"YOUR RIGHT TO KNOW"

 

SAFETY AT JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

 

In compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998 (formerly the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990)


October 1, 2007

 

Safety on the university campus is a natural source of concern for parents, students and university employees. Education - the business of James Madison University - can take place only in an environment in which each student and employee feels safe and secure. JMU recognizes this and employs a number of security measures to protect the members of its community.

 

Although the area, with its small-town feel and neighborly attitude, is perceived to have a relatively low crime rate, crime prevention remains a high priority among residents. JMU does its part to ensure the safety of its students and employees. A professionally trained and supervised police force, a closely screened and well-trained residence life staff, and the students and employees themselves all share in the responsibility of making the JMU campus a safe place to study, work and live.

 

Police Protection

 

JMU provides full-service police protection to the campus community through its Office of Public Safety.  The jurisdiction of the university police includes, but is not limited to, a core campus of 655 acres and 102 major buildings.

 

Out of a group of 32 sworn and commissioned police officers, all with comprehensive arrest powers, there are 25 fulltime and seven (7) part time officers.  24 are in uniform and supervise or patrol the campus and residence hall areas 24 hours a day, seven days a week as well as provide coverage for special events.  Six (6) normally plain clothed officers are the Chief of Police, investigators, technical support, primary crime prevention or administrative personnel. Their authority, responsibility and training are the same as required of any police officer in Virginia. Within their jurisdiction which includes all university-owned, -leased or -controlled property, the adjacent streets and sidewalks and expanded off-campus jurisdiction within designated neighboring areas of the city of Harrisonburg (through mutual aid and concurrent jurisdiction agreements), university police have the authority to enforce all regulations and laws, both of the university and of Virginia. They work closely with the Harrisonburg Police Department, the Rockingham County Sheriff's office and the local contingent of the Virginia State Police on incidents that occur off campus.  The 25 sworn fulltime officers primarily perform or are assigned additional tasks such as:

 

Eight officers do crime prevention programs

Two are certified and primarily assigned bike patrol officers

Two are certified evidence technicians

There is one Investigation Lieutenant (commander) plus one Sergeant Investigator.

There are four Patrol Sergeants

There is one Patrol Lieutenant

There is one Support Services Lieutenant

There is one Support Services Sergeant

One Chief of Police

Five are certified Firearms Instructors

Two are certified First Aid Instructors

One is a certified “high tech” crime analyst and investigator

One is a Breathalyzer Instructor

One is a Defensive Tactics instructor

Two are certified OC (chemical weapon) instructors

 

The seven part time officers primarily are assigned to work special and athletic events but are subject to patrol assignments when necessary.

 

When a James Madison University student is involved in an off-campus offense, JMU police officers may assist in the investigation in cooperation with local, county, state or federal law enforcement.  The Harrisonburg police may work and communicate with campus officers on any serious incidents occurring on-campus or in the immediate neighborhood and business areas surrounding campus.  Many JMU students live in apartment complexes and neighborhoods surrounding the university.  While the Harrisonburg police exercise primary jurisdiction in all areas off campus within the city, JMU officers have the authority to respond to student and non student related incidents that occur in close proximity to campus in the aforementioned designated expanded off-campus jurisdiction.  This option is exercised judiciously and usually with the full knowledge and concurrence, or at the request of the Harrisonburg Police.  JMU officers have direct radio communication with city police, fire and rescue services to facilitate rapid response in any emergency situation.

 

By mutual agreement with state and federal agencies, the University Police Department maintains a VCIN/NCIC data and information communication terminal (Virginia Crime Information Network/National Crime Information Center).

 

University police officers are graduates of any of several state-affiliated regional criminal justice training academies, having completed the 480-hour police basic performance-based training program, and are required to complete 40 hours of in-service training biennially. All are certified by the state Department of Criminal Justice Services as police officers and are trained in all phases of law enforcement, including the use of firearms. Officers carry standard issue or approved firearms at all times and must maintain firearms proficiency through semiannual classroom training, qualification and certification at a local firing range.

 

The university police department utilizes state-of-the-art Automatic External Defibulators (AEDs) in the field.  All sworn personnel within the department have been trained on the proper use of AEDs and basic life support techniques (Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation - CPR).  An AED unit is taken out into the field each shift by one of assigned officers on patrol.  This officer is the primary officer directed to all calls in which medical emergency response with the AED may be indicated.
 
Emergency Notiification
 
The University Police enjoy autonomous authority on activation and messaging on the multiple mass-communication emergency alert and notification systems.  Go to:  http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/EmergencyProceduresPoster.pdf  for more detailed information on the official JMU mass communication systems plus related the poster and advice on response to a hostile intruder, fire and weather emergencies.  

 

 

Forensic (Investigation) Unit

 

The mission of the Forensic Unit is to support the actions of the Criminal Investigation and Patrol Divisions of university's Police Department in its effort to provide a safe and secure environment for the entire James Madison University community.

 

Historical Overview - James Madison University has and will continue to field a professional and competent Police Department in an effort to provide the best vehicle for personal development and growth. This directly benefits the university community through the level of services provided. To that end the Office of Police and Public Safety organized and continues to maintain the Department’s Forensic Unit. The Forensic Unit consists of high technology (cyber) and evidence gathering response teams. It is staffed by graduates of the Virginia Forensic Science Academy and the National White Collar Crime Center.

 

The members of the Forensic Unit are primarily engaged in the forensic identification, investigation and recovery of physical evidence and are equipped to respond to any incident or accident. This section is also actively engaged in the continuing education of graduating members of the Central Shenandoah Criminal Justice Academy as well as responding to outside agency resource requests for varying crime scene or other needs.

 

The members of the unit maintain a high level of excellence and technical skill applying effective and scientific practices. The sworn officers of the Forensic Unit are dedicated to cooperation throughout the local, state, federal and international law enforcement communities. Members of the unit have in the past and are available now for the team teaching of students on the practical application of forensics in investigations in the University's academic programs. They were also actively involved several years ago in a  special summer session "Governor's School" program for exceptionally talented secondary school students.

 

Fingerprint evidence maintains its scientific validity and continues to be the primary mainstay in identification. Fingerprints are recovered from scenes were it is necessary to collect evidence. The university police are able to close cases due to the ability to link suspects and victims to crimes.

 

Forensic Unit Capabilities

Š                Recovery of fingerprints, tool marks, forensic biology specimens and trace    

           evidence

Š                Image recovery and enhancement

Š                Accident reconstruction

Š                Forensic illustration

Š                Information (cyber) security and recovery

Š                Demonstrative evidence and analogies

Š                Presumptive drug exams

Š                Catastrophic incident response

 

Campus Police Cadet Program

 

Through the Campus Police Cadet Program, carefully screened students are employed to act as additional eyes and ears for the university police. Cadets are on duty from 7 p.m. until 12 a.m. Sunday through Wednesday, 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Thursdays and 8 p.m. until 3 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays, patrolling their assigned areas and providing escort services to students walking across campus and to and from parking lots. Following cadet duty hours, university police officers escort students as needed. Cadets are also responsible for patrolling and securing academic and administrative buildings on campus each evening.

Normally there are a minimum of 35 cadets assigned to walking patrol and escorts during the fall and spring semesters.  For summers 12 cadets are the routine, primarily doing building lockup and security but who are also available to provide escorts.

 

 Emergency Telephone Number

 

The on-campus emergency number, 568-6911, directly connects any campus phone with the university police department and should be used when fire, police or medical response is required. This number is also published in the university telephone directory, the Harrisonburg/Rockingham County telephone directory and is printed on a sticker and attached to all residence hall student phones. From the university police department, a network of speed-dialed lines provide direct access to Harrisonburg/Rockingham Emergency Services for local and state law enforcement, fire and rescue services. For information, escort services and other non-emergencies, students and employees should dial 568-6913. The on-campus number for parking concerns is 568-3300.

 

In addition to a telephone in each student's room, there are 97 interior courtesy telephones housed in light blue colored boxes, 90 Area of Rescue Assistance (ARA) phones in stairwells and 120 outdoor emergency “Blue Light” phones located across campus and at the main entrance of each of the 34 residence halls. These telephones, housed in highly visible yellow call boxes, feature one-button speed dialing for instant communication with university police.

 

Campus Emergencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 568-6911
Information and non-emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . 568-6913
Parking Concerns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 568-3300
 

Security in University Housing

 

Nearly 5,800 undergraduate students reside in 33 residence halls on the JMU campus.  Six of those located on the west-shore of Newman Lake are units divided into 17 sub unit “houses”, each with individual entrances.   All were former on-campus fraternities or are currently occupied by sororities. All sororities are housed on-campus.  Eight sorority houses are located in three of the residence hall units with four in one sub unit exclusively, three in another exclusively with the one remaining in a sub unit shared with non sorority housing in the other subunits.  The nine remaining non sorority sub units are referred to as the “tree” houses due to their being designated by various common tree names.  There are no longer any fraternities located on campus.   Freshmen are required to live on campus, with the exception of day student commuters. Upper-class students select residence hall assignments dependent upon availability.

 

Off-campus housing includes apartments, private homes, individual rooms or apartments within private homes, and 12 off-campus fraternity houses.  The university does not provide supervision for unaffiliated off-campus housing.  It does provide supervision for the leased Denton Apartments located in the center of Harrisonburg between Court Square and North Liberty Street as well as the university owned Rockingham Hall, the former Howard Johnson’s Motel, situated diagonally across Interstate 81 from the Port Republic Road entrance to campus.

 

University housing provides coeducational housing for such lifestyle options as first year, upper class, substance-free, and international. Each residence hall has set visitation hours which may be further reduced by a vote of the residents. Guests must be escorted by a hall resident at all times. Overnight guests in the residence halls must be of the same sex.

 

Access to on-campus housing by university employees is on an "as needed" basis and incorporates strict card key control procedures during hours of restricted access. All university repair and maintenance personnel must be in uniform or wear a JMU photo ID to allow for easy identification by residents.

 

Each residence hall is staffed with a hall director and a number of resident advisers (one per 30 to 45 students). These individuals, living in the halls and on call 8:00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m. daily, are members of the university's residence life staff and receive extensive training in the enforcement of residence hall security policies.

 

All residence hall doors accessing resident living areas remain locked 24 hours daily, seven days a week. Unrestricted access to certain administrative, dining service, public assembly, and meeting rooms in Chandler, Huffman, and Frederikson Halls is permitted generally 7:30a.m. to 5:00p.m., weekdays.  Interior doors separating public access from residential room areas remain locked at all times in these halls. Currently perimeter security to all university-owned residence halls is maintained by automated card access.  The leased Denton Apartments feature mechanical key access.  Some rooms at Rockingham Hall feature direct exterior access while others are accessed from a central interior corridor.

 

A resident director or adviser is on duty each evening in the office at the main entrance of each hall from 8 p.m. to 12 midnight Sunday through Thursday and from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. the following morning Friday and Saturday. This individual is in immediate telephone contact with university police, if necessary. Following this desk assignment detail, the person on duty remains on call, with the office phone transferred to his or her apartment or room.

 

All residence halls and on-campus sororities are closed during Thanksgiving, Spring Break and semester breaks.  During low occupancy periods, such as the summer terms, students remaining on campus are moved into one concentrated area of the residence life complex to enhance security effectiveness.  Be assured though that the University Police remain in service during all breaks.  Over extended breaks, the doors of all vacated halls are secured from access by even the assigned residents by means of a temporary programming change in the card access software.

 

Inspections are conducted periodically by representatives from residence life, facilities management, locksmiths shop, police and safety engineering to survey the security integrity of university housing. In addition, a committee of students meets monthly to discuss security concerns and to provide feedback to the residence life staff. Repairs are made promptly, locks quickly replaced when keys are lost or stolen, and reports of potential safety hazards, such as broken windows, receive immediate response.

 

Greek Life

 

Student Affairs maintains contact with recognized fraternity and sorority organizations through the efforts of the Coordinator for Fraternity and Sorority (Greek) Life.  University police, though they may have jurisdiction in areas where some of the twelve off-campus fraternities are located (a thirteenth fraternity has non chapter “colony” status and no chapter house on or off campus), do not routinely provide law enforcement services to off-campus residences of recognized fraternities.  Criminal activity at recognized off-campus fraternity residences is monitored and recorded by the Harrisonburg Police Department.  Student Affairs, though its offices of Judicial Affairs and Greek Life, and the JMU Police members enjoy a close working relationship with the Harrisonburg  Police Department, especially when violations of federal, state or local laws surface.  This cooperative team approach addresses situations as they arise as well as future concerns.

