Funding Opportunities
 
 


The OSP requests that all proposals, electronic or otherwise, be submitted in their complete and final form to OSP FIVE WORKING DAYS PRIOR to an agency deadline with a hardcopy of the proposal and the signed Internal Approval Form.

Please visit the "funding sources" link at the following website for program listings and searchable databases:
http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/calendar.html


 
   
     
 
Funding Opportunities Links
 
 

National Science Foundation

National Endowment for the Arts

CEC ArtsLink

Institute of Museum and Library Services

Research Corporation for Science Advancement

National Endowment for the Humanities

National Trust for Historic Preservation

American Political Science Association

National Institutes of Health

Corporation for National and Community Service

National Council for Eurasian and East European Research

National Institute of Standards and Technology

Gannett Foundation

Autism Speaks

Graham Foundation

American Philosophical Society

Institute of Turkish Studies

Samuel H. Kress Foundation

Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

U.S. Department of Defense

Anthony Robbins Foundation

Cedar Tree Foundation

The Coca-Cola Company

Cognizant

Compton Foundation

Economic Development Administration

The Energy Foundation

Express Scripts Foundation

Frank and Lydia Bergen Foundation

The Harry Chapin Foundation

James S. McDonnell Foundation

LI-COR

National Geographic Society

Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative

 

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Funding Opportunities

 
National Science Foundation
 

Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI): Instrument Acquisition or Development (Limited Submission Program)

  • The Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program serves to increase access to shared instrumentation for scientific and engineering research and research training in our Nation's institutions of higher education and not-for-profit-museums, science centers and scientific/engineering research organizations. This program especially seeks to improve the quality and expand the scope of research and research training in science and engineering, by supporting proposals for shared instrumentation that fosters the integration of research and education in research-intensive learning environments. Each MRI proposal should request support for the acquisition (Track 1) or development (Track 2) of a single research instrument for shared inter- and/or intra-organizational use; development efforts that leverage the strengths of private sector partners to build instrument development capacity at MRI submission-eligible organizations are encouraged. The MRI Program is intended to assist with the acquisition or development of a single research instrument that is, in general, too costly and/or not appropriate for support through other NSF programs. An instrument provided through the MRI program is expected to be operational for regular research use by the end of the award period.
    For the purposes of the MRI Program, proposals must be for either acquisition (Track 1) or development (Track 2), and must be for only a single instrument or for equipment that when combined serves as an integrated research instrument (in contrast to requests for multiple instruments that enable research in a common or focused research domain, which MRI does not support). An integrated research instrument means that an ensemble of equipment that defines the instrument enables a specific research experiment or type of research experiment to be undertaken; separating or removing an element or component of such an integrated instrument would and preclude any experiments from occurring or succeeding. The MRI program does not support the acquisition or development of a suite of instruments to outfit research laboratories/facilities or to conduct independent experiments simultaneously. Similarly the MRI program does not fund common, general purpose ancillary equipment that would normally be found in a laboratory and/or is relatively easily procured by the institution. Further guidance on appropriate requests can be found in the MRI FAQs at http://www.nsf.gov/od/oia/programs/mri. See http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/deadlines.html for more information on limited submission programs.
  • Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: Three (3)
    If three proposals are submitted, at least one of the proposals must be for instrument development (i.e., no more than two proposals may be for instrument acquisition).
  • Estimated Number of Awards: 175 awards - Proposals that request funds from NSF in the range $100,000-$4 million may be accepted from any MRI-eligible organization. Proposals that request funds from NSF less than $100,000 may also be accepted from any MRI-eligible organization for the disciplines of mathematics or social, behavioral and economic sciences and from non-Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education for all NSF-supported disciplines.
    Anticipated Funding Amount:
    $90,000,000 - proposals submitted in response to this program solicitation will be competing for about $90 million, pending availability of funds and quality of proposals. Up to $35 million of these funds will be available to support proposals requesting $1-$4 million from NSF, depending on overall proposal pressure and quality.
    Cost-sharing of precisely 30% of the total project cost is required for Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education and for non-degree-granting organizations.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13517/nsf13517.htm
  • Target Internal Deadline: January 10, 2013; Sponsor Deadline: February 21, 2013

Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry

  • The Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry Program supports research on 1) the interactions between biological and geological systems at all scales of space and time; 2) geomicrobiology and biomineralization processes; 3) the role of life in the transformation and evolution of the Earth's geochemical cycles; 4) inorganic and organic geochemical processes occurring at or near the Earth's surface now and in the past, and at the broad spectrum of interfaces ranging in scale from planetary and regional to mineral-surface and supramolecular; 5) mineralogy and chemistry of soils and sediments; 6) surficial chemical and biogeochemical systems and cycles and their modification through natural and anthropogenic change; and 7) development of tools, methods, and models for low-temperature geochemistry and geobiological research - such as those emerging from molecular biology - in the study of the terrestrial environment.
  • Funding: $5,200,000 for 30-40 awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09552/nsf09552.htm
  • Deadline: January 16, 2013 (January 16, Annually Thereafter)

Division of Integrative Organismal Systems

  • The Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS) supports research aimed at understanding why organisms are structured the way they are and function as they do. Proposals should focus on organisms as a fundamental unit of biological organization. Principal Investigators (PIs) are encouraged to apply systems approaches that will lead to conceptual and theoretical insights and predictions about emergent organismal properties. Areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to, developmental biology and the evolution of developmental processes, nervous system development, structure, and function, physiological processes, functional morphology, symbioses, interactions of organisms with biotic and abiotic environments, and animal behavior.
    Proposals are welcomed in all areas of science supported by the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems. All investigator-initiated proposals to the core programs in the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems must now be invited based on merit review of preliminary proposals. There is a single submission deadline with a limit of 2 preliminary proposals per investigator per year as PI or co-PI in response to this solicitation. There are no limits on the number of proposals submitted as collaborator or senior personnel. These limits do not pertain to proposals submitted in response to other NSF solicitations.
  • Limit on Number of Proposals per PI: 2
    In a given year, an individual may participate as a PI or co-PI on no more than two preliminary proposals submitted in response to this IOS Core Program Solicitation. Preliminary proposals in excess of the limit for any person will be returned without review in the reverse order received. "PI" and "co-PI" refer to the role an individual would play in a full proposal (including all parts of a collaborative proposal).
    This limit does not pertain to proposals to other solicitations (e.g., Research Coordination Networks, Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants, CAREER, Plant Genome Research Program, Basic Research to Enable Agricultural Development) or to core programs in other BIO Divisions (Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, Biological Infrastructure, Environmental Biology). However solicitations may have their own limit guidelines so be sure to review those carefully for details.
  • Funding: $55,000,000 for 200 awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13506/nsf13506.htm
  • Preliminary Proposal Deadline (required): January 18, 2013; Full Proposal Deadline (by invitation only): August 2, 2013

Division of Environmental Biology (CORE Programs) (DEB)

  • The Division of Environmental Biology (DEB) supports fundamental research on populations, species, communities, and ecosystems. Scientific emphases range across many evolutionary and ecological patterns and processes at all spatial and temporal scales. Areas of research include biodiversity, phylogenetic systematics, molecular evolution, life history evolution, natural selection, ecology, biogeography, ecosystem structure, function and services, conservation biology, global change, and biogeochemical cycles. Research on organismal origins, functions, relationships, interactions, and evolutionary history may incorporate field, laboratory, or collection-based approaches; observational or manipulative experiments; synthesis activities; as well as theoretical approaches involving analytical, statistical, or computational modeling.
  • Funding: $72,000,000 for new awards each year
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13508/nsf13508.htm
  • Preliminary Proposal Deadline (required): January 23, 2013; Full Proposal Deadline (by invitation only): August 2, 2013

Interdisciplinary Behavioral and Social Science Research (IBSS)

  • The Interdisciplinary Behavioral and Social Science Research (IBSS) competition promotes the conduct of interdisciplinary research by teams of investigators in the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on support for research that involves researchers from multiple disciplinary fields, that integrates scientific theoretical approaches and methodologies from multiple disciplinary fields, and that is likely to yield generalizable insights and information that will advance basic knowledge and capabilities across multiple disciplinary fields.
  • Funding: $10,000,000; NSF anticipates making 10 to 15 awards annually.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12614/nsf12614.htm
  • Deadline: January 23, 2013; December 3, 2013

Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC)

