Biology


Department of Biology
*BIO 101. Contemporary Biology. 3 credits.
A study of the scope and limitations of biological science. Scientific information is integrated with important social issues. (Not available for major or minor credit in biology.)
BIO 120. General Zoology (3, 3). 4 credits.
Emphasis is on the study of the evolutionary development, classification, morphology and ecology of representatives of the major animal phyla.
BIO 130. General Botany (3, 3). 4 credits.
A study of the structure, function and importance of plants including a survey of the major divisions of the plant kingdom.
BIO 210. Human Heredity. 3 credits.
A study of the biological basis of human inheritance and genetic diversity, including chromosome behavior and modes of inheritance, interplay of genes and environment, and abnormalities related to genes and chromosomes. (Open as an elective to all students. Not available for major credit.)
BIO 220. Cell Biology. 3 credits.
A comparative and theoretical coverage of basic aspects of cell structure and function common to most biological systems, including integration of cell theory, metabolism and gene action. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 220 and CHEM 222. Prerequisite: CHEM 132 or permission of the instructor.
BIO 230. Genetics (3,3). 4 credits.
A study of the major principles of biological inheritance through lectures, readings, experimentation and discussions. Prerequisite: BIO 120 and 130.
BIO 270. Human Physiology (2, 2). 3 credits.
Study of the function of major organ systems of the human body. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 270 and 370. Prerequisite: A course in freshman biology or chemistry.
BIO 280. Allied Health Microbiology (2, 4). 4 credits.
An introduction to the biology and significance of microorganisms. Emphasis will be placed on human- and health-related aspects of microbiology. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 280 and BIO 380. Not available for major or minor credit. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or permission of the instructor.
BIO 290. Human Anatomy (2, 4). 4 credits.
A study of the basic body plan is reinforced by studies of dissected human cadavers and computer simulations. Emphasis is on the major body structures and systems.
BIO 300. Medical Terminology. 3 credits 4
Study of terms that relate to body systems, anatomical structures, medical processes and procedures, and a variety of diseases/disorders that afflict human organisms. By permission of instructor only.
BIO 305. Ornithology (1, 4). 3 credits. 1 3
Introduction to avian biology with exercises in field identification.
BIO 310. General Entomology (2, 4). 4 credits.1 3
A laboratory and field study of insects. Morphology, physiology and behavioral aspects will be emphasized. Collection, identification and preservation of local insects by standard procedures will be part of the course.
BIO 315. Introduction to Plant Pathology. 3 credits. 1 4
A study of plant diseases, their prevention, identification, control and treatment. Common diseases of both wild and cultivated plants are studied. Practical information is provided for those who attempt to grow plants and are confronted with plant disease problems. Prerequisite: BIO 130 or consent of instructor.
BIO 316. Vertebrate Embryology (2, 4). 4 credits. 1
An introduction to the comparative developmental anatomy of the vertebrates, including the human. Prerequisite: BIO 120 and junior standing.
BIO 320. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates (2, 4). 4 credits. 1
An integrated course comparing the gross anatomy and embryonic development of vertebrate organ systems.
BIO 325. Topics in Biology. 1-4 credits.
Studies in special areas of biology. May be repeated for credit when course content changes. (Topics that satisfy a capstone requirement will be noted in the Schedule of Classes.)
BIO 340. Morphology and Anatomy of Vascular Plants (2, 4). 4 credits. 1
A detailed study of the comparative morphology and anatomy of tracheophytes. Prerequisite: BIO 130.
BIO/GEOL 350. Invertebrate Paleontology (3, 2). 4 credits.
The history of nonvertebrate life from its origin, through evolving biogeochemical cycles, origin of eukaryotes and multicellularity, evolutionary records of all major groups and theoretical issues such as major group origins, adaptive radiation patterns, extinctions, functional adaptations and paleoecology. Prerequisite: GEOL 230, a general zoology course or permission of the instructor. (Formerly GEOL 250.)
BIO 351. Introduction to Ecology. 3 credits.
An introduction to habitat, populations, communities and ecosystems with emphasis on the principles of ecology as they are applied and their relationships to other areas of science. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 351 and 352. Prerequisite: Two courses in biology. Students wishing to pursue upper division ecology courses should take BIO 351 in their sophomore year.
