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Please visit the "funding sources" link at the following website for program listings and searchable databases:
http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/calendar.html

Funding Opportunities Links

U. S. Department of Education

National Science Foundation

Virginia Environmental Endowment

National Institutes of Health

Institute of Education Sciences

National Endowment for the Humanities

William T. Grant Foundation

The Mockingbird Foundation

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)

Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation

Rockwell Collins

U.S. Department of the Interior

Guggenheim Foundation

Research Corporation for Science Advancement

National Trust for Historic Preservation

Graham Foundation

U.S. Department of Defense

Compton Foundation

Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

The W.L.S. Spencer Foundation

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Wish You Well Foundation

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Funding Opportunities

U. S. Department of Education

Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII): Promise Neighborhoods Program--Implementation Grant Competition

  • The U. S. Department of Education's Promise Neighborhoods Program seeks to significantly improve the educational and developmental outcomes of children and youth in our most distressed communities and to transform those communities. Applicants applying under the Implementation Grant Competition must submit a plan to create a Promise Neighborhood.
  • Funding: Estimated grant range is from $4 million to $6 million.
  • Web: http://gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-20/html/2012-9597.htm
  • Deadline: Notice of Intent: June 8, 2012 (Intent to apply is strongly encouraged by completing a web-based form (http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/survey/survey.cfm?ID=c306e04-40e0-4cb3-b6e7-4a8ea1d2012e). Applicants that do not complete this form may still apply for funding. Full Proposals: July 27, 2012.

Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII): Promise Neighborhoods Program Planning Grant Competition

Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program

  • This program provides funds to institutions of higher education, a consortia of such institutions, or partnerships between nonprofit organizations and institutions of higher education to plan, develop, and implement programs that strengthen and improve undergraduate instruction in international studies and foreign languages.
    The primary role of each program assisted with federal funds is to enhance the international academic program of the institution. Eligible activities may include but are not limited to the following:
    Development of an interdisciplinary global or international studies program.
    Development of a program that focuses on issues or topics such as global migration or international health.
    Development of an area studies program and its languages.
    Creation of innovative curricula that combine the teaching of international studies with professional and pre-professional studies such as engineering.
    Research for and development of specialized teaching materials, including language materials (e.g., business French).
    Establishment of internship opportunities for faculty or students in domestic and overseas settings.
    Development of study-abroad programs.
  • Funding: Grant awards are normally made for projects extending over a period of two years. Organizations, associations, and institutional consortia are eligible for three years of support. Applicants for multi-year funding must provide a plan of operation and budget for each year for which support is requested. Continuation of an award is subject to a satisfactory performance level and the availability of funds. Programs are carried on primarily within the United States. It is estimated that about 15 awards will be made. Single institution of higher education: $70,000-$120,000. Consortia: $80,000-$200,000.
  • Web: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/iegpsugisf/index.html
  • Deadline: June 29, 2012

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National Science Foundation

GeoPrisms Program

  • GeoPRISMS (Geodynamic Processes at Rifting and Subducting Margins) is the successor to the MARGINS Program. GeoPRISMS will investigate the coupled geodynamics, earth surface processes, and climate interactions that build and modify continental margins over a wide range of timescales. These interactions cross the shoreline and have applications to margin evolution and dynamics, construction of stratigraphic architecture, accumulation of economic resources, and associated geologic hazards and environmental management. The GeoPRISMS Program includes two broadly integrated science initiatives (Subduction Cycles and Deformation and Rift Initiation and Evolution), linked by five overarching scientific topics and themes, where transformative advances are likely to occur in the next decade, and where a focused scientific program could be most effective. These overarching science topics include 1) Origin and evolution of continental crust; 2) Fluids, magmas and their interactions; 3) Climate-surface-tectonics feedbacks; 3) Geochemical cycles; and 5) Plate boundary deformation and geodynamics. Each of the initiatives has identified primary sites for focused investigations, as well as thematic studies that will complement primary site studies
  • Funding: $5,000,000 pending the availability of funds; 10 estimated awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12537/nsf12537.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click
  • Deadline: July 2, 2012

Petrology and Geochemistry

  • The Petrology and Geochemistry Program supports basic research that address the formation and evolution of our planet using petrological and geochemical characteristics of Earth materials in the crust, mantle, and core. Proposals in this program generally address the petrology and high-temperature geochemistry of igneous and metamorphic rocks (including mantle samples), mineral physics, economic geology, and volcanology. Proposals that bridge disciplinary boundaries or that include development of analytical tools for potential use by the broad community are also encouraged.
  • Funding: $13,900,000 annually, pending availability of funds; 40 to 60 annually
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09543/nsf09543.htm
  • Deadline: July 6, 2012 (July 6, Annually Thereafter)

Advances in Biological Informatics (ABI)

  • The Advances in Biological Informatics (ABI) program seeks to encourage new approaches to the analysis and dissemination of biological knowledge for the benefit of both the scientific community and the broader public. The ABI program is especially interested in the development of informatics tools and resources that have the potential to advance, or transform, research in biology supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences at the National Science Foundation. The ABI program accepts two major types of proposals: Innovation awards that seek to pioneer new approaches to the application of informatics to biological problems and Development awards that seek to provide robust cyberinfrastructure that will enable transformative biological research.
  • Funding: Estimated number of awards: 20 to 30. Actual number of awards may vary depending on the ratio of Innovation to Development awards, which in turn may vary according to overall portfolio balance and individual proposal merits. Total estimated funding is approximately $22 million annually, subject to the availability of funds. Approximately $8-10 million is available for new awards depending on prior commitments.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10567/nsf10567.htm
  • Deadline: July 10, 2012 (Second Tuesday in July, Annually Thereafter)

Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry

  • The Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry Program supports research on 1) the interactions between biological and geological systems at all scales of space and time; 2) geomicrobiology and biomineralization processes; 3) the role of life in the transformation and evolution of the Earth's geochemical cycles; 4) inorganic and organic geochemical processes occurring at or near the Earth's surface now and in the past, and at the broad spectrum of interfaces ranging in scale from planetary and regional to mineral-surface and supramolecular; 5) mineralogy and chemistry of soils and sediments; 6) surficial chemical and biogeochemical systems and cycles and their modification through natural and anthropogenic change; and 7) development of tools, methods, and models for low-temperature geochemistry and geobiological research - such as those emerging from molecular biology - in the study of the terrestrial environment.
  • Funding: $5,200,000 for 30-40 awards
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09552/nsf09552.htm
  • Deadline: Full Proposal - July 16, 2012 (July 16, Annually Thereafter); January 16, 2013 (January 16, Annually Thereafter)

Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology

  • Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology supports studies of: (1) the changing aspects of life, ecology, environments, and biogeography in past geologic time based on fossil plants, animals, and microbes; (2) all aspects of the Earth's sedimentary carapace-- insights into geological processes recorded in its historical records and rich organic and inorganic resources locked in rock sequences; (3) the science of dating and measuring the time sequence of events and rates of geological processes of the Earth's past sedimentary and biological (fossil) record; (4) the geologic record of the production, transportation, and deposition of physical and chemical sediments; and (5) understanding the complexities of Earth's deep time (pre-Holocene) climate systems. The Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology Program especially encourages integrative studies at the national and international levels that seek to link subdisciplines, such as geochronology, paleoclimatology, paleogeography, paleoenvironments and paleoecology.
  • Funding: $6,000,000 annually, pending availability of funds; 30 to 40 annually
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09560/nsf09560.htm
  • Deadline: Full Proposal - July 16, 2012 (July 16, Annually Thereafter)

Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE)

  • The Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE) program seeks to advance research at the frontiers of STEM learning and education, and to provide the foundational knowledge necessary to improve STEM learning and education in current and emerging learning contexts, both formal and informal, from childhood through adulthood, for all groups, and from before school through to graduate school and beyond into the workforce. The goals of the REESE program are: (1) to catalyze discovery and innovation at the frontiers of STEM learning and education; (2) to stimulate the field to produce high quality and robust research results through the progress of theory, method, and human resources; and (3) to coordinate and transform advances in education and learning research. In coordination with the Research on Gender in Science and Engineering (GSE) and Research on Disabilities Education (RDE) programs, REESE supports research on broadening participation in STEM education. REESE pursues its mission by developing an interdisciplinary research portfolio focusing on core scientific questions about STEM learning; it welcomes Fostering Interdisciplinary Research on Education (FIRE) projects, previously called for in a separate solicitation. REESE places particular importance upon the involvement of young investigators in the projects, at doctoral, postdoctoral, and early career stages, as well as the involvement of STEM disciplinary experts. Research questions related to educational research methodology and measurement are also central to REESE activities.
  • Funding: Estimated Number of Awards: Between 20-30 new awards in FY 2012. Approximately 2-3 Synthesis, 7-10 Small Empirical, and 7-10 Medium Empirical, 1-2 Large Empirical, and 3-5 FIRE awards will be funded. Anticipated Funding Amount:$10,000,000 for new awards. The maximum award amount for Synthesis projects is $300,000, with duration of up to two years. The maximum award amount for Small Empirical research projects is $500,000, with duration of up to three years. The maximum award amount for Medium Empirical research projects is $1,500,000, with duration of up to three years. The maximum award amount for Large Empirical research projects is $2,500,000, with duration of up to five years. The maximum award amount for FIRE projects is $400,000, with duration of two years.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12552/nsf12552.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click
  • Deadline: July 17, 2012

Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program

  • CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.
    PECASE
    : Each year NSF selects nominees for the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from among the most meritorious recent CAREER awardees. Selection for this award is based on two important criteria: 1) innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology that is relevant to the mission of the sponsoring organization or agency, and 2) community service demonstrated through scientific leadership, education or community outreach. These awards foster innovative developments in science and technology, increase awareness of careers in science and engineering, give recognition to the scientific missions of the participating agencies, enhance connections between fundamental research and national goals, and highlight the importance of science and technology for the Nation's future. Individuals cannot apply for PECASE. These awards are initiated by the participating federal agencies. At NSF, up to twenty nominees for this award are selected each year from among the PECASE-eligible CAREER awardees who are most likely to become the leaders of academic research and education in the twenty-first century. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy makes the final selection and announcement of the awardees.
  • Funding: $220,000,000 per year to new and continuing CAREER awards. This amount is approximate, includes new and continuing increments, and is subject to availability of funds. Funding for CAREER awards is contained within research and education program allocations.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2011/nsf11690/nsf11690.htm
  • Deadline: Full Proposal Deadline Date: July 23, 2012 BIO, CISE, EHR, OCI; Full Proposal Deadline Date: July 24, 2012 ENG; Full Proposal Deadline Date: July 25, 2012 GEO, MPS, SBE, OPP

Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBs)

