[Catalog Icon]

Undergraduate Programs


The vice president for academic affairs serves as the executive officer in all matters of academic status. All proposed exceptional programs of study and exceptions to degree requirements must be presented to the vice president for academic affairs through the faculty adviser, the school director or department head, and college dean for consideration and approval. The vice president also decides all questions of evaluation of credits which involve university policies.

Effective the 1994-95 academic year, the minimum number of credit hours required for graduation will be 120. Degrees listed below, requiring more than 120 credit hours, are in transition. Please check with your academic adviser on specific programs.

Degrees

James Madison University offers programs leading to eight baccalaureate degrees:

						Credit
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)				Hours
Foreign language courses			6-14
  (intermediate level required)
Liberal studies courses [1]			44
Philosophy course [2]				3
  (in addition to liberal studies courses)
Major concentration courses and electives [3]	67-75
						___
						128

						Credit
Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.)	Hours
Core program - business courses			42
Liberal studies courses [1]			44
Major concentration courses			24
Electives					18
						___
						128

						Credit
Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)			Hours
Core program - art courses			24
Liberal studies courses [1]			41
Area of emphasis courses			39
Art and art related electives			22
Electives					 2
						___
						128

						Credit
Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.)		Hours
General education courses			35
Major concentration courses			30
Elective program				63
						___
						128

						Credit
Bachelor of Music (B.M.)			Hours
Core music program courses			26
Liberal studies courses [1]			41
Major concentration courses and electives	67-71
						___
						134-138

						Credit
Bachelor of Science (B.S.)			Hours
Liberal studies courses [1]			44
Mathematics course				 3
  (in addition to liberal studies courses) [4]
Social science or natural science course(s) [5]	3-4
Major concentration courses and electives [3]	77-78
						___
						128
				
						Credit 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)		Hours
Liberal Studies courses [1]			44
Nursing courses					62
Other supportive courses			20
Elective					 2
						___
						128

						Credit
Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)		Hours
Core program - social work courses		39
Liberal studies courses [1]			44
Electives					45
						___
						128
________
Notes:
[1]
The liberal studies program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
[2]
100-, 200-, 300- or 400-level course acceptable.
[3]
Would include education course leading to licensure in teacher education.
[4]
Students are strongly encouraged to complete one of the following sequences: MATH 107-108, MATH 135-235, MATH 155-220, MATH 156-220, MATH 205-206 or MATH 235-236.
[5]
Social science to be chosen from approved liberal studies courses in economics, geography, political science, sociology or anthropology.

Undergraduate Programs

  • Accounting (B.B.A.)
      Accounting Information Systems
  • African/African-American Studies [1]
  • American Studies [1]
  • Anthropology (B.A., B.S.) [2]
      Archeology/Pre-History
      Cultural
      Physical
  • Art (B.F.A.) [2 3]
      General Fine Arts
      Graphic Design
      Interior Design [1]
  • Art (B.S.) [2] [3]
  • Art History (B.A.) [2] [3]
  • Asian Studies [1]
  • Biochemistry [1]
  • Biology (B.A., B.S.) [2]
      Animal Sciences
      Biotechnology
      Ecology
      Entomology
      Microbiology
      Molecular/Physiology
      Plant Sciences
  • Chemistry (B.A., B.S.) [2]
      ACS Accredited Programs
      Chemistry/Business
      General Chemistry
  • Communication
      (See Mass Communication or 
        Speech Communication)
  • Communication Sciences and Disorders (B.A., B.S.) [2]
  • Computer Information Systems (B.B.A.)
      Decision Support Systems
      Programming and Analysis
  • Computer Science (B.S.) [2]
  • Criminal Justice [1]
  • Dance (B.A., B.S.) [2]
  • Dietetics (B.S.)
  • Early Childhood Education [1] [3]
  • Economics (B.A., B.B.A., B.S.) [2]
  • Educational Media [1]
  • English (B.A.) [2]
  • Environmental Studies [1]
  • Family Issues [1]
  • Finance (B.B.A.)
      Financial Engineering
      Real Estate
  • General Business [1]
  • General Studies (B.G.S.)
  • Geography (B.A., B.S.) [2]
  • Geology (B.A., B.S.) [2]
      Earth Resources
      Earth Science Education [3]
      Environmental and Engineering Geology
      General Geology
  • Gerontology [1]
  • Health Sciences (B.S.)
      Athletic Training
      Basic Health 
      Health Assessment and Promotion
      Health Services Administration
      Nutrition [1]
      Public Health [1]
      Public Health Education
      School Health Education [3]
      Substance Abuse Intervention [1]
  • History (B.A.) [2]
  • Hotel-Restaurant Management (B.B.A.)
  • Human Services [1]
  • Integrated Science and Technology (B.S.)
  • Interdisciplinary Social Science (B.A., B.S.)
  • International Affairs (B.A.)
  • International Business (B.B.A.)
  • Kinesiology (B.S.) [2]
      Athletic Training
      Coaching [1]
      Exercise Science and Leadership
      Physical Education [3]
      Sport Management and Leisure Studies
  • Latin [1]
  • Latin American Studies [1]
  • Management (B.B.A.)
      General Management
      Human Resource Management
      Small and Family Business
  • Marketing (B.B.A.)
      Fashion Merchandising
      Industrial Marketing
      Retail Marketing
      Traditional Marketing
  • Marketing Education (B.S.) [3]
      Human Resource Development [1]
      Secondary Vocational Education [1] [3]
  • Mass Communication (B.A., B.S.) [2]
      Corporate Media
      Electronic Media Production
      Journalism
      Telecommunication
      Visual Communication
  • Mathematics (B.A., B.S.) [2] [3]
      Computational and Applied Mathematics
      Pure Mathematics
      Statistics [1]
  • Medical Technology (B.S.)
  • Middle Education [1] [3]
  • Military Science
      Army ROTC [1]
  • Modern Foreign Languages (B.A.)
      French [1]
      German [1]
      Russian [1]
      Spanish [1]
  • Music (B.M.) [2]
      Composition
      Music Industry Emphasis
      Music Education [3]
      	Instrumental
      	Vocal
      Performance
      	Instrumental
      	Vocal
      	Music Theater
      	Organ
      	Piano
  • Nursing (B.S.N.)
  • Office Systems Management (B.S.) [2]
      Business Education [1] [3]
  • Philosophy and Religion (B.A.)
      Philosophy [1]
      Religion [1]
  • Physics (B.A., B.S.) [2]
      Applied Physics
      Professional Physics
  • Political Science (B.A.) [2]
  • Pre-Dentistry
  • Pre-Law
  • Pre-Medicine
  • Pre-Pharmacy
  • Pre-Physical Therapy (2 years)
  • Pre-Theology
  • Pre-Veterinary
  • Production/Operations Management (B.B.A.)
  • Psychology (B.A., B.S.) [2]
  • Public Administration (B.S.) [2]
  • Russian Studies [1]
  • Secondary Education [1] [3]
      Economics
      English
      Foreign Language
      	French
      	German
      	Latin
      	Russian
      	Spanish
      Geography
      Government
      History
      Journalism
      Mathematics
      Natural Science
      	Biology
      	Chemistry
      	Earth Science
      	General Science
      	Physical Science
      	Physics
      Social Studies
      Sociology
      Speech
      Theater
  • Social Work (B.S.W.)
  • Sociology (B.A., B.S.) [2]
      Applied Sociology
      Deviance and Criminology
      Family and Lifestyles
      Occupations and Bureaucracy
      Social Psychology
  • Special Education [1] [3]
  • Speech Communication (B.A., B.S.) [2]
      Alternative Dispute Resolution
      Interpersonal Communication
      Organizational Communication
      Public Relations
  • Statistics [1]
  • Theater (B.A.) [2]
      Music Theater
  • Trade and Industrial Education (B.S.) [2] [3]
      Human Resource Development [1]
      Secondary Vocational Education [1] [3]
  • Urban and Regional Studies [1]
  • Women's Studies [1]
  • ________
    Notes:

    [1]
    Denotes minor.
    [2]
    Denotes major and minor.
    [3]
    Denotes teacher licensure program.