 

Alcohol and Drug Policies

 

JMU is committed to work against the illicit use of drugs and alcohol among students and employees. University police officers enforce all Virginia laws and university policies concerning the purchase, possession, consumption, sale and storage of alcoholic beverages and drugs, including the following:

Š                Individuals must be 21 years of age to buy, possess or drink alcoholic beverages.

Š                Alcoholic beverages may not be sold or furnished to any person who at the time of sale or exchange is visibly under the influence of alcohol.

Š                Falsely representing one's age for the purpose of purchasing or possessing alcohol is against state law.

Š                Drunkenness and possession of open containers of alcohol in public areas are prohibited by law.

Š                The unlawful or unauthorized manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of alcohol and other drugs in the work place is prohibited.

Š                Impairment in the work place from the use of alcohol or other drugs (except the use of drugs for legitimate medical purposes) is prohibited.

Š                Alcoholic beverages may not be possessed, distributed or consumed at events open to the general university community and held on university property, except when specific written approval has been obtained for the event in advance. Sponsors are responsible for assuring that all persons in attendance at an event comply with state alcohol law and university alcohol policy.

Š                No student shall possess or distribute an illegal drug, as defined by Virginia's Drug Control Act. Such possession or distribution is prohibited in any building or on any property owned or operated by the university. Possession is defined to include any area or property for which the student is responsible.

 

Convictions for violations of these laws could result in fines, loss of driver's license and imprisonment. University sanctions could include penalties ranging from fines to suspension from the university.

 

Many physical and psychological health risks are associated with the abuse of alcohol and other substances, including the following:

Š                difficulty with attention and learning

Š                physical and psychological dependence

Š                damage to the brain, liver and heart

Š                unwanted sexual activity

Š                accidents due to impaired judgment and coordination

 

Staff members at the JMU Health Center and the JMU Counseling and Student Development Center can provide additional information about these concerns. More complete information on JMU's substance abuse policy can be found in the section on "University Policies."

 

University Policy #1110 Addressing Substance Abuse - complies with relevant laws related to the abuse of controlled substances and help provide for a healthy and safe university community for employees, students, local community and campus visitors. In addition, it is the intent of the University to offer support and possible solutions to employees who are struggling with alcohol or drug-related problems.  This policy addresses standards of conduct that clearly prohibit, at a minimum, the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by  employees in addition to students on the institution's property or as part of any of the institution's activities; a description of the applicable legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol; a description of the health-risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol; a description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or re-entry programs that are available to employees or students; and a clear statement that the institution will impose sanctions on employees in addition to students (consistent with local, state, and federal law), and a description of those sanctions, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution, for violations of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s standards of conduct.

 

This policy is applicable to all employees of the university, whether classified or non-classified, full- time or part-time salaried or hourly, and includes all instructional and administrative & professional faculty. 

 

For further information including but not limited to prohibitions, rehabilitation and sanctions one can go to http://www.jmu.edu/JMUpolicy/1110.shtml within the university’s Manual of Policies and Procedures.  University employees with drug or alcohol problems are encouraged to seek counseling assistance. Sanctions will be commensurate with the severity and/or frequency of the offense and may include termination of employment.

Gambling Policies

 

From the Student Handbook's Judicial Policies Section J14-101 Gambling: "No student shall illegally wager or assist in the illegal wagering of money or any other thing of value on any game or contest.”

 

From the Counseling and Student Development Center: "Depending on the assessment of a licensed professional, interventions may include sending the student to a clinician with specialty in gambling addictions or to a twelve-step program." Peer mentoring is always available where and when appropriate. "The Counseling and Student Development Center is available for students with gambling or other addictive or problematic habits to help these students assess their concerns, identify relevant goals and interventions and to assist with finding appropriate treatment and/or support resources."

 

An overview of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rules applied and enforced by the James Madison University Athletics Compliance Office are as follows. NCAA rules prohibit sports gambling of any kind. In addition to student-athletes this rule applies to:

Coaches
Support Staff
Equipment Managers
Student Managers
Athletic Administrators
Athletic Trainers
Student Trainers
Secretaries

What does this mean? None of the aforementioned people may place any bet of any sort on ANY COLLEGE OR PROFESSIONAL SPORTING EVENT. They may not give information to anyone who does place bets on college or professional sports.

Š                No wagers on ANY professional or college sports event, even those that do not involve James Madison University

Š                No participation in any activity that involves predictions of athletics contests (radio, television, newspaper, etc.)

Š                No sports "pools", even those run by friends

Š                No internet gambling on sports events

Š                No sports wagering using "800" numbers

Š                No exchange of information about your team with ANYONE who gambles. This means no information about injuries, new plays, team morale, discipline problems or anything else.

 

The consequences for violation of these rules are that the Student-Athlete will be declared ineligible to compete in college sports. The JMU Student- Athletes are informed that if they place bets of any kind on any college or professional sport or if they give information to anyone who uses that information to make a bet, they are at risk of being:

Š                Removed from their team

Š                Expelled from college

Š                Turned down for future jobs

Š                Sent to jail

 

Furthermore, they are forewarned that sports wagering can destroy any future plans, dreams, or hopes for themselves. Pretty strong words, but ones based on reality. For this reason, college athletes, college athletic administrators, college athletic staff members and conference staff officials may not gamble on college or professional sporting events.

 

Crime Prevention and Personal Safety Programs

 

Through a cooperative effort between public safety and the police crime prevention coordinator, residence life, the campus health center and the affiliated Associate Director for Sexual Assault Prevention, the counseling center and the School of Health and Human Services, programs on personal safety and security, rape prevention and response, date rape, substance abuse, self-defense and resistance to burglary, larceny and vandalism are conducted regularly throughout the school year.

 

Each fall, in cooperation with Public Safety’s Crime Prevention Coordinator and the Safety Engineer, residence life conducts a safety and security campaign, distributing safety literature to each resident student and requiring all residents to attend hall meetings on personal safety. Resident advisers in each hall are required to offer a number of programs throughout the year to students in their areas on varying topics of personal safety. At least one lock check per semester is conducted late at night in each residence hall to ensure that student room doors are properly secured. Operation ID, a program which provides engraving and registration services for valuable personal property, is conducted once each semester in residence halls and is available on an ongoing basis through the Office of Public Safety.

 

In addition to programming throughout the year, the university annually sponsors Alcohol Awareness Week and Drug Awareness Week, two weeks devoted specifically to alcohol and substance abuse prevention.

 

Through these comprehensive awareness programs, members of the university community learn more about the university's efforts to enhance their safety and become aware of their personal stake in their own security and that of others. For a list of the crime prevention and personal safety programs presented by various offices of James Madison University in Academic year 2006-2007, go to the end of this report.

 

Emergencies Involving Students

 

For emergencies involving students, the campus police call on the services of the student affairs staff, including the JMU Counseling Center and the Sexual Assault Prevention Office as well as the local Victim/Witness Assistance Program when and where appropriate. The Victim/Witness Assistance Program, established through a cooperative effort between the commonwealth attorney's office, the campus police, Harrisonburg and Rockingham County law enforcement agencies, state police, and the Harrisonburg-Rockingham Community Services Board, is designed to lessen the impact of criminal acts on the victims and witnesses of crimes and to ensure that such individuals receive fair treatment while participating in the criminal justice system. The campus police can arrange assistance by the victim/witness coordinator and can also provide a handbook outlining what being a victim or witness can mean and the agencies available to assist in criminal justice procedures.

 

Missing Student

 

If a member of the University Community has reason to believe that a student is missing, whether or not the student resides on campus, all possible efforts are made to locate the student to determine his or her state of health and well-being through the collaboration of the University Police and the Office of Student Affairs. If the student is an on-campus resident, the University Police will secure authorization from Student Affairs officials to make a welfare entry into the student's room. If an off-campus student resident, the University Police will informally enlist the aid of the neighboring police agency having jurisdiction. Concurrently university officials will endeavor to determine the student's whereabouts through contact with friends, associates, and/or employers of the student. Whether or not the student has been attending classes, labs, recitals, and scheduled organizational or academic meetings; or appearing for scheduled work shifts will be established.

 

If located, verification of the student's state of health and intention of returning to the campus is made. When and where appropriate a referral will be made to the Office of Counseling and Student Development and/or the University Health Center.

 

If not located, notification of the family within 24 hours of receiving the initial report is made to determine if they know of the whereabouts of the student. If the student is an off-campus resident, appropriate family members or associates are encouraged to make an official missing person report to the law enforcement agency with jurisdiction. The University Police will cooperate, aid, and assist the primary investigative agency in all ways prescribed by law. The University Police Department is an active participant partnering in the Rockingham County/Harrisonburg City/James Madison University Mutual Aid Compact. If the student is an on-campus resident, the University Police will open an official investigation and retain status as the primary investigative unit.

 

All pertinent law enforcement agencies, be they neighboring municipal, county, or state; those located along suspected travel corridors; or place of original domicile, will be notified and requested to render assistance, through direct telephone contact or visit, Virginia Crime Information Network (VCIN) message, and/or radio transmission with a comprehensive BOL message based on the totality of up-to date information.

 

Suzanne's Law requiring local police to notify the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) when someone between 18 and 21 is reported missing was signed into law by President George W. Bush in the Spring of 2003 as part of the national "Amber Alert" Bill http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d108:s.00151:. The federal law is named after Suzanne Lyall, a State University of New York at Albany student who has been missing since 1998.

 

Previously police were only required to report missing persons under the age of 18. This new law is intended to encourage police to begin investigating immediately when college-age people disappear, instead of waiting a day, which has been a common practice (the JMU Police have always initiated such investigations promptly).

 

Upon closure of the missing person investigation, all parties previously contacted will be advised of the status of the case.

 

General Security Procedures

 

The JMU campus is well lighted and further improvements in campus lighting are continually being made, including the placement of high-intensity metal halide or sodium vapor lights on buildings, in parking lots, in areas with heavy landscaping and along sidewalks and pathways frequently traveled by students.

 

Lighting and shrubbery tours are conducted at least once an academic year by representatives from all segments of the campus community, including student government representatives, staff from Student Affairs, Facilities Management and Public Safety. Safety and security concerns are identified and recommendations for improvements made.  In addition, the university safety engineer makes regular safety and health inspections, serves as a liaison with public health and safety officials, schedules regular safety lectures and follows up on recommendations with Locksmiths Shop and Facilities Management personnel.

 

JMU students, faculty and staff have access to academic, recreational and administrative facilities on campus. The general public may attend cultural and recreational events on campus, with access limited to the facilities in which these events are scheduled.

 

The university's trespass policy, enforced by university police and posted in all university housing, is as follows:

 

Only those persons having legitimate business with James Madison University, members of the university community and their invited guests, are permitted in this building. The university reserves the right to exclude all persons not conforming to acceptable behavior from these premises. Those who disregard this warning are to be considered in violation of criminal trespass (under cited Virginia code provisions) and are liable for prosecution.

 

University police officers may serve verbal or written trespass notices on nonmembers of the university community present on campus and may make immediate arrests of persons in secure areas for which they have no legitimate business. If a person served with a prior trespass notice reappears on campus, or if a person is found in a posted facility with no legitimate purpose in that building, he or she is subject to immediate arrest.

 

Firearms and dangerous weapons of any type are not permitted in the residence halls or other university facilities, except when carried by bonafide law enforcement officers within their jurisdictions or as otherwise provided under Virginia and federal law. Intentional use, possession or sale of firearms or other dangerous weapons by students is strictly forbidden and is a violation of university policy as stated in the student handbook. Provisions for storage of firearms and other weapons such as hunting bows and arrows can be made with university police for short-term purposes, such as hunting off campus in approved areas. Strict sign-in and sign-out procedures are followed.

 

Police Crime Log Information

 

Crime Log information appears on the University Police website http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/index.shtml and can be accessed by scrolling down to links for Daily Police Crime Log report summaries monthly from October 1998 to present. For those not having access to the Daily Police Crime Log through the internet, the University Police will make the hard copy Crime and Arrest Logs for the most recent 60 day period open to public inspection during normal business hours, Monday through Friday, excepting holidays and closure of school. The University Police maintain a computer station kiosk 24/7 in the dispatcher reception lobby of the police station with access limited to http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/index.shtml plus all links including the Crime Log at http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/DailyCrimeLog.shtml.  Any portion of the log beyond 60 days, if not immediately available, will be made accessible within two business days of a request for public inspection.  The only exceptions in the posting of crimes reported and/or investigated are:

Š                If the disclosure is prohibited by law, or

Š                If the disclosure would jeopardize the confidentiality of the victim.

 

Posting of crimes reported and/or investigated may be temporarily withheld in some cases if the release of information would:

Š                Jeopardize an ongoing investigation,

Š                Jeopardize the safety of an individual,

Š                Cause a suspect to flee or evade detection, or

Š                Result in the destruction of evidence.

 

The information temporarily withheld from the log for any of the aforementioned justifications will be posted once the possibility of adverse or harmful effects are no longer likely to occur.

 

The university community is also kept aware of selected reported incidents on campus and in the nearby community through the semiweekly student newspaper, The Breeze in the publication's semi-weekly "Police Log" section. The police reporter from The Breeze contacts representatives from the university police, the Harrisonburg Police Department and the local court system prior to the printing of each issue to review all case activities since the previous issue.  As the University Police Department has no editorial control over what eventually appears in The Breeze "Police Log" the complete Crime Log as supplied to The Breeze reporters usually is incomplete due to the editors’ selective omissions.

 

Timely Warnings

 

In the event that a situation arises, either on or off campus, that, in the judgment of the Chief of University Police, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus wide “timely warning” will be issued. The warning will be issued by means of various rapid response state-of-the-art mass-communication technologies to students, faculty and staff:

§       “Blast” bulk e-mailings originating from the Public Safety Office to all student and employee e-mail accounts in text message,*

§       companion posters sent to various residence life listservs and other address book listings as attachments,

§       AM 1600 low power radio system receivable on all personal and car radios on the commercial AM band,

§       wireless text messaging to those who opt for the free service (contract effective August 1, 2007) and

§       blast siren alert horns with follow-up instructional and awareness voice messaging for exterior areas of the 500 acre core campus (contract effective August 17, 2007).

 

Of course other broad coverage rapid alert technologies will be explored once they become available and proven.  Go to:  http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/EmergencyProceduresPoster.pdf  for more detailed information on the official JMU mass communication systems.

 

 

The semiweekly student newspaper, The Breeze is not a reliable source for “Timely Warnings” due to editorial prerogative and the fact that it is published on Mondays and Thursdays only.   

 

Depending on the particular circumstances of the crime, especially in situations that could pose an immediate threat to the community and individuals, the Office of Public Safety may also post a notice on the campus-wide electronic bulletin board at the University Police web site: http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/IncidentListings.shtml, providing the university community with more immediate notification. In such instances, a copy of the notice is posted in each residence hall, at the front door of each on-campus fraternity and sorority house, and in the Center for Off-Campus Living. The electronic bulletin board is immediately accessible via computer by all faculty, staff and students. Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to the University Police office, by phone (568-6911) or in person at the dispatch center within Public Safety, Anthony-Seeger Hall, the southwest corner of West Grace and South Main Streets.   Timely Warnings of situations that may pose a threat to others are generated from reports made to Campus Security Authorities as identified by JMU, the University Police and/or the local police agencies having concurrent jurisdiction  (See the section on Campus Security Authorities).

 

*There is absolutely NO THIRD PARTY DELAY in the sending of the message to all e-mail accounts since no prior authorization outside of the Office of Public Safety is required.  Once the message is sent by one of the designated Public Safety information technicians, the only delay may be with the servers; up to 45 minutes with employees, up to 90 minutes with students; due primarily to the number of accounts. 

 

Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, Sex Offender Registry and Access to Related Information as amended effective July 1, 2006*

 

Incarceration may remove a sex offender from the streets but it does nothing to prevent the offender from committing another crime when released.

 

The federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act (CSCPA), enacted on October 28, 2000, went into effect October 28, 2002. The law requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement agency information provided by a State, concerning registered sex offenders, may be obtained. It also mandates that sex offenders, already required to register in a state, to provide notice, as required under State law, of each institution of higher education in that state at which the person is employed, carries on a vocation, volunteers services or is a student.  States are under an obligation to advise registrants of these requirements and establish procedures to do so.  States are also obligated to notify institutions if a registered sex 
offender is employed, carries on a vocation, volunteers services or is a student (not all do though – thankfully Virginia does and has been doing so since 2004). 
 
The CSCPA amended the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, the Jeanne Clery Act and the  Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.  The CSCPA covers not only individuals actually employed BY an institution, but also those who are employed AT an institution such as third party contractors (food service, custodial, etc.) through outsourcing.  

 

In the Commonwealth of Virginia convicted sex offenders must register with the Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry. The Registry was established pursuant to § 19.2-390.1 of the Commonwealth's Crimes Code. Every person convicted on or after July 1, 1997, including juveniles tried and convicted in the circuit courts pursuant to § 16.1-269.1, whether sentenced as adults or juveniles, of an offense for which registration is required shall be required as a part of the sentence imposed upon conviction to register and reregister with the Commonwealth's Department of State Police as provided by the law.

 

In addition all persons convicted of violations under the laws of the United States, any other state, foreign country or political subdivision thereof (effective 7/1/06) substantially similar to an offense for which registration is required shall provide to the local agency all necessary information for inclusion in the State Police Registry within three (3) days (effective 7/1/06) of establishing a residence within the Commonwealth.  Any person required to register shall also be required to reregister within three (3) days (effective 7/1/06)   following any change of residence, whether within or without the Commonwealth.  Prior to July 1, 2006 registration and re-registration was within ten (10) days.  Three (3) days is not much time, especially when you realize that it is only 72 hours!

 

 

Nonresident offenders entering the Commonwealth for employment, to carry on a vocation, volunteer services or as a student attending school who are required to register in their state of residence or who would be required to register under this section if a resident of the Commonwealth shall, within three (3) days (effective 7/1/06)  of accepting employment or enrolling in school in the Commonwealth, be required to register and reregister pursuant to the law. For purposes of this section "student" means a person who is enrolled on a full-time or part- time basis, in any public or private educational institution, including any secondary school, trade or professional institution, or institution of higher education.

 

Effective July 1, 2006 Public and private two- and four-year institutions of higher education in the Commonwealth of Virginia are required to electronically transmit information about applicants accepted for enrollment at each institution to the State Police for comparison with the Virginia Criminal Information Network and National Crime Information Center Convicted Sexual Offender Registry.

 

Information concerning offenders registered with the Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry may be disclosed to any person requesting information on a specific individual in accordance with the law. Information regarding a specific person requested pursuant to the law shall be disseminated upon receipt of an official request form that may be submitted directly to the Commonwealth's Department of State Police or to the State Police through a local law-enforcement agency. The Department of State Police shall make Registry information available, upon request, to criminal justice agencies including local law-enforcement agencies through the Virginia Criminal Information Network (VCIN). Registry information provided under this section shall be used for the purposes of the administration of criminal justice, for the screening of current or prospective employees or volunteers or otherwise for the protection of the public in general and children in particular. Use of the information for purposes not authorized by this section is prohibited and a willful violation of this section with the intent to harass or intimidate another shall be punished as a Class 1 misdemeanor.

 

The Commonwealth's State Police maintains a system for making certain Registry information on possessors of child pornography, sex offenders (effective 7/1/06), violent sex offenders and persons convicted of murdering a minor child (effective 7/1/06)  publicly available by means of the Internet. The information made available includes the offender's name; all aliases that he/she has used or under which he may have been known; the date and locality of the conviction and a brief description of the offense; his/her date of birth, current address and photograph; and such other information as the State Police may from time to time determine is necessary to preserve public safety. The system is secure and is not capable of being altered except by or through the State Police. The system is updated each business day with newly received registrations and re-registrations.

 

The new pertinent web site address for securing related information in the Commonwealth of Virginia is now:  http://sex-offender.vsp.virginia.gov/sor/index.htm.

 

For the neighboring West Virginia site go to: http://www.wvstatepolice.com/sexoff 

 

The National Sex Offender Registry Web site maintained by the U.S. Department of Justice is found at http://www.nsopr.gov/.

 

Also PublicData.com <http://www.PublicData.com/> is providing one-click search of sex offender databases in: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, N. Carolina, S. Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming for free.  Once in PublicData.com click on link "Click here for FREE SexOffender searches" <http://www.criminalcheck.com/>.  If you do not get into PublicData.com click on the “Refresh” icon in the tool bar.

 

The JMU Office of Residence Life Housing Contract provides for the cancellation of the housing contract of a sex offender, or any other convicted person, who is disruptive to the educational environment of the residence hall.

 

Federal laws governing the privacy of education records (Family Education Rights and Privacy Act or FERPA for short) do not prevent campus security agencies or other administrators from disclosing information concerning registered sex offenders enrolled at, employed by JMU or by outside contractors with operations on the JMU campus.  FERPA has been so amended to make that clarification.

 
*First offense child pornography possession and burglary with the intent to commit certain felony sex offenses are now Registry offenses if committed after July 1, 2006.  Criminal homicide in conjunction with child abuse is now a registrable offense.  The sex offender website includes persons convicted of all registrable sex offenses not just persons convicted of violent sex offenses.  The legislation modified the registration of a person convicted of murdering a child; registration is now required if the victim is under 15 years of age and if the minor victim is 15 or older and the murder is related to a registrable offense.  Persons convicted in a foreign country are now be required to register.  Offenders now have three days to register or reregister after an address change rather than the former 10 and have to reregister for any employment change.  Sex offenders moving into the Commonwealth now have three days to register instead of 10, as do nonresident visitors, workers and college students who are subject to registration requirements…
 
…Persons who have to register for murder of a minor are now required to reregister every 90 days, the same as a violent sex offender.  In addition, when a sex offender is convicted of failing to register, he/she is now required to reregister more frequently (violent sex offenders monthly instead of every 90 days and sex offenders 180 days instead of the former 12 months). The duration of registration for sex offenders who have been convicted of failing to register is now extended as they are no longer be permitted to get off of the registry in 10 years from the date of registration, but instead the requirement is now 10 years from the date of their last conviction for failing to register.  In addition, murder of a minor now requires lifetime registration.
 
Sex offenders convicted of failing to register are no longer permitted to petition for relief for three years from the date of registration, but now must wait to petition five years from the date of their last conviction for failure to register.
 
The legislation also made a second or subsequent conviction for failing to register as a sex offender a Class 6 felony and now requires GPS monitoring making a second or subsequent conviction of failing to register as a violent sex offender or murderer a Class 5 felony and requiring mandatory GPS monitoring... 
 
…An offender will be required to submit to having a DNA sample taken (if not already taken) and to being photographed by a law-enforcement agency every two years.
 
Failure to register is was added to the offenses for which conviction bars loitering within 100 feet of a school.  Persons convicted of such offenses after July 1, 2006, are also be prohibited from loitering within 100 feet of a child day program. Persons convicted of certain sex offenses are now prohibited from working or volunteering on the grounds of a school or day care center and are now prohibited from residing within 500 feet of a school or day care center…
 
Public and private two- and four-year institutions of higher education are required to electronically transmit information about applicants accepted for enrollment at each institution to the State Police for comparison with the Virginia Criminal Information Network and National Crime Information Center Convicted Sexual Offender Registry…
 
...The Department of Criminal Justice Services is required to advise and initiate training standards for criminal justice agencies and state, local and regional employees who work with the Registry.

 

Sexual Assault Prevention and Response

 

Prevention, intervention and education programs specifically addressing rape, acquaintance rape and other sexual offenses are regularly sponsored by a variety of organizations at JMU. The JMU Health Center, Sexual Assault Prevention Office,

Counseling and Student Development Center, Women's Resource Center, and C.A.R.E. (Campus Assault Response Emergency hot line - a student organization) present programs throughout the year in classes, residence halls and student organizations. Programs on sexual assault occur at least once each semester in all residence halls and the topic is addressed at freshman orientation.

