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Please visit the "funding sources" link at the following website for program listings and searchable databases:
http://www.jmu.edu/sponsprog/calendar.html

Funding Opportunities Links

National Science Foundation

Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation

National Institutes of Health

Department of Energy

Jeffress Memorial Trust

National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

Constellation Energy

Institute of Turkish Studies

Russell Sage Foundation

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Harry S. Truman Library Institute

Samuel H. Kress Foundation

Environmental Protection Agency

American Nurses Foundation

W. M. Keck Foundation

National Institute of Standards and Technology

American Astronomical Society

Virginia Environmental Endowment

The Mockingbird Foundation

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

Rockwell Collins

U.S. Department of the Interior

Amgen Foundation

BMW Group in North America

RGK Foundation

Spencer Foundation

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities

 

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Funding Opportunities

National Science Foundation


Cyberlearning: Transforming Education

  • Through the Cyberlearning: Transforming Education program, NSF seeks to integrate advances in technology with advances in what is known about how people learn to

    • better understand how people learn with technology and how technology can be used productively to help people learn, through individual use and/or through collaborations mediated by technology;
    • better use technology for collecting, analyzing, sharing, and managing data to shed light on learning, promoting learning, and designing learning environments; and
    • design new technologies for these purposes, and advance understanding of how to use those technologies and integrate them into learning environments so that their potential is fulfilled.
  • Funding: 28 to 49 awards will be made, contingent on the availability of funds.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503581
  • Deadline: February 15, 2012

Environmental Engineering

  • The Environmental Engineering program supports fundamental research and educational activities across the broad field of environmental engineering. The goal of this program is to encourage transformative research which applies scientific principles to minimize solid, liquid, and gaseous discharges into land, inland and coastal waters, and air that result from human activity, and to evaluate adverse impacts of these discharges on human health and environmental quality. The program fosters cutting-edge scientific research based on fundamental science for identifying, evaluating, and developing new methods and technologies for assessing the waste assimilative capacity of the natural environment and for removing or reducing conventional and emerging contaminants from polluted air, water, and soils. The program fosters environmental sustainability through pollution control and resource management/conservation, and development of techniques to minimize or avoid generating pollution.
  • Funding:The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years. The average annual award size for the program is $110,000. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501029
  • Deadline:Full Proposal Window: Present - February 17, 2012

Environmental Sustainability

  • The Environmental Sustainability program supports engineering research with the goal of promoting sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival.  The long-term viability of natural capital is critical for many areas of human endeavor. Research in Environmental Sustainability typically considers long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics.
  • Funding:The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years. The average annual award size for the program is $100,000. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501027
  • Deadline:Full Proposal Window: Present - February 17, 2012

Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21)

  • The Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) program aims to build a computationally savvy 21st century workforce that positions the US to demonstrate a leadership role in the global economy. Innovations in computing and more broadly, information technology (IT), drive our economy, underlie many new advances in science and engineering, and contribute to our national security. Projected job growth in IT is very strong.
  • Funding:$25,000,000 (pending availability of funds dispersed between 20 to 30 awards)
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10619/nsf10619.htm
  • Deadline: February 28, 2012 (Planning proposals only); April 25, 2012 (Type 1 and Type II proposals only)

Ethics Education In Science and Engineering (EESE)

  • The Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE) program funds research and educational projects that improve ethics education in all fields of science and engineering that NSF supports, with priority consideration given to interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and international contexts. Although the primary focus is on improving ethics education for graduate students in NSF-funded fields, the proposed programs may benefit advanced undergraduates as well.
  • Funding: Estimated program budget, number of awards and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds. The maximum award amount is $300,000. Collaborative proposals for the purpose of disseminating best practices in graduate ethics education will be eligible for a maximum award amount of $400,000 (for example, projects that include partnerships between universities and scientific or engineering societies to distribute curriculum and/or research findings). Anticipated funding amount is $3 million for an estimated 6 to 10 Standard Grants. The maximum award duration is 36 months.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2011/nsf11514/nsf11514.htm
  • Deadline: March 1, 2012

Plant Genome Research Program

  • This program is a continuation of the Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP) that began in FY 1998 as part of the National Plant Genome Initiative (NPGI). Since the inception of the NPGI and the PGRP, there has been a tremendous increase in the availability of functional genomics tools and sequence resources for use in the study of key crop plants and their models. Proposals are welcomed that build on these resources to develop conceptually new and different ideas and strategies to address grand challenge questions in plants of economic importance on a genome-wide scale. There is also a continued need for the development of novel and creative tools to facilitate new experimental approaches or new ways of analyzing genomic data. Especially encouraged are proposals that provide strong and novel training opportunities integral to the research plan and particularly across disciplines that include, but are not limited to, plant physiology, quantitative genetics, biochemistry, bioinformatics and engineering.
  • Funding:Up to $15 million for 10-15 awards.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5338
  • Deadline: March 5, 2012

Math and Science Partnership (MSP)

  • The Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program is a major research and development effort that supports innovative partnerships to improve K-12 student achievement in mathematics and science. MSP projects are expected to raise the achievement levels of all students and significantly reduce achievement gaps in the STEM performance of diverse student populations. MSP projects contribute to what is known in K-12 STEM education. All STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields supported by NSF may be involved in this work, with special encouragement to areas that are gaining increased traction at the K-12 level, such as computer science and engineering, in addition to mathematics and science. MSP projects also serve as models that have a sufficiently strong evidence/research base to improve STEM education outcomes for all students.
    Through this solicitation, NSF seeks to support two levels of Targeted Partnership awards, Implementation and Prototype. Implementation awards are intended to develop and put into practice innovative approaches and strategies in education. Prototype awards explore potentially innovative approaches and strategies in education. Both types of Partnerships incorporate significant new innovations to STEM education, linked to a strong educational research agenda, in one of four focal areas: Community Enterprise for STEM Learning; Current Issues Related to STEM Content; Identifying and Cultivating Exceptional Talent; and K-12 STEM Teacher Preparation. In addition, there are three types of Research, Evaluation and Technical Assistance (RETA) project opportunities in this solicitation: research related to sustainability, or policies, or state plans for STEM education; technical assistance for evaluators of MSP projects; and the STEM Education Resource Collaboratory.
  • Funding: Approximately $55 million for new awards and continuing awards in FY2012 and in FY2013; pending the availability of funds. Estimated number of awards: 15 to 22.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12518/nsf12518.htm
  • Deadline: March 5, 2012

