Graduate Program | Course Descriptions blue line

WRTC 500. Critical Questions in Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication. 3 credits.
A foundations course introducing students to the critical questions and ideas emerging from the intersections of writing, rhetoric, and technical communication. Through reading, discussion, research, and application of theory to the production of deliverables, students in the course acquire a solid foundation in this program of study and begin to develop a professional identity.

WRTC 504. Professional Editing in Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication. 3 credits.
Advanced study and practice in the duties essential to managing documents through the editorial process. Includes collaborating with authors as well as establishing awareness of audience, purpose, scope, and context for print and online documents. Includes training in numerous levels of editing, such as proofreading, copyediting, substantive editing, sensitivity editing, editing design and graphics, and editing for intercultural audiences.

WRTC 508. Research Methods in Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication. 3 credits.
Advanced study of research methodologies used in writing, rhetoric, and technical communication. Includes techniques used for collecting, sorting and analyzing information and data quantitatively and qualitatively from primary and secondary sources. Requires in-depth research through a self-designed study grounded in a clearly articulated awareness of audience, purpose and context. Prerequisites: WRTC 500 and WRTC 504.

WRTC 595. Special Topics in Writing, Rhetoric and Technical Communication. 3 credits.
Writing and research in a variety of writing, rhetoric and technical communication genres. Examines special and timely issues currently being explored in the field not addressed in sufficient depth in regularly scheduled WRTC courses. May be repeated with different course content and permission of director.

WRTC 604. Ethics in Communication. 3 credits.
Examines the relationship between rhetoric and ethics, emphasizing the challenges emerging from historical and contemporary communication. Employs various theories to explore the complex interplay among agency, authorship and intellectual property. Topics may include free speech, falsification of data, surveillance, ownership of information and conflicts of interest.

WRTC 608. Intercultural Literacies. 3 credits.
Examines critical approaches to intercultural communication beyond ethnic and racial lines. Investigates key theories of identity and difference, and intercultural communication practices. Topics may include definitions of culture, cross-cultural communication challenges and issues of globalization, localization and translation.

WRTC 612. Teaching Writing. 3 credits.
Preparation of WRTC teaching assistants in rhetorical theory and teaching methodologies. Emphasizes pedagogical strategies central to teaching effective written and oral communication in the field and provides practice in course development and assessment under the guidance of a faculty mentor in actual course situations. Required of all teaching assistants before their first semester teaching.

WRTC 624. Public Work of Rhetoric. 3 credits.
Explores the intersections among individuals, organizations, communities, environments and texts that inform the public work of rhetoric. Employs rhetorical theories to examine the way these networks produce and make discourses visible. Topics may include the role of technology, advocacy, contemporary and historical social movements, and non-profit and governmental organizations.

WRTC 628. Genre In Action. 3 credits.
Explores how established genres circulate and mutate within ecologies of humans, objects, technologies and spaces. Students will explore theories related to genre in order to analyze and compose within a medical, scientific, nonprofit, academic, or corporate discourse community of their choice.

WRTC 644. Discourses of Health and Medicine. 3 credits.
Introduces theory and research in medical rhetoric, health communication and related areas. Students will employ a variety of scholarly lenses, including technical communication, rhetoric, science studies and sociology, to examine the intersections between health and medicine. Topics may include patients’ agency and advocacy, patient compliance, uses of writing in clinical settings and digital spaces, access to health resources, politics of healthcare and the role of narrative.

WRTC 648. Rhetoric of Science and Technology. 3 credits.
Introduces students to theories exploring the discourses of science and technology. Provides students with a rhetorical perspective on the construction and application of scientific and technological knowledge. Topics may include the roles of language and ideology in scientific controversies, predominant theories in STEM fields and the scientific study of rhetoric.

WRTC 652. Communicating Science. 3 credits.
Prepares students to analyze, evaluate and produce scientific information for non-specialist audiences. Students will explore how writers, editors and designers reach and influence an audience, and how, in turn, the audience responds to their scientific texts. Topics may include the role of the news media, scientific literacy, advocacy and science policy creation.

WRTC 664. Critical Perspectives on Digital Cultures. 3 credits.
Introduces theories and methods that inform digital knowledge-making practices in social, civic, and professional contexts. Equips students with the analytical and technical skills to engage with established and emerging technologies. Topics may include network theory, remix culture, questions of identity, social media, code studies and mobile computing.

WRTC 668. Interfaces and Design. 3 credits.
Explores theoretical and practical approaches to the design of digital texts and objects. Students will learn and apply key design concepts and methodologies related to a variety of interfaces. Topics may include accessibility, usability, design theory, interface and content design, collaborative and open-source production spaces, and data management.

WRTC 680. Readings in Writing, Rhetoric and Technical Communication. 3 credits.
Faculty-supervised reading, research and writing on advanced writing, rhetoric and technical communication projects not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

WRTC 699. Thesis/Internship Continuance. 2 credits.
Individual reading, research and writing associated with completion of major's thesis/practicum portfolio. Directed by the chair of the student's thesis/practicum committee and required for graduation. Prerequisites: WRTC 500, WRTC 504, WRTC 508,, successful completion of the comprehensive exam, and permission of thesis/internship committee director. Students who have registered for six hours of thesis/internship credit but have not finished the thesis/internship must be enrolled in this course each semester until the thesis/internship is completed. This course is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis.

WRTC 700. Thesis. 6 credits.
Individual reading, research and writing associated with completion of major's thesis. Supervised by the director of the student's thesis committee. Student must complete six hours of thesis research to graduate. Prerequisites: WRTC 500, WRTC 504, WRTC 508 and permission of thesis committee director. Credit hours may be taken over one or two semesters. This course is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis.

WRTC 701. Internship. 6 credits.
Experiential learning integrating knowledge and theory learned in writing, rhetoric and technical communication courses with practical application and skills development in a professional setting. Students observe, analyze and reflect upon communication processes and apply effective written, interpersonal and public communication skills. Supervised by the director of the student's internship committee in conjunction with a client, students develop a significant, large-scale professional project. Prerequisites: WRTC 500, WRTC 504, WRTC 508 and permission of thesis/internship committee director. Credit hours may be taken over one or two semesters. This course is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis.