Funding Opportunities
 
 


The OSP requests that all proposals, electronic or otherwise, be submitted in their complete and final form to OSP FIVE WORKING DAYS PRIOR to an agency deadline with a hardcopy of the proposal and the signed Internal Approval Form.

Please visit the "funding sources" link at the following website for program listings and searchable databases:
http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/calendar.html


 
   
     
 
Funding Opportunities Links
 
 

National Science Foundation

Jeffress Memorial Trust

  • Jeffress Trust ***** NOTICE the Trust is ONLY accepting renewal applications ($10,000) at this time. *****

U. S. Department of the Interior

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Guggenheim Foundation

Research Corporation for Science Advancement

Institute of Education Sciences

National Endowment for the Humanities

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The NEA Foundation

National Institutes of Health

U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Virginia Environmental Endowment

National Endowment for Financial Education

Graham Foundation

U.S. Department of Defense

Alcatel-Lucent Foundation

GE Foundation

The Hershey Company

Macy's Inc.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Wish You Well Foundation

The W.L.S. Spencer Foundation

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Funding Opportunities

 
National Science Foundation
 

International Research Experiences for Students

  • The International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) program supports development of globally-engaged U.S. science and engineering students capable of performing in an international research environment at the forefront of science and engineering. The IRES program supports active research participation by students enrolled as undergraduates or graduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. IRES projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the IRES program.
  • Funding: Approximately 12 IRES awards will be made in FY 2013, pending quality of proposals and availability of funds
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12551/nsf12551.htm
  • Deadline: August 21, 2012 (Third Tuesday in August, Annually Thereafter)

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

  • Research experience is one of the most effective avenues for attracting talented undergraduates to, and retaining them in careers in, science and engineering, including careers in teaching and education research. The REU program, through both Sites and Supplements, aims to provide appropriate and valuable educational experiences for undergraduate students through participation in research. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. REU projects feature high-quality interaction of students with faculty and/or other research mentors and access to appropriate facilities and professional development opportunities.
  • Funding: $67,700,000 in FY2010 -- This estimate includes both Sites and Supplements, pending availability of funds. Estimated number of awards: 1,800 to 1,850 -- This estimate includes approximately 170 new Site awards and 1,650 new Supplement awards each year.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09598/nsf09598.htm
  • Deadline: August 22, 2012 (Deadline for REU Site proposals except for those requiring access to Antarctica)

Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBs)

  • Science and engineering research and education are increasingly digital and increasingly data-intensive. Digital data are not only the output of research but their analysis provide input to new hypotheses, enabling new scientific insights, driving innovation and informing education. Therein lies one of the major challenges of this scientific generation: how to develop, implement and support the new methods, management structures and technologies to store and manage the diversity, size, and complexity of current and future data sets and data streams.
    NSF's vision for a Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21) considers an integrated, scalable, and sustainable cyberinfrastructure as crucial for innovation in science and engineering (see www.nsf.gov/cif21).
    Data Infrastructure Building Blocks is an integral part of the CIF21 portfolio and seeks to provide support for the following research activities: (a) Conceptualization; (b) Implementation; and (c) Interoperability.
  • Funding: $41,500,000 pending availability of funds; the average award size for conceptualization awards is anticipated to be $100,000 for one year; the average award size for implementation awards is anticipated to be approximately $8 million total over 5 years; the award size for interoperability awards is anticipated to be up to $1.5 million total over 3 years.
  • Web: http://nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12557/nsf12557.htm
  • Deadline: Implementation & Interoperability Tracks: August 30, 2012

Geography and Spatial Sciences Program (GSS)