Transforming STEM Learning (TSL)

  • TSL combines interests and resources of separate programs in the Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL) to explore the opportunities and challenges implied by innovative visions of the future for STEM learning. The TSL program invites interdisciplinary teams of STEM content specialists, experts in relevant technologies, STEM formal and informal education specialists, researchers with expertise in the learning sciences, and specialists in education research and evaluation methods to submit proposals for research projects that (1) Study efficacy of existing prototypes for innovations like virtual schools, special STEM schools, and educational programs that combine opportunities of formal and informal learning resources in their communities; or (2) Design and conduct exploratory development of new potentially transformative models for STEM learning environments. The cross-cutting proposals will draw from work in the four primary DRL programs: Discovery Research K-12 (DR K-12), Informal Science Education (ISE), Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE), and Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST). However, proposals submitted in response to this solicitation must have a scope that extends well beyond any of those programs individually.
  • Funding: $5,000,000; In FY 2011 and FY 2012, up to $5,000,000 will be allocated to funding projects under this solicitation, subject to availability of funds. Research projects may ask for up to $2,000,000 for project duration of up to 4 years; planning and pilot development projects may ask for up to $500,000 for project duration up to 2 years.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10602/nsf10602.htm
  • Deadline: March 9, 2012

Dimensions of Biodiversity

  • Despite centuries of discovery, most of our planet's biodiversity remains unknown. The scale of the unknown diversity on Earth is especially troubling given the rapid and permanent loss of biodiversity across the globe. With this loss, humanity is losing links in the web of life that provide ecosystem services, forfeiting an understanding of the history and future of the living world, and losing opportunities for future beneficial discoveries in the domains of food, fiber, fuel, pharmaceuticals, and bio-inspired innovation.The goal of the Dimensions of Biodiversity campaign is to transform, by 2020, how we describe and understand the scope and role of life on Earth. The campaign promotes novel, integrated approaches to identify and understand the evolutionary and ecological significance of biodiversity amidst the changing environment of the present day and in the geologic past.This campaign seeks to characterize biodiversity on Earth by using integrative, innovative approaches to fill the most substantial gaps in our understanding of the diversity of life on Earth. It takes a broad view of biodiversity, and currently focuses on the integration of genetic, taxonomic/phylogenetic, and functional dimensions of biodiversity. Successful proposals should integrate these three dimensions to understand interactions and feedbacks among them. While this focus complements several core NSF programs, it differs by requiring that multiple dimensions of biodiversity be addressed simultaneously, in innovative or novel ways, to understand their synergistic roles in critical ecological and evolutionary processes.
  • Funding: $15,000,000 to $24,000,000 for about 10 awards.
  • Web: http://nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12528/nsf12528.htm
  • Deadline: April 10, 2012

Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences: NSF-CBMS Regional Conferences

  • To stimulate interest and activity in mathematical research, the National Science Foundation intends to support up to seven NSF-CBMS Regional Research Conferences in 2012. A panel chosen by the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences will make the selections from among the submitted proposals. In the 43 year history of this NSF-CBMS Regional Research Conference Series, a total of 332 such conferences have been held. Each five day conference features a distinguished lecturer who delivers ten lectures on a topic of important current research in one sharply focused area of the mathematical sciences. The lecturer subsequently prepares an expository monograph based upon these lectures, which is normally published as a part of a regional conference series. Depending upon the conference topic, the monograph is published by the American Mathematical Society, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, or jointly by the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. Support is provided for about 30 participants at each conference and the conference organizer invites both established researchers and interested newcomers, including postdoctoral fellows and graduate students, to attend.
  • Funding: Typical awards for these conferences vary between $33,000 and $35,000. CBMS pays the lecturer a stipend of $2,000 for delivery of the lectures and an additional stipend of $5,000 when the lecturer delivers to CBMS a manuscript for publication satisfactory to NSF. The lecturer's stipends are paid directly by CBMS and are not to be part of the budget of the host institution's proposal.
  • Web: http://www.cbmsweb.org/NSF/2013_call.htm
  • Deadline: April 13, 2012

Nanotechnology Undergraduate Education (NUE) in Engineering

  • The Nanotechnology Undergraduate Education (NUE) in Engineering program aims to integrate advancements in nanoscale science, engineering, and technology into the undergraduate engineering curricula. The NUE in Engineering program provides funding for projects that will address the educational challenges of these emerging fields and generate practical ways of introducing nanotechnology into undergraduate engineering education with a focus on devices and systems and/or on social, economic, and ethical issues relevant to nanotechnology. Given the worldwide expansion of research and education in NSE, international collaborations that advance underlying NSE education goals and strengthen U.S. activities are encouraged.
  • Funding: $1,900,000; Each award will be up to a maximum of $200,000 for two years. Estimated number of awards: 10
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12534/nsf12534.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click
  • Deadline: April 23, 2012

Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (TUES)