  • Cyberspace has transformed the daily lives of people for the better. The rush to adopt cyberspace, however, has exposed its fragility and vulnerabilities: corporations, agencies, national infrastructure and individuals have been victims of cyber-attacks. In December 2011, the National Science and Technology Council with the cooperation of NSF has advanced a broad, coordinated federal strategic plan for cybersecurity research and development to "change the game," check the misuses of cyber technology, bolster education and training in cybersecurity, establish a science of cybersecurity, and transition promising cybersecurity research into practice. This challenge requires a dedicated approach to research, development, and education that leverages the disciplines of mathematics and statistics, the social sciences, and engineering with the computational and information sciences.
    This program welcomes proposals that address Cybersecurity from a Trustworthy Computing Systems perspective (TWC); a Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences perspective (SBE); and a Transition to Practice perspective (TPP) (see below). In addition, we welcome proposals that integrate research addressing two or more of these perspectives as well as proposals focusing entirely on Cybersecurity Education (see below).
  • Estimated Number of Awards: 70; NSF anticipates approximately 5 Education awards, 51 Small awards, 12 Medium awards and 2 Frontier awards in FY13. Funding: Small projects: up to $500,000 in total budget, with durations of up to three years; Medium projects: $500,001 to $1,200,000 in total budget, with durations of up to four years; Frontier projects: $1,200,001 to $10,000,000 in total budget, with durations of up to five years.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12596/nsf12596.htm
  • Deadline: FRONTIER Projects; January 30, 2013

United States-Israel Collaboration in Computer Science

  • The United States-Israel Collaboration in Computer Science (USICCS) program is a joint program of NSF and the United States - Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF). The program supports research projects that develop new knowledge in the areas of theory of computing; algorithm design and analysis; design, verification, and evaluation of software systems; and revolutionary computing models based on emerging scientific ideas. Through this program, NSF and BSF will jointly support collaborations among US-based researchers and Israel-based researchers. US-based researchers will receive funds from NSF to support travel to Israel to interact with their Israeli counterparts. Israel-based and US-based researchers will receive funds allowable under the BSF program described at http://www.bsf.org.il/.
  • Funding: $400,000 in total for 6 to 9 awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12603/nsf12603.htm
  • Deadline: February 1, 2013

Mechanics of Materials (MOM)

  • The MoM program supports fundamental research in interdisciplinary solid mechanics.  Emphasis is placed on fundamental understanding that i) advances theory, experimental, and/or computational methods in MoM, and/or ii) uses contemporary MoM methods to address modern challenges in material and device mechanics and physics.
    Proposed research can focus on existing or emerging material systems across time and length scales; especially of interest are contemporary materials including complex solids, phononic/elastic metamaterials, soft materials, and active materials.  Research is welcome in emerging areas of multiscale methods, nanomechanics, manufacturing mechanics, and areas that incorporate fundamental understanding of physics and chemistry into the continuum-level understanding of solids.
    Intellectual merit typically includes advances in deformation, fracture, fatigue, constitutive modeling, multiphysics, nonlinear mechanics, computational methods, or experimental techniques. 
    Broader impacts are welcome that may include, but are not limited to i) advancing the relevant application of solid mechanics to important problems in new technological domains, ii) increasing awareness of the importance and role of solid mechanics in other scientific communities as well as society in general, iii) impacting graduate education in solid mechanics across the US, iv) impacting engineering practice, v) strengthening undergraduate and K-12 education in and exposure to solid mechanics, and vii) engaging and encouraging the participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields.  Proposers should strive to make deep and lasting impacts via their proposed activities.
    Potentially transformative research is sought, as well as research that systematically advances the state-of-the-art in important ways.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13355
  • Deadline: February 15, 2013

Environmental Sustainability

  • The Environmental Sustainability program supports engineering research with the goal of promoting sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival. The long-term viability of natural capital is critical for many areas of human endeavor. Research in Environmental Sustainability typically considers long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics.
    This program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions. There are four principal general research areas which are supported, but others can be proposed by contacting the program director by email at: bhamilto@nsf.gov
    • Industrial Ecology
    • Green Engineering
    • Ecological Engineering
    • Earth Systems Engineering
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501027
  • Deadline: February 19, 2013

Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE)

  • The INSPIRE awards program was established to address some of the most complicated and pressing scientific problems that lie at the intersection of traditional disciplines. It is intended to encourage investigators to submit bold, exceptional proposals that some may consider to be at a disadvantage in a standard NSF review process; it is not intended for proposals that are more appropriate for existing award mechanisms. INSPIRE is open to interdisciplinary proposals on any NSF-supported topic, submitted by invitation only after a preliminary inquiry process initiated by submission of a required Letter of Intent.
    Specifically, INSPIRE seeks to:
    • Create new interdisciplinary opportunities that are not perceived to exist presently.
    • Attract unusually creative high-risk / high-reward interdisciplinary proposals.
    • Provide sufficient funding to pursue the novel idea beyond the exploratory stage.
    • Recognize and encourage innovative interdisciplinary research by unusually creative individual investigators, especially at early- to mid-career stages.
    • Designate no favored topics; be open to all NSF-supported areas of science, engineering, and education research.
    INSPIRE Track 2. With a larger magnitude than Track 1, INSPIRE Track 2 awards are "mid-scale" research projects that can request budgets up to $3,000,000 over a duration of up to five years. In addition to the larger scale relative to Track 1, Track 2 projects must be substantially co-funded by at least three intellectually distinct NSF divisions or programs whose research communities do not have a well-established history of collaboration. Also, the expectations for significant broader impacts (e.g., unique interdisciplinary training opportunities, international collaboration, broadening participation considerations, outreach to facilitate societal benefit of the research) will be higher than for Track 1. 
    Note: INSPIRE Track 2 directly addresses mid-scale research, not mid-scale instrumentation. INSPIRE Track 2 proposals can request substantial funding for instrumentation if this is justified by the needs of the research, and if the instrumentation itself yields highly innovative capabilities to push the boundaries of science in a new direction.
  • Funding: 10 to 15 awards; Grants range from $500,000 to $3 million.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13518/nsf13518.htm
  • Letter of Intent (REQUIRED) : February 20, 2013; Full Proposal Deadline: May 13, 2013

Promoting Research and Innovation in Methodologies for Evaluation (PRIME)

  • The Promoting Research and Innovation in Methodologies for Evaluation (PRIME) program seeks to support research on evaluation with special emphasis on exploring innovative approaches for determining the impacts and usefulness of STEM education projects and programs; building on and expanding the theoretical foundations for evaluating STEM education and workforce development initiatives, including translating and adapting approaches from other fields; and growing the capacity and infrastructure of the evaluation field. Two types of proposals will be supported by the program: Exploratory Projects that include proof-of-concept and feasibility studies and more extensive Full-Scale Projects.
  • Funding: $7,000,000 for 11 to 13 awards; approximately 6-9 full scale and approximately 4-6 exploratory projects will be selected for funding. The remainder of funds will be allocated to conference and workshop projects, RAPIDs and EAGERs, pending availability of funds.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13515/nsf13515.htm
  • Deadline: February 20, 2013

Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE)

  • The Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE) program funds research and educational projects that improve ethics education in all fields of science and engineering that NSF supports, with priority consideration given to interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and international contexts. Although the primary focus is on improving ethics education for graduate students in NSF-funded fields, the proposed programs may benefit advanced undergraduates as well.
  • Funding: $3,000,000 for 6 to 10 awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2011/nsf11514/nsf11514.htm
  • Deadline: March 1, 2013

Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21)

  • The Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) program aims to build a robust computing research community, a computationally competent 21st century workforce, and a computationally empowered citizenry. In this undertaking, there are three interrelated challenges: the significant underproduction of degrees needed for the computing and computing-related workforce, the longstanding underrepresentation of many segments of our population, and the lack of a presence of computing in K-12.
    CE21 thus supports efforts in three tracks:
    Computing Education Research (CER) proposals will aim to develop a research base for computing education. Projects may conduct basic research on the teaching and learning of computational competencies in face-to-face or online settings; they may design, develop, test, validate, and refine materials, measurement tools, and methods for teaching in specific contexts; and/or they may implement promising small-scale interventions in order to study their efficacy with particular groups. Efforts can focus on computational thinking as taught in computing courses or infused across the curriculum, they can target students or their teachers in informal or formal educational settings, or they can address any level within the K-16 pipeline, from elementary school through high school and college.
    CS 10K
    proposals will aim to develop the knowledge base and partnerships needed to catalyze the CS 10K Project. The CS 10K Project aims to have rigorous, academic curricula incorporated into computing courses in 10,000 high schools, taught by 10,000 well-trained teachers. CS 10K proposals can address a wide range of needed activities, including the development of course materials, pedagogy, and methods courses, as well as professional development and ongoing support for teachers, approaches to scaling, best practices for increasing the participation of students from underrepresented groups, and strategies for building K-12, university, and community partnerships.
    Broadening Participation
    (BP) proposals will aim to develop and assess novel interventions that contribute to our knowledge base on the effective teaching and learning of computing for students from the underrepresented groups: women, persons with disabilities, African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and indigenous peoples. Proposed interventions should be designed to engage and retain students from these groups and, at the same time, to increase their knowledge of computational thinking concepts and skills. Proposers are encouraged to leverage the resources provided by the existing BPC-A Alliances and to develop interventions that, if proven successful, could be implemented within a BPC-A Alliance. For additional information on the Alliances, see http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503593&org=NSF.
    In aggregate, CE21 projects will contribute to our understanding of how diverse student populations are engaged and retained in computing, learn its fundamental concepts, and develop computational competencies that position them to contribute to an increasingly computationally empowered workforce.
  • Funding: $15,000,000 total annually for 13 to 20 awards per year.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12609/nsf12609.htm
  • Deadline: March 13, 2013

Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP)

  • This program is a continuation of the Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP) that began in FY 1998 as part of the National Plant Genome Initiative (NPGI). Since the inception of the NPGI and the PGRP, there has been a tremendous increase in the availability of functional genomics tools and sequence resources for use in the study of key crop plants and their models. Proposals are welcomed that build on these resources to develop conceptually new and different ideas and strategies to address grand challenge questions in plants of economic importance on a genome-wide scale. There is also a critical need for the development of novel and creative tools to facilitate new experimental approaches or new ways of analyzing genomic data. Especially encouraged are proposals that provide strong and novel training opportunities integral to the research plan and particularly across disciplines that include, but are not limited to, plant physiology, quantitative genetics, biochemistry, bioinformatics and engineering.
    Four kinds of activity will be supported in FY 2013: (1) Genomics-empowered plant research to tackle fundamental questions in plant sciences on a genome-wide scale; (2) Development of tools and resources for plant genome research including novel technologies and analysis tools to enable discovery; (3) Mid-Career Investigator Awards in Plant Genome Research (MCA-PGR) to increase participation of investigators trained primarily in fields other than plant genomics; and, (4) Novel Methods for Generating Physical Frameworks for Plant Genomes (GPF-PG) to develop new and cost effective strategies for the construction of the genomes of plants of economic importance. Proposals addressing these opportunities are welcomed at all scales, from single-investigator projects through multi-investigator, multi-institution projects, commensurate with the scope and scale of the work proposed.
  • Funding: $15,000,000 for 10 to 15 awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13522/nsf13522.htm
  • Deadline: March 13, 2013

Geophysics (PH)

  • The Geophysics Program is part of the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR). EAR provides funding for the conduct of research concerning the solid Earth and its surface environment. EAR supports investigations of the Earth's structure, composition, evolution, and the interaction of the lithosphere with the Earth's biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. In addition, EAR provides support for instrumental and observational infrastructure, cyberinfrastructure, and innovative educational and outreach activities. Projects may employ any combination of field, laboratory, and computational studies with observational, theoretical, or experimental approaches. Support is available for research and research infrastructure through grants and contracts awarded in response to investigator-initiated proposals from U.S. universities and other eligible organizations. EAR will consider co-funding of projects with other agencies and supports international work and collaborations.
  • Estimated Number of Awards: 70 to 80 annually; Anticipated Funding Amount: $15,900,000
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12598/nsf12598.htm
  • Deadline: June 5, 2013

Broadening Participation in Engineering (BPE)

  • The Broadening Participation in Engineering (BPE) Program is a Directorate-wide activity to support the development of a diverse and well-prepared workforce of engineering graduates, particularly those with advanced degrees. A central theme of the program's activities is enhancing the ability of early career faculty members, particularly those from underrepresented groups, to succeed in their careers as researchers and educators.   The Broadening Participation in Engineering Program supports projects to engage and develop diverse teams that can offer unique perspectives and insights to challenges in engineering research and education.  By seeing problems in different ways, a diverse workforce can encourage innovation and scientific breakthroughs.   Throughout this Program Description, the term underrepresented groups will refer to and include the following: women, persons with disabilities, and ethnic/racial groups which are in the minority in engineering, specifically African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Pacific Islanders.
    The Engineering Directorate recognizes that broadening participation is a systemic issue, with a need for wide-ranging and comprehensive interventions at all levels of the educational system.  While there is a general need to diversify pathways that lead to engineering careers, the BPE program currently supports engineering faculty, particularly early career faculty, in integrating broadening participation and diversity with their scholarly activities, including education, research and innovation.  Given that engineering addresses human needs, the US population is becoming much more diverse, and engineering practice increasingly turns to customers in designing innovations, it is critical that the faculty of the future are able to draw from diverse perspectives in their engineering research and educational activities.
    In alignment with the goals of the Engineering Directorate (ENG) and with other programs in the Engineering Education and Centers Division, the BPE Program is interested in areas related to:
    • Understanding how a diverse engineering student body, professional workforce, and faculty impact engineering innovation and productivity.
    • The underlying issues affecting the differential participation rates in engineering, particularly those that can be addressed by engineering faculty members.
    • The experiences and interactions that enhance or inhibit underrepresented groups' persistence to degree and career interest in the professoriate.
    BPE award activities should be informed by the body of knowledge that surrounds these (and other) important research questions; and in turn add to that knowledge base. 
    Establishing Mentoring and Networking Opportunities for early career engineering faculty members that allow targeted faculty to engage with, learn from, and network with diverse individuals and groups in ways that will demonstrably enhance their long term career success.  The program is particularly interested in creating opportunities for early career faculty from groups typically under-represented in engineering departments.  Funds will be utilized primarily to seed new networking and mentoring opportunities rather than fund ongoing efforts; thus all projects are expected to develop a plan for sustainability independent of further NSF support.
    Broadening Participation Research supports up to 3-year research projects that seek to create and study new models and innovations related to the participation and success of groups underrepresented in engineering graduate education, postdoctoral training, and academic engineering careers.  The program accepts a range of project scales from small, exploratory projects to larger scale investigations with a broad, systemic scope; project budgets should match the project scope.  Small-scale, exploratory projects that contribute to the knowledge base of diversifying faculty in engineering-for example exploring matriculation into graduate programs, reward structures for faculty, or ways to broaden participation from specific groups-are strongly encouraged.
  • Funding: $300,000 for 15 awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504870
  • Deadline: Full proposal accepted anytime

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National Endowment for the Arts
 

Our Town

  • Art works to improve the lives of America's citizens in many ways. Communities across our nation are leveraging the arts and engaging design to make their communities more livable with enhanced quality of life, increased creative activity, a distinct sense of place, and vibrant local economies that together capitalize on their existing assets. The NEA defines these efforts as the process of Creative Placemaking.
    Our Town will invest in creative and innovative projects in which communities, together with their arts and design organizations and artists, seek to:
    • Improve their quality of life.
    • Encourage greater creative activity.
    • Foster stronger community identity and a sense of place.
    • Revitalize economic development.
    Through Our Town projects, the NEA intends to achieve the following outcome: Livability: American communities are strengthened through the arts.
  • Funding:An organization may request a grant amount from $25,000 to $200,000. All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. These matching funds may be all cash or a combination of cash and in-kind contributions.
  • Web: http://arts.gov/grants/apply/OurTown/index.html
  • Deadline: January 14, 2013

The Big Read

  • The Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts designed to revitalize the role of literature in American culture and to encourage citizens to read for pleasure and enlightenment. The Big Read provides organizations with grants and comprehensive resources that support their efforts to read and discuss a single book or the work of a poet. The Big Read is managed by Arts Midwest.
    The Big Read supports organizations across the country in developing community-wide reading programs which encourage reading and participation by diverse audiences. These programs include activities such as author readings, book discussions, art exhibits, lectures, film series, music or dance events, theatrical performances, panel discussions, and other events and activities related to the community’s chosen book or poet.
    Organizations selected to participate in The Big Read receive a grant, access to online training resources and opportunities, and educational and promotional materials designed to support widespread community involvement.
  • Funding: Eligible organizations may apply for grants ranging from $2,500 to $20,000. Grants must be matched 1 to 1 with nonfederal funds. Grant funds may be used for such expenses as book purchases, speaker fees and travel, salaries, advertising, and venue rental.
  • Web: http://www.neabigread.org/application_process.php
  • Deadline: February 5, 2013