    Liberal Studies Program

    Purpose and Goals

    Intended to provide the basis for lifelong learning, the liberal studies program is designed to liberate the minds of students through experiences that challenge them to become active in their own education, to be critical of ideas, and to explore the foundations and range of knowledge. More specifically, in the course of the entire program the student should develop or improve:

    Liberal Studies Curriculum and Requirements

    JMU attempts to realize these goals through the 11 areas of study listed below with purposes and course requirements. By the time of graduation, most students will have taken 41 credit hours in the liberal studies program, although this number may vary depending on options chosen during the student's college career.

    NOTE: An individual course in areas 1-10 may not be used to satisfy requirements in more than one of these areas, even if the course is listed under two or more areas. However, courses taken to satisfy requirements in areas 1-10 may be counted toward a major program if permitted by the provisions of that program. Only the courses in area 11 may be counted both toward the major and toward a requirement in one of the other areas.

    
    						Credit
    Requirement Summary				Hours
    ENG 101-102. Reading and Composition		3-6
    Fine arts/aesthetics course			3
    History/civilization courses			6
    Literature course				3
    Mathematics course				3
    Natural science courses				6-12
    Oral communication course			3
    Philosophy/religion course			3
    Physical education/dance course			2
    Social science courses				6
    Cultural studies courses			0-6
    						___
    						38-53
    
    1. Composition
    ENG 101-102. Reading and Composition (3-6)
    
    To improve, through critical reading and various strategies of writing, the student's ability to develop and communicate ideas, interpretations, and judgments; to enable the student to locate, evaluate and use library resources effectively.
    
    2. Fine Arts/Aesthetics (3)
    
    To inculcate awareness of the importance of creativity; understanding of the value of fine art in the individual life experience and as a major cultural force in human societies present and past; connections between the imagination and other mental functions; better perceptual skills; fundamental understanding of artistic uses of sound, movement, and/or images; sensitivity to and enjoyment of aesthetic experiences; ability to make enlightened aesthetic choices.
    Select one course (three hours) from:
    ART 200. Art in General Culture
    ARTH 201. Art and Its Purpose
    ARTH 205. Survey I: Prehistoric Through Medieval Art
    ARTH 206. Survey II: Renaissance Through Modern Art
    ARTH 413. Masterpieces of Italian Renaissance Art
    ARTH 414. Masterpieces of Spanish Art
    ARTH 415. Masterpieces of British Architecture
    ARTH 416. Masterpieces of British Art
    ARTH 417. Masterpieces of French Art
    DANC 248. History of Dance: Renaissance Through 
      the 20th Century
    LS 250. Meaning and Response in the Arts
    MUS 200. Music in General Culture
    MUS 203. Music in America
    MUS 356. History of Jazz in America
    THEA 210. Introduction to Theater
    
    3. History/Civilization (6)
    
    To inculcate a basic ability to confront historical evidence by analyzing primary texts; an understanding of the way in which human experience has unfolded over time; familiarity with the interrelationships of the political, intellectual, religious, economic, and artistic developments that have shaped lives and formed the world; a tradition of experience to draw upon in framing humane solutions to contemporary issues.
    Select two courses (six hours) from:
    HIST 101. World History to 1650 and
      HIST 102. World History Since 1650
    HIST 101. World History to 1650 or
      HIST 102. World History Since 1650
    Plus one course from the following:
    	HIST 233. United States to 1877
    	HIST 234. United States Since 1877
    	HIST 263. Africa
    	HIST 267. Latin America
    	HIST 268. Contemporary Latin America
    	HIST 270. Modern Middle East
    	HIST 273. Asia to 1600
    	HIST 274. Modern Asia
    
    4. Literature (3)
    
    To inculcate detailed knowledge, within a larger conceptual framework, of a broad selection of acknowledged masterpieces of creative literature; skill in fundamental techniques of literary criticism.
    Select one course (three hours) from:
    CHIN 265. Chinese Literature in Translation
    CLAS 266. Greek and Roman Classics in Translation
    ENG 231. Survey of Poetry
    ENG 232. Survey of Drama
    ENG 233. Survey of Prose Fiction
    ENG 235. Survey of English Literature: From Beowulf
      to the 18th Century
    ENG 236. Survey of English Literature: From the 18th
      Century to the Modern Period
    ENG 238. Survey of World Literature: From the Ancient
      World Through the Renaissance
    ENG 239. Survey of World Literature: From the
      Enlightenment Through the Modern Age
    ENG 247. Survey of American Literature: From the
      Beginning to the Civil War
    ENG 248. Survey of American Literature: From the
      Civil War to the Modern Period
    ENG 260. Survey of African-American Literature
    FL 265. Modern Japanese Literature in Translation
    FL 266. African Literature of the 20th Century
    FL 267. The Literature of Opera in Translation
    FR 265 or 266. French Literature in Translation
    GER 265. German Literature of the 18th and 19th
      Centuries in Translation
    GER 266. Contemporary German Literature in Translation
    ILS 290. Selected Topics in International Liberal Studies
    RUS 265 or 266. Russian Literature in Translation
    SPAN 265. Spanish Literature in Translation
    SPAN 267. Spanish-American Literature in Translation
    
    5. Mathematics (3)
    
    To inculcate an understanding of the nature, methods, power, growth and ethical use of mathematics; experience and awareness of the precise and careful reasoning used to solve problems with mathematics, including the use of computers as appropriate; and ability to connect particular subjects in mathematics with the discipline as a whole and with other disciplines.
    Select one course (three hours) from:
    MATH 103. The Nature of Mathematics
    MATH 107 or 108. Fundamentals of Mathematics
    MATH 205. Introductory Calculus I
    MATH 206. Introductory Calculus II
    MATH 220. Elementary Statistics
    MATH 235 or 236. Analytic Geometry and Calculus
    (See footnote [2 ]on page 47.)
    
    6. Natural Science (6-16)
    
    To inculcate a substantial body of currently valid scientific facts, theories and models; basic knowledge about the philosophy, ethics, historical development, current methods and data bases, and limits of science, and of how science and technology influence human life; awareness that scientific truth emerges from the interplay of imagination and observation and that it is often ambiguous and always tentative; basic ability to distinguish non-scientific from scientific classifications and theories, and to engage with critical awareness in the sequence, observation - hypothesis - test - retry.

    NOTE: The number of credit hours required depends on the option chosen and must include courses from at least two different disciplines, although the two selected might be from the same department, e.g., physics and astronomy or geology and oceanography.

    Select two of the following (or the corresponding multi-
      course substitutions in parenthesis). Include at least 
      two disciplines.
    BIO 101. Contemporary Biology (or BIO 120. 
      General Zoology and BIO 130. General 
      Botany)
    CHEM 100. Chemistry Today (or CHEM 131-131L 
      and 132-132L. General Chemistry I-II with Laboratories)
    GEOL 100. The Earth and Man (or GEOL 110. Physical 
      Geology and GEOL 230. Evolution of Earth)
    GEOL 211. Introduction to Oceanography
    LS 300. History of Modern Science
    LS 310. The British Foundations of Modern Science
    PHYS 115. Physics as Inquiry (or PHYS 130 and
      135. General Physics I-II) (or PHYS 240. 
      Principles of Mechanics and PHYS 250. 
      Principles of Electricity and Magnetism)
    PHYS 120. The Astronomical Perspective
    PHYS 201. Discovering Physics
    
    7. Oral Communication (3)
    
    To improve the student's ability to develop, deliver, assume responsibility for and absorb oral messages, especially as a speaker before small and large groups; to inculcate knowledge of the variables that affect successful communication.
    Select one course (three hours) from:
    SCOM 120. Interpersonal Communication
    SCOM 121. Basic Human Communication
    SCOM 122. Public Speaking
    
