian Revolution, totalitarianism, World War II, decolonization, the Cold War and European integration.
*HIST 233. United States to 1877. 3 credits.
A survey of U.S. history from colonization through Reconstruction, with emphasis on the multicultural composition of the American people, hemispheric and global influence, and the development of the American political-economic system and its international dimensions.
*HIST 234. United States Since 1877. 3 credits.
A survey of U.S. history from Reconstruction to the present, with emphasis on the multicultural composition of the American people, hemispheric and global influence, and the development of the American political-economic system and its international dimensions. Interpretation and analysis are stressed.
*HIST 263. Africa. 3 credits.
Emphasis is placed on the social and cultural aspects, as well as the emerging role the continent plays in contemporary world history.
*HIST 267. Latin America. 3 credits.
A survey of the history of Latin America examining the pre-Columbian Indian civilizations, the Spanish and Portuguese conquests, the colonial era and its impact, the wars of independence, and selected case studies of the early national period.
*HIST 268. Contemporary Latin America. 3 credits.
A survey of the historical development of Latin America during the 20th century with emphasis on selected nations which have played a significant role in Latin American affairs.
*HIST 270. Modern Middle East. 3 credits.
A survey of the political evolution of the modern Middle East. Emphasis is placed on the impact of Western imperialism, the problems of Arab nationalism, the origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the involvement of the Soviet Union and the United States in the Middle East today.
*HIST 273. Asia to 1600. 3 credits.
A broad survey of Eastern civilizations from their beginnings to about 1600, with emphasis on their distinctive aesthetic and intellectual traditions as well as the development of their political, social and economic institutions.
*HIST 274. Modern Asia. 3 credits.
A historical survey of East, South and Southeast Asia with emphasis on the impact of the West on the traditional societies and governments of the Eastern World, as well as nationalism, colonialism, wars, revolutions and industrialization in Asia in modern times.
HIST 300. U.S. Military History. 3 credits.
A survey of the evolution of the American way of war from the Colonial era to the post-Cold War period emphasizing the development of military and naval institutions, U.S. strategic doctrine, and the social legacies of the U.S. military establishment.
HIST 301. European Military History. 3 credits.
A survey of European military history (including Russia/Soviet Union) from the Hellenistic period through the 1982 Falklands-Malvinas War. The evolution of strategic doctrine and military institutions, their effect upon European society, and their role in Europe imperialism will be emphasized.
HIST 310. American Business History. 3 credits.
A survey of the role of business in the United States from the Colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the entrepreneurial spirit, business developments and innovations, and the relationship between the federal government and commerce.
HIST 320. Women in U.S. History. 3 credits.
A survey of the role of women in the United States from the Colonial period to the present. Attention is given to contributions of the ordinary women, the Women's Rights movements, the impact of women on reform and political movements, and the changing status of women in society.
HIST 321. European Women's History. 3 credits.
A survey of the gendered history of European women from the Classical to the Modern Era. Attention will focus on women in England, France, Germany and Central Europe, but material will also be presented on women of the Baltic, Mediterranean and Slavic regions.
HIST 323. The Old South. 3 credits.
Economic, cultural and social history of the antebellum South, 1790-1860. The region's political history will serve as a supporting part of the course.
HIST 324. History of Western Science. 3 credits.
An intellectual and social survey of Western science from the pre-Socratic philosophers of the Near East to contemporary U.S. "Big Science." Topics include Classical, Medieval and Renaissance natural philosophy; the Scientific Revolution; Enlightenment science, the 19th-century organizational and research revolutions; and science in America. No scientific knowledge assumed.
HIST 325. Technology and Western Society. 3 credits.
A survey of the interaction between technology and Western society since the Middle Ages. Topics include Medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, 19th-century British and continental technologies, inter-cultural technology transfer, the American mass production ethos, technology within modern totalitarian and national security states, and technological futurism. No technical knowledge assumed.