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CEC ArtsLink
 

ArtsLink Projects

  • ArtsLink Projects provides support to US artists, curators, presenters and arts organizations undertaking projects in any of the 37 eligible countries listed below. Applicants must be working with an artist or organization in that region and projects should be designed to benefit participants and audiences in both the US and the host country.
    ArtsLink has a cycle of alternate year deadlines according to discipline. In 2012, applications will be accepted from individual artists, presenters and non-profit arts organizations working in dance, music, literature and theater. In 2013, applications will be accepted from individual artists, curators and non-profit arts organizations working in visual and media arts.
    Support is provided to create new work that draws inspiration from interaction with artists and the community in the US; to establish mutually beneficial exchange of ideas and expertise between artists, arts organizations and the local community and to pursue artistic cooperation that will enrich creative or professional development or has potential to expand the community's access to the art of other cultures.
  • Maximum award: $10,000
  • Web: http://www.cecartslink.org/grants/artslink_projects/
  • Deadline: January 15, 2013

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Institute of Museum and Library Services
 

Museums for America

  • The goal of the Museums for America (MFA) program is to strengthen the ability of an individual museum to serve the public more effectively by supporting high-priority activities that advance its mission, plans, and strategic goals and objectives.
    MFA grants support activities that strengthen museums as active resources for lifelong learning, as important institutions in the establishment of livable communities, and as good stewards of the nation’s collections. MFA grants can fund both new and ongoing museum activities and programs. Examples include planning, managing and conserving collections, improving public access, training, conducting programmatic research, school and public programming, producing exhibitions, and integrating new or upgraded technologies into your operations.
  • There are three categories within the MFA program:
    Learning Experiences
    IMLS places the learner at the center and supports engaging experiences in museums that prepare people to be full participants in their local communities and our global society. Projects should deliver high quality, inclusive, accessible and audience-focused programs, exhibitions, and services for lifelong learning in formal or informal settings.
    Community Anchors
    IMLS promotes museums as strong community anchors that enhance civic engagement, cultural opportunities, and economic vitality. Projects should address common community challenges and demonstrate how your museum improves the quality of life and enriches community members’ knowledge and understanding of critical local and global issues, provides forums for community dialogue, and/or connects individuals to resources in the broader community service infrastructure through its programs and services. Projects may include capacity-building activities that position your museum to be more effective in fulfilling its role as a community anchor institution.
    Collections Stewardship
    IMLS supports exemplary stewardship of museum collections and promotes the use of technology to facilitate discovery of knowledge and cultural heritage. Projects should support the care and management of collections to expand and sustain access for current and future generations. Projects should reflect systematic, holistic, logical approaches to the documentation, preservation, and conservation of tangible and digital collections to sustain and improve public access.
  • Funding: $5,000-$150,000 for up to three years. Matching requirement is 1:1.
  • Web: http://www.imls.gov/applicants/detail.aspx?GrantId=11
  • Deadline: January 15, 2013

Sparks! Ignition Grants for Libraries and Museums

  • The Sparks! Ignition Grants for Libraries and Museums are a special funding opportunity within the IMLS National Leadership Grants program. These small grants encourage libraries, museums, and archives to test and evaluate specific innovations in the ways they operate and the services they provide. Sparks Grants support the deployment, testing, and evaluation of promising and groundbreaking new tools, products, services, or organizational practices. You may propose activities or approaches that involve risk, as long as the risk is balanced by significant potential for improvement in the ways libraries and museums serve their communities.
    Successful proposals will address problems, challenges, or needs of broad relevance to libraries, museums, and/or archives. A proposed project should test a specific, innovative response to the identified problem and present a plan to make the findings widely and openly accessible. 
    To maximize the public benefit from federal investments in these grants, the Sparks Grants will fund only projects with the following characteristics:
    Broad Potential Impact—You should identify a specific problem or need that is relevant to many libraries, archives, and/or museums, and propose a testable and measurable solution. Proposals must demonstrate a thorough understanding of current issues and practices in the project’s focus area and discuss its potential impact within libraries, archives, and/or museums. Proposed innovations should be widely adoptable or adaptable.
    Significant Innovation—The proposed solution to the identified problem must offer strong potential for non-incremental, significant advancement in the operation of libraries, archives, and/or museums. You must explain how the proposed activity differs from current practices or takes advantage of an unexplored opportunity, and the potential benefit to be gained by this innovation.
  • Funding: Grants range from $10,000 to $25,000
  • Web: http://www.imls.gov/applicants/detail.aspx?GrantId=19
  • Deadline: February 1, 2013

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Research Corporation for Science Advancement
 

Multi-Investigator Cottrell College Science Awards

  • The MI-CCSA program is aimed at helping start sustainable, collaborative programs of research by cross-disciplinary teams of faculty from science departments in primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs). The program is focused on helping early career faculty jumpstart research programs that tackle complex scientific problems. The research project should be one that could not be effectively approached by an individual researcher or a group of researchers within the same discipline or sub-discipline. Rather, it is aimed at projects that, by their complexity and interdisciplinary nature, require a cross-disciplinary team approach to achieve significant progress and sustainability. In addition, the proposed research should help enhance interdisciplinary educational activities at the home institution.
  • Funding: The award amount is $75,000 for a two-investigator team and $100,000 for a three-investigator team. The award duration is two years with a single, one-year, no-cost extension available on request. An institutional match of $25,000 is required on all applications. Allowed budget categories include faculty summer stipends, student summer stipends, equipment, supplies and funds for travel needed to conduct the research.
  • Web: http://www.rescorp.org/grants-and-awards/cottrell-college-science-awards/multi-investigator
  • Deadline: January 15, 2013

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National Endowment for the Humanities
 

Digital Humanities Implementation Grants

  • This program is designed to fund the implementation of innovative digital-humanities projects that have successfully completed a start-up phase and demonstrated their value to the field. Such projects might enhance our understanding of central problems in the humanities, raise new questions in the humanities, or develop new digital applications and approaches for use in the humanities. The program can support innovative digital-humanities projects that address multiple audiences, including scholars, teachers, librarians, and the public. Applications from recipients of NEH’s Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants are welcome.
    Unlike NEH’s start-up grant program, which emphasizes basic research, prototyping, experimentation, and potential impact, the Digital Humanities Implementation Grants program seeks to identify projects that have successfully completed their start-up phase and are well positioned to have a major impact.
    Proposals are welcome for digital initiatives in any area of the humanities. Digital Humanities Implementation Grants may involve
    • implementation of computationally-based methods or techniques for humanities research;
    • implementation of new digital tools for use in humanities research, public programming, or educational settings;
    • efforts to ensure the completion and long-term sustainability of existing digital resources (typically in conjunction with a library or archive);
    • studies that examine the philosophical or practical implications of the use of emerging technologies in specific fields or disciplines of the humanities, or in interdisciplinary collaborations involving several fields or disciplines; or
    • implementation of new digital modes of scholarly communication that facilitate peer review, collaboration, or the dissemination of humanities scholarship for various audiences.
    Successful projects must make digital innovations and be significant to the humanities.
  • Funding: Awards are for one to three years. Awards range from $100,000 to $325,000. During fiscal year 2013, NEH estimates that it will make three to five awards in this program. Cost sharing is not required for Digital Humanities Implementation Grants. However, applicants are welcome to use cost sharing for implementation projects in which the total budget exceeds the NEH grant limit.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/odh/digital-humanities-implementation-grants
  • Deadline: January 23, 2013 for Projects Beginning September 2013

Summer Seminars and Institutes

  • These grants support faculty development programs in the humanities for school teachers and for college and university teachers. NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes may be as short as two weeks or as long as five weeks.
    NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes
    • extend and deepen knowledge and understanding of the humanities by focusing on significant topics and texts;
    • contribute to the intellectual vitality and professional development of participants;
    • build communities of inquiry and provide models of civility and excellent scholarship and teaching; and
    • effectively link teaching and research in the humanities.
    An NEH Summer Seminar or Institute may be hosted by a college, university, learned society, center for advanced study, library or other repository, a cultural or professional organization, or a school or school system. The host site must be suitable for the project, providing facilities for scholarship and collegial interaction. These programs are designed for a national audience of teachers.
  • Funding: Awards for seminars range between $70,000 and $140,000 for a grant period of twelve months. Awards for institutes range from $90,000 to $200,000 for a grant period of fifteen months. Cost sharing is not required in this program.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/education/summer-seminars-and-institutes
  • Deadline: March 5, 2013 for seminars and institutes in summer 2014

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National Trust for Historic Preservation
 

National Trust Preservation Fund

  • Grants from National Trust Preservation Funds (NTPF) are intended to encourage preservation at the local level by providing seed money for preservation projects. These grants help stimulate public discussion, enable local groups to gain the technical expertise needed for particular projects, introduce the public to preservation concepts and techniques, and encourage financial participation by the private sector. The National Trust is particularly interested in projects that relate to the preservation priorities listed below. If your project relates to any of these issues, please explain the connection in your narrative.
    Building sustainable communities: Does your project demonstrate that historic preservation supports economic, environmental and cultural sustainability in communities?
    Reimagining historic sites: Does your project use innovative, replicable strategies that create new models for historic site interpretation and stewardship?
    Promoting diversity and place: Does your project broaden the cultural diversity of historic preservation?
    Protecting historic places on public lands A small grant at the right time can go a long way and is often the catalyst that inspires a community to take action on a preservation project.
  • Funding: Grants generally start at $2,500 and range up to $5,000. (Please note: larger grants may be available.) The selection process is very competitive. Applicants are encouraged to develop proposals carefully and to complete the application form with assistance and guidance from the National Trust.
  • Web: http://www.preservationnation.org/resources/find-funding/documents/preservation-funds-guidelines-eligibility.html
  • Deadline: February 1, 2013

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American Political Science Association
 

Small Research Grant Program

  • The APSA Small Research Grant Program supports research in all fields of political science. The intent of these grants is to support the research and further the careers of political scientists who are not employed at Ph.D.-granting departments in the field.
    Prior grant recipients have been able to publish several books and book chapters, journal articles, working papers, and conference presentations as the result of the grants. They also report benefits to students, who have been able to serve as co-authors or research assistants on the grant-funded projects.  Several recipients were also able to use the APSA grant as "seed money" to gain additional funding.
  • Funding: A small number of these grants are awarded annually by the Council on the basis of a peer-review process.  Individual grants may not exceed $2,500 and are not renewable. Funds may be used for such research activities as: travel to archives, travel to conduct interviews, administration and coding of instruments, research assistance, and purchase of datasets. While this list is merely illustrative, certain research activities are specifically excluded from funding: travel to professional meetings, secretarial costs except for preparation of the final manuscripts for publication, and salary support for the principal investigator. Overhead or indirect costs are not allowable expenses.  Funds must be expended between the time they are received (usually in May) and the end of the following fiscal year (September 30). 
  • Web: http://www.apsanet.org/content_9222.cfm
  • Deadline: February 4, 2013

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National Institutes of Health
 

Improving Diet and Physical Activity Assessment (R01)

  • This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), issued by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of the Director (OD) Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), encourages innovative research to enhance the quality of measurements of dietary intake and physical activity. Applications submitted under this FOA may include development of: Novel assessment approaches; better methods to evaluate instruments; assessment tools for culturally diverse populations or various age groups, including older adults; improved technology or applications of existing technology; statistical methods to assess or correct for measurement errors or biases, methods to investigate the multidimensionality of diet and physical activity behavior through pattern analysis; or integrated measurement of diet and physical activity along with the environmental context of such behaviors.  
  • Funding: Expected direct cost amounts for individual awards range from $200,000 to $650,000.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-12-198.html
  • Deadline: February 5, 2013

Pilot Intervention and Services Research Grants (R34)

  • The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage research on 1) the development and/or pilot testing of new or adapted interventions, 2) the adaptation and/or pilot testing of interventions with demonstrated efficacy for use in broader scale effectiveness trials, or 3) innovative services research directions that require preliminary testing or development. The R34 award mechanism provides resources for evaluating the feasibility, tolerability, acceptability and safety of novel approaches to improving mental health and modifying health risk behavior, and for obtaining the preliminary data needed as a pre-requisite to a larger-scale (efficacy or effectiveness) intervention or services study.  NIMH intervention and services research is aimed at preventing or ameliorating mental disorders, emotional or behavioral problems, the co-occurrence of mental, physical and substance abuse problems, HIV infections, and the functional consequences of these problems across the life span.  NIAAA prevention, treatment, and services research is aimed at preventing or ameliorating alcohol use disorders, related emotional or behavioral problems, and the co-occurrence of other mental, physical, and substance abuse problems, HIV/AIDS, and the functional consequences of these problems across the life span..
  • Funding: Direct costs are limited to $450,000 over the R34 project period, with no more than $225,000 in direct costs allowed in any single year. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity may not exceed three years.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-12-279.html
  • Deadline: February 16, 2013

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Corporation for National and Community Service
 

AmeriCorps State and National Grants FY 2013

  • The mission of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) is to improve lives, strengthen communities, and foster civic participation through service and volunteering. CNCS—through its AmeriCorps and Senior Corps programs and the Social Innovation Fund—has helped to engage millions of citizens in meeting community and national challenges through service and volunteer action.This AmeriCorps State and National (AmeriCorps) Notice of Federal Funding Opportunity Notice (Notice) will focus grant making for fiscal year 2013 in six focus areas identified by the Serve America Act (SAA):
    • Disaster Services.
    • Economic Opportunity.
    • Education.
    • Environmental Stewardship.
    • Healthy Futures.
    • Veterans and Military Families.
    In order to maximize the impact of the public investment in national service, CNCS will fund programs that can demonstrate community impact and solve community problems using an evidence-based or evidence-informed approach (e.g. performance data, research, theory of change).
  • Funding: The actual level of funding will be subject to the availability of annual appropriations, which have not yet been made.
  • Web: http://www.americorps.gov/for_organizations/funding/nofa_detail.asp?tbl_nofa_id=98
  • Deadline: February 6, 2013

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National Council for Eurasian and East European Research
 

Title VIII National Research Competition

  • National Council for Eurasian and East European Research (NCEEER) invites proposals for its National Research Competition. This competition provides funds for both collaborative and individual research projects in the humanities and social sciences in or on any country of Eurasia or East-Central Europe. The primary scholar on either a collaborative or individual project must be a US citizen and hold a PhD degree. In addition, applicants must have completed any previous NCEEER grants received before they may apply for a new grant.
  • Funding: Research Contracts support collaborative projects involving multiple post-doctoral scholars, or individuals with comparable research skills who do not hold PhDs, including at least one US-citizen scholar or researcher with a maximum award of $70,000. Research Grants support research projects conducted by individual US citizens, with a maximum award of $40,000. Contracts provide funding to scholars or researchers via institutional awards, while Grants are awarded directly to the scholar or researcher. Accordingly, Contracts and Grants involve different application forms and guidelines.
    Funding for summer salary support is ordinarily not fundable by NCEEER. Research support funding is primarily to be devoted to necessary travel and research expenses. While regular salary support will be considered, summer salary support will be considered as the lowest priority for funding. Any exception concerning summer salary support will need to have clear and detailed specification of its necessity for completion of the proposed project.
  • Web: http://www.nceeer.org/programs/national-research-competition.html
  • Deadline: February 15, 2013

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National Institute of Standards and Technology
 

SURF 2013

  • NIST Boulder and NIST Gaithersburg are soliciting applications from eligible colleges and universities located in the U.S. and its territories nominating undergraduate students to participate in the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) NIST Boulder Programs (SURF NIST Boulder Programs) and NIST Gaithersburg Programs (SURF NIST Gaithersburg Programs). The SURF NIST Programs will provide research opportunities for undergraduate students to work with internationally known NIST scientists, to expose them to cutting-edge research, and to promote the pursuit of graduate degrees in science and engineering.
    The SURF NIST Boulder Programs are anticipated to run from May 20, 2013 through August 2, 2013; adjustments may be made to accommodate specific academic schedules (e.g., a limited number of 11-week programs with the schedule shifted to begin after the regular start in order to accommodate colleges or universities operating on quarter systems).
    The SURF Gaithersburg Program is anticipated to run between May 23 – August 9, 2013 or June 6 – August 9, 2013; adjustments may be made to accommodate specific academic schedules (e.g., a limited number of 9-week slots).
  • Funding for Boulder: Approximately $163,800 for new awards. NIST anticipates that individual awards to institutions will range from approximately $9,100 to $72,800 and will support a total of 18 undergraduate students. The total number of awards will depend on the number of undergraduate students selected per institution to attend the SURF NIST Boulder Program.
  • Funding for Gaithersburg: Approximately $820,000 for new awards. NIST anticipates that individual awards to institutions will range from approximately $9,000 to $72,000 and will support a total of 90 undergraduate students. The total number of awards will depend on the number of undergraduate students selected per institution to attend the SURF NIST Gaithersburg Program.
  • Web: http://www.nist.gov/surfboulder/; http://www.nist.gov/surfgaithersburg/
  • Deadline: February 15, 2013 (for Boulder and Gaithersburg)

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Gannett Foundation
 

Community Action Grants

  • The Gannett Foundation provides support for: education and neighborhood improvement, economic development, youth development, community problem-solving, assistance to disadvantaged people, environmental conservation and cultural enrichment. 
  • Funding: Grants range from $1,000 to $5,000.
  • Web: http://www.gannettfoundation.org/
  • Deadline: February 16, 2013

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Autism Speaks
 

2013 Treatment Research Grants: Full- and Pilot- Level

  • Autism Speaks invites both Full- and Pilot-Level Treatment research grant applications to conduct innovative studies of novel treatments and interventions for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) throughout the lifespan. These may include medical approaches including complementary and alternative forms of health care and pharmacological treatments, as well as behavioral and/or psychosocial interventions, and evaluation of efficacy, safety or therapeutic benefits of all types of interventions. Also appropriate are animal model studies that test the effects of novel compounds for reducing core or associate autism symptoms. 
    For all RFAs, Autism Speaks is focusing on a set of targeted research priorities. All treatment study projects will be required to demonstrate direct relevance to at least one of these targeted research priorities:
    1. Identify risk factors for ASD that can lead to prevention and improved diagnosis and treatment
    2. Reduce age of detection and improve access to early intervention for children with ASD
    3. Enhance quality of, and access to, medical care for individuals with ASD
    4. Promote the development of safe, effective interventions and medicines to reduce core and associated symptoms of ASD throughout the lifespan
    5. Improve the health and outcomes of adults with ASD from a lifetime perspective
  • Funding: Full-level research grant: 1-3 years; $150,000/year maximum; Pilot-level research grant: 1-2 years; $60,000/year maximum
    An amount not to exceed 10% (inclusive) of direct costs may be used for Sponsoring Institution’s indirect (overhead) costs. The total award including indirect costs cannot exceed the annual maximum award allowed.
  • Web: http://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/docs/sciencedocs/grants/treatment_rfa_2013.pdf
  • Letter of Intent Deadline: February 21, 2013; Application Deadline: April 24, 2013

Suzanne and Bob Wright Trailblazer Award Program

  • Autism Speaks places a high priority on innovation and has designed its new Trailblazer Award to respond quickly to fund highly novel transformative projects. The Trailblazer Award mechanism will support highly novel “out of the box” autism-relevant research that open new avenues to understanding the causes, diagnosis, subtyping, prevention, treatments, and cure of autism spectrum disorders. The Trailblazer Award mechanism is designed to fund small investigator-initiated high risk/high impact projects that are potentially transformative, paradigm shifting, and/or will overcome significant roadblocks in autism research within a 12 month period. We are seeking projects that may be too risky for regular research mechanisms, including that of Autism Speaks Pilot Study grants.
    The proposed Trailblazer project:
    • Must explore a highly novel idea or research technique that potentially could have high impact, i.e., have the capacity to change the way we diagnose, subtype, prevent, and/or treat ASD or the way we conduct relevant research on ASD.
    • Is not required to have preliminary data, but must have a sound rationale supporting the need for such a project
    • Should be considered risky as to not likely be supported though other AS grants programs, including pilot studies.
    • May come from newer or established investigators with demonstrated expertise and experience in autism and/or from investigators in non-autism areas of research that will be applied directly to autism research. Applicants must have a demonstrated track record of research experience relevant to the proposed project.
  • Autism Speaks research funding will be restricted to projects that address one of the following priorities:
    1. Understand environmental risk factors and their interaction with genetic susceptibility to enable prevention and improve diagnosis and treatment
    2. Discover biomarkers that can improve risk assessment and subtype stratification that will allow for an individualized approach to treatment
    3. Improve quality of life through more effective medicines, behavioral interventions, and technologies
    4. Enhance diagnosis and treatment of underserved and under-studied populations, specifically,
    • Nonverbal persons with ASD
    • Ethnically-diverse and/or low resource communities
    • Adults
    • Those with medical co-morbidities
    5. Disseminate and implement evidence-based clinical practices to the broader community worldwide
  • Funding: Awards are limited to a period of 12 months and an amount up to $100,000 total, inclusive of 10% indirect costs. Funds must be used for
    research expenses and cannot be used for equipment, travel, meeting, or publication costs. Training and mentoring-only applications are not appropriate for this funding program. Project completion must be achievable within 12 months.
  • Web: http://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/docs/sciencedocs/grants/trailblazer_rfa_2012.pdf
  • Deadline: Letters of inquiry accepted on a rolling basis

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Graham Foundation

 

Grants in Architecture and Related Arts

  • Founded in 1956, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts makes project-based grants to individuals and organizations and produces public programs to foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society.
  • Architecture and related spatial practices engage a wide range of cultural, social, political, technological, environmental, and aesthetic issues. We are interested in projects that investigate the contemporary condition, expand historical perspectives, or explore the future of architecture and the designed environment. We support innovative, thought-provoking investigations in architecture; architectural history, theory, and criticism; design; engineering; landscape architecture; urban planning; urban studies; visual arts; and related fields of inquiry. Our interest also extends to work being done in the fine arts, humanities, and sciences that expands the boundaries of thinking about architecture and space. In an effort to bridge communities and different fields of knowledge, we support a wide range of practitioners (such as architects, scholars, critics, writers, artists, curators, and educators) and organizations (such as non-profit galleries, colleges and universities, publishers, and museums).Open discourse is essential to advance study and understanding, therefore our grantmaking focuses on the public dissemination of ideas. With our support, the work of individuals and organizations reaches new audiences, from specialized to general, and creates opportunities for critical dialogue between various publics.
  • Funding: The Graham Foundation offers Production and Presentation Grants to organizations up to $30,000, likely less.
  • Web: http://www.grahamfoundation.org/grant_programs
  • Deadline: February 25, 2013

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American Philosophical Society
 

Phillips Fund for Native American Research

  • The Phillips Fund of the American Philosophical Society provides grants for research in Native American linguistics, ethnohistory, and the history of studies of Native Americans, in the continental United States and Canada. Grants are not made for projects in archaeology, ethnography, psycholinguistics, or for the preparation of pedagogical materials. The committee distinguishes ethnohistory from contemporary ethnography as the study of cultures and culture change through time. The grants are intended for such costs as travel, tapes, films, and consultants' fees but not for the purchase of books or permanent equipment.
  • Eligibility: The committee prefers to support the work of younger scholars who have received the doctorate. Applications are also accepted from graduate students for research on master's theses or doctoral dissertations. The committee sometimes approves two awards to the same person within a five-year period.
  • Funding: The average award is about $2,500; grants do not exceed $3,500. Grants are given for one year following the date of the award.
  • Web: http://www.amphilsoc.org/GRANTS/PHILLIPS
  • Deadline: March 1, 2013

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Institute of Turkish Studies
 

Grants Program

  • Since 1983, the Institute of Turkish Studies (ITS) has sponsored an annual grant program that offers a variety of awards to scholars, colleges and universities in the United States. The principal purpose of the grant program is to support and encourage the development of research, scholarship, and learning in the field of Turkish Studies in the U.S. All grant applications submitted to the Institute are evaluated by committees comprised of the academic members of the Board of Governors and Associate Members of the ITS. These standing committees present their recommendations to the Board of Governors for approval.
    The Institute of Turkish Studies (ITS) will offer grants and fellowships in the field of Ottoman and Modern Turkish Studies to graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, universities, and other educational institutions through its Grants Program for the 2013-2014 academic year.
  • Funding: The annual budget for the Grants Program has been significantly expanded and ITS encourages qualified applicants to apply for its grants.
  • Web: http://www.turkishstudies.org/grants/index.shtml
  • Deadline: March 8, 2013

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Samuel H. Kress Foundation
 

Conservation Fellowships

  • The purpose of the Kress Conservation Fellowship program is to provide a wide range of post-graduate fellowship opportunities that will help develop the skills of emerging conservators.
    At the crossroads of science and art, the fields of conservation and technical art history demand a complex knowledge of chemistry and materials and an extraordinary sensitivity to artistic intent, as well as physical dexterity, patience, and powers of concentration. Initial training, typically at one of a handful of institutions in North America, provides basic qualifications that must be supplemented with an extended period of specialized concentration on paintings, objects, textiles, antiquities, ethnic materials, photographs, prints and drawings, books and manuscripts, furniture, etc. Within a supervised environment, the young conservator develops the specific skills, the hands-on experience, and the confidence on which to base a future career.
    The Kress Conservation Fellowships provide competitive grants to museums and other conservation facilities which sponsor supervised internships in the conservation of specific objects and onsite training.
  • Eligibility: Application must be made by the museum or conservation facility at which the internship will be based. Fellows should have completed (or will complete prior to the Fellowship) a masters-level degree in conservation prior to beginning the Fellowship. The Fellowship candidate may be identified in advance of application by the host institution or recruited subsequently.
    Priority is given to first-year requests, but worthy projects that clearly outline benefits to the Fellow for a second year of Fellowship can be and have been funded.
  • Funding: Nine $32,000 Fellowships are expected to be awarded each year for one-year post-graduate internships in advanced conservation at a museum or conservation facility. Typically, $27,000 is allocated as a fellowship stipend, and $5,000 toward host institution administrative costs, benefits for the Fellow, and other direct costs of hosting the Fellowship. Most Fellowships begin in late summer or early fall, and run for a term of 9 to 12 months.
  • Web: http://www.kressfoundation.org/fellowships/conservation/
  • Deadline: March 10, 2013

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Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society
 

Grants-in-Aid of Research Program

  • The Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid of Research (GIAR) program has been providing undergraduate and graduate students with valuable educational experiences for more than 80 years. By encouraging close working relationships between students and faculty, the program promotes scientific excellence and achievement through hands-on learning.
  • Eligibility: Only undergraduate and graduate students currently enrolled in degree seeking programs may apply. Undergraduates who are graduating seniors must plan to complete their research prior to graduation. While membership in Sigma Xi is not a requirement for applying for funding from the Grants-in-Aid of Research program, approximately 75% of funds are restricted for use by dues paying student members of Sigma Xi or students whose project advisor is a dues paying member of Sigma Xi. Students from any country are eligible to receive funding.
  • Funding: The program awards grants of up to $1,000 to students from all areas of the sciences and engineering. Designated funds from the National Academy of Sciences allow for grants of up to $5,000 for astronomy research and $2,500 for vision related research. Students use the funding to pay for travel expenses to and from a research site, or for purchase of non-standard laboratory equipment necessary to complete a specific research project.
  • Web: http://www.sigmaxi.org/programs/giar/
  • Deadline: March 15, 2013

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Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
 

East European Studies Short-term Research Scholarships

  • East European Studies (EES) offers residential research scholar grants to scholars working on policy relevant projects on the following countries: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Kosovo, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Slovenia. Projects should focus on fields in the social sciences and humanities including, but not limited to: Anthropology, History, Political Science, Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Sociology.
  • Eligibility: These Title VIII grants are available to American academic experts and practitioners, including advanced graduate students, engaged in specialized research requiring access to Washington, DC and its research institutions.
  • Funding: Grants are for one month and include residence at the Wilson Center. Candidates must be U.S. citizens, in order to be considered eligible for this grant opportunity.
  • Web: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/opportunity/east-european-studies-short-term-research-scholarships
  • Deadline: September 1, 2013

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U.S. Department of Defense

 

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

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Anthony Robbins Foundation
 

Grants

  • The Anthony Robbins Foundation  seeks to empower  youth, elderly, disabled, homeless and hungry, and prison populations.
  • Funding: In 2010, the foundation awarded more than $171,000 in charitable grants.
  • Web: http://anthonyrobbinsfoundation.org/grants/grants.php
  • Deadline: Rolling for letters of intent

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Cedar Tree Foundation
 

Grants

  • The Cedar Tree Foundation is a small family fund created by the late pediatrician and entrepreneur, Dr. David H. Smith. Dr. Smith believed in the power of individuals and organizations to make significant changes in our world, and the foundation reflect that belief in their grantmaking. The Cedar Tree Foundation's grant making focuses on the following areas of concern: Sustainable Agriculture; Environmental Education; and Environmental Health. The Foundation gives particular consideration to proposals that demonstrate strong elements of environmental justice, and conservation.
  • Funding: In 2011, the foundation awarded more than $1 million in charitable grants. Previous grants ranged from $4,000 to $100,000.
  • Web: http://www.cedartreefound.org/index.html
  • Deadline: Rolling for letters of intent

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The Coca-Cola Company
 

Community Support

  • The Coca-Cola Company, its global philanthropic arm, The Coca-Cola Foundation, and its regional foundations strive daily to be responsive to the citizenship priorities in the global communities where we live and work.
    At The Coca-Cola Company, we recognize that we cannot have a healthy and growing business unless the communities we serve are healthy and sustainable. As a global beverage company, we have committed ourselves to improving the quality of life in the communities where we do business. Our community investment priorities reflect the global and local nature of our business and focuses on those global pillars where The Coca-Cola Company can make a unique and sustainable difference: water stewardship, active healthy living, community recycling, and education.
  • Web: http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/citizenship/application_guidelines.html
  • Deadline: Applications for contributions, fundraising dinners, and community sponsorships are accepted year-round.

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Cognizant
 

Making the Future

  • Cognizant’s Making the Future education initiative was created to unleash the passion of young people in STEM disciplines by creating fun, hands-on learning opportunities. Through financial, in-kind and volunteer support for schools and nonprofits; advocacy; college scholarships; and our flagship Making the Future After-School and Summer Program, Cognizant seeks to develop 21st century skills like creativity, innovation, and collaboration that will create a brighter future for our children, preparing them to be tomorrow’s leaders in our global economy.
    The company plans to double the number of afterschool programs funded from 10 to 20.
  • Deadline: Grants fund tools, materials, and instructor stipends from programs.
  • Web: http://www.cognizant.com/aboutus/makingthefuture
  • Deadline: Rolling

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Compton Foundation
 

Grant Program

  • Compton Foundation has adopted a new mission: We ignite change. We support transformative leadership and courageous storytelling, inspiring action toward a peaceful, just, sustainable future. The status quo is not shifting rapidly enough toward a peaceful, just, and sustainable world. Our new mission highlights a sense of urgency and a willingness to take risks in order to transform the way we live. Bringing forth a positive future requires innovative ways of understanding and naming the problems we face, as well as new methods for collaborating to solve them. Implicit in the mission is support for progressive and democratic social change.
    Change requires both long-term movement building and the ability to respond quickly to opportunistic moments when transformation and/or real short-term gains are possible. The Foundation will support organizations building the long-term capacity to ignite change as well as providing rapid response and emerging opportunity funding. The Foundation values projects that explore the connections between issue areas.
    Transformative Leadership
    :
    In this area, the Foundation expects to support:
    • Institutions that are training, convening, and coaching leaders with the above qualities.
    • Networks of leaders working across difference in issue, approach, or constituency.
    • Exemplary organizations that demonstrate new ways of working, creative collaboration, and transformative leadership qualities.
    Courageous Storytelling: In this area, the Foundation expects to support:
    • Creative media (art, music, drama, writing, photography) that captures imagination, expands our understanding of critical social and environmental problems, and articulates a positive vision for the future.
    • Organizations that help creative artists engage with social and environmental change.
  • Web: http://www.comptonfoundation.org/
  • Deadline: Anytime

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Economic Development Administration
 

Planning Program and Local Technical Assistance Program

  • Under the Planning program EDA assists eligible recipients in creating regional economic development plans designed to stimulate and guide the economic development efforts of a community or region. As part of this program, EDA supports Partnership Planning investments to facilitate the development, implementation, revision, or replacement of Comprehensive Economic Development Strategies (CEDS), which articulate and prioritize the strategic economic goals of recipients' respective regions. In general, EDA provides Partnership Planning grants to the designated planning organization (e.g., District Organization) serving EDA-designated Economic Development Districts to enable these organizations to develop and implement relevant CEDS. In addition, EDA provides Partnership Planning grants to Indian Tribes to help develop and implement CEDS and associated economic development activities. The Planning program also helps support planning organizations, including District Organizations, Indian Tribes, and other eligible Recipients, with Short Term and State Planning investments designed to guide the eventual creation and retention of higher-skill, higher-wage jobs, particularly for the unemployed and underemployed in the Nation’s most economically distressed regions. The Local Technical Assistance program strengthens the capacity of local or State organizations, institutions of higher education, and other eligible recipients to undertake and promote effective economic development programs through projects such as feasibility analyses and impact studies.
  • Funding: Approximately 425 awards of up to $100,000: $29 million total for the Planning Program and $3.5 million for the Local Technical Assistance Program. There is a 50 percent cost sharing or matching share requirement.
  • Web: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=zBB6Q3NpWF8ppJL7nwSWVlyQ11fkwLyhLDQb1JMMJk0stJh2j145!73790769?oppId=189193&mode=VIEW
  • Deadline: Ongoing

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The Energy Foundation
 

Grants for Research and Analysis on Energy

  • The Energy Foundation is a partnership of major donors interested in solving the world's energy problems. The Foundation's mission is to advance energy efficiency and renewable energy -new technologies that are essential components of a clean energy future. The geographic focus is on the United States and China, the largest and fastest growing energy markets in the world. The Foundation's primary role is as a grantmaker, providing resources to the institutions that most effectively leverage change. The following program areas are currently available: Power, Buildings, Transportation, Climate, and the China Sustainable Energy Program.
  • Funding: In 2011 the Energy Foundation made 592 grants to 347 groups, totaling $76,201,513.
  • Web: http://www.ef.org/home.cfm
  • Deadline: Anytime