    8. Philosophy/Religion (3)
    
    To foster knowledge and a sensitive understanding of the world's great philosophical and religious traditions, with emphasis on their systematic interpretation and investigation by scholars; students develop the intellectual skills and attitudes, including some of the forms of reasoning, which enable them to critically analyze such fundamental and perennial questions as the nature of the self and the world, the character of the divine, what we can know, the meaning of human life, and the nature of morality.
    Select one course (three hours) from:
    AMST 250. Introduction to American Studies
    ANTH/SOCI 313. Processes of Social and 
      Cultural Change
    ANTH 350. Magic, Witchcraft and Religion
    ART 380. Seminar in Aesthetics
    CLAS 265. The Individual and Society in Ancient 
      Greece and Rome
    CLAS 336. Myth in Classical and Modern 
      European Literature
    CLAS 337. Human Values: The Classical Tradition
    EDUC 360. Foundations of American Education
    ENG 250. Literature and Values
    ENG 306. The Bible for Students of Literature
    LS 200. The Age of Pericles
    LS 240. Aesthetic Values in American Society
    LS 260. The West African Experience: Its Impact 
      on the West
    PHIL 101. Introduction to Philosophy
    PHIL 200A. Philosophers in Cultural Context:
      Ancient Greek Philosophy
    PHIL 250. Introductory Logic
    PHIL 260. Philosophy and Contemporary Life
    PHIL 270. Introduction to Ethics
    PHIL 300. Reasoning: Methods and Problems
    REL 101. Religions of the World
    REL 200. Exploring Religion
    REL 201. Introduction to the Literature and 
      Religion of the Old Testament
    REL 202. Introduction to the Literature and 
      Religion of the New Testament
    REL 270. Religion and Moral Values
    REL 300. Religion and the Contemporary World
    SCOM 346. Free Speech in America
    SOCI/ANTH 368. Modern American Culture
    NOTE: Courses in literature, area 4, will also satisfy the requirement in philosophy/religion.
    
    9. Physical Education/Dance [1] (2)
    
    To inculcate knowledge of the relationship between body, mind and spirit; skills in at least one lifetime physical activity that contributes to fitness and a sense of well being; knowledge and skill needed to design a realistic fitness program based on scientific information; and commitment to continuous adjustment of lifestyle to maintain a positive environment for the individual and society.
    Select one course (two hours) from:
    DANC 140. Elementary Modern Dance
    DANC 141. American Folk Dance
    DANC 142. Elementary Ballet
    DANC 143. International Folk Dance
    DANC 144. Ballroom Dance
    DANC 146. Jazz Dance
    DANC 147. Tap Dance
    DANC 240. Intermediate Modern Dance I
    DANC 242. Intermediate Ballet
    KIN 105. Kinesiology Adapted Activities
    KIN 122-138. Elementary Sports
    KIN 145 or 148. Conditioning Activities
    KIN 149. Aerobic Dance
    KIN 154. Elementary Gymnastics
    KIN 160. Elementary Swimming
    KIN 225-231. Intermediate Sports
    KIN 245. Swim Conditioning
    KIN 260. Intermediate Swimming
    KIN 266. Water Polo
    KIN 267. Advanced Swimming
    KIN 325. Advanced Tennis
    KIN 331. Advanced Skiing
    