If a sexual offense should occur, the victim should take the following actions:

Š                Go to a safe place.

Š                Call the campus police if the incident occurred on campus; call the local police if it occurred off campus. The police will then contact the Counseling and Student Development Center.

Š                Contact a friend or family member.

Š                Do not shower, bathe, or douche.

Š                Do not urinate, if possible.

Š                Do not eat, drink liquids, smoke or brush teeth if oral contact took place.

Š                Keep the clothes worn during the offense. If clothes are changed, place clothes    in a paper bag (evidence deteriorates in plastic).

Š                Get prompt medical attention.

Š                Do not destroy the physical evidence that may be found in the vicinity of the crime. If the crime occurred in the victim's home, the victim should not clean or straighten until the police have had an opportunity to collect evidence.

Š                Tell someone all details remembered about the assault.

Š                Write down all details remembered as soon as possible.

 

Once an incident is reported to the Counseling and Student Development Center, a professional staff member will be assigned to work with the victim in deciding whether or not to pursue legal action and in connecting with local programs and agencies, such as Citizens Against Sexual Assault (CASA) and the Victim/Witness Assistance Program. The treating professional will also assist the victim in making any necessary changes in academic program or living situation.

 

Following an incident, victims are encouraged to make a report to campus or local police. This action does not obligate prosecution, but it does make legal action possible if the decision to prosecute is made at a later date. The earlier an incident is reported, the easier it is to collect valuable evidence. Victims have the option of keeping their report of sexual assault in complete confidence, protecting their right to anonymity, when making a report through the university's Counseling and Student Development Center.

 

University judicial action, criminal prosecution and civil suits are all options available to victims of sexual assault. To begin university judicial action, the counselor, police or victim should contact the Office of Judicial Affairs at 540-568-6218 to speak with a judicial advisor. During campus judicial proceedings, both the victim and the accused may be present and may have an attorney and/or adviser present to provide support and advice. Both the victim and the accused will be informed of the results of the proceeding. Sanctions for sexual assault may range up to and include suspension or expulsion from JMU.

 

Volunteer On-campus Sexual Assault Victim Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

CARE, and its Campus Assault Response Helpline (540)568-6411, was established to serve James Madison University students by James Madison University students thus creating an environment that offers compassion and support for sexual assault survivors. CARE volunteers offer a free and confidential support system including a telephone helpline service and Peer Assistant program. CARE surrounds both its volunteers and the students it serves in a warm and supportive atmosphere. CARE is not possible without the help and support of volunteers and contributors. Non-emergency contact may be made with CARE through the James Madison University Women’s Resource Center at (540)568-3407. Additional resources are available through cooperating companion student volunteer groups SCAR (Student Coalition Against Rape) and HAVEN, a student support group for sexual assault survivors.

 

Rockingham/Harrisonburg Community Based Sexual Assault Services

 

Citizens Against Sexual Assault - Citizens Against Sexual Assault of Harrisonburg and Rockingham, Inc., or CASA, is a grass roots organization currently located at 165 S. Main St., Suite “D,” Harrisonburg, VA 22801.  In October of 1987, Shirley Collins, a well known community member, was sexually assaulted in Harrisonburg. She died of the injuries she sustained during that assault. The community was devastated and many people were moved to take action. In response, community leaders, allied professionals and private citizens developed a task force to analyze how sexual violence was affecting the community. A needs assessment indicated that many people were seeking services for sexual assault and abuse, but few resources were available that could address their comprehensive needs. As a result, (CASA) was incorporated in 1988 and began providing services in October of 1989. All (CASA) services are free and confidential.

 

CASA addresses the needs of women, men and children who have experienced the trauma of sexual violence through crisis intervention, advocacy and support. The agency also strives to reduce the occurrence of sexual violence by raising awareness of this issue in our community. CASA staff and volunteers work to achieve this mission through the provision of direct victim services, allied professional training and community education programs. The philosophy behind the agency’s services is to promote empowerment as the basis for decision-making and dealing with one’s own unique situation.

 

Services provided by CASA include crisis intervention, support groups, court advocacy, workshops, education, information, and referrals. CASA can be reached by calling the 24-hour hotline, 434-CASA(2272). The CASA non-emergency office line is 432-6430.

 

Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners, Rockingham Memorial Hospital (RMH) - Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners program, otherwise known as SANE, is a program set up specifically to gather forensic evidence from victims of sexual assault. SANE nurses are on call for duties to be performed at the RMH Emergency Room. As a routine, police investigators suggest that victims receive an exam by a SANE nurse if they are interested in pressing charges, though SANE exams are administered to walk-in victims. If a SANE nurse is unavailable a qualified RMH Emergency Room physician will administer the recovery of forensic evidence utilizing the PERK (physical evidence recovery) kit. The RMH Emergency Room is located one half block north of the James Madison University campus on Mason Street south of the intersection with Cantrell Ave.

 

SANE nurses are trained in examination techniques, forensic practice, how to collaborate with law enforcement officers, and how to present evidence as an expert witness in the courtroom. The SANE exam is an evidentiary exam, not a diagnostic one. If the victim does not wish to support a police investigation or declines a forensic exam, she/he will be referred to the Emergency Room Physician. There is a SANE nurse available 24/7 and exams are done for both adult and pediatric victims.

 

For the exam, the SANE nurse obtains a brief medical history and may ask some detail about the assault that will help to know what areas of physical examination are most important for a thorough collection of forensic evidence. Blood, hair, and specific body fluids will be collected and packaged in a manner prescribed by the Virginia State Crime Lab (we are located in the Roanoke region - that lab is about two hours distant). Specimens are labeled in detail and then sealed in a box that is remitted to law enforcement, following the rules of chain-of-custody. The investigating agency is then responsible for carrying the sealed evidence to the crime lab.

 

At the completion of the exam, the victim is offered prophylaxis for sexually transmitted diseases (SDTs) and pregnancy and is given follow-up instructions depending on any findings during the exam. Follow-up can be through a private physician, University Health Center, and/or the Public Health Department of Rockingham/Harrisonburg.

 

When the victim is a student from a local college/university, the SANE nurse requests of the victim that they allow the nurse call a professional counselor from that school to let them know of the assault. The SANE nurses are bound by the limits of confidentiality, however, and may be able to only let the counselor know that an assault occurred on a student, but be unable to name that student if the victim wishes not to be named. The SANE nurses’ experience has been that students rarely decline their school’s counseling services.

 

The SANE team works in concert with the SART (Sexual Assault Response Team). SART is composed of representatives from SANE, local law enforcement (Harrisonburg city and JMU Police, Rockingham County Sheriff’s Office), the Commonwealth Attorney’s (local prosecutor) Office, Harrisonburg-Rockingham Department of Social Services (primarily Child Protective Services), Citizens Against Sexual Assault, First Step (for victims of domestic violence), JMU’s Sexual Assault Prevention Office, and representatives from Eastern Mennonite University and Bridgewater College. SART meets quarterly to discuss how communications can be maintained and improved, debrief members about problems with particular cases, and use the meeting to educate each of the members about the varied roles played by each with victims of sexual assault.

 

Date Rape Drugs

 

Date rape drugs can be placed in any drink, not just alcohol. Effects may range from a feeling of well being and short term memory loss to an apparent aphrodisiac and intoxication effect.  Serious adverse effects can occur such as seizures, insomnia, anxiety, nausea, dizziness, hallucinations, coma, even death. Some common side effects of these drugs include a drunken appearance, drowsiness, light-headedness, staggering, confusion, muscle relaxation and amnesia that lasts up to 24 hours.

 

If one suspects they or someone they know has been drugged and/or assaulted, first, go to a safe place, call the university police or local police if off campus, go to the University Health Center or the local hospital’s emergency room for immediate treatment of any injuries, plus urine, blood, pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing, and call the university’s Office of Sexual Assault Prevention.

 

Support and Assistance Resources

JMU Counseling and Student Development Center

568-6552

JMU Health Center

568-6177

JMU Office of Sexual Assault Prevention

568-2831

Substance Abuse Prevention

568-6177

JMU Campus Assault Response Emergency help line (C.A.R.E.)

568-6411

JMU Women's Resource Center

568-3407

JMU Office of Public Safety

Emergency 568-6911
Business 568-6913

JMU Office of Judicial Affairs

568-6218

Harrisonburg Police Department

Emergency 911
Business 434-4436

Rockingham County Sheriff

Emergency 911
Business 564-3800

Citizens Against Sexual Assault

434-CASA (2272)

 

Crime Victim and Witness Rights

 

As a victim or witness of a crime, individuals have certain rights under Virginia’s Crime Victim and Witness Rights Act.  James Madison University’s Police are active participants in the city of Harrisonburg, county of Rockingham’s Victim/Witness Program telephone 564-3350.

 

There are specific steps one needs to take in order to receive these rights.  The victim/witness program at the Commonwealth Attorney's Office has been implemented for the benefits of victims and witnesses of crime.

A victim is defined as a person who has suffered physical, psychological, or economic harm as a direct result of a crime.

 

As a victim one may be entitled to information about:

Š                Financial Assistance and Social Services

Š                Address and telephone confidentiality

Š                Closed preliminary hearing or use of closed-circuit television, if one was the          victim of a sexual offense

Š                Separate waiting area during court proceedings

Š                The right to remain in the courtroom during a criminal trial or proceeding

 

As a victim one may also be entitled to assistance in:

Š                Obtaining protection from further harm or threats of harm

Š                Obtaining property obtained by law enforcement agencies

Š                Obtaining financial assistance from the Criminal Injuries

           Compensation Fund

Š                Intercession services with one’s employer and/or school

Š                Obtaining advanced notice of court proceedings

Š                Receive the services of an interpreter

Š                Preparing a victim impact statement prior to the defendant’s sentencing

Š                Seeking restitution for damages or loss

 

As a victim one may also be entitled to notification of:

Š                Case status information

Š                Changes in court dates

Š                Changes in the status of the defendant and release information

 

As the witness to a crime, one may be entitled to information about:

Š                Protection from harm or threats of harm

Š                Address and telephone number confidentiality

Š                A separate waiting area during court proceedings

 

As a witness one may also be entitled to assistance with:

Š                Receiving intercession services with one’s employer or school

Š                Receiving the services of an interpreter

 

A crime victim or witness is subject to receiving a subpoena, which is a court document requiring them to be present in court at the time and place stated.

 

Steps one takes to receive confidentiality, notification, or release of information if they are a crime victim:

 

Confidentiality:  To request confidentiality, the crime victim must file a Request for Confidentiality by Crime Victim Form (DC-301) with the Magistrate, court, commonwealth’s attorney, or law enforcement agency in the locality where the crime occurred.

 

Silent Witness:  If you have any information you feel would be helpful in an investigation but wish to remain anonymous, you have the option to report it through Silent Witness at: http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/SilentWitness.shtml.  Please note: If the location of the incident is not provided, the university's Clery Act Compliance Coordinator will be unable to count the related statistic in the annual Clery Campus Crime Disclosure and Policy Report.

 

Court Dates: A crime victim must give the Commonwealth’s Attorney their current name, address, and phone number, in writing, if they wish to be notified in advance of the scheduled court dates in their case.

 

Information about release or status of defendant: The crime victim must give the sheriff, jail superintendent, or Department of Corrections their current name, address, telephone number and defendant name, in writing, if they wish to be notified about the changes in the status of the defendant or inmate.

 

Domestic Violence

 

Domestic violence is any violent or controlling behavior by a person toward a spouse or partner. Although the partner is the primary target, domestic abuse also affects the children in the household, extended family members, and even the community at large. If anyone has ever been hit or abused by spouse, domestic partner, or boy/girl friend and they want to report it as a crime; they should immediately call the police. The victim or the police officer will need to go to the magistrate to see about getting an arrest warrant and/or restraining order. If a warrant is issued, the offending spouse or friend will be arrested. An arrest warrant charges someone with committing a crime, usually assault and battery. If you are a student or employee victim, please inform the University Police of any such warrant or restraining order.