  • As specified in the Geography and Spatial Sciences Program strategic plan, the goals of the NSF Geography and Spatial Sciences (GSS) Program are:
    • To promote scientific research in geography and the spatial sciences that advances theory and basic understanding and that addresses the challenges facing society.
    • To promote the integration of geographers and spatial scientists in interdisciplinary research.
    • To promote education and training of geographers and spatial scientists in order to enhance the capabilities of current and future generations of researchers.
    • To promote the development and use of scientific methods and tools for geographic research.
    The Geography and Spatial Sciences Program sponsors research on the geographic distributions and interactions of human, physical, and biotic systems on the Earth's surface. Investigations are encouraged to propose plans for research about the nature, causes, and consequences of human activity and natural environmental processes across a range of scales. Projects on a variety of topics (both domestic and international) qualify for support if they offer promise of contributing to scholarship by enhancing geographical knowledge, concepts, theories, methods, and their application to societal problems and concerns. GSS encourages projects that explicitly integrate undergraduate and graduate education into the overall research agenda.
    GSS provides support through a number of different funding mechanisms:
    • Regular research awards
    • Doctoral dissertation research improvement (DDRI) awards
    • Faculty early-career development (CAREER) awards
    • Awards for conferences, workshops, group-travel support, and community-development or community-serving activities
    • Research coordination network (RCN) awards
    • Rapid-response research (RAPID) awards
    • Early-concept grants for exploratory research (EAGER) and creative research awards for transformative interdisciplinary ventures (CREATIV) may be supported in rare and unusual cases. (GSS strives to be open to ideas and approaches in early stages of development and emphasizes the potential longer-term significance of new lines of inquiry as part of its merit evaluation of all proposals.)
  • Funding: Estimated number of awards is 60 to 75. Anticipate funding amount is $6,000,000 to $7,000,000 pending availability of funds. Project budgets should be developed at scales appropriate for the work to be conducted. Regular research awards supported by GSS generally range from between $40,000 to $400,000. Doctoral dissertation research improvement (DDRI) awards may not exceed $16,000. Faculty early-career development (CAREER) awards must be a minimum of $400,000, with CAREER awards supported by GSS rarely exceeding $550,000. Awards to support conferences, workshops, group travel, and/or other community-development activities generally range between $20,000 and $300,000. Research coordination network (RCN) awards generally range between $300,000 and $500,000. RAPID awards generally range between $20,000 and $60,000.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12570/nsf12570.htm
  • Deadline: September 13, 2012

NSF/NEH: Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL)

  • This funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program supports projects that contribute to data management and archiving, and to the development of the next generation of researchers. Funding can support fieldwork and other activities relevant to the digital recording, documenting, and archiving of endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases.
  • Funding: Funding will be available in the form of one- to three-year project grants as well as fellowships for up to twelve months and doctoral dissertation research improvement grants for up to 24 months.
  • Web: http://nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=12816
  • Deadline: September 15, 2012

Joint DMS/NIGMS Initiative to Support Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences (DMS/NIGMS)

  • The Division of Mathematical Sciences in the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health plan to support research in mathematics and statistics on questions in the biological and biomedical sciences. Both agencies recognize the need and urgency for promoting research at the interface between the mathematical sciences and the life sciences. This competition is designed to encourage new collaborations, as well as to support existing ones.
  • Funding: 15 to 20 Awards from this competition may be made by either NSF or NIH at the option of the agencies, not the grantee. $5,000,000 Per year for new applications ($2,000,000 from NSF, $3,000,000 from NIGMS), subject to availability of funds. Award sizes are expected to range from $100,000 to $400,000 per year with durations of 3-5 years.
  • Web: http://nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12561/nsf12561.htm
  • Deadline: September 17, 2012

Partnerships for Innovation: Building Innovation Capacity (PFI: BIC)

  • National prosperity today has become more dependent upon research and technology. Thus, NSF's role of supporting discovery research across all fields of science and engineering has become increasingly more relevant to economic development. By establishing and expanding partnerships, existing research discovery findings from institutions of higher education can be translated to innovations.
    This program solicitation, Partnerships for Innovation: Building Innovation Capacity (PFI: BIC) starts with an existing sound scientific and/or engineering-based research discovery that can be translated to market-valued solutions through a partnership between academe and small technology-based businesses. The funds will provide support to an academic institution to partner with at least two small technology-based businesses that are not in direct competition with each other to carry out early translational-research activities The primary aims of the activities of this partnership are three-fold: (1) to build the innovation capacity of the individual participants from academe and from business; (2) to increase the viability of the small business concerns; and (3) to develop the next-generation workforce by providing opportunities for students at different levels to effectively learn from, participate in, and be profoundly changed by exposure to the process of building innovation capacity that occurs in BIC projects. The active collaboration between academe and business could result in solutions with potential for an impact on more than one market.
  • Funding: $8,000,000 total for 11 to 13 awards of up to $600,000 with project period of two years
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12578/nsf12578.htm
  • Letter of Intent (REQUIRED) : September 26, 2012; Full Proposal Deadline: December 12, 2012

Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science

  • The Directorate for Engineering (ENG) and the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE),  Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science program supports the active involvement of K-12 science, technology, engineering, computer and information science, and mathematics (STEM) teachers and community college faculty in engineering and computer science research in order to bring knowledge of engineering, computer science, and technological innovation into their classrooms. The goal is to help build long-term collaborative partnerships between K-12 STEM teachers, community college faculty, and the NSF university research community by involving the teachers and community college faculty in engineering and computer science research and helping them translate their research experiences and new knowledge into classroom activities.  Partnerships with inner city schools or other high needs schools are especially encouraged, as is participation by underrepresented minorities, women, and persons with disabilities. This announcement features two mechanisms for support of in-service and pre-service K-12 STEM teachers and community college faculty: RET supplements to ongoing ENG or CISE awards and new RET Site awards. RET supplements may be included in proposals for new or renewed NSF Directorate for Engineering (ENG) or CISE grants or as supplements to ongoing NSF ENG or CISE funded projects. RET in Engineering and Computer Science Sites are based on independent proposals from engineering or computer and information science departments, schools or colleges to initiate and conduct research participation projects for a number of K-12 STEM teachers and/or community college faculty.
  • Funding: Funding levels to be determined.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5736
  • Deadline: October 1, 2012 (First Monday in October, Annually Thereafter)

Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP)

  • AGEP is committed to the national goal of increasing the numbers of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (URMs), including URMs with disabilities entering and completing graduate education and postdoctoral training to levels representative of the available pool of URMs. Increased URM participation in advanced STEM education and training is critical for supporting the development of a diverse professional STEM workforce especially a diverse STEM faculty who serve as the intellectual, professional, personal, and organizational role models that shape the expectations of future scientists and engineers. To achieve this long term commitment, the AGEP program will support the development, implementation, study, and dissemination of innovative models and standards of graduate education and postdoctoral training that are designed to improve URM participation, preparation, and success.
    AGEP projects must focus on URM U.S. citizens in STEM graduate education, and/or postdoctoral training, and their preparation for academic STEM careers at all types of institutions of higher education.  STEM professional development more broadly may be included in projects with a strong and compelling argument.  AGEP is interested in proposals that include any or all science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields supported by NSF including the social, behavioral and economic sciences, and multi-, cross-, or inter-disciplinary STEM fields.
    AGEP encourages community colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, minority-serving institutions (Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Alaskan Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions, and Tribal Colleges and Universities), women's colleges, and institutions primarily serving persons with disabilities to participate as lead institutions and as alliance partners in all three types of AGEP projects.
    AGEP intends to support the following types of projects:
    • AGEP-Transformation - Strategic alliances of institutions and organizations to develop, implement, and study innovative evidence-based models and standards for STEM graduate education, postdoctoral training, and academic STEM career preparation that eliminate or mitigate negative factors and promote positive practices for URMs.
    • AGEP-Knowledge Adoption and Translation (AGEP-KAT) - Projects to expand the adoption (or adaptation) of research findings and evidence-based strategies and practices related to the participation and success of URMs in STEM graduate education, postdoctoral training, and academic STEM careers at all types of institutions of higher education. 
    • AGEP-Broadening Participation Research in STEM Education (AGEP-BPR) - Investigator initiated empirical research projects that seek to create and study new theory-driven models and innovations related to the participation and success of URMs in STEM graduate education, postdoctoral training, and academic STEM careers at all types of institutions of higher education.
  • Funding: Approximately $6,000,000 in FY 2013 for new AGEP awards for up to 5 AGEP-Transformation awards, about 3 AGEP-KAT awards, and about 4 AGEP-BPR awards are anticipated in FY 2013 pending the availability of funds.
  • Web: http://nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12554/nsf12554.htm
  • Deadline (AGEP-Transformation, AGEP-KAT, and AGEP-BPR): October 30, 2012     

Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry

  • The Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry Program supports research on 1) the interactions between biological and geological systems at all scales of space and time; 2) geomicrobiology and biomineralization processes; 3) the role of life in the transformation and evolution of the Earth's geochemical cycles; 4) inorganic and organic geochemical processes occurring at or near the Earth's surface now and in the past, and at the broad spectrum of interfaces ranging in scale from planetary and regional to mineral-surface and supramolecular; 5) mineralogy and chemistry of soils and sediments; 6) surficial chemical and biogeochemical systems and cycles and their modification through natural and anthropogenic change; and 7) development of tools, methods, and models for low-temperature geochemistry and geobiological research - such as those emerging from molecular biology - in the study of the terrestrial environment.
  • Funding: $5,200,000 for 30-40 awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09552/nsf09552.htm
  • Deadline: January 16, 2013 (January 16, Annually Thereafter)

Environmental Sustainability

  • The Environmental Sustainability program supports engineering research with the goal of promoting sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival. The long-term viability of natural capital is critical for many areas of human endeavor. Research in Environmental Sustainability typically considers long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics.
    This program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions. There are four principal general research areas which are supported, but others can be proposed by contacting the program director by email at: bhamilto@nsf.gov
    • Industrial Ecology
    • Green Engineering
    • Ecological Engineering
    • Earth Systems Engineering
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501027
  • Deadline: February 19, 2013

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Jeffress Memorial Trust
 

Jeffress Trust ***** NOTICE the Trust is ONLY accepting renewal applications ($10,000) at this time. *****