BIO 352. Honors Introduction to Ecology (3, 1). 4 credits.
An introduction to ecological principles including independent study and/or a problem-solving seminar which distinguishes this course from BIO 351. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 351 and 352. Prerequisite: Meet university honors guidelines; two courses in biology; two semesters of college chemistry or physics. CS 100 or 101, or microcomputer background recommended. Students wishing to pursue upper division ecology courses should take BIO 352 in their sophomore year.
BIO/CHEM 361. Biochemistry I. 3 credits.
An introduction to the molecules and chemical reactions of living systems. Structure and function of important classes of biomolecules are explored and the relationship of structure to function is stressed. Basic metabolic sequences are discussed. Prerequisite: CHEM 342 and permission of instructor.
BIO 370. Vertebrate Physiology (3, 3). 4 credits. 2 3
Function of organs and organ systems in vertebrates. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 270 and 370. Prerequisite: BIO 120 and 220, and CHEM 132; MATH 220 recommended.
BIO 380. General Microbiology (2, 4). 4 credits. 1 4
A study of the structure and function of microorganisms and their relationship to humans and to the environment. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 280 and BIO 380. Prerequisite: BIO 220 or permission of the instructor.
BIO 385. Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (2, 3). 3 credits. 1
A study of identification, nomenclature and classification of vascular plants with emphasis on field investigation. Techniques for identification, collection and preservation will be stressed. Major ecological associations in the mid-Appalachian region will be studied. Prerequisite: BIO 130 and 220, or consent of instructor.
BIO 404. Evolution. 3 credits. 3
An examination of the place of theoretical thought in biology. The concepts of phylogenetic relationships and the mechanisms of organic change as expressed through the principles of organic evolution will be stressed. Prerequisite: BIO 230 and 351.
BIO/GEOL 405. Vertebrate Paleontology (3, 1). 3 credits.
A study of the origin and evolution of the vertebrates. Emphasis will be on understanding how the processes of Earth evolution and biological evolution have interacted through time to produce a coherent picture of vertebrate history. Prerequisite: GEOL 230, a general zoology course or permission of instructor. (Formerly GEOL 435.)
BIO 410. Advanced Human Anatomy (1, 6). 3 credits. 1
An advanced study of topics in human anatomy using dissection techniques. Prerequisite: BIO 290 and/or BIO 320, and permission of instructor.
BIO 415. Immature Insects (2, 4). 4 credits. 1
Immature forms of insects representing the major orders will be studied for recognition purposes. Life cycles, habitats and their economic importance will be included. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 415 and 515.
BIO 420. Medical Parasitology (2, 3). 3 credits. 1 4
A study of the principal parasites of humans.
BIO 425. Medical Entomology (2, 4). 4 credits. 4
A study of arthropods that parasitize humans or serve as vectors of human and animal pathogens. Morphological features, distribution, life histories and control methods will be emphasized. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 425 and 525. Prerequisite: BIO 310.
BIO 430. Human Genetics. 3 credits. 4
Current topics in human genetics with emphasis on species and population variation, medical genetics and genetic applications that affect humans. Prerequisite: BIO 230.
BIO 435. Insect Ecology (2, 4). 4 credits.
A study of the environmental relationships of insects, including development, population growth and regulators, and distributional studies with an emphasis on field problems. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 435 and 535. Prerequisite: BIO 310 and 351, or equivalent.
BIO 442. Basic Immunology. 3 credits. 3
A study of the basic concepts of immune responses, the properties of antigens and immunoglobulins, immunologic specificity, and the development and regulation of cellular and humoral immunity. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 442 and 542. Prerequisite: A course in microbiology or cell biology, or the equivalent.
BIO 444. Basic Virology. 3 credits.
A study of the fundamental aspects of both basic and medical virology. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 444 and 544. Prerequisite: A course in microbiology or consent of the instructor.
BIO 451. Ecological Systems (3, 3). 4 credits. 3
Ecosystems are examined as basic ecological units which are comprised of communities interacting with their environments and are themselves components of landscape. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 451 and 551. Prerequisite: BIO 351 or 352.
BIO 452. Population Biology (2, 4). 4 credits. 3
Theoretical and applied aspects of distribution and abundance, population regulation, interactions between populations, and conservation will be studied in selected organisms, including humans. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 452 and 552. Prerequisite: BIO 351 or 352.