  • Science and engineering research and education are increasingly digital and increasingly data-intensive. Digital data are not only the output of research but their analysis provide input to new hypotheses, enabling new scientific insights, driving innovation and informing education. Therein lies one of the major challenges of this scientific generation: how to develop, implement and support the new methods, management structures and technologies to store and manage the diversity, size, and complexity of current and future data sets and data streams.
    NSF's vision for a Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21) considers an integrated, scalable, and sustainable cyberinfrastructure as crucial for innovation in science and engineering (see www.nsf.gov/cif21).
    Data Infrastructure Building Blocks is an integral part of the CIF21 portfolio and seeks to provide support for the following research activities: (a) Conceptualization; (b) Implementation; and (c) Interoperability.
  • Funding: $41,500,000 pending availability of funds; the average award size for conceptualization awards is anticipated to be $100,000 for one year; the average award size for implementation awards is anticipated to be approximately $8 million total over 5 years; the award size for interoperability awards is anticipated to be up to $1.5 million total over 3 years.
  • Web: http://nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12557/nsf12557.htm
  • Deadline: Conceptualization Track: July 26, 2012; Implementation & Interoperability Tracks: August 30, 2012

International Research Experiences for Students

  • The International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) program supports development of globally-engaged U.S. science and engineering students capable of performing in an international research environment at the forefront of science and engineering. The IRES program supports active research participation by students enrolled as undergraduates or graduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. IRES projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the IRES program.
  • Funding: Approximately 12 IRES awards will be made in FY 2013, pending quality of proposals and availability of funds
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12551/nsf12551.htm
  • Deadline: August 21, 2012 (Third Tuesday in August, Annually Thereafter)

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

  • Research experience is one of the most effective avenues for attracting talented undergraduates to, and retaining them in careers in, science and engineering, including careers in teaching and education research. The REU program, through both Sites and Supplements, aims to provide appropriate and valuable educational experiences for undergraduate students through participation in research. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. REU projects feature high-quality interaction of students with faculty and/or other research mentors and access to appropriate facilities and professional development opportunities.
  • Funding: $67,700,000 in FY2010 -- This estimate includes both Sites and Supplements, pending availability of funds. Estimated number of awards: 1,800 to 1,850 -- This estimate includes approximately 170 new Site awards and 1,650 new Supplement awards each year.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09598/nsf09598.htm
  • Deadline: August 22, 2012 (Deadline for REU Site proposals except for those requiring access to Antarctica)

NSF/NEH: Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL)

  • This funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program supports projects that contribute to data management and archiving, and to the development of the next generation of researchers. Funding can support fieldwork and other activities relevant to the digital recording, documenting, and archiving of endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases.
  • Funding: Funding will be available in the form of one- to three-year project grants as well as fellowships for up to twelve months and doctoral dissertation research improvement grants for up to 24 months.
  • Web: http://nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=12816
  • Deadline: September 15, 2012

Joint DMS/NIGMS Initiative to Support Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences (DMS/NIGMS)

  • The Division of Mathematical Sciences in the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health plan to support research in mathematics and statistics on questions in the biological and biomedical sciences. Both agencies recognize the need and urgency for promoting research at the interface between the mathematical sciences and the life sciences. This competition is designed to encourage new collaborations, as well as to support existing ones.
  • Funding: 15 to 20 Awards from this competition may be made by either NSF or NIH at the option of the agencies, not the grantee. $5,000,000 Per year for new applications ($2,000,000 from NSF, $3,000,000 from NIGMS), subject to availability of funds. Award sizes are expected to range from $100,000 to $400,000 per year with durations of 3-5 years.
  • Web: http://nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12561/nsf12561.htm
  • Deadline: September 17, 2012

Environmental Sustainability

  • The Environmental Sustainability program supports engineering research with the goal of promoting sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival. The long-term viability of natural capital is critical for many areas of human endeavor. Research in Environmental Sustainability typically considers long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics.
    This program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions. There are four principal general research areas which are supported, but others can be proposed by contacting the program director by email at: bhamilto@nsf.gov
    • Industrial Ecology
    • Green Engineering
    • Ecological Engineering
    • Earth Systems Engineering
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501027
  • Deadline: February 19, 2013

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Virginia Environmental Endowment

Virginia Mini-Grant Program

  • One of the most successful and popular of VEE's grantmaking programs is the Virginia Mini-Grant Program, which has enabled thousands of citizens to become actively involved in solving environmental problems in their own hometowns. With grants of $5,000 or less, schools have initiated environmental science courses and outdoor classroom projects, volunteers have monitored water quality in dozens of local streams and rivers, and communities have developed innovative strategies to ensure environmental quality is improved in their community.
  • Funding: VEE's Virginia Mini-Grant awards range from a minimum of $1,000 to a maximum of $5,000 for projects up to one year in duration. Matching funds from other sources are usually required. Although cash matches are preferred, in-kind and volunteer services will be considered when detailed in the grant proposal and budget.
  • Web: http://www.vee.org/mini.cfm
  • Deadline: June 15, 2012; December 1, 2012

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National Institutes of Health

Exploratory Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology (R21)

  • The NIH is interested in promoting research and developments in biomedical informatics and computational biology that will support rapid progress in areas of scientific opportunity in biomedical research. As defined here, biomedical informatics and computational biology includes database design, graphical interfaces, querying approaches, data retrieval, data visualization and manipulation, data integration through the development of integrated analytical tools, and tools for electronic collaboration, as well as computational and mathematical research including the development of structural, functional, integrative, and analytical computational models and simulations.
  • Funding: Grants up to $275,000
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-219.html
  • Deadline: June 16, 2012

Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) Grants- (R15)

  • The purpose of the Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) program is to stimulate research in educational institutions that provide baccalaureate or advanced degrees for a significant number of the Nation's research scientists, but that have not been major recipients of NIH support. AREA grants create opportunities for scientists and institutions, otherwise unlikely to participate extensively in NIH research programs, to contribute to the Nation's biomedical and behavioral research effort. AREA grants are intended to support small-scale research projects proposed by faculty members of eligible, domestic institutions, to expose students to meritorious research projects, and to strengthen the research environment of the applicant institution.
  • Funding: Applicants may request up to $300,000 in direct costs plus applicable Facilities & Administrative (F&A)/indirect costs for the entire project period of up to 3 years. Note when a consortium is involved, the $300,000 direct cost limit is exclusive of consortium F&A costs. These can be requested in addition to the $300,000 direct costs limit.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-12-006.html#_Part_1._Overview
  • Deadline: Standard due dates: June 25, 2012; and October 25, 2012; Expiration Date: January 8, 2015