 

Dating Violence

 

James Madison University is committed to providing on-campus security, education, training, and victim services to combat violence against all persons. “Dating violence” is defined as violence committed by a person “who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim;” and “where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of...the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship” 20 U.S.C. 1152(f)(1).

 

The JMU Counseling & Student Development Center (CSDC) offers support and counseling for individuals who have experienced dating violence. That support may be through individual or group counseling. Counseling is also available for friends and partners of people who have experienced this kind of violence.

Additionally, the JMU CSDC offers psycho-educational programs for students on issues of relationships (this includes such topics as avoiding "toxic" relationships and violence to oneself by a dating partner). Call 568-6552.

 

Likewise, the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention does not strictly limit its services to those who are victims of sexual assault. Rather it is committed to enhancing the development of students by supporting, educating, and collaborating with them as they learn to make healthy choices. It is ready and able to extend its services to those who are victims of dating violence. Call 568-2831.

 

A student victim of dating violence has the right, in addition to filing charges through the criminal justice system, to file a complaint with the university’s Office of Judicial Affairs, relative acts of violence toward them or another committed by JMU student(s). It does not matter whether the act of violence occurred on or off-campus since the university reserves the right to hold students accountable for certain types of off-campus behavior. Disciplinary action will result if a student’s behavior jeopardizes the educational atmosphere or mission of the institution. Examples of such off-campus behavior would include but not be limited to crimes of violence, sexual assault and/or alcohol or drug violations. Judicial response to referral(s) related to act(s) of dating violence can result in a charge of “Violence to Persons” (J43-100 Student Handbook) against the accused; “no student shall engage or attempt to engage in any form of violence directed toward another person or group of people” (J43-101).

 

Campus resources for dealing with dating violence are:

Š                Counseling and Student Development Center, Varner House, 568-6552

Š                Office of Sexual Assault Prevention, 404 Warren Hall, 568-2831

Š                Substance Abuse Prevention, Health Center, 568-6177

Š                University Police, Public Safety, Anthony-Seeger Hall, 568-6911

Š                Office of Judicial Affairs, Frederikson Hall, C101, 568-6218

 

In addition to campus based resources there are community-based organizations such as CASA (Citizens Against Sexual Assault - 434-2272) and First Step. CASA’s services are covered in the prior section pertaining to Rockingham/Harrisonburg Community Based Sexual Assault Victim Services.

First Step - First Step (434-0295) is a non-profit organization located in the City of Harrisonburg, Virginia and funded by federal, state and local grants; United Way and private gifts. First Step provides the following services for victims of domestic violence regardless of their permanent address:

Š                Twenty-four hour a day shelter

Š                Twenty-four hour a day hotline

Š                Support groups

Š                Court advocacy

Š                Counseling service referral   

Š                Rental and mortgage assistance for those at imminent risk

Š                Children's services

 

Victim, Witness, Domestic & Dating Violence Resource and Assistance:

 

Harrisonburg/Rockingham’s Victim/Witness Program

564-3350

Victim/Witness e-mail address is

vbarnard@rockinghamcountyva.gov

JMU Public Safety Office

568-6913

JMU Counseling & Student Development Center

568-6552

JMU Office of Sexual Assault Prevention

568-2831

Harrisonburg Police Department

434-4436

General District Court

564-3130

Rockingham County Sheriff's Department

564-3800

Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court

564-3370

Magistrate's Office

564-3848

Circuit Court

564-3118

First Step-Domestic Violence Shelter - 24 hour emergency shelter, support and information for victims of domestic violence

434-0295

24 hour emergency shelter, support and information for victims of domestic violence Citizens Against Sexual Assault (CASA)

434-2272

24 hour crises hotline and support services for victims of sexual assault Center for Marriage and Family Counseling

433-1546

Offers domestic and violence/anger control groups and visitation assistance Community Services Board (CSB)

434-1941

Mental Health counseling, outpatient treatment for alcohol and drug problems, and 24 hour crisis services.

Emergency Services
Blue Ridge Legal Services

Emergency 434-1766
Legal 433-1830

 

Sexual Harassment Guidelines for Students

Any questions, assistance or violations related to the university policy on sexual harassment should be directed to the university’s Office of Equal Opportunity, 1017 Harrison Street, MSC 5802, Harrisonburg, VA 22807, 540-568-6991.

If a student believes that they have been harassed by a staff member, faculty member or by a student employee, they should take one or more of the following actions:

Š                Discuss the matter with the faculty or staff member involved, explaining why a particular comment or action was offensive.

Š                Discuss the matter with the immediate supervisor of the faculty or staff member, giving an account of the comment or action in question.


If a student believes that they have been harassed by a student, they should take one or more of the following actions:

Š                Discuss the matter with the accused, explaining why a particular comment or action was offensive. 

Š                Bring a charge of harassment to the Office of Judicial Affairs in Frederikson Hall, C 101.

If a student employee believes that he or she has been a victim of harassment, he or she should take one or more of the following actions:

Š                Discuss the matter with the accused, explaining why a particular comment or action was offensive.

Š                Discuss the matter with the immediate supervisor of the accused, giving an account of the comment or action in question.

Š                Contact the Work Experience Center at 568-8167.

Regardless of who the alleged harasser is, student victims may discuss the matter with the associate vice president for student affairs, the director of the Counseling and Student Development Center or the Office of Equal Opportunity, giving full details of the alleged harassment. They will be advised of proper university procedures that can be pursued.
 

One of the main interests of the university is to hold all complaints in strict confidence. Equally important interest is that counseling will be provided if requested. However, although the complainant may wish not to be identified, the university has an obligation to intervene in the matter if sexual harassment has occurred. It is important for the student encountering what he or she perceives to be harassment to remember that he or she may not be the only victim.  For more information on how to deal with suspected harassment go to the JMU brochure Harassment is Prohibited and Illegal at http://www.jmu.edu/affirmact/wm_library/Harassment%20Brochure.pdf.


 

A student also has the option of filing a formal charge of harassment with the U.S. Department of Education. Its address and telephone number are available from the affirmative action officer in the Office of Equal Opportunity, 1017 Harrison Street, MSC 5802, Harrisonburg, VA 22807, 540-568-6991.

 

List of Officials with Significant Responsibility for Student and Campus Activities

(Commonly known as the Campus Security Authorities)

 

As specified in the Clery Act those considered to be Campus Security Authorities are deans (or other senior student administrative personnel), coaches, residence hall staff; overseers and advisors to student clubs, organizations, and Greek houses; and other campus officials having "significant responsibility for student and campus activities," not just police and/or security officers. All are subject to reporting annual campus crime statistics of crimes not previously reported to police (professional and pastoral counselors excluded; passages in quotations are taken directly from the applicable Federal Register)(1).   Timely Warnings are generated from reports made to Campus Security Authorities designated by JMU of situations that may pose a threat to others in addition to the University Police and/or the local police agencies having concurrent jurisdiction.

 

Although we encourage the reporting of campus criminal activity directly to the James Madison University (JMU) Police, in some instances members of the campus community may choose to file a report with one of the Campus Security Authorities. James Madison University officials who learn about sexual assaults, as well as other crimes, must tell the victims that they can take their complaints to the police. JMU officials will help the victims if asked to do so and will assist the student in notifying these authorities, if the student requests their assistance. Crime statistics are monthly and annually gathered from JMU Campus Security Authorities via fax, online and campus mail reporting utilizing a report/survey form supplied by the Clery Act Compliance Coordinator.  Any crime report made to a Campus Security Authority can be immediately transmitted to the JMU Police via fax machine, e-mail or conventional campus mail.  For reporting purposes at JMU, Campus Security Authorities have been designated as listed below. People and/or positions at JMU considered Campus Security Authorities under the law (there may be others not listed so it should go without saying that the ruling word “including” should be followed in spirit with “but not limited to” no matter whether or not  it is articulated):

 

Chief of Police, all subordinate police administrators, supervisors, officers, student patrol “Cadets,” and police dispatchers

 

Director of Parking and the Manager of Parking Field Operations

 

Vice President of Student Affairs, Associate Vice Presidents, subordinate administrators and staff  including but not limited to the Ombudsperson, Honor Council Co-coordinators,  those at the Health Center, Multicultural/International Student and Scholar Services, Sexual Assault Prevention, the University Union (Festival Conference and Student Center; Events, Conferences and Summer Housing; Student Organizational Services; Taylor Down Under/Off Campus Living; Sonner Hall Lobby Welcome Center and all three University Information Desk locations), ALL advisors to student clubs and organizations (even non employee volunteers), the University Recreation Center, the Office of Judicial Affairs, Orientation/First Year Experience, Residence Life (including RA’s), Madison House (also see the London branch campus report), Professional Counselors (voluntary reporting), Pastoral Counselors aka Campus Ministers (voluntary reporting), Campus Ministers mandatory reporting (generally those who are not ordained pastors) and Academic Advising and Career Development personnel 

 

Reporting to the Office of the President:  Admissions and Student Ambassadors; Financial Aid and Student Employment (note that oversight of the Student Ambassadors program is shared with the Development Office)

 

Development Office:  Overseers of Student Ambassadors and Madison Connection programs

 

Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, Associate Directors of Intercollegiate Athletics, Facilities Managers and non-clerical staff, Athletics Personnel Administrator, subordinate Human Resources Coordinator and Compliance Officers, all Coaches and Assistant Coaches (Archery, Baseball, Men’s & Women’s Basketball, Cheerleading, Men’s & Women’s Cross Country, Men’s & Women’s Diving, Field Hockey, Football Men’s & Women’s Golf, Men’s & Women’s Gymnastics, LaCrosse, Men’s & Women’s Soccer, Softball, Men’s & Women’s Swimming, Men’s & Women’s Tennis, Men’s & Women’s Track,  Volleyball and Wrestling), Athletics Development and Marketing, Sports Media Relations, Athletics Strength & Conditioning, Sports Medicine (trainers) and Athletic Equipment  Issue personnel (all sports)

 

Military Science Head (Lt. Colonel), subordinate Commissioned and Non-Commissioned Officers

  

Washington Semester Coordinator

 

Art Department Head (by virtue of the fact that the Painting and Drawing studio is remote from main campus in what is geographically designated as a Non-Campus area).

 

Marching Band Director and subordinate Assistant Directors

 

Blue Ridge AHEC Director and subordinate non-clerical staff

 

Nursing Research & Outreach Center Director and subordinate non-clerical staff

 

Equal Opportunity Employment (formerly Affirmative Action) Officer and subordinate non-clerical staff

 

Human Resources Director and selected subordinate(s) overseeing or directly involved with employee disciplinary action

 

WXJM Student Radio Station overseen by WMRA General Manager and subordinate non-clerical staff

 

The Breeze (student newspaper) Advisors

 

Safe Zones Advisors/Coordinators

 

As a result of the negotiated rulemaking process which followed the signing into law, the 1998 amendments to 20 U.S.C. Section (f), clarification was given to those considered to be campus security authorities.  Campus “Pastoral Counselors” and Campus “Professional Counselors”, when acting as such, are not to be considered to be campus security authorities and are not required to report crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of crime statistics.  The rulemaking committee defined counselors as:

 

Pastoral Counselor

An employee (in the case of JMU, they are affiliates) of an institution who is associated with a religious order or denomination, recognized by that religious order or denomination as a person who provides confidential counseling and who functions within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor.

 

Professional Counselor

An employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling to members of the institution’s community and who is functioning within the scope of his/her license or certification.

 

That said, JMU pastoral (campus ministers) and professional counselors are encouraged to tell their clients about reporting procedures outlined in this document.  As noted below, confidential/anonymous reports are extremely valuable in order to prevent further victimizations and to obtain a more accurate portrait of JMU campus crime.  Of course, other employees not listed above are expected to inform those notifying them of crimes about reporting same to the university police.

 

In certain instances, a crime victim may be reluctant to file a report fearing the process and/or loss of his/her anonymity.  In such circumstances, crime victims are encouraged to consider making a confidential report to one of the designated Campus Security Authorities. At a minimum, crime victims will receive valuable counseling and referral information. Confidential reports are important because they provide valuable information that will enhance the safety of the community-at-large and they will, at least, provide a more accurate portrait of actual campus crime. Remember, help is available. All one needs to do is ask.