  • The purpose of the Jeffress Trust is to support basic research in chemical, medical, or other scientific fields through grants to educational and research institutions in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Grants are given to assist scientists in such institutions to conduct investigations in the natural sciences, generally considered to include chemistry, physics, biology (with the exception of field studies, classification, other largely observational studies), studies in the basic medical sciences, such as biochemistry, microbiology, and others.
    The Trust will make grants-in-aid of research and will not suggest specific research programs. Institutions requesting support for programs will be expected to give evidence of their interest in the programs by providing usual supplies and services and indirect costs. The Trust will normally not support clinical research (diagnosis or treatment of disease, abnormality, or malfunctions in people or animals, or testing of drugs or procedures for their treatment). The principal evaluation criteria will be the scientific significance of the proposed work and the competence of the investigator. The Trust is particularly interested in supporting fundamental research by scientists early in their careers and new areas of research or more speculative projects by established investigators.
  • Funding: At this time, funds should be requested for only one year, maximum $10,000.  Only existing projects are eligible for funding at this time and until further notice from the sponsor. One-year renewals can be requested for up to $10,000 per year for up to two additional years. These renewals should be requested at the regular application deadlines and should begin no sooner than one year after the start of the first award.
  • Web: http://www.wm.edu/offices/sponsoredprograms/preaward/external/scitechfundsourcesatoz/Jeffress/index.php
  • Application Deadline: September 1, 2012; March 1, 2013

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U.S. Department of the Interior

 

Youth Environmental Education Opportunities

  • The objective of this funding opportunity is to provide youth the opportunity to connect with the natural world by participating in hands-on environmental educational experiences through outdoor programs and field classrooms to youth and families, working in conjunction with a variety of schools and other youth-focused nonprofit organizations. These experiences will provide academic, experiential, and environmental education opportunities in order for youth and families to gain a better understanding and appreciation of natural resource management objectives and stewardship of the land.
  • Funding: $30,000 in funding is available for five to 10 cooperative agreements ranging from $2,000 to $10,000 for projects up to five years.
  • Web: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=g8X7Tm9J2r8qhGhQld1gTNBJWnJp0C9JKBlyQDL1vBlyjtx9kX1t!65310457?oppId=118213&mode=VIEW
  • Deadline: September 14, 2012

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Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
 

Sloan Research Fellowships

  • The Sloan Research Fellowships seek to stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise. These fellowships are awarded in recognition of distinguished performance and a unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field. Eligible fields include chemistry, computational or evolutionary molecular biology, computer science, economics, mathematics, neuroscience, ocean sciences (including marine biology), physics, or a related field.
  • Eligibility: Candidates must be nominated by a department head or other senior researcher. Submissions unaccompanied by a nomination from a senior researcher are not accepted.
    Candidates must:
    - hold a Ph.D. (or equivalent) in one of the eligible fields;
    - be members of the teaching faculty (i.e., tenure track) of a college, university or other degree-granting institution in the United States or Canada; and
    - normally, be no more than six years from completion of their most recent Ph.D. (or equivalent) as of the year of their nomination. (Selection committees may make exceptions for candidates who are more than six years from their most recent Ph.D. due to military service, a change of field, or child-rearing responsibilities or who have held a faculty appointment for less than two years. If any of these circumstances apply, a clear explanation should be included in the candidate's nomination letter.)
    While Fellows are expected to be at an early stage of their research careers, there should be strong evidence of independent research accomplishments. Candidates in all fields are normally below the rank of associate professor and do not hold tenure, but these are not strict requirements.
    The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation welcomes nominations of all candidates who meet the traditional high standards of this program, and strongly encourages the nomination of qualified women and members of underrepresented minority groups.
  • Funding: These two-year fellowships are awarded yearly to 126 researchers. The size of the award is $50,000 for a two-year period.
  • Web: http://www.sloan.org/fellowships
  • Deadline: September 15, 2012

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Guggenheim Foundation

 

Fellowships to Assist Research and Artistic Creation

  • Often characterized as "midcareer" awards, Guggenheim Fellowships are intended for men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.
    Fellowships are awarded through two annual competitions: one open to citizens and permanent residents of the United States and Canada, and the other open to citizens and permanent residents of Latin America and the Caribbean. Candidates must apply to the Guggenheim Foundation in order to be considered in either of these competitions.
    The Foundation receives between 3,500 and 4,000 applications each year. Although no one who applies is guaranteed success in the competition, there is no prescreening: all applications are reviewed. Approximately 220 Fellowships are awarded each year.
  • Funding: The amounts of grants vary, and the Foundation does not guarantee it will fully fund any project. Working with a fixed annual budget, the Foundation strives to allocate its funds as equitably as possible, taking into consideration the Fellows' other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. Members of the teaching profession receiving sabbatical leave on full or part salary are eligible for appointment, as are those holding other fellowships and appointments at research centers.
  • Web: http://www.gf.org/about-the-foundation/the-fellowship
  • Deadline: September 15, 2012