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Career Transition Award (K22)

  • The purpose of the NIAID Research Scholar Development Award (RSDA) program is to increase and maintain a strong cohort of new and talented NIH-supported independent investigators that will address the health needs of the Nation. The NIAID RSDA is specifically designed to facilitate the transition from a postdoctoral research position to an independent research position.
  • Funding: The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations, and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. The total project period may not exceed 2 years. In the first year of the K22 award, NIAID will contribute up to $150,000 (total direct cost), and in the second year up to $100,000 (total direct cost) toward the research development costs of the award recipient, which must be justified and consistent with the stage of development of the candidate and the proportion of time to be spent in research or career development activities. The PI will have discretion to utilize the award as needed by the research described in the application. However, no more than $50,000 per year of the award may be utilized to support the Principal Investigator's salary.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-12-156.html
  • Deadline: October 12, 2012

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Advanced Postdoctoral Career Transition Award to Promote Diversity in Neuroscience Research (K22)

  • The NINDS Advanced Postdoctoral Career Transition Award to Promote Diversity issued by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is designed to increase the number of highly trained early career investigators from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in neuroscience research. This opportunity provides individuals from diverse backgrounds with strong training in neuroscience with the resources and tools that will help facilitate a transition to a stable and productive independent research position. Individuals from diverse backgrounds underrepresented in neuroscience research are eligible for support under this award if they have doctoral research degrees (Ph.D., P.h.D./M.D. or equivalent) and between 2 and 5 years of postdoctoral research experience at the time of application.
    The primary objectives of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) are to: (1) assist talented underrepresented scientists to transition from postdoctoral training to a secure, independent research position and (2) enhance the conditions that promote establishing a strong and innovative independent program of research.
  • Funding: The total duration of the award, including both phases, is limited to 5 years maximum. NIH will contribute up to $25,000 in Phase I and $100,000 in Phase 2 per year toward the research and career development costs of the award recipient, which must be justified and consistent with the stage of development of the candidate and the proportion of time to be spent in research or career development activities.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-12-163.html
  • Deadline: October 12, 2012

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Institute of Education Sciences (IES)

Education Research Grant Programs

  • In this announcement, the Institute of Education Sciences (Institute) requests applications for research projects that will contribute to its Education Research Grants program. Through the Education Research Grants program, the Institute seeks to improve the quality of education for all students through advancing the understanding of and practices for teaching, learning, and organizing education systems. For the FY 2013 competition, the Institute will consider only applications that meet the requirements outlined in this Request for Applications.
    The Institute supports research on a diverse set of student outcomes including: school readiness for prekindergarten; academic outcomes in kindergarten through Grade 12 that include learning, achievement, and higher order thinking in the core academic content areas of reading, writing, mathematics, and science measured by specific assessments (e.g., researcher-developed assessments, standardized tests, grades, end of course exams, exit exams) as well as course completion, grade retention, high school graduation and dropout rates; social skills, dispositions, and behaviors that support academic outcomes for students from prekindergarten through high school; access to, retention in, and completion of postsecondary education; and reading, writing, and mathematics skills for adult learners (i.e., students at least 16 years old and outside of the K-12 system). The Institute supports research from prekindergarten through Grade 12 for the typically developing student.
  • Funding: Measurement grants may vary in time and cost due to the nature of the proposed work. For example, the development of a new assessment may require more time than refinement of an existing assessment or validation of an existing assessment. Projects using existing data may require less time than projects that require new data collection. Your proposed length of project should reflect the scope of work to be accomplished. The maximum duration of a Measurement project is 4 years. Development and validation costs vary according to the type of assessment proposed. Your budget should reflect the scope of the work to be done. The maximum award for a Measurement project is $1,600,000 (total cost = direct costs + indirect costs).
  • Web: http://ies.ed.gov/funding/ncer_progs.asp
  • Deadline: First competition round: Application due date: June 21, 2012 (Deadline for submitting a letter has passed, but you still may submit an application. If you miss the deadline, the Institute asks that you inform the relevant program officer of your intention to submit an application.)
    Second competition round: Letter of Intent: July 19, 2012; Application Due Date: September 20, 2012

Special Education Research Grant Programs

  • In this announcement, the Institute of Education Sciences (Institute) requests applications for research projects that will contribute to its Special Education Research Grants program. Through the Special Education Research Grants program, the Institute seeks to expand the knowledge base and understanding of infants, toddlers and children with disabilities through advancing the understanding of and practices for teaching, learning, and organizing education systems. For the FY 2013 competition, the Institute will consider only applications that meet the requirements outlined in this Request for Applications.
    Through its Special Education Research grant program, the Institute supports research over a diverse set of child outcomes and for a range of purposes. The outcomes include school readiness, achievement in core academic content (reading, writing, mathematics, science), and behaviors that support learning in academic contexts for students with disabilities or at risk for disabilities from prekindergarten through high school. Additional outcomes of interest include developmental outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for disabilities and functional outcomes that improve educational results and transitions to employment, independent living, and postsecondary education for students with disabilities.
  • Funding: Measurement grants may vary in time and cost due to the nature of the proposed work. For example, the development of a new assessment may require more time than refinement of an existing assessment or validation of an existing assessment. Projects using existing data may require less time than projects that require new data collection. Your proposed length of project should reflect the scope of work to be accomplished. The maximum duration of a Measurement project is 4 years. Development and validation costs vary according to the type of assessment proposed. Your budget should reflect the scope of the work to be done. The maximum award is $1,600,000 (total cost = direct costs + indirect costs).
  • Web: http://ies.ed.gov/funding/ncser_progs.asp
  • Deadline: First competition round: Application due date: June 21, 2012 (Deadline for submitting a letter has passed, but you still may submit an application. If you miss the deadline, the Institute asks that you inform the relevant program officer of your intention to submit an application.)
    Second competition round: Letter of Intent: July 19, 2012; Application Due Date: September 20, 2012