 

(1) From page 59063, Federal Register/Vol. 64, No. 210/Monday. November 1, 1999/(Final) Rules and Regulations: "For example, a dean of students who oversees student housing, a student center, or student extra-curricular activities, has significant responsibility for student and campus activities. Similarly, a director of athletics, team coach, and faculty advisor to a student group also have significant responsibility for student and campus activities. A single teaching faculty member is unlikely to have significant responsibility for student and campus activity, except when serving as an advisor to a student group. A physician in a campus health center or a counselor in a counseling center whose only responsibility is to provide care to students are unlikely to have significant responsibility for student and campus activities."

 

Voluntary Confidential Reporting of Crimes, On Campus Locations

 

For those wishing to make a report of criminal incident, be they victim, witness, or third party, reports may be made in confidence to the following offices where further options will be discussed with the reporting party.
 

JMU Public Safety Office
Anthony-Seeger Hall
Grace and
South Main Streets

568-6913

JMU Counseling Center
Varner Hall
Madison Mall at Bluestone Dr.

568-6552

JMU Health Center
"B" Parking Lot

568-6177

JMU Office of Sexual Assault Prevention
Warren Hall Room 404

568-2831

JMU Office of Equal Opportunity Employment
1017 Harrison Street (former Medical Arts West)

568-6991

JMU Ombudsperson
Huffman Hall A 101

568-2804

JMU Office of Judicial Affairs
Fredrickson Hall C 101

568-6218

JMU Multicultural/International Student Services
Warren Hall

568-6636

JMU Office of Student Success Programs
Wilson Hall 206

568-3787

JMU Pastoral Counselors and Advisors
Campus Ministers

(Please check the latest JMU phone directory for any address, phone additions or changes)

Agape Christian Fellowship

438-8157

Baptist Student Center
711 South Main St
JMU Box 8063

434-6822

BASIC
(JMU Box 8296)

433-3068
564-1987

Campus Crusade for Christ
JMU Box 8069

564-0341

Canterbury Episcopal Ministry
741 South Main St  (Formerly RMH Haas House)
JMU Box 8071

432-9613

Catholic Campus Ministry
1052 South Main St
JMU Box 8072

434-7360

Chi Alpha
Assemblies of God
JMU Box 8051

867-5257

Church of Christ
822 Country Club Road
JMU Box 2164

896-1417

Hillel Counsellorship
JMU Box 8058

568-6365

Intervarsity
JMU Box 8129

434-7730

Lutheran Campus Ministries
741 South Main St (Formerly RMH Haas House)
JMU Box 8147

432-9613

Muslim Student Association

568-3215

Navigators
JMU Box 8169

433-3083

Presbyterian Campus Ministries

741 South Main St (Formerly RMH Haas House)
JMU Box 8192

432-9613

Wesley Foundation
690 South Mason (at Cantrell)
JMU Box 8279

434-5806

Young Life
JMU Box 8279

434-5806

 

For those who wish to remain anonymous, yet still make a report of a crime, reports may be made anonymously by phone or through Silent Witness" at:

http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/SilentWitness.shtml

 

Professional counseling staff informs their clients of the procedures to report crime to the University Police on a voluntary or confidential basis, should they feel that it is in the best interest of the client.  Currently professional and pastoral counselors do not capture and report crime statistics related to crimes disclosed confidentially to them.

 

Policy for Reporting the Monthly and Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics

 

This report was prepared to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act.  The hard copy print version of the annual report is updated annually. The web based version (see http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/RTKtable.shtml)  is updated semi-annually as needed. Each contributing entity provides updated information on their educational and programs to comply with the Act.

 

The JMU police department submits a report to the Virginia State Police's and the FBI's Incident Based Reporting Program (NIBRS) on a monthly basis. Clery Act mandated crime statistics for the most recent three-year period, including incidents reported to the state police, are listed below. These statistics also reflect incidents reported to Campus Security Authorities, law enforcement agencies with concurrent jurisdiction, Harrisonburg Police (HPD), Rockingham/Harrisonburg Sheriff’s Office (RCSO), the local Virginia State Police (VSP) installation, and the Alcoholic Beverage Commission enforcement officers (Virginia ABC) from off-campus affiliated organizations such as fraternities, the various campus ministry locations and non-campus properties, on-campus and public areas. The HPD, RCSO, VSP and ABC records personnel are able to supply crime information in Harrisonburg detailed down to specific addresses. The university provides the Harrisonburg Police, the Sheriff and aforementioned state law enforcement agencies with off campus addresses for which it is required to provide statistics (fraternities, campus ministries, other affiliates and university facilities remote from the main campus). Fairly accurate crime stats can be provided for the geographical categories, e.g., main campus, the residence halls subset, the streets and sidewalks immediately bordering campus (public areas) and non-campus (affiliates and remote university facilities).

 

The Health Place (Non Campus Area Extended) Town of Stanley, Page County, VA

The Health Place is an initiative of James Madison University 's Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services (IIHHS), Blue Ridge Area Health Education Center and is a resource that promotes the provision of health and human services that are affordable, accessible, responsive to, and advance the physical, mental, and developmental health of rural Page county residents. Programs and services provided through or supported by The Health Place are characterized by their responsiveness to identified community needs, quality, dignity, and respect. The Health Place serves as a resource for interdisciplinary service learning involving faculty and students and is located on 294 East Main Street in the town of Stanley, Page county, approximately 45 minutes northeast of JMU’s Harrisonburg campus.*  The telephone number for The Health Place is (540) 778-4061.

*Directions to The Health Place:  take I-81 N to exit 264, take a right off the exit 264 and proceed through New Market, follow signs through town to US Highway 211 East, take highway 211 East over Massanutten mountain (approximately 7 miles), turn right at the bottom of the hill (toward Stanley) on US Highway 340 South, drive 3 miles, turn left on Business 340N toward Stanley, drive 5 miles, the Health Place will be on the right (east) side of  340 just before the railroad tracks, next to the Stanley Pharmacy.

 

Boston University Washington Center (Non Campus Area Extended) DC Northwest

 

The Boston University Washington Center, location of JMU’s Washington DC Internship Program, is located in Woodley Park, an upscale neighborhood on Connecticut Avenue near the National Zoo.  The Center is approximately two blocks from the Woodley Park metro (red line) within the Metropolitan Police 2nd District’s Public Service Area (PSA) 204.  It combines residential units for students with classroom space, faculty offices, and a computer lab.  In the residential section, students live in 6-person, 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom suites with shared kitchen and living area.  Laundry facilities are in the basement.  There is front-desk security 24 hours a day; residents must show official BU Center photo IDs upon entering; visitors must register one day in advance and show a photo ID before being admitted.  The Director of the Boston University Washington Center is Linda J. Killian.  The Asst. Director is Joseph P. Gareri.  The main number for the Center is (202)756-7802.

The Washington Metropolitan Police Second District Station is located at 3320 Idaho Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20016; Telephone: (202) 282-0070, Fax: (202) 282-0196.  For more information and map of the 2nd District go to http://mpdc.dc.gov/info/districts/2nd/main.shtm.

The Washington Semester Program is not considered a branch campus for purposes of annual reporting relative the federal Clery Act.  Crime statistics for JMU's Washington Center Program are included within the "NON CAMPUS" column in each of the following tables for 2004 through 2006.  For the supplemental annual report for this program see http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/Washington/WashingtonSemester.shtml.  From January 2003 to May 2004 JMU's Washington program was located at the Capital Hill area in close proximity to the Capital, the House and Senate office buildings, the Library of Congress and the Supreme Court building.  

 

For the Fall 2004 the JMU program returned to the Boston University Washington Center at 2807 Connecticut Ave NW, 20008 in Woodley Park near the National Zoo (see included supplemental map).  It remains at that location to date.

 

This program only ran in the Spring Semester of each year up to May 2004.  As of August 2004 the program expanded to two semesters, Fall and Spring along with the move from Capitol Hill back to the Boston University Washington Center.

 

Crime Statistics for the Washington Semester Program - For 2004, the Boston University officials reported that the B.U. Washington Center program had one instance of non-forcible entry burglary in their dormitory on the main level directly accessed by the exterior entrance.   For 2005, those same officials reported that the B.U. Washington Center program had one non-forcible entry burglary in their dormitory.  Since those incidents the B.U. officials have assessed the facility access procedures for needed updating and oversight.  Again, see the map for the location of the Boston University Washington Center.  Neither the 2004 nor the 2005 incidents affected the JMU students who were housed on a different floor.  The aforementioned information corrects the record relative the 2005 report where there were it was incorrectly reported that there were two burglaries in “2005.”  For 2006 Boston University officials reported that there was one student residing at the BU Center enrolled in a University of Michigan sponsored program who was instructed to leave the Center for a Drug Law violation.  Again, the 2006 did not affect JMU students who were housed on a different floor. 

The Semesters in the Overseas London, Antwerp and Florence Branch Campuses

For crime stats and other safety/security information for JMU's London (UK), Antwerp (Belgium) and Florence (Italy) branch campuses see: http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/RTKLondontable.shtml, http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/RightToKnow/AntwerpCampus2007.shtml and http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/RightToKnow/FlorenceCampus2007.shtml  for the annual reports.

Notice of Availability of Annual Campus Crime (Your Right to Know) Report

Each year e-mail and conventional mail notification is made to all enrolled students and employees that provide the web site to access this report.  Availability of the print version is also imparted to the community through the same means (“summary” statement on a 5” X 7” mailer card).  Prospective student and employees are informed of the report and how it may be secured.  The report is also made available to the general public upon request.

Crime Statistics for the Main (Harrisonburg) Campus    

Please note that reported crimes may involve individuals not associated with James Madison University; no matter whether they are victims, witnesses or perpetrators.   

OFFENSE

(Mandatory Reporting)

YEAR

ON CAMPUS 4

**RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES

(Subset of  On Campus )

NON-CAMPUS 5

PUBLIC AREAS 6

MURDER / NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

SEX OFFENSES, FORCIBLE 1

2006

6

5

0

0

2005

6

4

10

1

2004

5

5

2

0

SEX OFFENSES, NON-FORCIBLE

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

ROBBERY

2006

1

0

0

0

2005

1

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT

2006

1

0

1

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

BURGLARY 2

2006

38

22

2

0

2005

40

24

6

0

2004

32

19

0

0

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

2

0

0

0

2004

1

0

0

0

ARSON

2006

1

0

0

0

2005

1

0

0

0

2004

6

5

0

0

LIQUOR LAW ARRESTS 3

2006

65

30

1

0

2005

58

28

0

19

2004

48

23

0

11

LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS REFERRED FOR DISCIPLINARY ACTION 3

2006

608

586

24

0

2005

481

466

68

0

2004

503

489

0

2

DRUG LAW ARRESTS

2006

39

25

0

1

2005

51

26

0

1

2004

35

23

0

0

DRUG LAW VIOLATIONS REFERRED FOR DISCIPLINARY ACTION

2006

11

8

1

0

2005

13

11

1

0

2004

43

32

0

0

ILLEGAL WEAPONS POSSESSION ARREST

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

1

0

0

0

2004

1

0

0

0

ILLEGAL WEAPONS POSSESSION VIOLATIONS REFERRED FOR DISCIPLINARY ACTION

2006

5

4

0

0

2005

7

7

0

0

2004

1

1

0

0

   ** CRIMES REPORTED IN THE RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES COLUMN ARE ALSO INCLUDED WITHIN THE ON CAMPUS  CATEGORY.

OFFENSE

(Optional Reporting)

YEAR

ON CAMPUS 4

**RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES

(Subset of  On Campus )

NON-CAMPUS 5

PUBLIC AREAS 6

DRUNK IN PUBLIC ARRESTS

2006

37

10

5

0

2005

27

8

0

2

2004

40

11

0

1

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE

2006

5

0

0

1

2005

8

0

0

6

2004

6

0

0

5

SIMPLE ASSAULT

2006

5

 

1

0

2005

16

15

7

0

2004

1

0

0

0

LARCENY

2006

128

 

1

0

2005

131

29

11

0

2004

154

34

0

0

GAMBLING INVESTIGATIONS

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

GAMBLING

ARRESTS

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

GAMBLING

REFERRALS

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

FALSE FIRE ALARMS, DELIBERATE ACT

2006

1

0

0

0

2005

8

7

0

0

2004

8

5

0

0

FIRE ALARMS, MECHANICAL OR ACCIDENTAL 7

2006

188

108

0

0

2005

182

94

0

0

2004

177

94

0

0

FIRES

2006

5[8]

0

0

0

2005

168

4

0

0

2004

198

2

0

0

INJURIES DUE TO FIRE

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

DEATHS DUE TO FIRE

2006

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

** CRIMES REPORTED IN THE RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES COLUMN ARE ALSO INCLUDED WITHIN THE ON CAMPUS  CATEGORY.