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Research Corporation for Science Advancement

 

Cottrell College Science Awards- Single Investigator Awards

  • The Single-Investigator Cottrell College Science Awards support research in astronomy, chemistry, physics and closely related fields that significantly overlap these three disciplines at public and private, predominantly undergraduate institutions. The projects proposed are judged on the basis of scientific merit, originality, significance, feasibility, overlap with the three core disciplines and the ability of the institutional environment to sustain the activity. The involvement of undergraduate students in the research is expected, and is an important factor in most awards.
  • Eligibility: Applications will be accepted from faculty members at public and private institutions of higher education in the United States. The applicant's home department must offer at least the baccalaureate, but not doctoral, degrees in the applicant's discipline. The institutional commitment to research is an important consideration in evaluating the potential of the proposal. The principal investigator must have a faculty appointment in a department of astronomy, chemistry or physics, or, if from another department, propose research that significantly overlaps with research in one of these three disciplines. Faculty who have had a previous CCSA award, or whose appointment is in a department or school of engineering or medicine, are not eligible. At the time of application the applicant must be within the first three years of his/her first tenure-track appointment, and within 12 years of receiving his/her doctoral degree.
  • Funding: The total funding requested from RCSA is $35,000. An institutional matching contribution to the project of $10,000 is required for all applicants. SI-CCSAs provide for only those direct expenses necessary for the conduct of the proposed research and within the five budgetary categories described below. While these awards are designed to provide primarily summer support, continuation of the research throughout the academic year is expected. Budgets should be tailored to individual circumstances. Awards are approved for two years with a single, one-year extension possible to expend remaining funds.
  • Web: http://www.rescorp.org/grants-and-awards/cottrell-college-science-awards/single-investigator
  • Deadline: September 15, 2012 (pre-proposal)

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Institute of Education Sciences
 

Special Education Research: Reading, Writing, and Language Development

  • Through its Reading, Writing, and Language Development (Reading/Language) special education research program, the Institute intends to contribute to the improvement of reading, writing, and language skills for students with or at risk for disabilities. The long-term outcome of this program will be an array of tools and strategies (e.g., assessments, instructional approaches) that have been documented to be effective for improving reading, writing, or language outcomes for students with or at risk for disabilities from kindergarten through Grade 12.
  • Funding: Awards of up to $5 million are available. The maximum length of the award period varies by goal, ranging from two to five years. Although the Institute intends to support the research topics described in this announcement, all awards pursuant to this request for applications are contingent upon the availability of funds and the receipt of meritorious applications. The Institute does not plan to award a specific number of grants under a particular topic or goal. Rather, the number of projects funded under a specific topic and goal depends upon the number of high quality applications submitted to that topic and goal. The size of the award depends on the goal and scope of the project.
  • Web: http://ies.ed.gov/funding/ncser_rfas/ncser_readwrite.asp
  • Application Deadline: September 20, 2012

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National Endowment for the Humanities
 

Enduring Questions

  • The NEH Enduring Questions grant program supports faculty members in the teaching and development of a new course that will foster intellectual community through the study of an enduring question. This question-driven course will encourage undergraduates and teachers to grapple with a fundamental concern of human life addressed by the humanities, and to join together in a deep and sustained program of reading in order to encounter influential thinkers over the centuries and into the present day.
    What is an enduring question? The following list is neither prescriptive nor exhaustive but serves to illustrate.
    • What is good government?
    • Can war be just?
    • What is friendship?
    • What is evil?
    • Are there universals in human nature?
    • What are the origins of the universe?
  • Funding: Awards of up to $25,000 for projects serving a single institution. Project periods may run between 18 and 36 months.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/education/enduring-questions
  • Deadline: September 13, 2012

Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

  • The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) invites applications to the Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants program. This program is designed to encourage innovations in the digital humanities. By awarding relatively small grants to support the planning stages, NEH aims to encourage the development of innovative projects that promise to benefit the humanities. Proposals should be for the planning or initial stages of digital initiatives in any area of the humanities.
    Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants may involve
    • research that brings new approaches or documents best practices in the study of the digital humanities;
    • planning and developing prototypes of new digital tools for preserving, analyzing, and making accessible digital resources, including libraries’ and museums’ digital assets;
    • scholarship that focuses on the history, criticism, and philosophy of digital culture and its impact on society;
    • scholarship or studies that examine the philosophical or practical implications and impact of the use of emerging technologies in specific fields or disciplines of the humanities, or in interdisciplinary collaborations involving several fields or disciplines;
    • innovative uses of technology for public programming and education utilizing both traditional and new media; and
    • new digital modes of publication that facilitate the dissemination of humanities scholarship in advanced academic as well as informal or formal educational settings at all academic levels.
  • Funding: Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants have two levels of funding:
    Level I Grants range from $5,000 to $30,000 in outright funding.
    Level II Grants range from $30,001 to $60,000 in outright funding.
    Cost sharing is not required for Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/odh/digital-humanities-start-grants
  • Deadline: September 25, 2012

Summer Stipends

  • Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both.
    Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources.
    Summer Stipends support full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months.
    Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.
  • The Summer Stipends program welcomes projects that respond to NEH's Bridging Cultures initiative. Such projects could focus on cultures internationally or within the United States. International projects might seek to enlarge Americans' understanding of other places and times, as well as other perspectives and intellectual traditions. American projects might explore the great variety of cultural influences on, and myriad subcultures within, American society. These projects might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest.
  • Funding: Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/summer-stipends
  • Deadline: September 27, 2012 (for projects beginning May 2013)

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National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

National Trust Preservation Fund

  • Grants from National Trust Preservation Funds (NTPF) are intended to encourage preservation at the local level by providing seed money for preservation projects. These grants help stimulate public discussion, enable local groups to gain the technical expertise needed for particular projects, introduce the public to preservation concepts and techniques, and encourage financial participation by the private sector. The National Trust is particularly interested in projects that relate to the preservation priorities listed below. If your project relates to any of these issues, please explain the connection in your narrative.
    Building sustainable communities: Does your project demonstrate that historic preservation supports economic, environmental and cultural sustainability in communities?
    Reimagining historic sites: Does your project use innovative, replicable strategies that create new models for historic site interpretation and stewardship?
    Promoting diversity and place: Does your project broaden the cultural diversity of historic preservation?
    Protecting historic places on public lands A small grant at the right time can go a long way and is often the catalyst that inspires a community to take action on a preservation project.
  • Funding: Grants generally start at $2,500 and range up to $5,000. (Please note: larger grants may be available.) The selection process is very competitive. Applicants are encouraged to develop proposals carefully and to complete the application form with assistance and guidance from the National Trust.
  • Web: http://www.preservationnation.org/resources/find-funding/documents/preservation-funds-guidelines-eligibility.html
  • Deadline: October 1, 2012; February 1, 2013

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The NEA Foundation
 

Learning & Leadership Grants

  • Learning & Leadership grants support public school teachers, public education support professionals, and/or faculty and staff in public institutions of higher education for one of the following two purposes: Grants to individuals fund participation in high-quality professional development experiences, such as summer institutes or action research or grants to groups fund collegial study, including study groups, action research, lesson study, or mentoring experiences for faculty or staff new to an assignment. All professional development must improve practice, curriculum, and student achievement. "One-shot" professional growth experiences, such as attending a national conference or engaging a professional speaker, are discouraged. Decisions regarding the content of the professional growth activities must be based upon an assessment of student work undertaken with colleagues, and must be integrated into the institutional planning process. Grant funds may be used for fees, travel expenses, books, or other materials that enable applicants to learn subject matter, instructional approaches, and skills. Recipients are required to exercise professional leadership by sharing their new learning with their colleagues.
  • Funding: The grant amount is $2,000 for individuals and $5,000 for groups engaged in collegial study. All $5,000 group grant applicants must include partner information.
  • Web: http://www.neafoundation.org/pages/educators/grant-programs/learning-and-leadership
  • Deadline: October 15, 2012

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National Institutes of Health
 

Small Research Grant Program (Parent R03)

  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) supports small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources. Investigator-initiated research, also known as unsolicited research, is research funded as a result of an investigator submitting a research grant application to NIH in an investigator's area of interest and competency. The R03 grant mechanism supports different types of projects including pilot and feasibility studies; secondary analysis of existing data; small self-contained research projects; development of research methodology; and development of new research technology. Any individual with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI) is invited to work with his or her organization to develop an application for support.
  • Funding: Direct costs are limited to $100,000 direct costs over the R03 two-year period, with no more than $50,000 in direct costs allowed in a single year. Cost sharing is not required.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-11-262.html
  • Deadline: October 16, 2012

Support for Conferences and Scientific Meetings (Parent R13/U13)