HIST 330. U.S. Diplomatic History. 3 credits.
A survey of major themes, events and forces shaping the development of American foreign relations throughout our history. Key documents such as the Monroe Doctrine will be examined, as will significant issues including manifest destiny, the United States as a world power, origins of Cold War and detente.
HIST 339. Selected Themes in U.S. History. 3 credits.
Selected themes are studied in depth. See Schedule of Classes for current classes. Course may be repeated when content changes.
HIST 340. Internship in History. 3 credits.
Provides students with practical experience in using historical skills in a public or private agency. Periodic student reports and seminars required. This course may be repeated with permission of department head. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, HIST 395 (History Seminar) and permission of the department head.
HIST 341. Selected Themes in World History. 3 credits.
Selected themes are studied in depth. See Schedule of Classes for current classes. Course may be repeated when content changes.
HIST 350. Virginia. 3 credits.
An interpretive survey of the history of Virginia from its Colonial beginnings to the present time.
HIST 353. Trans-Mississippi West. 3 credits.
A study of the United States west of the Mississippi from the early Spanish exploration and settlement through the progressive waves of explorers, trappers, miners, soldiers and farmers as they encountered the western environment, the Indians and one another.
HIST 355. Afro-American History to 1865. 3 credits.
A survey of the experience and changing status of African-Americans in the United States from 1619 through the Civil War, with attention to the West African background, cultural developments, social and political movements, slavery and the slave trade, dual-consciousness and emancipation.
HIST 356. Afro-American History Since 1865. 3 credits.
A survey of the experience and changing status of African-Americans in the United States from Reconstruction to the present, emphasizing the strengthening of social and cultural institutions; Afro-American leadership; the impact of segregation; the Great Migration; labor, protest, and cultural movements; pan-Africanism; the Civil Rights Movement; and contemporary issues.
HIST 371. India. 3 credits.
A survey of India from the earliest times to the attainment of national independence following World War II. Particular attention is given to traditional Indian civilization, its impact on India's Asian neighbors, its response to the intrusion of Western power, the British in India and the struggle for independence.
HIST 383. Early England. 3 credits.
A survey of English history from the earliest times to the late 17th century. Particular attention is given to the rise of Parliament and the growth of limited monarchy.
HIST 384. England and the Empire-Commonwealth. 3 credits.
A survey of English history from the late 17th century to the present. Particular attention is given to the growth of British democracy, the industrial revolution, and the rise and fall of the British Empire.
HIST 385. Russia to 1855. 3 credits.
A survey of Russian history from the origins of the Russian state down through the reign of Nicholas I. Attention is given to such topics as the Kievan state, the Muscovite state, the rise of Imperial Russia and the emergence of Russia as a Western European power.
HIST 386. Russia Since 1855. 3 credits.
A survey of Russian history from the reign of Alexander II to the present. Attention is given to such topics as the decline of Imperial Russia, the rise of the revolutionary movement, and the emergence and consolidation of the Soviet state.
HIST 387. Germany to 1871. 3 credits.
A survey of the German-speaking lands of Central Europe from the end of the Thirty Years War to the creation of the Second Reich. Emphasis is given to political, diplomatic and military affairs, although social, economic and cultural developments are included.
HIST 388. Germany Since 1871. 3 credits.
A survey of German history during the Second Reich, World War I, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and the post-World War II periods of Cold War and Detente. Emphasis is given to political, diplomatic and military affairs, although social, economic and cultural developments are included.
HIST 389. France to 1789. 3 credits.
A survey of French history from the Capetians to the end of the old Regime, 987-1789. Particular attention is given to France's medieval heritage; the impact of the Renaissance; the Protestant revolt; the policies of Richelieu, Colbert and Louis XIV; and the background of the French Revolution.
HIST 390. France Since 1789. 3 credits.
A study of the social and political events which determined the course of French history from the Revolution through the Fifth Republic. Particular attention is given to the social, economic and cultural currents which have contributed to the making of contemporary France.