    10. Social Science (6)
    
    To prepare students to handle social science information intelligently by inculcating basic knowledge about the historical development, philosophy, ethics, theories, methods and disciplinary range of social science, and of how social science is influenced by technology; by fostering understanding of the differences between individual and social problems and their resolutions, other cultures, and the contingent, value-ridden nature of "truth" in social science; and by engaging students in the sequence, observation/assumption - questioning - hypotheses - methodology - testing - theory - application - evaluation.
    Select two courses (six hours), representing separate 
      disciplines, from:
    ANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics
    ANTH 196. Physical Anthropology and Archeology
    ANTH 227. World Prehistory
    ANTH/SOCI/SOWK 348. Third World Societies: 
      An Introduction
    ECON 131. Principles of Economics (Micro)
    GEOG 120. Introduction to World Geography
    GEOG 280. Introduction to Cultural Geography
    POSC 110. Introduction to Political Science
    POSC 210. Introduction to Law and Jurisprudence
    POSC 225. U.S. Government
    POSC 230. International Relations
    POSC 240. Comparative Politics
    PSYC 101. General Psychology I
    PSYC 102. General Psychology II
    PSYC 160. Life Span Human Development
    SOCI 101. Introductory Sociology
    SOCI 102. Social Problems
    SOCI 240. Individual in Society
    SOWK 288. Social Welfare
    NOTE: An individual course in areas 1-10 may not be used to satisfy requirements in more than one of these areas, even if the course is listed under two or more areas. However, courses taken to satisfy requirements in areas 1-10 may be counted toward a major program if permitted by the provisions of that program. Only the courses in area 11 may be counted both toward the major and toward a requirement in one of the other areas.
    