  • The purpose of the NIH Research Conference (R13) Grant and NIH Research Conference Cooperative Agreement (U13) Programs is to support high quality scientific conferences that are relevant to its mission and to the public health. A conference is defined as a symposium, seminar, workshop, or any other organized and formal meeting, whether conducted face-to-face or via the Internet, where individuals assemble (or meet virtually) to exchange information and views or explore or clarify a defined subject, problem, or area of knowledge, whether or not a published report results from such meeting. The NIH recognizes the value to members of the research community and all other interested parties in supporting such forums.
  • Funding: The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations, and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-12-212.html
  • Deadline: December 12, 2012

Improving Diet and Physical Activity Assessment (R01)

  • This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), issued by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of the Director (OD) Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), encourages innovative research to enhance the quality of measurements of dietary intake and physical activity. Applications submitted under this FOA may include development of: Novel assessment approaches; better methods to evaluate instruments; assessment tools for culturally diverse populations or various age groups, including older adults; improved technology or applications of existing technology; statistical methods to assess or correct for measurement errors or biases, methods to investigate the multidimensionality of diet and physical activity behavior through pattern analysis; or integrated measurement of diet and physical activity along with the environmental context of such behaviors.  
  • Funding: Expected direct cost amounts for individual awards range from $200,000 to $650,000.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-12-198.html
  • Deadline: February 5, 2013

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U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service
 

Small Grants

  • The Small Grants Program is a competitive, matching grants program that supports public-private partnerships carrying out projects in the United States that further the goals of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (Act). These projects must involve long-term protection, restoration, and/or enhancement of wetlands and associated uplands habitats for the benefit of all wetlands-associated migratory birds.
    This program supports the same type of projects and adheres to the same selection criteria and administrative guidelines as the U.S. Standard Grants Program. However, project activities are usually smaller in scope and involve fewer project dollars. Grant requests may not exceed $75,000, and funding priority is given to grantees or partners new to the Act’s Grants Program.
  • Funding: A minimum of $3 million has been approved to support projects in FY 2012. The Small Grant Program funding level is authorized up to $5 million, the maximum amount being contingent upon the quality and number of proposals received.
  • Web: http://www.fws.gov/birdhabitat/grants/nawca/small/index.shtm
  • Deadline: October 25, 2012

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Virginia Environmental Endowment

 

Virginia Mini-Grant Program

  • One of the most successful and popular of VEE's grantmaking programs is the Virginia Mini-Grant Program, which has enabled thousands of citizens to become actively involved in solving environmental problems in their own hometowns. With grants of $5,000 or less, schools have initiated environmental science courses and outdoor classroom projects, volunteers have monitored water quality in dozens of local streams and rivers, and communities have developed innovative strategies to ensure environmental quality is improved in their community.
  • Funding: VEE's Virginia Mini-Grant awards range from a minimum of $1,000 to a maximum of $5,000 for projects up to one year in duration. Matching funds from other sources are usually required. Although cash matches are preferred, in-kind and volunteer services will be considered when detailed in the grant proposal and budget.
  • Web: http://www.vee.org/mini.cfm
  • Deadline: December 1, 2012

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National Endowment for Financial Education
 

Research Funding

  • The National Endowment for Financial Education supports innovative research that can make a profound contribution to the field of financial literacy. Applications are encouraged from the following fields: behavior, marketing, economics, finance, neuroscience, education, sociology, change theory, psychology, and decision sciences, among others.
  • Funding: Recent grants have ranged from $100,000 to $150,000.
  • Web: http://www.nefe.org/what-we-provide/research-funding/grant-guidelines.aspx
  • Deadline: December 4, 2012

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Graham Foundation

 

Grants in Architecture and Related Arts

  • Founded in 1956, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts makes project-based grants to individuals and organizations and produces public programs to foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society.
  • Architecture and related spatial practices engage a wide range of cultural, social, political, technological, environmental, and aesthetic issues. We are interested in projects that investigate the contemporary condition, expand historical perspectives, or explore the future of architecture and the designed environment. We support innovative, thought-provoking investigations in architecture; architectural history, theory, and criticism; design; engineering; landscape architecture; urban planning; urban studies; visual arts; and related fields of inquiry. Our interest also extends to work being done in the fine arts, humanities, and sciences that expands the boundaries of thinking about architecture and space. In an effort to bridge communities and different fields of knowledge, we support a wide range of practitioners (such as architects, scholars, critics, writers, artists, curators, and educators) and organizations (such as non-profit galleries, colleges and universities, publishers, and museums).Open discourse is essential to advance study and understanding, therefore our grantmaking focuses on the public dissemination of ideas. With our support, the work of individuals and organizations reaches new audiences, from specialized to general, and creates opportunities for critical dialogue between various publics.
  • Funding: The Graham Foundation offers Production and Presentation Grants to organizations up to $30,000, likely less.
  • Web: http://www.grahamfoundation.org/grant_programs
  • Deadline: February 25, 2013

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U.S. Department of Defense

 

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

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Alcatel-Lucent Foundation
 

Charitable Grants

  • The Alcatel-Lucent Foundation supports programs designed to provide youth in underserved communities with access to education and life skills to prepare them for employment, higher education, and the opportunity to contribute as citizens and community leaders. Special emphasis is directed toward girls and young women.
  • Funding: In 2010, the foundation awarded more than $3.4 million in charitable grants.
  • Web: http://www2.alcatel-lucent.com/foundation/missionandgovernanace.html
  • Deadline: Ongoing for letters of inquiry. Full proposals accepted on an invite-only premise.