  • The Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (TUES) program seeks to improve the quality of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education for all undergraduate students. This solicitation especially encourages projects that have the potential to transform undergraduate STEM education, for example, by bringing about widespread adoption of classroom practices that embody understanding of how students learn most effectively. Thus transferability and dissemination are critical aspects for projects developing instructional materials and methods and should be considered throughout the project's lifetime. More advanced projects should involve efforts to facilitate adaptation at other sites.
    The program supports efforts to create, adapt, and disseminate new learning materials and teaching strategies to reflect advances both in STEM disciplines and in what is known about teaching and learning. It funds projects that develop faculty expertise, implement educational innovations, assess learning and evaluate innovations, prepare K-12 teachers, or conduct research on STEM teaching and learning. It also supports projects that further the work of the program itself, for example, synthesis and dissemination of findings across the program. The program supports projects representing different stages of development, ranging from small, exploratory investigations to large, comprehensive projects.
    Results from Type 1 projects are expected to be significant enough to contribute to understanding undergraduate STEM education. Proposed evaluation efforts should be informative with respect to student learning or engagement, based on the project's specific expected outcomes, and consistent with budget limitations and the scope of a Type 1 project. In order to encourage collaboration between four-year colleges and universities and two-year colleges, projects involving such collaboration may request a total of $250,000. In such partnerships, the distribution of effort and funds between the four-year institution and the community college should reflect a genuine collaboration. At a minimum, the implementation, if successful, should be institutionalized at the participating colleges and universities.
  • Funding: Total budget may not exceed $200,000 ($250,000 when four-year colleges and universities collaborate with two-year colleges) for 2 to 3 years.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10544/nsf10544.htm
  • Deadline: May 29, 2012 (For Type 1 proposals from submitting organizations located in states or territories beginning with N through W)

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

  • Research experience is one of the most effective avenues for attracting talented undergraduates to, and retaining them in careers in, science and engineering, including careers in teaching and education research. The REU program, through both Sites and Supplements, aims to provide appropriate and valuable educational experiences for undergraduate students through participation in research. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. REU projects feature high-quality interaction of students with faculty and/or other research mentors and access to appropriate facilities and professional development opportunities.
  • Funding: $67,700,000 in FY2010 -- This estimate includes both Sites and Supplements, pending availability of funds. Estimated number of awards: 1,800 to 1,850 -- This estimate includes approximately 170 new Site awards and 1,650 new Supplement awards each year.
  • Web: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/nsf09598/nsf09598.htm
  • Deadline: August 22, 2012 (Deadline for REU Site proposals except for those requiring access to Antarctica)

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Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation

Grants

  • While the Kazanjian Foundation maintains a vital interest in the overall efforts to increase economic literacy, the Board of Trustees will give special attention to proposals and projects with national impact that address the following issues: (a) The Foundation has an abiding interest in elevating the nation's understanding of the need for economic education. It will support programs that raise various public's participation in economic education and/or create a demand for greater economic literacy; (b) The application of new strategies for teaching economics including on-line and web-based instruction is of interest to the Foundation; (c) Projects, policy studies, or programs that encourage measurement of economic understanding more often and/or more effectively are of specific interest; and (d) The large number of students at risk of leaving school, and hence never effectively participating in the nation's economic system are of concern to the Foundation. Programs that help otherwise disenfranchised youth and/or young adults with children learn to participate in the economic system are very important to the Foundation. ELIGIBILITY: Only IRS Approved 501(C)(3) organizations are eligible to receive grants.
  • Funding:The Foundation makes grants of various sizes. The average grant is approximately $22,000, however grants as small as $3,500 and as large as $150,000 have been made. Occasionally, multi-year grants are made for larger projects.
  • Web: http://www.kazanjian.org/grants/apply
  • Deadline: February 15, 2012

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National Institutes of Health

Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) Grants- (R15)

  • The purpose of the Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) program is to stimulate research in educational institutions that provide baccalaureate or advanced degrees for a significant number of the Nation's research scientists, but that have not been major recipients of NIH support. AREA grants create opportunities for scientists and institutions, otherwise unlikely to participate extensively in NIH research programs, to contribute to the Nation's biomedical and behavioral research effort. AREA grants are intended to support small-scale research projects proposed by faculty members of eligible, domestic institutions, to expose students to meritorious research projects, and to strengthen the research environment of the applicant institution.
  • Funding: Applicants may request up to $300,000 in direct costs plus applicable Facilities & Administrative (F&A)/indirect costs for the entire project period of up to 3 years.  Note when a consortium is involved, the $300,000 direct cost limit is exclusive of consortium F&A costs. These can be requested in addition to the $300,000 direct costs limit
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-12-006.html#_Part_1._Overview
  • Deadline: Standard due dates: February 25, 2012; June 25, 2012; and October 25, 2012; Expiration Date: January 8, 2015

Shared Instrumentation Grant Program (S10)

  • The NCRR Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instrumentation or an integrated system that costs at least $100,000. The maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include confocal and electron microscopes, biomedical imagers, mass spectrometers, DNA sequencers, biosensors, cell-sorters, X-ray diffraction systems, and NMR spectrometers among others.
  • Funding: Applications will be accepted that request a single, commercially available instrument or integrated system which costs at least $100,000. There is no upper limit on the cost of the instrument, but the maximum award is $600,000. Since the cost of the various instruments will vary, it is anticipated that the size of the award also will vary. The total amount awarded and the number of awards will depend on the funds available for the SIG program.
  • Web: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-12-017.html
  • Deadline: March 21, 2012

Healthy Habits (HHS)

  • This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), issued by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) with participation from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), is to encourage Research Project Grant (R01) applications that employ innovative research to identify mechanisms of influence and/or promote positive sustainable health behavior(s) in children and youth (birth to age 18). Positive health behaviors may include: developing healthy sleep patterns, developing effective self-regulation strategies, adaptive decision-making in risk situations, practicing proper dental hygiene, eating a balanced and nutritious diet, engaging in age-appropriate physical activity and/or participating in healthy relationships.
  • Funding: Grants up to $500,000
  • Web: http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&oppId=119573
  • Deadline: June 5, 2012