 

1 Forcible sexual offenses include offense of rape

2 Most burglaries are non-forcible unlawful entries involving petty thefts

3 Classification Liquor Law Violations does not include arrests for Driving Under the Influence and Drunk In Public

4 On Campus includes the figure from Residence Halls within the aggregate

5 Non Campus includes off campus affiliates such as privately owned off-campus fraternity houses and campus ministry  centers in addition to university owned or controlled off-campus facilities not considered to be Branch Campuses

6 Public Areas are mainly the city streets and sidewalks (both sides of the street) bordering campus

7 False Alarm, Mechanical, Accidental refers to mechanical malfunctions, cooking odors/burned food, cigarette/cigar/pipe smoke and accidental activations

8 Fires – On Campus refers to mulch fires, vehicle fires, trashcan fires, other non residential structural fires

 

  

Hate Crimes

Involving Crimes or Incidents of violence against persons characterized by bias against Race, Gender, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Ethnicity, National Origin and/or Disability
Geographical Areas:  On Campus, Residential Facilities, Non-Campus and Public Property

 

2006 – There were no reported bias motivated incidents.

 

2005 – There were no reported bias motivated incidents.

 

2004 – There were no reported bias motivated incidents.

 

  

Campus Maps

Click for larger version

 

 

 

 



 

The below supplemental map of the Woodley Park area for the JMU Washington Semester Program can also be found at: http://www.stationmasters.com/System_Map/WOODLEYP/woodleyp.html

Note that the Boston University Center is located top center of the map on the 2800 block of Connecticut Avenue just south of the intersection with Cathedral Avenue in close proximity to The Carlton and All Souls Memorial Episcopal Church.

 

 

 

 

Policy and Procedures for Developing Information for this Report:

 

The offices of Judicial Affairs and Public Safety serve as "clearing houses" in the statistical gathering of crime data from those with "significant responsibilities for students and campus activities" and reports such statistics involving pertinent criminal incidents and arrests or referrals gathered from various "campus security authorities" to the Public Safety office on a monthly and/or annual basis.  The offices of Public Safety and Judicial Affairs routinely compare and reconcile the gathered information to minimize multiple postings for the same reported criminal incidents or arrests.

 

Likewise, the Virginia State Police, the Harrisonburg Police, the Rockingham County Sheriff's Office, Town of Stanley (in adjacent Page County), the Page County Sheriff's Office, and the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Department report pertinent statistics from the required geographical areas to James Madison University annually upon request. All figures reported are incorporated in the preceding statistical tables.  For the calendar year 2004 the Harrisonburg and Stanley Police Departments as well as the Page County Seriff’s Office either failed respond to repeated requests for statistical information or were unable to comply.  The Stanley Police and Page County Sheriff’s Officer failed to provide statistics for calendar years 2005 and 2006.

 

The Individual's Responsibility

 

Although JMU works hard to ensure the safety of all individuals within its community, students and employees themselves must take responsibility for their own personal safety and that of their personal belongings. Simple, common sense precautions are the most effective means of maintaining personal security.

 

For example, although the JMU campus is well lighted and may appear safe, all members and guests of the University community, walking across campus or to/from parking lots at night, whether male or female, should utilize the emergency “blue light” and other courtesy phones plus the university cadet and police escort services. Students living in residence halls should keep their room doors locked at all times and should never prop open external doors. All guests in the halls should be escorted by a resident at all times. Any harassing or obscene phone calls should be reported to hall staff or university police at once.

 

All valuable personal property should be engraved with the owner's vehicle operator’s permit number (not Social Security number), using equipment provided through Residence Life or Public Safety offices. Bicycles should be registered with University Police and secured with a good lock. Cars should be locked and parked in well-lighted areas with all valuable items locked in the trunk. Students and employees should notify University Police or Residence Life staff of any individual present in a building or on campus who appears to have no legitimate business there or who arouses suspicion in any way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further information about campus safety can be obtained from the Public Safety Office at (540) 568-6913 as well as the Public Safety web site:

www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/index.shtml

 

The Clery act is constantly under review and revision. For the latest updates and information use this link to access the Clery Act Homepage maintained by Security On Campus, Inc., the non-profit organization established by the Clery family to honor the memory of their daughter Jeanne.

 

The Office of Public Safety collects and compiles pertinent information to be disclosed to the public from on and off campus sources, those described above as well as law enforcement agencies with concurrent and neighboring jurisdiction for publishing on an annual basis.

 

James Madison University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, veteran status, political affiliation, sexual orientation or disability (in compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act) with respect to employment or admissions, or in connection with its programs or activities.  Inquiries or requests for reasonable accommodations may be directed to the activity coordinator, the appropriate university office, or the:

 

Office of Equal Opportunity
Tel. (540)568-6991 or (540)568-6991 TDD
FAX (540) 568-7992
James Madison University
Harrisonburg, VA 22807


The University is committed to enhancing the opportunities of minorities and women for employment, promotion and retention. To this end, the University has adopted an "Affirmative Action Plan" which establishes recruitment procedures, provides professional development opportunities and sets forth monitoring and reporting requirements.

 

This policy represents a commitment by James Madison University to support the practice, spirit and good-faith effort of equal opportunity beyond mere compliance with government regulations. University administrators, management staff and supervisors are responsible to support and follow this policy in their respective areas. Faculty and staff members are expected to understand and uphold this important policy.
 

LIST OF CRIME PREVENTION AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007

 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC SAFETY (UNIVERSITY POLICE) CRIME PREVENTION AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007 (some collaborative with other offices)            

PROGRAMS

ATTENDANCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Transfer Orientation Fair

550

6/5/2006

See below.

RAD Class

12

6/5/2006

See below.

Transfer Orientation Fair

300

6/6/2006

See below.

Transfer Orientation Fair

550

6/9/2007

See below.

RAD Class

7

6/12/2006

See below.

RAD Class

10

6/19/2007

See below.

ORL Hall Staff Training

236

8/18/2006

Overview of crime prevention programs available to be presented in the resident halls.

"The Duke Is Right"

3700

8/24/2006

See below.

Freshmen Orientation Fair

3700

8/24/2006

See below.

Centennial Challenge

1250

8/25//2006

Freshmen scavenger hunt-students have to ask questions about campus safety.

Pedestrian Crossing Education

1500

8/28/2006

See below.

Pedestrian Crossing Education

1500

8/29/2006

See below.

General Safety Program

35

9/4/2006

 

See below

Alcohol Awareness/Goggles Program

40

9/5/2006

See below.

General Safety Program

30

9/5/2006

See below.

Travel Safety for Recruiters

20

9/6/2006

See below.

Alcohol Awareness/Goggles Program

50

9/6/2006

See below.

Gang Awareness & Prevention

120

9/6/2006

See below.

General Safety Program

25

9/6/2006

See below.

Alcohol Awareness/Goggles Program

40

9/7/2006

See below.

Identity Theft

14

9/7/2006

See below.

Alcohol Awareness/Goggles Program

66

9/11/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

9

9/11/2006

See below.

General Safety Program

1

9/11/2006

See below.

Alcohol Awareness/Goggles Program

45

9/12/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

5

9/12/2006

See below.

Alcohol Awareness/Goggles Program

0

9/13/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

12

9/13/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

0

9/14/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

5

9/14/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

11

9/18/2006

See below.

Alcohol Awareness/Goggles Program

10

9/19/2006

See below.

General Safety Program

20

9/20/2006

See below.

Calling the Shots – Judicial Affairs

7

9/21/2006

See below.

Identity Theft

41

9/21/2006

See below.

Brown Bag Lecture – Personal Safety

50

9/26/2006

See below.

Bike/Pedestrian/Vehicle Safety

23

9/27/2006

See below.

Calling the Shots

9

9/27/2006

See below.

General Safety Program

10

9/28/2006

See below.

Identity Theft

23

10/2/2006

See below.

R.A.D. Class

9

10/4/2006

See below.

Personal Safety

12

10/10/2006

See below.

R.A.D. Class

9

10/11/2006

See below.

Calling the Shots

2

10/12/2006

See below.

Alcohol Awareness/Goggles Program

52

10/18/2006

See below.

R.A.D. Class

9

10/18/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

17

10/19/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

8

10/25/2006

See below.

Self Defense/Personal Safety

11

10/31/2006

See below.

 

R.A.D. Class

 

8

 

11/1/2006

See below.

 

Self Defense/Personal Safety

 

32

 

11/14/2006

 

See below.

 

Sexual Assault Program

 

7

 

11/14/2006

 

See below.

 

General Safety Program

 

4

 

11/27/2006

 

See below.

 

Calling the Shots

 

6

 

12/1/2006

 

See below.

 

Calling the Shots

 

6

 

12/7/2006

 

See below.

 

Calling the Shots

 

8

 

1/23/2007

 

See below.

 

Calling the Shots

 

12

 

1/24/2007

 

See below.

 

Self Defense/Personal Safety

 

6

 

1/24/2007

 

See below.

 

Self Defense/Personal Safety

 

9

 

1/30/2007

 

See below.

 

ADMIN Criminal Justice Class

 

22

 

2/8/2007

Class time at the JMU PD learning about the department and the Forensics Unit.

 

Self Defense/Personal Safety

 

17

 

2/12/2007

 

See below.

 

Security & Safety Awareness

 

10

 

2/19/2007

 

See below.

 

R.A.D. Class

 

4

 

2/19/2007

 

See below.

 

Choices Student Services Fair

 

2788

 

2/19/2007

 

See below.

 

Finance Training – Monetary Escorts

 

20

 

2/20/2007

Explanation of monetary & safety escorts provided by the JMU PD.

 

Calling the Shots

 

8

 

2/20/2007

 

See below.

 

Defensive Driving & Safety

 

75

 

2/21/2007

Driver training for SAFE ride drivers.

 

R.A.D. Class

 

5

 

2/26/2007

 

See below.

 

General Safety Program

 

11

 

2/26/2007

 

See below.

 

R.A.D. Class

 

4

 

3/19/2007

 

See below.

 

Self Defense/Personal Safety

 

7

 

3/21/2007

 

See below.

 

Self Defense/Personal Safety

 

20

 

3/24/2007

 

See below.

 

Teen Health Fair

 

500

 

3/30/2007

 

See below.

 

Self Defense/Personal Safety

 

13

 

3/31/2007

 

See below.

 

radKIDS class

 

6

 

4/1/2007

 

See below.

 

Teen Health Fair

 

521

 

4/2/2007

 

See below.

 

Self Defense/Personal Safety

 

20

 

4/10/2007

 

See below.

 

Choices Student Services Fair

 

2918

 

4/13/2007

 

See below.

 

Choices Student Services Fair

 

2051

 

4/16/2007

 

See below.

 

radKIDS class

 

6

 

4/22/2007

 

See below.

 

radKIDS class

 

6

 

4/29/2007

 

See below.

 

radKIDS class

 

5

 

5/6/2007

 

See below.

 

Introduction to MySpace

 

21

 

5/11/2007

The training was to show parents how a MySpace page is obtained & set up, and how it used by teenagers.  Also included a discussion on internet safety.

 

The JMU Police Department provides numerous programs for the JMU and local community. Programs are tailored to the group’s needs and orientation. For those requesting a program they can contact the Crime Prevention Office at 568-6910 or contact Sgt. Peggy Campbell by e-mail campbema@jmu.edu. A list of programs and a description of each (PUBLIC SAFETY PROGRAMS (B.E.W.A.R.E. information is incorporated in all Public Safety programs as a core module):

 

General Safety Program – Consists of an overview of the JMU Police Department, general safety tips, alcohol, the RAD program, Operation ID, handling harassing telephone calls and e-mails, bike registration and safety, date rape drugs, the Silent Witness Program, Operation Life Saver among others. This program is approximately one hour long.