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National Endowment for the Humanities

Preservation and Access Education and Training

  • Preservation and Access Education and Training grants support national or regional (multistate) education and training programs. Grants aim to help the staff of cultural institutions, large and small, obtain the knowledge and skills needed to serve as effective stewards of humanities collections. Grants also support educational programs that prepare the next generation of conservators and preservation professionals, as well as projects that introduce the staff of cultural institutions to new information and advances in preservation and access practices.
  • Funding: Awards normally are for two years. Grants to regional preservation field service organizations may not exceed $175,000 per year. For all other applicants, the maximum award is $100,000 per year. Successful applicants will be awarded a grant in outright funds, federal matching funds, or a combination of the two, depending on the applicant's preference and the availability of NEH funds. Matching funds are released when a grantee secures nonfederal gift funds from eligible third parties. Although cost sharing is not required, NEH is rarely able to support the full costs of projects approved for funding. In most cases, NEH grants cover no more than 80 percent of project costs.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/preservation-and-access-education-and-training
  • Deadline: June 28, 2012 (for projects beginning January 2013)

Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

  • This program supports projects that provide an essential underpinning for scholarship, education, and public programming in the humanities. Thousands of libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country maintain important collections of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art and material culture, and digital objects. Funding from this program strengthens efforts to extend the life of such materials and make their intellectual content widely accessible, often through the use of digital technology. Awards are also made to create various reference resources that facilitate use of cultural materials, from works that provide basic information quickly to tools that synthesize and codify knowledge of a subject for in-depth investigation.
  • Funding: The maximum award is $350,000, for up to three years. The maximum award for Foundations projects is $40,000 for up to two years. Successful applicants will be awarded a grant in outright funds, federal matching funds, or a combination of the two, depending on the applicant's preference and the availability of NEH funds. Although cost sharing is not required, NEH is rarely able to support the full costs of projects approved for funding. In most cases, NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources grants cover no more than 50 to 67 percent of project costs. A 50 percent level is most likely to pertain in the case of projects that deal exclusively with the applicant's own holdings.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/humanities-collections-and-reference-resources
  • Deadline: July 19, 2012 (for projects beginning May 2013)

Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges

  • NEH invites proposals for a cooperative agreement to develop and administer a national or regional (multistate) project to advance the role of the humanities at community colleges through curriculum and faculty development focused on the theme of Bridging Cultures.
    This agency-wide initiative encourages exploration of the ways in which cultures from around the globe, as well as the myriad subcultures within America's borders, have influenced American society. With the aim of revitalizing intellectual and civic life through the humanities, NEH welcomes proposals that enhance understanding of diverse countries, peoples, and cultural and intellectual traditions worldwide. Applications might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest.
  • Funding: NEH expects to award two to five cooperative agreements of up to $360,000 each in outright funds. The award period may run between twenty-four and thirty-six months.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/education/request-proposals-cooperative-agreement-neh-support-bridging-cultures-community-col
  • Deadline: August 14, 2012 (for projects beginning February 2013)

America's Media Makers

  • America's Media Makers (AMM) grants support the following formats: (1) Interactive digital media may be websites, games, mobile applications, virtual environments, streaming video, or podcasts. (2) Film and television projects may be single programs that address or a series that addresses significant figures, events, or developments and draw their content from humanities scholarship. They must be intended for national distribution. (3) Film and television projects may be single programs that address or a series that addresses significant figures, events, or developments and draw their content from humanities scholarship. They must be intended for national distribution. NEH encourages projects that feature multiple formats to engage the public in the exploration of humanities ideas. Proposed projects might include complementary components that expand or deepen the audience's understanding of a subject: for example, museum exhibitions, book/film discussion programs, or other formats that enhance the programs' humanities content, engage audiences in new ways, and expand the distribution of programs.
  • Grant Categories: (a) Development grants enable media producers to collaborate with scholars to develop humanities content and to prepare programs for production. Grants should result in a script or a design document and should also yield a detailed plan for outreach and public engagement in
    collaboration with a partner organization or organizations. (b) Production grants support the production and distribution of digital projects, films,
    television programs, radio programs, and related programs that promise to engage the public.
  • Funding: Awards for development typically range from $40,000 to $75,000, depending on the complexity of the project, and are usually made for a period of six to twelve months. Basic development grants of up to $40,000 are available for activities that include collaborating with scholars to refine the humanities content, undertaking archival research, and conducting preliminary interviews. These grants should culminate in the creation of a brief treatment or design document. Production Grants last for one to three years and may range from $100,000 to $800,000. In rare circumstances, Chairman's Special Awards of up to $1 million are available for large-scale, collaborative, multiformat projects that will reach broad portions of the public. Successful applicants will be awarded a grant in outright funds, matching funds, or a combination of the two, depending on the applicant's preference and the availability of funds. Although cost sharing is not required for America's Media Makers grants, the program is rarely able to support the full costs of projects approved for funding. In most cases, America's Media Makers grants cover no more than 50-60 percent of project costs.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/amm
  • Deadline: August 15, 2012 (for projects beginning April 2013)