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Department of Energy

CONNECT

  • The Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency seeks applications for the Conferences, Outreach and Networking for New Energy Communities and Technologies (CONNECT) Program. Acceptable activities include: energy technology conferences, workshops and other events; and student participation in energy technology conferences, workshops and other events.
  • Funding: $100,000 total in FY2011 for awards ranging from $5,000 to $25,000.
  • Web:http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=nQXxTBJQfY5Kvl2vLWjgvMGdXkqRQdBx2K02r5y7SRVbldJMbhYB!1014880958?oppId=102713&mode=VIEW
  • Deadline: Applications accepted on an ongoing basis and reviewed quarterly: March 1, 2012; June 1, 2012

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Jeffress Memorial Trust

Grants

  • The purpose of the Jeffress Memorial Trust is to support basic research in chemical, medical, or other scientific fields through grants to educational and research institutions in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Grants are given to assist scientists to conduct investigations in the natural sciences, generally considered to include chemistry, physics and biology (with the exception of field studies, classification, and other largely observational studies), studies in the basic medial sciences such as biochemistry, microbiology, and others.
  • Funding:Funds should be requested for only one year, maximum $30,000. After the first year, one-year renewals can be requested for up to $10,000 per year for up to two additional years. Direct expenses for the project will be provided, normally including undergraduate or graduate student summer stipends; summer stipends for principal investigators who lack other support for research in the summer months (up to two months at the monthly maximum rate of $3,000 per month or $6,000 for the summer. Up to $1,000 will be allowed for national or local travel with sponsor funding. No funds will be approved for indirect costs, international travel, tuition and fees, or fringe benefits including FICA.
  • Web: https://www.wm.edu/offices/sponsoredprograms/announcements/jeffress-memorial-trust-.php
  • Deadline: March 1, 2012


National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)

NEA Literature Fellowships: Poetry, FY2013

  • The Arts Endowment's support of a project may begin any time between January 1, 2013, and January 1, 2014, and extend for up to two years. Grant Program Description: The NEA Literature Fellowships program offers $25,000 grants in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published creative writers that enable the recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Applications are reviewed through an anonymous process in which the only criteria for review are artistic excellence and artistic merit. To review the applications, the NEA assembles a different advisory panel every year, each diverse with regard to geography, race and ethnicity, and artistic points of view. The NEA Literature Fellowships program operates on a two-year cycle with fellowships in prose and poetry available in alternating years. For FY 2013, which is covered by these guidelines, fellowships in poetry are available. Fellowships in prose will be offered in FY 2014 and guidelines will be available in the fall of 2012. You may apply only once each year. Competition for fellowships is extremely rigorous. You should consider carefully whether your work will be competitive at the national level. We Do Not Fund: Individuals who previously have received two or more Literature Fellowships (in fiction, creative nonfiction, or poetry) or Translation Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts; Individuals who have received any Literature Fellowship (in fiction, creative nonfiction, or poetry) or Translation Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts within the past ten years; News reporting; Scholarly writing (Writers who are engaged in scholarly work may wish to contact the National Endowment for the Humanities.); Work toward academic degrees.
  • Funding: Grants are for $25,000.
  • Web: http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/Lit/index.html
  • Deadline: March 1, 2012

Our Town

  • Art works to improve the lives of America's citizens in many ways. Communities across our nation are engaging design and leveraging the arts to create livable, sustainable neighborhoods with enhanced quality of life, increased creative activity, distinct identities, a sense of place, and vibrant local economies that capitalize on existing local assets.
  • Funding: Grant requests must be requested at one of the following levels: $25,000, $50,000, $75,000, $100,000, or $150,000. Very few grants are made at the $150,000 level; these will be only for projects of significant scale and impact. All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1.
  • Web: http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/OurTown/
  • Deadline: March 1, 2012

Art Works, FY 2013

  • Applicants will be asked to select the outcome that is most relevant to their projects (they also will be able to select a secondary outcome). When making selections, applicants should identify the outcomes that reflect the results expected to be achieved by their project. If a grant is received, grantees also will be asked to provide evidence of those results. Art Works encourages and supports the following four outcomes:
    1. Creation: The creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence. Support is available for projects to create art that meets the highest standards of excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. Through the creation of art, these projects are intended to replenish and rejuvenate America's enduring cultural legacy.
    2. Engagement: Public engagement with diverse and excellent art. Support is available for projects that provide public engagement with artistic excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should engage the public directly with the arts, providing Americans with new opportunities to have profound and meaningful arts experiences.
    3. Learning: Lifelong learning in the arts. Americans of all ages acquire knowledge or skills in the arts. Support is available for projects that provide Americans of all ages with arts learning opportunities across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should focus on the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts, thereby building public capacity for lifelong participation in the arts.
    4. Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts. Support is available for projects that incorporate the arts and design into strategies to improve the livability of communities. Livability consists of a variety of factors that contribute to the quality of life in a community such as ample opportunities for social, civic, and cultural participation; education, employment, and safety; sustainability; affordable housing, ease of transportation, and access to public buildings and facilities; and an aesthetically pleasing environment. The arts can enhance livability by providing new avenues for expression and creativity.
  • Funding: Grants range from $10,000 to $100,000. There is a cost-sharing or matching requirement.
  • Web: http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/GAP13/ArtsEdAW.html
  • Deadline: March 8, 2012 (Applications for community-based projects are due.); August 9, 2012 (Applications for school-based projects are due.)