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Express Scripts Foundation
 

Foundation Grants

  • The Express Scripts Foundation board of directors considers requests from organizations that advance medical- and health-related causes, particularly for the uninsured and underinsured; we fund educational activities that support school readiness, improve literacy, develop math competency and provide science enrichment to help prepare students for higher education and success in life.
  • Funding: In 2010, the foundation awarded more than $1.15 million in charitable grants.
  • Web: https://easymatch.com/expressscriptsgive/applications/agency?skip=guideline&programid=5
  • Deadline: Rolling

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Frank and Lydia Bergen Foundation
 

Foundation Grants

  • The Frank and Lydia Bergen Foundation provides support for musical performing arts and musical education.
    Preference will be given to requests for the following:
    • Arrange for musical entertainment, concerts, and recitals appropriate for the education and instruction of the public in the musical arts. Paramount consideration, however, is given to traditional classical music programs
    • Aid worthy students of music to secure complete and adequate musical education
    • Aid organizations in their efforts to present fine music to the public, provided that such organizations are operated exclusively for educational purposes
  • Funding: Grants range from $5,000 to $20,000; Average number of grants per year: 26
  • Web: https://www.wellsfargo.com/privatefoundationgrants/bergen
  • Deadline: Applications are accepted year-round. Applications must be submitted by April 10 to be reviewed at the grant meeting in May and August 15 to be reviewed in October.

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The Harry Chapin Foundation
 

Grants

  • The Harry Chapin Foundation will fund only 501(c)(3) not for profit programs that operate in the United States that fall within the areas of:
    • Community Education Programs
    • Arts-In-Education Programs
    • Agricultural and Environmental Programs
  • Funding: Grant sizes range from a few hundred dollars to our maximum of $10,000. The Foundation makes grants covering a one year period. In some instances, grant renewals are considered but are never automatic. The applicant for a renewal grant must submit a new proposal each year, along with a report of the activities of the preceding year. Grants are never awarded for more than three consecutive years.
  • Web: http://www.harrychapinfoundation.org/focus_focusandguidelines.php
  • Deadline: Rolling

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James S. McDonnell Foundation
 

Collaborative Activity Awards

  • The Foundation offers Collaborative Activity Awards to initiate interdisciplinary discussions on problems or issues, to help launch interdisciplinary research networks, or to fund communities of researchers/practitioners dedicated to developing new methods, tools, and applications of basic research to applied problems. In each case the focus of the collaborative activity must meet the program guidelines for one of the following program areas: (a) Studying Complex Systems; and (b) Understanding Human Cognition.
    With the Collaborative Activity Awards, JSMF continues and formalizes a funding mechanism the Foundation has used since 1987. Over the past decade or so, the Foundation has from time to time provided grants to support study panels and research networks. This has proven to be an effective way to encourage cross-disciplinary thinking and research on fundamental questions. Furthermore, these activities have contributed to the development of programs both at the Foundation and at other funding agencies. Collaborative Activity Awards developed from questions or topics discussed at JSMF-sponsored meetings may be initiated by JSMF Advisory Panel members, particularly when the outcome of collaborative discussions assists with Foundation program planning.
    NOTE: Collaborative awards will not be awarded in support of large, program-project style research proposals. Applicants requesting funds to support innovative research projects involving several laboratories should consider submitting one or more applications to the 21st Century Research Awards.
  • Eligibility: The 21st Century Collaborative Activity Awards are awards for multidisciplinary and multi-participant projects that address questions and topics relevant to the Foundation's core and complementary program areas.
    1. Strong preference will be given to applications involving multi-institutional collaboration.
    2. There are no geographic restrictions on these awards and the Foundation encourages international applications.
    3. The lead applicant must be sponsored by a non-profit institution as defined by Section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code.
    4. The grantee institution must agree to administer the award and to waive all indirect and administrative costs.
  • Funding: The budgets for collaborative activities will vary greatly depending on the scope of the proposed problem or project and on the number of people involved. The Foundation recognizes that funding must be appropriate to an activity's specific scope and needs. It also recognizes that organizing and implementing such an activity can be exceedingly time consuming. Unlike Research Award budgets, Collaborative Awards may request administrative support to facilitate the collaborative aspects.
  • Web: http://www.jsmf.org/apply/collaborative/
  • Deadline: Anytime

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LI-COR
 

Science Undergraduate Research Grant (SURG) Program

  • The Science Undergraduate Research Grant (SURG) Program is designed for faculty researchers and their students to gain access to cutting edge life science technology and incorporate it into the classroom. The SURG program’s goal is to increase inquiry-based learning by providing the tools necessary to accelerate both students’ and instructors’ research and improve the quality of their science curriculum.
  • Funding: LI-COR Biosciences is awarding a limited number of matching fund grants (value up to $18,400) to eligible academic institutions within the United States and Puerto Rico to be used toward the purchase of a LI-COR Odyssey® Fc Imaging System including the instrument, software, and reagents. LI-COR SURG grants are a 40% match from LI-COR with the institution providing 60%. Depending on the package you choose, the system will cost the institution around $25,650 or $27,600, after you receive the 40% match.
  • Web: http://www.licor.com/bio/educational_resources/surg/index.jsp
  • Deadline: Rolling

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National Geographic Society
 

Field Research

  • The National Geographic Society awards grants for scientific field research and exploration through its Committee for Research and Exploration. All proposed projects must have both a geographical dimension and relevance to other scientific fields and be of broad scientific interest.
    Applications are generally limited to the following disciplines: anthropology, archaeology, astronomy, biology, botany, geography, geology, oceanography, paleontology, and zoology.
    In addition the committee is emphasizing multidisciplinary projects that address environmental issues (e.g., loss of biodiversity and habitat, effects of human-population pressures).
  • Eligibility: Applicants are expected to have advanced degrees (Ph.D. or equivalent) and be associated with an educational organization or institution. Independent researchers or those pursuing a Ph.D.-level degree may apply, but awards to non-Ph.D. applicants are rare. As a general rule, all applicants are expected to have published a minimum of three articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals.
  • Funding: While grant amounts vary greatly, most range from U.S. $15,000 to $20,000. There is no set quantity of grants awarded, but budget constraints keep the number to approximately 250 per year.
    As National Geographic Society funds are intended to function as complementary support, the committee strongly encourages applicants to seek additional, concurrent funding from other funding agencies. Committee grants tend to act as seed money and are given for one year's research.
    Sometimes, but rarely, the committee will fund a maximum of two years of research. If the project director in your project feels that there are distinctive and substantive reasons for submitting a two-year application, he or she should understand that competition is keen, and awards for two years are scarce.
  • Web: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/grants-programs/cre-application/
  • Deadline: Anytime

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Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
 

Explorer Awards RFA

  • The Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) seeks to improve the diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorders by funding, catalyzing and driving innovative research of the greatest quality and relevance. Although SFARI's immediate priority is to benefit individuals challenged by autism spectrum disorders, autism research is expected to yield insights into the neural mechanisms of fundamental human capabilities. Thus SFARI's efforts will aid the broader mission of the Simons Foundation to advance research in basic science and mathematics.
    This award program is designed to enhance our existing support of autism research by providing timely resources to enable focused experiments highly relevant to our mission. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying autism spectrum disorders or potential therapeutic approaches will require investigation at multiple levels, including but not limited to studies focused on gene discovery, molecular mechanisms, circuits, anatomy, and cognition and behavior. We will consider proposals at all of these levels.
    Explorer Awards are intended to provide resources to support exploratory experiments that will strengthen hypotheses and lead to the formulation of competitive applications for subsequent larger-scale funding by SFARI or other organizations. Innovative, high-risk/high-impact proposals are encouraged. We especially encourage applications from investigators who are new to the field of autism, but who have expertise that could be brought to bear on this complex disorder.
  • Funding: SFARI will support applications for maximum direct costs of $50,000 for one year, non-renewable. Indirect costs are limited to 20 percent of direct costs, with the following exceptions: equipment, tuition, pre and postdoctoral fellow stipends and benefits, any subcontracts with budgets — including indirect expenses, and SCC biospecimens. Travel expenses may not be included in the budget. Indirect costs paid to a subcontractor may not exceed 20 percent of the direct costs paid to the subcontractor.
  • Web: http://sfari.org/funding/grants/explorer-awards-rfa
  • Deadline: Applications are considered on a rolling basis, with a response time as early as 30 days.

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