Summer Stipends

  • Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both.
    Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources.
    Summer Stipends support full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months.
    Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.
  • The Summer Stipends program welcomes projects that respond to NEH's Bridging Cultures initiative. Such projects could focus on cultures internationally or within the United States. International projects might seek to enlarge Americans' understanding of other places and times, as well as other perspectives and intellectual traditions. American projects might explore the great variety of cultural influences on, and myriad subcultures within, American society. These projects might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest.
  • Funding: Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/research/summer-stipends
  • Deadline: September 27, 2012 (for projects beginning May 2013)

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William T. Grant Foundation

William T. Grant Scholars

  • The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports the professional development of early-career researchers in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. The goal is to help Scholars tackle important questions that will advance theory, policy, and practice for youth and to do so with an expanded array
    of expertise that includes different methods, disciplinary perspectives, and content knowledge.
    Proposed research plans must fit the Foundation's research interests. We currently support research to understand and improve the everyday settings of youth ages 8 to 25 in the United States. Specifically, we fund studies that enhance understanding of:
    • How youth settings work, how they affect youth development, and how they can be improved; and
    • When, how, and under what conditions research evidence is used in policy and practice that affect youth, and how its use can be improved.
  • Funding: Award recipients are designated William T. Grant Scholars. Each year, four to six Scholars are selected and each receives $350,000, distributed over five years. Awards begin July 1.
  • Web: http://wtgrantfoundation.org/funding_opportunities/fellowships/william_t__grant_scholars
  • Deadline: July 3, 2012

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The Mockingbird Foundation

Grants

  • The Mockingbird Foundation provides support for:
    Projects that encourage and foster creative expression in any musical form (including composition, instrumentation, vocalization, or improvisation), but also recognizes broader and more basic needs within conventional instruction;
    Music education, which may include the provision of instruments, texts, and office materials, and the support of learning space, practice space, performance space, and instructors/instruction; and
    Programs which benefit disenfranchised groups, including those with low skill levels, income, or education; with disabilities or terminal illnesses; and in foster homes, shelters, hospitals, prisons, or other remote or isolated situations.
  • Funding: Grants range from $100 to $5,000.
  • Web: http://mbird.org/funding/inquiries/
  • Deadline: August 1, 2012 for letters of inquiry

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Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

Defense Sciences Research and Technology

  • The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) pursues and exploits fundamental science and innovation for national defense and has released a broad agency announcement (BAA) soliciting abstracts and full proposals for advanced research and development in a variety of enabling technical areas.
  • Funding:Multiple awards are expected and will depend on the quality of the proposals received and the availability of funds.
  • Web:http://www.darpa.mil/Opportunities/Solicitations/DSO_Solicitations.aspx
  • Deadline: August 9, 2012

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National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)

Art Works, FY 2013

  • Applicants will be asked to select the outcome that is most relevant to their projects (they also will be able to select a secondary outcome). When making selections, applicants should identify the outcomes that reflect the results expected to be achieved by their project. If a grant is received, grantees also will be asked to provide evidence of those results. Art Works encourages and supports the following four outcomes:
    1. Creation: The creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence. Support is available for projects to create art that meets the highest standards of excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. Through the creation of art, these projects are intended to replenish and rejuvenate America's enduring cultural legacy.
    2. Engagement: Public engagement with diverse and excellent art. Support is available for projects that provide public engagement with artistic excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should engage the public directly with the arts, providing Americans with new opportunities to have profound and meaningful arts experiences.
    3. Learning: Lifelong learning in the arts. Americans of all ages acquire knowledge or skills in the arts. Support is available for projects that provide Americans of all ages with arts learning opportunities across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should focus on the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts, thereby building public capacity for lifelong participation in the arts.
    4. Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts. Support is available for projects that incorporate the arts and design into strategies to improve the livability of communities. Livability consists of a variety of factors that contribute to the quality of life in a community such as ample opportunities for social, civic, and cultural participation; education, employment, and safety; sustainability; affordable housing, ease of transportation, and access to public buildings and facilities; and an aesthetically pleasing environment. The arts can enhance livability by providing new avenues for expression and creativity.
  • Funding: Grants range from $10,000 to $100,000. There is a cost-sharing or matching requirement.
  • Web: http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/GAP13/ArtsEdAW.html
  • Deadline: August 9, 2012 (Applications for school-based projects)

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Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation

Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences

  • The Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences provides funding for innovative projects in any area consistent with the Foundation's broad objective to advance the chemical sciences.
    The Foundation encourages proposals that are judged likely to significantly advance the chemical sciences. Examples of areas of interest include (but are not limited to): the increase in public awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the chemical sciences; innovative approaches to chemistry education at all levels (K-12, undergraduate, and graduate); and efforts to make chemistry careers more attractive. Research proposals are not customarily considered.
    Aspects of proposals that are important are:
    • broad applicability beyond the submitting institution
    • specific and detailed descriptions of the chemistry associated with the proposal
    • uniqueness of the project
  • Favorable consideration also is given to:
    • a plan for sustaining this project, if relevant
    • significant institutional support or other sources of funding
    • evidence of expertise of the PI's and/or identified consultants
    • plans to assess effectiveness, including over the longer term
  • Funding: The amount of support requested is determined by the applicant. Recent awards have ranged from about $11,000 to $100,000.
  • Web: http://www.dreyfus.org/awards/special_grant_program_chemical.shtml
  • Deadline: August 27, 2012