Challenge America Fast-Track, FY 2013

  • The Challenge America Fast-Track category offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations -- those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. Age alone (e.g., youth, seniors) does not qualify a group as underserved; at least one of the underserved characteristics noted above also must be present. Grants are available for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development.This category encourages and supports the following two outcomes:
    • Engagement: Engaging the public with diverse and excellent art.
    • Livability: The strengthening of communities through the arts.
    You will be asked to select the outcome that is most relevant to your project (you also will be able to select a secondary outcome). When making selections, you should identify the outcome(s) that reflect the results expected to be achieved by your project. If you receive a grant, you also will be asked to provide evidence of those results.
  • Funding: These grants are for a fixed amount of $10,000 and require a minimum $10,000 match. The grants receive an expedited application review. Organizations are notified whether they have been recommended for a grant approximately six months after they apply; projects may start shortly thereafter. The Arts Endowment's support of a project may start on or after January 1, 2013.
  • Web: http://www.arts.gov/grants/apply/GAP13/Challenge.html
  • Deadline: May 24, 2012

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National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

Landmarks of American History and Culture

  • The Landmarks of American History and Culture program supports series of one-week residence-based workshops for a national audience of K-12 educators. NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops use historic sites to address central themes and issues in American history, government, literature, art, music, and other related subjects in the humanities. The goals of the workshops are to: increase knowledge and appreciation of subjects, ideas, and places significant to American history and culture through humanities reading and site study; build a community of inquiry and provide models of civility and of excellent scholarship and teaching; provide teachers with expertise in the use and interpretation of historical sites and of material and archival resources; and encourage historical and cultural sites to develop greater capacity and scale for professional development programs. NEH Landmarks Workshops are held at or near sites important to American history and culture (e.g., presidential residences or libraries; colonial-era settlements; major battlefields; historic districts; parks and preserves; sites of key economic, social, political, and constitutional developments; and places associated with major writers, artists, and musicians). Applicants should make a compelling case for the historical significance of the site(s), the material resources available for use, and the ways in which the site(s) will enhance the workshop.
  • Funding: NEH anticipates that awards for Landmarks Workshops for school teachers will range between $150,000 and $180,000, assuming that a one-week session costs approximately $75,000 to $90,000.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/landmarks.html
  • Deadline: March 1, 2012

Summer Seminars and Institutes

  • These grants support faculty development programs in the humanities for school teachers and for college and university teachers. NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes may be as short as two weeks or as long as five weeks. The duration of a program should allow for a rigorous treatment of its topic.
  • Funding: Awards for institutes range from $90,000 to $200,000 for a grant period of fifteen months.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/seminars.html
  • Deadline: March 1, 2012

Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

  • These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities.
  • Funding: Awards normally range from one to three years and from $50,000 to a maximum of $250,000 in outright funds.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/IATDH.html
  • Deadline: March 6, 2012

Preservation Assistance Grants

  • Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions--such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities--improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, and digital materials.
  • Funding: Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded. All grants are awarded for a period of eighteen months, although a grantee may complete a project in a shorter period of time. Cost sharing is not required in this program. If eligible expenses are more than $6,000, an applicant may cover the difference and show this as cost sharing in the project's budget.
  • Web: http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/pag.html
  • Deadline: May 1, 2012


United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

USAID/DCHA/CMM Annual Program Statement for Conflict Mitigation and Reconciliation Programs and Activities

  • The objective of this APS is to make significant strides in the overall goal of conflict mitigation, peace, and reconciliation in selected eligible conflict-affected countries. In addition, this APS seeks to contribute to USAID's developmental objectives in an affected country or countries. "People-to-people" programs are one approach among many to conflict mitigation. While a diversity of programs and approaches may be considered people-to-people in nature, most entail bringing together representatives of conflict-affected groups to interact purposefully in a safe space. This type of work addresses divisions within a community that may be rooted in group differences such as ethnicity or religion, status, class, or political affiliation. People-to-people projects generally address patterns of prejudice and demonizing that reinforce the perceived differences between groups and hinder the development of relationships among parties to a conflict. The aim is to create opportunities for a series of interactions between conflicting groups in the community to promote mutual understanding, trust, empathy, and resilient social ties. This funding opportunity is intended to fund conflict mitigation programs with a people-to-people approach, and to derive lessons learned and best practices for future people-to-people programming. Lessons learned will be incorporated into future programs and funding opportunities, and will inform DCHA/CMM's research agenda for conflict management and mitigation. DCHA/CMM is currently undertaking a global evaluation of grants implemented since 2004 under this APS.
  • Funding: USAID anticipates approximately $15.5 million will be available for support. The duration of programs funded under this APS is for a minimum period of 12 months and up to 36 months from the date of award. Applications in the amount of $100,000 to $500,000 will only be considered from local organizations. USAID plans to make multiple awards under this APS, subject to the availability of funds.
  • Web: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=138514
  • Deadline: March 9, 2012

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Constellation Energy

EcoStar Grants

  • Environmental stewardship is one of Constellation Energy's foundational values. The EcoStar Grant program was launched in January 2010 with a request for applications from nonprofit organizations seeking funds for environmental projects in their communities.  EcoStar Grants are available to projects that fit into one or more of five stewardship categories: pollution prevention, education and outreach, energy efficiency, conservation and community activism.
  • Funding: Grants up to $5,000.
  • Web: http://www.constellation.com/community/pages/eco-star-grants.aspx
  • Deadline: March 10, 2012

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Institute of Turkish Studies

Grants Program

  • Since 1983, the Institute of Turkish Studies (ITS) has sponsored an annual grant program that offers a variety of awards to scholars, colleges and universities in the United States. The principal purpose of the grant program is to support and encourage the development of research, scholarship, and learning in the field of Turkish Studies in the U.S. All grant applications submitted to the Institute are evaluated by committees comprised of the academic members of the Board of Governors and Associate Members of the ITS. These standing committees present their recommendations to the Board of Governors for approval.
  • Funding:The annual budget for the Grants Program has been significantly expanded and ITS encourages qualified applicants to apply for its grants.
  • Web: http://www.turkishstudies.org/grants/
  • Deadline: March 12, 2012