    11. Cultural Studies
    
    To inculcate an informed understanding of cultures within the U.S. and outside the U.S. and Western Europe, and to examine critically how various cultures are interconnected.
    Select one course (three hours) in U.S. cultures and a 
      separate course (three hours) in non-U.S. and non-
      Western European cultures from the following lists. 
      The same course may not be used to satisfy both 
      parts of this requirement.
    U.S. Cultures (select one course from):
    	ANTH 312. North American Indians
    	ANTH 327. North American Prehistory
    	ANTH 382. Cultures of Appalachia
    	ARTH 409. American Art
    	ARTH 411. American Art Since 1945
    	ECON 210. Economic History of the United States
    	ECON 345. Industrial Organization
    	ECON 455. Economics of Regulated Industries
    	EDUC 360. Foundations of American Education
    	ENG 247. Survey of American Literature: 
    	  From the Beginning to the Civil War
    	ENG 248. Survey of American Literature: 
    	  From the Civil War to the Modern Period
    	ENG 260. Survey of African-American Literature
    	GEOG 136. Geography of North America
    	HIST 233. United States to 1877
    	HIST 234. United States Since 1877
    	HIST 300. U.S. Military History
    	HIST 310. American Business History
    	HIST 320. Women in U.S. History
    	HIST 323. The Old South
    	HIST 330. U.S. Diplomatic History
    	HIST 350. Virginia
    	HIST 353. Trans-Mississippi West
    	HIST 355. Afro-American History to 1865
    	HIST 356. Afro-American History Since 1865
    	HIST 402. Workshop in Colonial American Life
    	HIST 411. Colonial America
    	HIST 415. The Age of James Madison
    	HIST 420. U.S. History, 1763-1800
    	HIST 425. Civil War and Reconstruction
    	HIST 430. The Gilded Age: U.S. History, 1877-1901
    	HIST 431. Reform, World War and Prosperity:
    	  U.S. History, 1901-1929
    	HIST 432. Depression, War and Cold War: 
    	  U.S. History, 1929-1961
    	HIST 433. Reform, Upheaval and Reaction:
    	  U.S. History Since 1961
    	LS 240. Aesthetic Values in American Society
    	MCOM 330. History of American Journalism
    	MCOM 460. Movies as Mass Communication
    	MCOM 461. Movies as Visual Communication
    	MUS 203. Music in America
    	MUS 356. History of Jazz in America
    	PHIL 370. American Philosophy
    	POSC 225. U.S. Government
    	POSC 325. Constitutional Law
    	POSC 326. Civil Rights
    	POSC 330. American Political Thought
    	POSC 370. U.S. Foreign Policy
    	POSC 405. American Political System
    	POSC 450. Contemporary Problems in American Government
    	PSYC 275. Psychology of Human Intimacy
    	PSYC 345. Social Psychology
    	PSYC 355. Health Psychology
    	PSYC 410. Industrial/Organizational Psychology
    	REL 300A. African and Afro-American Religion
    	SCOM 248. Intercultural Communication
    	SOCI 302. Business in American Society
    	SOCI 345. Sociology of Occupations and Professions
    	SOCI/ANTH 368. Modern American Culture
    	SPAN 267. Spanish-American Literature in Translation
    	SPAN 327. Survey of Spanish American Literature
    	SPAN 415. The Spanish-American Novel
    	THEA 485. American Theater History
    Non-U.S. and Non-Western European Cultures
      (select one course from):
    	ANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics
    	ANTH 325. Aztec, Maya and Their Predecessors
    	ANTH 355. Culture and Ecology
    	ANTH 380. Chinese and Japanese Society and Culture
    	ARTH 301. African Art
    	ARTH 302. Far Eastern Art
    	CHIN 265. Chinese Literature in Translation
    	ECON 365. Economic Development
    	ENG 238. Survey of World Literature: From the 
    	  Ancient World Through the Renaissance
    	ENG 239. Survey of World Literature: From the 
    	  Enlightenment Through the Modern Age
    	FL 265. Modern Japanese Literature in Translation
    	FL 266. African Literature of the 20th Century
    	GEOG 335. Geography of Africa
    	GEOG 337. Geography of Latin America
    	GEOG 348. Geography of U.S.S.R.
    	GEOG 349. Geography of East Asia
    	HIST 263. Africa
    	HIST 267. Latin America
    	HIST 268. Contemporary Latin America
    	HIST 270. Modern Middle East
    	HIST 273. Asia to 1600
    	HIST 274. Modern Asia
    	HIST 371. India
    	HIST 385. Russia to 1855
    	HIST 386. Russia Since 1855
    	HIST 445. Latin America and the United States
    	HIST 446. Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean
    	HIST 447. South America
    	HIST 460. Modern Japan
    	HIST 470. Modern Africa
    	HIST 473. The Islamic World
    	HIST 474. The Byzantine Empire
    	HIST 475. Soviet Russia
    	HIST 476. Ancient History
    	HIST 478. Eastern Europe
    	HIST 480. Modern China
    	HIST 485. The Arab Middle East, 1945 to Present
    	LS 260. The West African Experience: Its Impact on the West
    	NUTR 380. Global Nutrition
    	POSC 320. Radical Political Theory Since 1844
    	POSC 337. Russian Political System
    	POSC 338. Russian Foreign Policy
    	POSC 339. Politics of Communist and 
    	  Post-Communist Systems
    	POSC 340. Political Development in the 
    	  Third World
    	POSC 350. Latin American Politics
    	REL 101. Religions of the World
    	REL 300A. African and Afro-American Religion
    	REL 300B. Religion in World Politics
    	REL 380. Regional Studies in the Religions 
    	  of the World
    	RUS 265 or 266. Russian Literature in Translation
    	RUS 308. Introduction to Russian Civilization
    	RUS 405. Russian Literature of the19th Century
    	RUS 420. Russian Drama
    	RUS 426. Russian Literature of the 20th Century
    	SOCI/SOWK/ANTH 348. Third World Societies: 
    	  An Introduction
    	SPAN 308. Latin American Civilization
    	SPAN 385. Latin American Drama and 
    	  Short Stories
    ________
    Notes:
    [1]
    Only the kinesiology and dance courses within the liberal studies program may be taken credit/ no-credit.
    [2]
    Students planning to teach grades K-8 should complete either MATH 107 or MATH 235.

    Selection of a Major

    Entering students, in conference with their advisers, may determine a major program of study. If they have not decided on a specific major they may register as undeclared. Students who have not decided on a major field of study are encouraged to discuss their interests with their adviser, professors, department heads, school directors and fellow students. The Counseling and Student Development Center and the Office of Career Services will provide career guidance and testing for those who request it. All students should declare a major by the end of their sophomore year. Failure to do so could extend the time needed to fulfill graduation requirements.