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Rockwell Collins

Community Involvement: Charitable Giving

  • Rockwell Collins makes charitable contributions to a variety of nonprofit organizations in the United States and around the world.
  • Through our Rockwell Collins Charitable Corporation, we make grants available for programs and initiatives. Our giving priorities include education with an emphasis in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and arts and culture with an emphasis in youth development. We believe that by strengthening the quality of education and providing opportunities for youth involvement and leadership, we are helping students prepare for the future.
    The Rockwell Collins Community Partnership Fund supports fundraising events and sponsorship opportunities. We limit support to organizations and activities in the communities where our employees live and work.
  • Funding: In 2009, the company awarded more than $4.8 million in charitable grants.
  • Web: http://www.rockwellcollins.com/Our_Company/Corporate_Responsibility/Community_Overview/Charitable_Giving.aspx
  • Deadline: September 1, 2012

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U.S. Department of the Interior

Youth Environmental Education Opportunities

  • The objective of this funding opportunity is to provide youth the opportunity to connect with the natural world by participating in hands-on environmental educational experiences through outdoor programs and field classrooms to youth and families, working in conjunction with a variety of schools and other youth-focused nonprofit organizations. These experiences will provide academic, experiential, and environmental education opportunities in order for youth and families to gain a better understanding and appreciation of natural resource management objectives and stewardship of the land.
  • Funding: $30,000 in funding is available for five to 10 cooperative agreements ranging from $2,000 to $10,000 for projects up to five years.
  • Web: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=g8X7Tm9J2r8qhGhQld1gTNBJWnJp0C9JKBlyQDL1vBlyjtx9kX1t!65310457?oppId=118213&mode=VIEW
  • Deadline: September 14, 2012

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Guggenheim Foundation

Fellowships to Assist Research and Artistic Creation

  • Often characterized as "midcareer" awards, Guggenheim Fellowships are intended for men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.
    Fellowships are awarded through two annual competitions: one open to citizens and permanent residents of the United States and Canada, and the other open to citizens and permanent residents of Latin America and the Caribbean. Candidates must apply to the Guggenheim Foundation in order to be considered in either of these competitions.
    The Foundation receives between 3,500 and 4,000 applications each year. Although no one who applies is guaranteed success in the competition, there is no prescreening: all applications are reviewed. Approximately 220 Fellowships are awarded each year.
  • Funding: The amounts of grants vary, and the Foundation does not guarantee it will fully fund any project. Working with a fixed annual budget, the Foundation strives to allocate its funds as equitably as possible, taking into consideration the Fellows' other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. Members of the teaching profession receiving sabbatical leave on full or part salary are eligible for appointment, as are those holding other fellowships and appointments at research centers.
  • Web: http://www.gf.org/about-the-foundation/the-fellowship
  • Deadline: September 15, 2012

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Research Corporation for Science Advancement

Cottrell College Science Awards- Single Investigator Awards

  • The Single-Investigator Cottrell College Science Awards support research in astronomy, chemistry, physics and closely related fields that significantly overlap these three disciplines at public and private, predominantly undergraduate institutions. The projects proposed are judged on the basis of scientific merit, originality, significance, feasibility, overlap with the three core disciplines and the ability of the institutional environment to sustain the activity. The involvement of undergraduate students in the research is expected, and is an important factor in most awards.
  • Eligibility: Applications will be accepted from faculty members at public and private institutions of higher education in the United States. The applicant's home department must offer at least the baccalaureate, but not doctoral, degrees in the applicant's discipline. The institutional commitment to research is an important consideration in evaluating the potential of the proposal. The principal investigator must have a faculty appointment in a department of astronomy, chemistry or physics, or, if from another department, propose research that significantly overlaps with research in one of these three disciplines. Faculty who have had a previous CCSA award, or whose appointment is in a department or school of engineering or medicine, are not eligible. At the time of application the applicant must be within the first three years of his/her first tenure-track appointment, and within 12 years of receiving his/her doctoral degree.
  • Funding: The total funding requested from RCSA is $35,000. An institutional matching contribution to the project of $10,000 is required for all applicants. SI-CCSAs provide for only those direct expenses necessary for the conduct of the proposed research and within the five budgetary categories described below. While these awards are designed to provide primarily summer support, continuation of the research throughout the academic year is expected. Budgets should be tailored to individual circumstances. Awards are approved for two years with a single, one-year extension possible to expend remaining funds.
  • Web: http://www.rescorp.org/grants-and-awards/cottrell-college-science-awards/single-investigator
  • Deadline: September 15, 2012 (pre-proposal)

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National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust Preservation Fund

  • Grants from National Trust Preservation Funds (NTPF) are intended to encourage preservation at the local level by providing seed money for preservation projects. These grants help stimulate public discussion, enable local groups to gain the technical expertise needed for particular projects, introduce the public to preservation concepts and techniques, and encourage financial participation by the private sector. The National Trust is particularly interested in projects that relate to the preservation priorities listed below. If your project relates to any of these issues, please explain the connection in your narrative.
    Building sustainable communities: Does your project demonstrate that historic preservation supports economic, environmental and cultural sustainability in communities?
    Reimagining historic sites: Does your project use innovative, replicable strategies that create new models for historic site interpretation and stewardship?
    Promoting diversity and place: Does your project broaden the cultural diversity of historic preservation?
    Protecting historic places on public lands A small grant at the right time can go a long way and is often the catalyst that inspires a community to take action on a preservation project.
  • Funding: Grants generally start at $2,500 and range up to $5,000. (Please note: larger grants may be available.) The selection process is very competitive. Applicants are encouraged to develop proposals carefully and to complete the application form with assistance and guidance from the National Trust.
  • Web: http://www.preservationnation.org/resources/find-funding/documents/preservation-funds-guidelines-eligibility.html
  • Deadline: October 1, 2012; February 1, 2013