HIST 391. Travel Studies Seminar. 3 credits.
Designed to encourage the student to augment the regular academic program through independent investigation including organized travel-study. Prearrangements must be made with a designated faculty member who will direct the study with preparatory instructions and final requirements. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head.
HIST 395. History Seminar. 3 credits.
A seminar to introduce history as an academic discipline and acquaint the student with the work of major historians and problems of historical interpretation. Students will be required to complete assignments designed to develop basic skills in historical research and writing. Open to all students, but required of history majors.
HIST 399. Special Studies in History. 3 credits.
Designed to give capable students in history an opportunity to complete independent study under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head. (Formerly HIST 490.)
HIST 402. Workshop in Colonial American Life. 3 credits.
A comparative study of life in 18th-century Virginia and Massachusetts. Colonial Massachusetts is studied through the use of printed materials, films and lectures. Published sources, lectures and a four-day study visit to Colonial Williamsburg are used for the study of Virginia. Supplemental fee required.
HIST 411. Colonial America. 3 credits.
An interpretive survey of England's mainland colonies from 1558-1776. Prerequisite: HIST 233 or equivalent.
HIST 420. U.S. History, 1763-1800. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of the political, economic, social and cultural history of the United States from the French and Indian War through the Federalist period. Prerequisite: HIST 233 or equivalent.
HIST 422. U.S. History, 1789-1848. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of the political, economic, social, intellectual and cultural history of the United States from the ratification of the Constitution through the Mexican-American War.
HIST 425. Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 credits.
A study of the background, development, personalities and aftermath of the Civil War. Special attention is given to the coming of the war and different explanations of its causes, and to the policies and significance of Reconstruction, with varying interpretations thereof. Prerequisite: HIST 233 or equivalent.
HIST 430. The Gilded Age: U.S. History, 1877-1901. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of the United States from the conclusion of the Civil War until the assassination of William McKinley, with special emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, western and overseas expansion, early reform movements and politics. Prerequisite: HIST 234 or equivalent.
HIST 431. Reform, World War and Prosperity: U.S. History, 1901-1929. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of U.S. history from the rise of Theodore Roosevelt through the 1920s. Emphasis is placed on the reform movements of the period and the problems and issues generated by the nation's emergence as a world power and an industrial, urban society. Prerequisite: HIST 234 or equivalent.
HIST 432. Depression, War and Cold War: U.S. History, 1929-1961. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of U.S. history from the onset of the Great Depression in 1929 through the inauguration of John Kennedy in 1961. Emphasis is given to the New Deal, World War II and the early years of the Cold War. Prerequisite: HIST 234 or equivalent.
HIST 433. Reform, Upheaval and Reaction: U.S. History Since 1961. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of U.S. history from the inauguration of John Kennedy in 1961 through the present. Emphasis is given to the Kennedy-Johnson administrations, Vietnam, the counter-culture and student movement, Watergate and the Reagan years. Prerequisite: HIST 234 or equivalent.
HIST 439. Selected Topics in American History. 3 credits.
Selected topics are studied in depth. See Schedule of Classes for current topic. Course may be repeated for credit when content changes.
HIST 445. Latin America and the United States. 3 credits.
An examination of the diplomatic relations between Latin America and the United States from the era of the Latin American revolutions for independence to the present. Emphasis is placed on the Monroe Doctrine and its extensions, as well as the development of the Pan-American system.
HIST 446. Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. 3 credits.
A study of the nations of the area with special attention given to Mexico, Panama and Cuba. Prerequisite: HIST 234 or equivalent.
HIST 447. South America. 3 credits.
Historic development of the continent with special attention to selected nations since the early national period of the 19th century. Prerequisite: HIST 234 or equivalent.
HIST 450. Studies in Military History. 3 credits.