    Transfer students who enter JMU with junior status (60 or more credit hours) should declare a major upon acceptance to the university.

    Change or Declaration of Major

    Students who wish to change or declare a major should obtain a Change or Declaration of Major Form from the Office of Registration and Records and take it to the head of the department or director of the school they wish to enter. Students are accepted by the department or school on the basis of their academic records and the satisfaction of such other criteria as the department or school may establish. A new adviser is assigned by the department or school for students beyond the freshman level.

    Progression

    Degree-seeking students progress satisfactorily in their academic programs, with expected completion of a degree in eight semesters, if an average of 16 credit hours is taken each semester. Dropping below 16 credit hours per semester can extend the time needed to fulfill graduation requirements and may affect eligibility for financial aid.

    Writing Across the Curriculum

    A distinguishing feature of an educated person is the ability to write effectively. As part of its mission to prepare graduates for a meaningful role in society, the university is committed to developing writing skills across the curriculum. Academic programs contain writing components in which students study the process of writing as well as the product. Students prepare term papers, essays, special reports, case briefs and other written work in which style, form and content are assessed. This approach helps to make writing an integral part of learning in all disciplines.

    Computer Literacy Requirement

    James Madison University is committed to providing an educational environment which is consonant with current technology in an information society. The university provides an opportunity for each student, regardless of major, to have some experience with computers. Introductory courses designed to build and/or enhance computer literacy are housed in the Department of Computer Science and in the Department of Information and Decision Sciences; other departments and schools throughout the university also offer courses emphasizing computer applications for individual disciplines. Students are expected to take advantage of these offerings, which are designed to enhance computer awareness and to build specific computer skills.

    Student Assessment

    A series of student outcomes assessment tests will be required prior to graduation. Information from the test results will be used to measure the contribution of JMU's programs and services for institutional and individual student learning and development. Students are encouraged to review the Student Outcome Assessment Form for further details.

    Student Progression and Graduation Rates

    Studies of undergraduate student retention and completion rates indicate that more than 90 percent of entering first-time freshmen return for their second year and more than 85 percent return for their third year of study at JMU. Approximately 60 percent of those who enter the university as first-time freshmen complete their degrees in four calendar years or less. About 78 percent of the entering class graduates after five years. Approximately 80 percent of an entering class will eventually complete the requirements for an undergraduate degree at JMU. The remainder either withdraw or transfer, the large majority of these doing so before reaching their junior year. Since a number of entering students enroll in a program which requires that they transfer to another institution (e.g., pre-physical therapy), the completion rate at the university is considered to be very good.

    Other Credit Opportunities

    The university offers the following options to enable students to earn credit toward their degree outside the traditional classroom setting.

    Admission of High School Students as Special Students

    See pages 302-303 for information concerning this special program of admission.

    Admission of Freshmen With Advanced Placement

    Consult pages 24-25 for information concerning the College Board Advanced Placement program.

    Independent Study

    Every department and school at JMU offers a course designed to give capable students an opportunity to do independent study under faculty guidance. Such courses often carry more than the normal three credit hours for a semester's work. In addition, they allow especially capable students to work at their own, often accelerated pace. Arrangements for independent study should be made through individual instructors.

    Honor System

    The academic program at JMU is operated under an Honor System which dates back to the 1909-10 academic session.

    The present Honor System has been adopted by the students to uphold individual and community integrity. Each student is expected to observe complete honesty in all academic matters and to assume responsibility in cases in which honor is violated. Penalties for violations of the Honor System range from a minimum of one semester suspension and a grade of "F" in the course in which the violation was committed to permanent expulsion from the university.

    The Honor System is administered by a student Honor Council. Every student who matriculates at the university, whether graduate or undergraduate, becomes a member of the Honor System. The cooperation of faculty and administrators is expected. Full information is set forth in the Student Handbook and assistance is available from the Honor Council office.


    Catalog Table of Contents

    JMU Home Page

    Last reviewed: Sept. 10, 1994
    Information Publisher: Academic Services