BIO 453. Microbial Ecology (2, 4). 4 credits. 3 4
The ecology of microorganisms will be covered, emphasizing the study of microbial growth and activity in natural environments. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 453 and 553. Prerequisite: BIO 351 or 352, and BIO 380.
BIO 454. Introduction to Biometrics (3, 2). 4 credits.3 4
The design of biological experiments and applications of statistical techniques in ecology, cell biology, physiology, behavior, systematics, genetics and evolution. Experiments and data from the biological literature will be emphasized. Statistical software packages will be used. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 454 and 554. Prerequisite: MATH 220 or equivalent.
BIO 455. Physiology of Vascular Plants (3, 3). 4 credits. 2 3
Function and structure of higher plants including water relations, mineral nutrition, transport phenomena, metabolism, growth and development, and selected topics in physiological ecology. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 455 and 555. Prerequisite: BIO 130 and 220, and CHEM 341-342. CHEM 342 may be taken concurrently.
BIO 458. Comparative Animal Physiology (2, 4). 4 credits. 2 3
An investigation of animal physiological adaptations to biotic and abiotic environmental factors. Laboratory study emphasizes experimental methods utilized to examine adaptive mechanisms. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 458 and 558. Prerequisite: BIO 270 or 370.
BIO 459. Limnology (2, 4). 4 credits. 3
Functional relationships and productivity of freshwater communities are examined as they are affected by their physical, chemical and biotic environment. Organisms inhabiting lakes, ponds, rivers, streams and estuaries are studied at the population, community and ecosystem levels. Credit may not be earned for both BIO 459 and 559. Prerequisite: BIO 351 or 352, and CHEM 131-132.
BIO 460. Plant Cell and Tissue Culture (2, 4). 4 credits. 2 3 4
Theory and practice of growing isolated plant cells, tissues and organs. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 460 and 560. Prerequisite: BIO 130, CHEM 131-132.
BIO 465. Plant Somatic Cell Genetics. 3 credits.
Examination of genetic changes at the cellular level and implications for plant trait modification. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 465 and 565. Prerequisite: BIO 220 and 230.
BIO 470. Morphology of Nonvascular Plants. (2, 4). 4 credits.1
Comparative morphology, ecology and taxonomy of representative algae, fungi and bryophytes. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 470 and 570. Prerequisite: BIO 130.
BIO 480. Molecular Biology (2, 4). 4 credits.2 3
Cellular constituents and genetics are emphasized at the molecular level. Credit may not be earned in both BIO 480 and 580. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 342.
BIO 490. Biomechanics (3, 3). 4 credits. 1 3
A study of the interactions of organisms with their physical environment. Concepts from fluid and solid mechanics are applied to biological form and function. Prerequisite: BIO 220 or permission of the instructor.
BIO 494. Internship in Biology (0, 2-12). 1-6 credits.
Students participate in research or applied biology outside of this university. A proposal must be approved prior to registration, and a final paper will be completed. Prerequisite: Biology major with a minimum of eight biology credit hours and a biology GPA of 2.5 or greater.
BIO 495. Biotechniques (0, 2). 1 credit.
Emphasis is placed on theory, methodology and the development of manipulative abilities. Students must notify the biology office of their interest the semester before registration. (May be repeated for credit when course content changes.)
BIO 496. Research Literature (0, 2). 1 credit.
A systematic review and study of the research literature in a selected field of biology. Proposal for study must be approved by sponsor and department head the semester before registration. (May be repeated for credit when course content changes.)
BIO 497A, B, C. Biological Research (0, 4-6). 2-3 credits, repeatable to 6 credits. 3
Research in a selected area of biology as arranged with sponsor. Research outline must be approved by sponsor and department head the semester before registration.
BIO 499. Honors in Biology (0, 6). 6 credits. 3
Three semester course.
1 Meets the organismal course requirement in biology.
2 Meets the molecular biology or physiology course requirement in biology.
3 Meets the research experience requirement in biology.
4 Meets the applied experience requirement in biology.

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Undergraduate Catalog Contents


1996-97 Undergraduate Catalog
Last reviewed: 30 November 1996
Information Publisher: Division of Academic Affairs
James Madison University