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Graham Foundation

Grants in Architecture and Related Arts

  • Founded in 1956, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts makes project-based grants to individuals and organizations and produces public programs to foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society.
  • Architecture and related spatial practices engage a wide range of cultural, social, political, technological, environmental, and aesthetic issues. We are interested in projects that investigate the contemporary condition, expand historical perspectives, or explore the future of architecture and the designed environment. We support innovative, thought-provoking investigations in architecture; architectural history, theory, and criticism; design; engineering; landscape architecture; urban planning; urban studies; visual arts; and related fields of inquiry. Our interest also extends to work being done in the fine arts, humanities, and sciences that expands the boundaries of thinking about architecture and space. In an effort to bridge communities and different fields of knowledge, we support a wide range of practitioners (such as architects, scholars, critics, writers, artists, curators, and educators) and organizations (such as non-profit galleries, colleges and universities, publishers, and museums).Open discourse is essential to advance study and understanding, therefore our grantmaking focuses on the public dissemination of ideas. With our support, the work of individuals and organizations reaches new audiences, from specialized to general, and creates opportunities for critical dialogue between various publics.
  • Funding: The Graham Foundation offers Production and Presentation Grants to organizations up to $30,000, likely less.
  • Web: http://www.grahamfoundation.org/grant_programs
  • Deadline: February 25, 2013

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U.S. Department of Defense

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

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Compton Foundation

Grant Program

  • In 2012 the Foundation will keep its guidelines broad, casting a wide net and seeking new partners, as well as deepening its engagement with a subset of existing partners, to learn how people in the field might enhance the Foundation's understanding of transformative leadership and courageous storytelling and their relationship to mobilizing collective imagination and action. While the Foundation will look across the spectrum of progressive issue areas, it has a particular interest in work happening within and between the Foundation's traditional areas of work-peace, environment, and reproductive health and rights. Within those fields, the Foundation sees particular momentum in the areas of sustainable food systems, money in politics, reproductive justice, and climate/energy solutions. The Foundation is also interested in exploring the fields of women in peace building and alternative economics.
  • Web: http://www.comptonfoundation.org/
  • Deadline: Anytime

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Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

Humanities Program

  • The Foundation intends to further the humanities along a broad front, supporting projects which address the concerns of the historical studia humanitatis: a humanistic education rooted in the great traditions of the past; the formation of human beings according to cultural, moral, and aesthetic ideals derived from that past; and the ongoing debate over how these ideals may best be conceived and realized. Programs in the following areas are eligible: history; archaeology; literature; languages, both classical and modern; philosophy; ethics; comparative religion; the history, criticism, and theory of the arts; and those aspects of the social sciences which share the content and methods of humanistic disciplines. The Foundation welcomes projects that cross the boundaries between humanistic disciplines and explore the connection between the humanities and other areas of scholarship. The Humanities Program is primarily directed to institutions of higher education and humanistic enterprises such as learned societies, museums, and major editorial projects. The program may also consider, on a selective basis, projects that increase the exposure of those outside these institutions to the humanistic experience or that strengthen preparation for the humanistic disciplines in secondary education. The prime criterion remains that of Gladys and Jean Delmas: a commitment to excellence, whether proven or promised.
  • Funding: In 2008, grants were made ranging from about $5,000 to $135,000.
  • Web: http://www.delmas.org/programs/humanities.html
  • Deadline: Anytime, letter of inquiry

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The W.L.S. Spencer Foundation

Grants

  • The mission of The W.L.S. Spencer Foundation is to fund activities, anywhere in the world, which foster new and innovative ideas in education.
  • Program Areas:
    Art: educational activities, publications and outreach associated with innovative art and/or contemporary art exhibitions, especially those focusing on contemporary Asian Art. The foundation is interested in projects that encourage knowledge about art and culture, foster international understanding, and are supported by academic scholarship.
    Education: innovative and that motivate children to stay in school, do well academically and continue their education beyond high school (to college or other higher education opportunities). In this area, the foundation may continue to fund programs that they believe in, and they may fund replication of a successful program in a new site. The foundation tends to fund programs that are national or regional in nature, but which have a chapter in San Francisco. The foundation does not fund individual schools.
  • Funding: In 2009, the foundation provided more than $1 million for 40 grants, ranging from $500 to $400,000.
  • Web: http://www.pfs-llc.net/spencer/spencer.html
  • Deadline: Rolling for letters of inquiry. When a letter of inquiry reflects most closely the Foundation's purposes, they will request a full proposal.

 

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization

  • Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) supports research, policy analysis and evaluation projects that provide policy leaders timely information on health care policy, financing and organization issues. Supported projects include: (a) examining significant issues and interventions related to health care financing and organization and their effects on health care costs, quality and access; and (b) exploring or testing major new ways to finance and organize health care that have the potential to improve access to more affordable and higher quality health services.
  • Eligibility: Researchers, as well as practitioners and public and private policy-makers working with researchers, are eligible to submit proposals through their organizations. Projects may be initiated from within many disciplines, including health services research, economics, sociology, political science, public policy, public health, public administration, law and business administration. RWJF encourages proposals from organizations on behalf of researchers who are just beginning their careers, who can serve either individually as principal investigators or as part of a project team comprising researchers or other collaborators with more experience.
  • Funding: In January 2011, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) re-authorized this initiative for $5 million over approximately three years. Grants will be awarded in two categories: (1) Small grants for projects requiring $100,000 or less and projected to take up to 12 months or less; (2) Large grants for projects requiring more than $100,000 and/or projected to take longer than 12 months.
  • Web: http://www.hcfo.org/funding
  • Deadline: Anytime

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Wish You Well Foundation

Donation Request

  • The Wish You Well Foundation seeks to support family literacy in the United States by fostering and promoting the development and expansion of new and existing literacy and educational programs.
  • Funding: Grants range from $200 to $10,000
  • Web: http://wishyouwellfoundation.org/apply/
  • Deadline: Rolling

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