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GE Foundation
 

Grant Program

  • The GE Foundation provide grants and invest in initiatives that work to solve some of the world’s most difficult problems. In coordination with their partners, the GE Foundation support U.S. and international education, developing health globally, the environment, public policy, human rights, disaster relief and community success around the globe. In the area of education, the foundation supports programs designed to raise student achievement through improved math and science curricula, professional development opportunities for teachers, and management capacity in schools.
  • Funding: In 2010, the foundation awarded more than $74 million in grants.
  • Web: http://www.ge.com/foundation/about_ge_foundation/index.jsp
  • Deadline: Rolling

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The Hershey Company
 

Grant Program

  • The Hershey Company remains committed to supporting the communities in which it operates and to society in general. Cash and product contributions are made to support a variety of worthy causes and non-profit organizations which support Education, Health & Human Services, Civic
    & Community initiatives, Arts & Culture and the Environment. Particular emphasis is placed upon causes that support kids and kids at risk.
  • Funding: Varies by program and scope.
  • Web: http://www.thehersheycompany.com/assets/pdfs/hersheycompany/GRANT_APPLICATION_GUIDELINES_cashcontributions.pdf
  • Deadline: Rolling

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Macy's Inc.
 

My Macy's District Grants

  • My Macy's District Grants support nonprofit organizations and initiatives that are important to our individual local communities from coast to coast and that fall within the Macy's focus areas - arts and culture, education, the environment, HIV/AIDS, and women's issues.
  • Funding: Varies by request and by program.
  • Web: http://macysinc.com/community/my_macys_district_grants.aspx
  • Deadline: Ongoing

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

 

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization

  • Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) supports research, policy analysis and evaluation projects that provide policy leaders timely information on health care policy, financing and organization issues. Supported projects include: (a) examining significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and (b) exploring or testing major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.
  • Eligibility: Researchers, as well as practitioners and public and private policy-makers working with researchers, are eligible to submit proposals through their organizations. Projects may be initiated from within many disciplines, including health services research, economics, sociology, political science, public policy, public health, public administration, law and business administration. RWJF encourages proposals from organizations on behalf of researchers who are just beginning their careers, who can serve either individually as principal investigators or as part of a project team comprising researchers or other collaborators with more experience.
  • Funding: In January 2011, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) re-authorized this initiative for $5 million over approximately three years. Grants will be awarded in two categories: (1) Small grants for projects requiring $100,000 or less and projected to take up to 12 months or less; (2) Large grants for projects requiring more than $100,000 and/or projected to take longer than 12 months.
  • Web: http://www.hcfo.org/funding
  • Deadline: Anytime

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Wish You Well Foundation
 

Donation Request

  • The Wish You Well Foundation seeks to support family literacy in the United States by fostering and promoting the development and expansion of new and existing literacy and educational programs.
  • Funding: Grants range from $200 to $10,000
  • Web: http://wishyouwellfoundation.org/apply/
  • Deadline: Rolling

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The W.L.S. Spencer Foundation

 

Grants

  • The mission of The W.L.S. Spencer Foundation is to fund activities, anywhere in the world, which foster new and innovative ideas in education.
  • Program Areas:
    Art: educational activities, publications and outreach associated with innovative art and/or contemporary art exhibitions, especially those focusing on contemporary Asian Art. The foundation is interested in projects that encourage knowledge about art and culture, foster international understanding, and are supported by academic scholarship.
    Education: innovative and that motivate children to stay in school, do well academically and continue their education beyond high school (to college or other higher education opportunities). In this area, the foundation may continue to fund programs that they believe in, and they may fund replication of a successful program in a new site. The foundation tends to fund programs that are national or regional in nature, but which have a chapter in San Francisco. The foundation does not fund individual schools.
  • Funding: In 2009, the foundation provided more than $1 million for 40 grants, ranging from $500 to $400,000.
  • Web: http://www.pfs-llc.net/spencer/spencer.html
  • Deadline: Rolling for letters of inquiry. When a letter of inquiry reflects most closely the Foundation's purposes, they will request a full proposal.

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