A seminar addressing topics in U.S. or European military and naval history such as military operations, strategic theory, institutional evolution, the nature of modern war, technology and the warrior ethos, military-industrial-academic relations, and military ethics and the laws of war. Prerequisite: HIST 300 or HIST 301 depending on the seminar topic offered; HIST 395 (instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite for nonhistory majors.)
HIST 451. Studies in Science, Technology and Medicine. 3 credits.
A seminar addressing topics in the history of science, history of technology and history of medicine. Prerequisite: HIST 395 (instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 prerequisite if you are not a history major).
HIST 455. Political and Social Thought, Ancient to Early Modern Times. 3 credits.
A study of the most significant political and social ideas from ancient Greece through the 18th Century. Emphasis is given to such classics as the works of Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, Machiavelli and Montesquieu.
HIST 460. Modern Japan. 3 credits.
The development of Japan from around the mid-19th century to the present. Attention is given to the collapse of isolation, the end of the Shogunate, the creation of a modern state, the years of party government, the rise of militarism, the Pacific war, the occupation and the new Japan.
HIST 461. Europe in the Era of World War II. 3 credits.
An examination of the origin, conduct and immediate aftermath of World War II in Europe. Attention is given to Germany's early wartime successes, Hitler's "New Order" in Europe, and the emergence and ultimate victory of the Allied "Ground Alliance." The major military campaigns are discussed as are collaboration, resistance and liberation.
HIST 462. The Rise and Fall of Nazi-Germany, 1918-1945. 3 credits.
An advanced study of the period of Nazi domination in Germany covering the Weimar Republic, the rise of the NSDAP, the Third Reich and World War II. The nature of totalitarianism, the character of Adolph Hitler and the general Weltanschaaung of Germany under the Third Reich are emphasized. Prerequisite: Liberal studies history or equivalent.
HIST 463. Tudor-Stuart England. 3 credits.
A study of the economic, intellectual, political and religious development of the English people from 1485 to 1714, with special attention to the constitutional struggles of the 17th century. Prerequisite: Liberal studies history or equivalent.
HIST 464. Renaissance and Reformation. 3 credits.
A study of High Medieval civilization as an introduction to the history of Modern Europe. Attention is given to the Italian and Northern Renaissance, the fragmentation of Western christendom, the intellectual impact of Luther and Calvin on Western thought and the structure of Tudor despotism in England.
HIST 465. Twentieth-Century Britain. 3 credits.
An examination of the major themes of British history in the 20th century, with attention to political, social, economic, diplomatic and imperial topics from the pre-World War I decade through the post-World War II decades. Prerequisite: Liberal studies history or equivalent.
HIST 466. The Family, 1400-1800. 3 credits.
An examination of the bibliography, methods and substance of family history in Europe and America. Emphasis will be on sources, structure, patterns of change and continuity, and stages of family life to the Industrial Revolution.
HIST 468. The History of Flight: The Piston Era. 3 credits.
A survey of the history of powered flight from the earliest times to the era of World War II. Attention is given to major developments in the history of pre-jet aviation and the impact man's growing mastery of flight has had on 20th century history.
HIST 469. The History of Flight: The Jet and Rocket Era. 3 credits.
A survey of the history of aviation in the era of jet and manned space flight. This course examines the origins and development of jet flight, considers its impact on military and commercial aviation, and traces the course of manned space flight from its beginning to the present.
HIST 470. Modern Africa. 3 credits.
Africa in the 20th century, with special emphasis on Senegal, Ivory Coast, Gold Coast (Ghana), Nigeria and Zaire.
HIST 472. Greece and Rome. 3 credits.
Advanced study of Greek and Roman history from the Minoans to the fall of the Roman Empire. Emphasis is given to political, military, social and cultural development of each civilization.
HIST 473. The Islamic World. 3 credits.
The rise of Islam and spread of the Ottoman Empire. A survey of the Middle East from the pre-Islamic period to World War I. This course provides a background for understanding the present situation in the Middle East.