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Russell Sage Foundation

Project Awards

  • The Foundation's awards are restricted to support for basic social science research within its announced programs. Currently, the Foundation is pursuing five principle areas: (1) A program of research on the Future of Work concerned principally with the causes and consequences of changes in the quality of low-wage work in the United States and other advanced economies; (2) A program of research on current U.S. Immigration aimed at discovering how well immigrants and their children are adapting socially, politically, and economically to life in the United States, particularly as they move beyond the traditional immigrant gateway cities; (3) A program on Cultural Contact concerned with understanding and improving relations between racial and ethnic groups in schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, and other key institutional settings; (4) A program on Social Inequality, focused on the social effects of rising economic inequality, with particular attention to the ways in which the U.S. political and educational systems have responded to growing economic disparities; and (5) A program of research on Behavioral Economics which incorporates the insights of psychology and other social sciences into the study of economic behavior.
  • Funding:The Foundation's major awards range between $35,000 and $500,000. Support is mainly provided for analyzing data and writing up results, but occasionally larger awards are considered for data acquisition projects highly relevant to the Foundation's program goals.
  • Web: http://www.russellsage.org/how-to-apply/apply-project-awards
  • Deadline: March 15, 2012

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Astrophysics Research and Enabling Technology

  • The Astrophysics Research and Enabling Technology (APRET) program solicits basic research proposals for investigations relevant to NASA's programs in astronomy and astrophysics. This includes research over the entire range of photons, gravitational waves, and particles of cosmic origin. Awards may be for up to four years' duration (five years for suborbital investigations), but shorter-term proposals are typical. Proposals for suborbital investigations are particularly encouraged. The APRET program solicits proposals for developing experimental concepts and related technology for future NASA fundamental physics missions. The program seeks to support research that addresses the best possible (i) state-of-the-art detector technology development for instruments that may be proposed as candidate experiments for future space flight opportunities; (ii) science and technology investigations that can be carried out with instruments flown on suborbital sounding rockets, stratospheric balloons, or other platforms; and (iii) supporting technology, laboratory research, and, with restrictions, ground-based observations that are directly applicable to space astrophysics missions. To meet these goals, proposals are solicited in the following five broad categories: Detector Development, Suborbital Investigations, Supporting Technology, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Ground-Based Observations.
  • Funding:The approximate available funding for new selections for the Detector Development category is $3 million; the approximate number of new selections is 8. The approximate available funding for new selections for the Suborbital Investigations category is $11 million; the approximate number of new selections is 14. The approximate available funding for new selections for the Supporting Technology category is $1.8 million; the approximate number of new selections is 10. The approximate available funding for new selections for the Laboratory Astrophysics category is $1.2 million; the approximate number of new selections is 9. The approximate available funding for new selections for the Ground-Based Observations category is $0.1 million; the approximate number of new selections is 1. The deadline for submitting a letter of intent is January 27, 2012.
  • Web: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={35076738-28B6-924D-48DA-5ABC71D7F85F}&path=open
  • Deadline: Proposal: March 23, 2012

Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) - 2011

  • This NASA Research Announcement (NRA) solicits proposals for supporting basic and applied research and technology across a broad range of Earth and space science program elements relevant to one or more of the following NASA Research Programs: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics. This ROSES NRA covers all aspects of basic and applied supporting research and technology in space and Earth sciences, including, but not limited to: theory, modeling, and analysis of SMD science data; aircraft, stratospheric balloon, suborbital rocket, and commercial reusable rocket investigations; development of experiment techniques suitable for future SMD space missions; development of concepts for future SMD space missions; development of advanced technologies relevant to SMD missions; development of techniques for and the laboratory analysis of both extraterrestrial samples returned by spacecraft, as well as terrestrial samples that support or otherwise help verify observations from SMD Earth system science missions; determination of atomic and composition parameters needed to analyze space data, as well as returned samples from the Earth or space; Earth surface observations and field campaigns that support SMD science missions; development of integrated Earth system models; development of systems for applying Earth science research data to societal needs; and development of applied information systems applicable to SMD objectives and data.
  • Funding: Awards range from under $100K per year for focused, limited efforts (e.g., data analysis) to more than $1M per year for extensive activities (e.g., development of science experiment hardware).
  • Web: http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={AEF75D0F-2272-7DE7-D52A-295B47C8F5CF}&path=open
  • Deadline: April 30, 2012

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Harry S. Truman Library Institute

Research Grants

  • The Harry S. Truman Library Institute for National and International Affairs is the private, non-profit partner of the Harry S. Truman Library. The Institute's purpose is to foster the Truman Library as a center for research and as a provider of educational and public programs. Applications for funding will be considered by the Institute's Committee on Research, Scholarship and Academic Relations
  • Funding: Grants up to $2500 are awarded
  • Web: http://www.trumanlibrary.org/grants/
  • Deadline: April 1, 2012; October 1, 2012

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Samuel H. Kress Foundation

History of Art Grants Program

  • The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.
  • Funding: In 2010, 7 awards were made, ranging from $10,000 to $65,000
  • Web: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/default.aspx?id=142
  • Deadline: April 15, 2012

Conservation Grants Programs

  • The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.
  • Funding: In 2010, one grant was made for $30,000
  • Web: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/default.aspx?id=138
  • Deadline: April 15, 2012

Digital Resources Grants Program

  • The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.
  • Funding: In 2010, five grants were made ranging from $23,400 to $165,000
  • Web: http://www.kressfoundation.org/grants/default.aspx?id=150
  • Deadline: April 15, 2012

 

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Environmental Protection Agency

Centers for Material Life Cycle Safety

  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as part of its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program, is seeking applications for an interdisciplinary center focused on the application of a life cycle perspective towards the development of materials. The aim of the center will be to develop methodologies and practices for materials design which applies a holistic perspective. This holistic approach to design, which considers all the stages of a material's life cycle, provides an opportunity to produce materials which minimize, and preferably eliminate, any associated potential environmental and human health impacts that may occur during the life cycle.
  • Funding: Approximately $10 million total for 2 awards. Up to a total of $5 million, including direct and indirect costs, with a maximum duration of 4 years. Cost-sharing is not required. Proposals with budgets exceeding the total award limits will not be considered.
  • Web: http://epa.gov/ncer/rfa/2012/2012_star_lifecycle.html
  • Deadline: April 25, 2012