HIST 474. The Byzantine Empire. 3 credits.
A survey of the political, economic, military and religious history of the Byzantine Empire, 330-1453.
HIST 475. Soviet Russia. 3 credits.
A study of Soviet Russia from the 1917 Revolution to the present. Readings and discussion will emphasize significant political, economic, social and cultural developments. Prerequisite: Liberal studies history or equivalent.
HIST 476. Ancient History. 3 credits.
A survey of the rise and fall of ancient civilizations of the Near East and Mediterranean area.
HIST 477. Medieval Europe. 3 credits.
Attention is focused on Europe in the Middle Ages, with a concentration on social and intellectual aspects and on the development of parliamentary institutions.
HIST 478. Eastern Europe. 3 credits.
A study of the lands between Germany and Russia, from the Baltic to the Balkans. Emphasis is on the Hapsburg Empire and its successor states, the origins of the World Wars, the post-World War II communist governments, and the cultural and intellectual contributions of the Eastern European people. Prerequisite: Liberal studies history or equivalent.
HIST 480. Modern China. 3 credits.
China since 1840, with special emphasis on China's response to the West, the disintegration of imperial China, the abortive experiments in republicanism, the origin and nature of Chinese Communism. China under Mao and post-Mao developments. Prerequisite: Liberal studies history or equivalent.
HIST 481. Early Modern Europe: The New Worlds of Exploration and Science. 3 credits.
A study of the major changes in world view brought on by exploration and science in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries in Europe. Attention is given to the causes, individuals and technology involved in each movement.
HIST 483. Baroque and Revolutionary Europe, 1648-1815. 3 credits.
A study of the unfolding of European civilization from the Baroque through the Napoleonic era. Attention is given to the Old Regime and its institutions, the causes of popular revolts, the Enlightenment, the beginnings of industrialism and urbanism, and the impact of the French Revolution on Europe.
HIST 484. Nineteenth-Century European Civilization, 1815-1914. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of the First World War. Particular attention is given to the intellectual climate of the period, with emphasis on liberalism, nationalism, socialism and nihilism.
HIST 485. The Arab Middle East, 1945 to Present. 3 credits.
A survey of the special problems which have beset the Arab Middle East since World War II. Special emphasis will be given to Palestinian Nationalism and the PLO, the origins of civil conflict in Lebanon, Iraqi and Syrian Baathism, and the revival of Islamic fundamentalism in the area.
HIST 486. Europe Since 1914. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of European history from the First World War to the Cold War, with special emphasis on the revolutions of 1917-19, the rise of totalitarianism, the origins of the Second World War and the continuing crisis of values.
HIST 489. Selected Topics in World History. 3 credits.
Selected topics are studied in depth. See Schedule of Classes for current topic. Course may be repeated for credit when content changes.
HIST 491. Editing Historical Documents. 3 credits.
A seminar in the techniques of analyzing manuscript collections in order to create an edition of historical documents. Study will address the theory and practice of historical documentary editions, including collecting, selecting, transcribing, annotating, proofing, illustrating, indexing and publishing.
HIST 493. Historic Preservation. 3 credits.
An introduction to the philosophy and techniques of historic preservation, guidelines for restoration, state and National Register forms and procedures, historic architecture, structural analysis, restoration techniques as well as the business aspects of historic preservation projects. Field trips are a major component of the course.
HIST 494. Introduction to Museum Work. 3 credits. (Cross-listed as ARTH 494.)
The practice and philosophy of museum work, including the areas of design, conservation, registration, education and administration. Subject is taught from the perspective of the museum profession and is applicable to diverse disciplines and types of collections.
HIST 499. Honors. 6 credits. Year course.

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Undergraduate Catalog Contents


1996-97 Undergraduate Catalog
Last reviewed: 30 November 1996
Information Publisher: Division of Academic Affairs
James Madison University