Centers for Sustainable Molecular Design

  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as part of its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program, is seeking applications for an interdisciplinary center focusing on the sustainable molecular design of chemicals. The aim of the center will be to develop a set of parameters and strategies that will establish design criteria regarding the properties of chemicals that will lead to the development of intrinsically less hazardous substances when compared to those currently used in society. These newly acquired criteria and design principles will direct researchers towards the generation of novel chemicals that will minimize, and preferably eliminate, associated potential environmental and human health impacts that may occur during the life cycle of that chemical. The advent of these novel chemicals and their respective discovery of correlations between a chemical’s inherent properties and their adverse impacts require the development of improved methods for the design of next generation chemicals.
  • Funding: Approximately $10 million total for 2 awards. Up to a total of $5 million, including direct and indirect costs, with a maximum duration of 4 years. Cost-sharing is not required. Proposals with budgets exceeding the total award limits will not be considered.
  • Web: http://epa.gov/ncer/rfa/2012/2012_star_molecular_design.html
  • Deadline: April 25, 2012

 

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American Nurses Foundation

Nursing Research Grants Program

  • The ANF Nursing Research Grants Program was founded 56 years ago to encourage the research career development of nurses. This program continues to grow with contributions for nursing research, from organizations and individuals. These donations support scientific research for advancing the practice of nursing, promoting health and preventing disease.
    Each year, through our Nursing Research Grants program, ANF provides funds to beginner and experienced nurse researchers to conduct studies that contribute toward the advancement of nursing science and the enhancement of patient care. Awards are given in all areas of nursing, including healthy patient outcomes, health care policy development, critical care, gerontology, women's health, community and family intervention.
  • Funding: Awards for 2010 ranged from $3,500 to $28,000
  • Web: http://www.anfonline.org/MainCategory/NursingResearchGrant.aspx
  • Deadline: May 1, 2012

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W.M Keck Foundation

Science and Engineering and Medical Research, Undergraduate Education Program

  • The W. M. Keck Foundation was founded with the goal of generating far-reaching benefits for humanity. Following the ideals of our founder, the Foundation supports outstanding science, engineering and medical research, undergraduate education; and, in Southern California, arts and culture, education, health and community service projects that will have a significant impact in addressing complex issues and problems. The Foundation strives to fund endeavors that are distinctive and novel in their approach. It encourages projects that are high-risk with the potential for transformative impact. "High-risk" comprises a number of factors, including questions that push the edge of the field, present unconventional approaches to intractable problems, or challenge the prevailing paradigm. To make grant determinations, the Foundation relies upon a wide range of input, including assessments by its professional staff, site visits (where appropriate), peer reviews, the latest available scientific information in print, and presentations by experts in scientific, medical and health and human service fields.
  • Funding: The average size and duration of grants varies by project and program area. Research grants range from $500,000 to $5 million, and are typically $2 million or less. Undergraduate Education grants range from $200,000 to $1 million, but are typically under $500,000. Southern California grants range from $100,000 to $1 million, but typically are under $500,000. Duration of grants ranges from one to five years. In 2012, Research grants will continue to be capped at $1 million and Undergraduate Education grants at $250,000.
  • Web: http://www.wmkeck.org/grant-programs/grant-programs.html
  • Deadline: May 1, 2012; November 1, 2012

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National Institute of Standards and Technology

Precision Measurement Grants

  • Since 1970, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has awarded Precision Measurement Grants to faculty members of U.S. universities or colleges for significant research in the field of fundamental measurement or the determination of fundamental constants. NIST sponsors these grants to encourage basic, measurement related research in universities and colleges and other research laboratories and to foster contacts between NIST scientists and those faculty members of academic institutions and other researchers who are actively engaged in such work. The Precision Measurement Grants are also intended to make it possible for researchers to pursue new ideas in areas where other sources of support may be difficult to find.
  • Funding: NIST plans that a total of $100,000 may be made available in FY 2012 to award two multiyear awards to eligible proposers for the first year. New awards are expected to be $150,000 each with project performance periods of up to three years. Therefore, proposers may propose multi-year projects for up to three years at no more than $50,000 per year.
  • Web: http://www.nist.gov/pml/div684/fcdc/pmg.cfm
  • Deadline: May 3, 2012

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American Astronomical Society

Small Research Grants

  • To cover costs associated with any type of astronomical research. The Small Research Grant (SmRG) Program is administered by the AAS Executive Office. The program is funded by a grant from NASA and is thus intended mainly to support investigators in the U.S. working on NASA-relevant projects. A small amount of additional funding may be provided by income from the AAS operating-reserve fund to support particularly meritorious proposals from outside the U.S. and/or not strictly relevant to current or future NASA missions. The amount of money available during any proposal cycle depends on the sources of support available to the Society at that time.
  • Funding: Awards range from $500 to a maximum of $7,000.
  • Web: http://aas.org/grants/smrg.php
  • Deadline: May 7, 2012

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Virginia Environmental Endowment

Virginia Mini-Grant Program

  • One of the most successful and popular of VEE's grantmaking programs is the Virginia Mini-Grant Program, which has enabled thousands of citizens to become actively involved in solving environmental problems in their own hometowns. With grants of $5,000 or less, schools have initiated environmental science courses and outdoor classroom projects, volunteers have monitored water quality in dozens of local streams and rivers, and communities have developed innovative strategies to ensure environmental quality is improved in their community.
  • Funding: VEE's Virginia Mini-Grant awards range from a minimum of $1,000 to a maximum of $5,000 for projects up to one year in duration. Matching funds from other sources are usually required. Although cash matches are preferred, in-kind and volunteer services will be considered when detailed in the grant proposal and budget.
  • Web: http://www.vee.org/mini.cfm
  • Deadline: June 15, 2012; December 1, 2012

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The Mockingbird Foundation

Grants

  • The Mockingbird Foundation provides support for:
    Projects that encourage and foster creative expression in any musical form (including composition, instrumentation, vocalization, or improvisation), but also recognizes broader and more basic needs within conventional instruction;
    Music education, which may include the provision of instruments, texts, and office materials, and the support of learning space, practice space, performance space, and instructors/instruction; and
    Programs which benefit disenfranchised groups, including those with low skill levels, income, or education; with disabilities or terminal illnesses; and in foster homes, shelters, hospitals, prisons, or other remote or isolated situations.
  • Funding: Grants range from $100 to $5,000.
  • Web: http://mbird.org/funding/inquiries/
  • Deadline: August 1, 2012 for letters of inquiry.

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Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

Defense Sciences Research and Technology

  • The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) pursues and exploits fundamental science and innovation for national defense and has released a broad agency announcement (BAA) soliciting abstracts and full proposals for advanced research and development in a variety of enabling technical areas.
  • Funding:Multiple awards are expected and will depend on the quality of the proposals received and the availability of funds.
  • Web:http://www.darpa.mil/Opportunities/Solicitations/DSO_Solicitations.aspx
  • Deadline: August 9, 2012

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Rockwell Collins

Community Involvement: Charitable Giving

  • Rockwell Collins makes charitable contributions to a variety of nonprofit organizations in the United States and around the world.
  • Through our Rockwell Collins Charitable Corporation, we make grants available for programs and initiatives. Our giving priorities include education with an emphasis in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and arts and culture with an emphasis in youth development. We believe that by strengthening the quality of education and providing opportunities for youth involvement and leadership, we are helping students prepare for the future.
    The Rockwell Collins Community Partnership Fund supports fundraising events and sponsorship opportunities. We limit support to organizations and activities in the communities where our employees live and work.
  • Funding: In 2009, the company awarded more than $4.8 million in charitable grants.
  • Web: http://www.rockwellcollins.com/Our_Company/Corporate_Responsibility/Community_Overview/Charitable_Giving.aspx
  • Deadline: September 1, 2012

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U.S. Department of the Interior

Youth Environmental Education Opportunities

  • The objective of this funding opportunity is to provide youth the opportunity to connect with the natural world by participating in hands-on environmental educational experiences through outdoor programs and field classrooms to youth and families, working in conjunction with a variety of schools and other youth-focused nonprofit organizations. These experiences will provide academic, experiential, and environmental education opportunities in order for youth and families to gain a better understanding and appreciation of natural resource management objectives and stewardship of the land.
  • Funding: $30,000 in funding is available for five to 10 cooperative agreements ranging from $2,000 to $10,000 for projects up to five years.
  • Web: http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=g8X7Tm9J2r8qhGhQld1gTNBJWnJp0C9JKBlyQDL1vBlyjtx9kX1t!65310457?oppId=118213&mode=VIEW
  • Deadline: September 14, 2012

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Amgen Foundation

Grants

  • The Amgen Foundation seeks to advance science education, improve quality care and access for patients, and support resources that create sound communities where Amgen staff members lice and work. The Amgen Foundation carefully considers each grant application it receives, seeking out divers organizations whose philosophies, objectives and approaches align with the Foundation goals and mission.
  • Funding: Amgen Foundation grants range from $10,000 to multi-million dollar commitments.
  • Web: http://www.amgen.com/citizenship/apply_for_grant.html
  • Deadline: Continuous for LOI

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BMW Group in North America

Grants

  • The Foundation's grants support initiatives to conserve/preserve natural resources, in particular parklands and waterways; initiatives to research/ promote the use of alternative fuels; and environmental education for K-12 students.
  • Funding: Funding varies by request.
  • Web: http://www.bmwgroupna.com/07_Philanth.htm
  • Deadline: Continuous

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RGK Foundation

Grants

  • The RGK Foundation awards grants in the broad areas of Education, Community, and Medicine and Health. The foundation's primary interests within the Education area include programs that focus on formal K-12 education (particularly mathematics, science, and reading), teacher development, literacy, and higher education.
  • Funding: The average grant amount is $25,000. Multi-year grants are rare; most grants are awarded for a one-year period.
  • Web:http://www.rgkfoundation.org/public/guidelines
  • Deadline: Continuous

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Spencer Foundation

Research Grants

  • The Foundation's research grants are organized under four areas of inquiry that identify broad topics believed to have fundamental and abiding importance for educational improvement: (1) The Relation Between Education and Social Opportunity; (2) Organizational Learning in Schools, School Systems, and Higher Education Systems; (3) Teaching, Learning, and Instructional Resources; and (4) Purposes and Values of Education. The Foundation also welcomes proposals that do not fit one of the four areas listed through its Field-Initiated Proposal program.
  • Eligibility: Principal Investigators (PIs) applying for a Research Grant must have an earned doctorate in an academic discipline or professional field, or appropriate experience in an education research-related profession. PIs must be affiliated with a college, university, research facility, school district, or cultural institution that is willing to serve as the fiscal agent if the grant is awarded. Research Grant proposals from individuals are not eligible.
  • Funding: Research grants are made up to $500,000.
  • Web: http://www.spencer.org/content.cfm/how-to-apply
  • Deadline: Continuous

 

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Virginia Foundation for the Humanities

Discretionary Grants

  • The grant programs offered by the VFH are open to proposals on a wide range of subjects. Six key areas of priority have been established by the VFH for its work in Virginia, and these are also subjects of particular interest for the Grant Program. They include: Books, Reading, and Literacy; Rights and Responsibilities; Media and Culture; Violence and Community; Science, Technology, and Society; Virginia History. Other areas of long-term interest and commitment for the VFH and its grant programs include: Teacher education programs (especially those related to Virginia's Standards of Learning); African American history and culture; Native American history and culture; The history and culture of other minority communities in Virginia; Virginia's folklife and traditional culture(s); and The future of rural Virginia
  • Funding: Up to $3,000 at any time during the year.
  • Web: http://www.virginiafoundation.org/grants/apply.html
  • Deadline: None; submit at any time.

     


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