Public Safety Orientation – Presented throughout the year at both Orientation Fairs and group meetings. This program consists of crime prevention/resistance and a basic orientation to the university Police Department for new and transfer students.

Self-Defense/Personal Safety - Presented by Sgt. Campbell, a certified RAD Instructor/Trainer. Topics covered are personal safety tips, the Defensive Mindset, Postures of Conflict, the Use of Physical Force and principles of self-defense. This program is approximately one hour in length.

Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) Training – This self-defense class, Presented by Sgt. Campbell, a certified RAD Instructor/Trainer and/or her assistants. This is a 15-hour program designed specifically for women, is a nationally recognized course that gives women the skills they need to prevent and survive a violent attack. It covers educational aspects of self-defense and physical hands-on training of defense techniques. The program is offered twice a semester, each being broken up into five, three-hour blocks of instruction. The schedule for the RAD classes is posted on the JMU Police web page http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety. Students can register for the class by contacting Sgt. Campbell at 568-6910 or by e-mail at campbema@jmu.edu.
 
Alcohol Awareness/Beer Goggles Program – This educational program demonstrates to students the results of alcohol impairment in a hands-on environment. Participants wear goggles that simulate the effects of alcohol and drug impairment. Allows students to experience vision impairment without consumption, the opportunity to drive an adult tricycle or play a video game while wearing the goggles. The hope of the program is to decrease impaired driving incidents.

 

Identity Theft – This program discusses the methods of how your identity is stolen, how you can tell if you are a victim of identity theft, how to manage your personal information and how to protect and manage your personal information on your computer.
 
Safe Breaks – Discusses all aspects of having a safe break from classes, be it fall, winter or spring break; securing property, notification of friends and family, travel tips and safety kits; potential problems; what to do if confronted with an emergency or you are the potential victim of a crime while on the road or at your destination.

Compliance with The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act – International Assn. College & University Law Enforcement Administrators’ (IACLEA) derived PowerPoint provides guidance and strategies for campus administrators, including but not limited to police and/or security officials; all having significant responsibility for student life and activities in their keeping up-to-date with and support for their college or university’s compliance with this set of federal laws administered by the U.S. Dept. of Education.  The amended PowerPoint includes added sections on coordinating Clery with other federal laws, e.g., the Campus Sex Crimes Protection Act, Suzanne’s Law (missing persons investigation procedures and policies) and the FERPA law (privacy act); how Clery impacts on those laws and vice versa.

 

Choices Student Orientation Fair – presented at the Admissions Choices Events for prospective students.  This program consists of crime prevention/resistance and a basic orientation to the university Police Department for new and transfer students.
 

The Duke is Right: University Police in cooperation with the REACH Peers designed and presented this program on campus safety, sexual assault prevention, substance abuse, and sexual health to approximately 3,300 freshman and transfer students in Wilson Hall during August Orientation. The Duke is Right won an “Outstanding Program” award from the BACCHUS & GAMMA Peer Education Network as well as “Outstanding New Program” and “Outstanding Educational Program” at the JMU Leadership Celebration several years ago.

 

Calling the Shots – Judicially sanctioned students for minor and major alcohol violations and minor drug violations attend a three week, two hours each week program which addresses alcohol and drug use and decision-making. A JMU police officer attends one of the three classes in a session to discuss risk reduction strategies, laws, and consequences for the Office of Judicial Affairs.

 

NGWSD Fair – National Girls and Women in Sports Day fair sponsored by the JMU Counseling Center for teenage girls.  The University Police provided personal safety and self defense information to attendees.

 

Kids Safety/ Stranger Danger –program for local day care children.  Topics discussed included stranger danger and personal safety.

 

radKIDS Program -  a personal empowerment safety education program for 5 to 12 year olds.  The radKIDS program provides children with hope, options, and practical skills to recognize, avoid, and, if necessary, escape violence and abuse. This program is presented by certified radKIDS instructors Sgt. Peggy Campbell, Officer John Campbell and Officer Debby Spart, who are members of the James Madison University Police Department.

 

Workplace Safety – an overview on workplace safety.  Topics of discussion included what to do in case of a fire alarm, how to handle a disgruntled/irate customer, physical assaults, etc.

 

Judicial Affairs 101 – University Police in cooperation with the Judicial Affairs office presented an overview of the Judicial Affairs Office, its purpose, process and procedures.

 

Teen Health Fair – University Police in cooperation with the Office of Children and Youth provided personal safety/self defense information, alcohol education and general crime prevention information for high school freshmen in local area high schools.

 

Benefits Fair – University Police in cooperation with the Human Resource participated in an information fair for JMU employees.  The University Police provided information on general crime prevention information and specific information on the RAD and radkids programs.

 

Programs Offered but not Requested (though elements of some of these programs were incorporated in some of the above listed programs appearing in the table):

 

Responding to the Victim – discusses resources for and how to provide aid and comfort, confidential and compassionate support to victims of sexual assault and sexual harassment, as well as those who have been indirectly affected by the rape or sexual assault of a friend or family member (secondary victims).

B.E.W.A.R.E. – Basic Enforcement Warning and Risk Education as well as Alcohol Awareness and Safety programs. Summarizes Resources for support and assistance; safety tips for party attendance; impaired vision goggles; selected Virginia Alcohol codes (and Keg Laws), Public Intoxication, Driving Under the Influence and Implied Consent statutes; alcohol and noise related Harrisonburg ordinances; and selected JMU Judicial Violations.

Bike/Pedestrian/Vehicle Safety – includes a discussion of Virginia state traffic code and safety tips for traveling through the JMU campus. This program is approximately one hour in length.

S. A. F. E. Walkers and Drivers – (Students and Faculty Educated) includes discussion on Virginia traffic laws relating to pedestrians, intersections and drivers. This program is approximately one hour in length.

Bike Registration and Operation I.D. – this program allows students to register their bikes (a JMU policy requirement) and their valuable electronic equipment by filling out an Operation ID card. This card is an excellent resource if an item is stolen, providing the student with a quick reference. An engraver will also be available for use. The actual time frame determined by attendance, usually an hour.

Operation Lifesaver – is an education program designed to help save lives at railroad grade crossings, along railroad rights of way, in yards, on bridges and trestles and in tunnels. Discusses Virginia laws concerning unauthorized vehicle track crossings and trespass on rights of way and other property; in, around or on trains.

 

Silent Witness – is a way for JMU students and employees to anonymously report crimes or information about crimes to the JMU Police Department. All tips are checked out by the JMU Police investigation unit.

 

OFFICE OF RESIDENCE LIFE (ORL) 

Personal safety programs held in residence halls during the 2006-07 academic year:  

Month

Type of Program

Number of Programs

Audience

August/September

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

15

0

18

The audience for each of these programs is JMU residential students.

October

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

1

8

5

Same as above

November

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

1

7

0

Same as above

December

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

0

3

0

Same as above

January

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

1

2

10

Same as above

February

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

6

1

3

Same as above

March

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

4

6

3

Same as above

April

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

2

4

1

Same as above

May

Alcohol & Drug Awareness

Sexual Assault Education

Safety & Security

 

Same as above

Totals

Alcohol & Drug

Awareness: 30

Sexual Assault Education:  31

Safety & Security: 40

Alcohol & Drug Awareness - includes programs on good and bad experiences with alcohol, the judicial process, smart "party" behaviors, date rape drugs and things to do that do not involve alcohol.  Each residence hall community is required by the department to present one program on the topic of alcohol and drug awareness each semester.  Target audience is residential students.

Sexual Assault - includes the high profile ORL/First Year Involvement. Each residence hall community is required by the department to present one program on the topic of sexual assault awareness each semester. Target audiences were resident students.

Personal Safety - (topics included self defense, learning specifically about safety here on campus, locking your room, etc.). Each residence hall community is required be the department to present one program on the topic of personal safety awareness each semester. Target audiences were resident students.

Jeanne Clery Act – Obligations to Report Certain Events - The following memorandum was issued to all 200 residence hall directors and resident advisers in February, 2007. The memo gave staff instructions on the new crime reporting obligations and procedures. Each staff group met during the week the memo was issued to discuss its contents and to learn how to use the new Knowledge of Crime – Statistical Disclosure Report Form.  This new form was posted on the Residence Life website with other important forms in our staff resources section.  The text of that memo:

 

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, 20 U.S.C. 1092, (the "Clery Act") requires all colleges and universities receiving federal funds to take a variety of actions aimed at educating their campus communities and the public about crime, safety, abuse prevention, counseling resources, and other issues concerning campus safety.  One of the Clery Act's requirements is that James Madison University compile and then publish information in its mandated annual security and statistical report (titled Your "Right-To-Know" at JMU) concerning the number of federally-defined crimes "reported to a campus security authority or to the local police." The Clery Act also articulates a very broad definition of who should be treated as a campus security authority, including anyone who has significant responsibility for "student and campus activities."

 

Whenever you are aware that a crime has occurred in the residence halls, you are obligated as a university official to report it. Our preference is that all crimes are reported directly to the police.

 

In the rare instance when a crime is not reported to the police, a Knowledge of Crime – Statistical Disclosure Report Form must be completed and submitted with an Incident Documentation Form through the regular process to Residence Life.  If the crime has also been reported to the police, only the Incident Documentation Form is necessary.

 

The Knowledge of Crime – Statistical Disclosure Report Form is now available on the ORL website under staff resources/forms.

 

Thank you very much for your assistance with this important crime follow-up process.

 WASHINGTON SEMESTER PROGRAM

CRIME PREVENTION AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007  

PROGRAM

AUDIENCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Washington Semester Orientation

Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 Washington Semester students

August 26-27, 2006

January 6-7, 2007

As part of Washington Semester program orientation, students were given an overview of safety and crime issues in the Boston University Washington Center facility, the neighborhood, and DC in general.  BU Center Residence Director Mary Beth Fecteau described building security procedures.  In addition, students received hard copies of “How to Have a Safe Semester in DC,” a report prepared by the JMU Office of Public Safety. 

 

 

ORIENTATION OFFICE 2006-07 

In general:  

Public Safety Orientation is presented throughout the year at both Orientation Fairs and group meetings. This program consists of crime prevention/resistance and a basic orientation to the university Police Department for first-year and transfer students.  Prevention, intervention and education programs specifically addressing rape, acquaintance rape and other sexual offenses are regularly sponsored by a variety of organizations at JMU. The JMU Health Center, Sexual Assault Prevention Office, Counseling and Student Development Center, Women's Resource Center, and C.A.R.E. (Campus Assault Response Emergency hot line - a student organization) present programs throughout the year in classes, residence halls and student organizations. Programs on sexual assault occur at least once each semester in all residence halls and the topic is addressed at first-year orientation.  

More specifically: 

PROGRAMS

ATTENDANCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Transfer Orientation Resource Fair

230 incoming transfer students

6/5/2006

Public safety provided information and handouts to new students on crime prevention/resistance as well as basic orientation to the University Police Department.

Transfer Orientation Resource Fair

135 incoming transfer students

6/6/2006

See above.

Transfer Orientation Resource Fair

125 incoming transfer students

6/8/2006

See above.

Transfer Orientation Resource Fair

162 incoming transfer students

6/9/2006

See above.

Orientation staff training

26 Orientation Program Assistants and 240 First yeaR Orientation Guides

8/21/2006

Members of Judicial Affairs and the University Health Center educated Orientation student staff on judicial policies and alcohol and substance abuse prevention.

“The Duke Is Right”

Approximately 2800 first year students

8/24/2006

Interactive program presented by REACH Peer Educators of the JMU Health Center to educate freshmen on sexual assault prevention and the dangers of substance abuse.

Orientation Fair

1500 first year students

8/25/2006

Public safety provided information and handouts to new students on crime prevention/resistance as well as basic orientation to the University Police Department.

Transfer Orientation Resource Fair

57 incoming transfer students

12/8/2006

See above.

 

 

 CENTER FOR MULTICULTURAL STUDENT SERVICES 2006-07 

The following was a crime prevention and personal safety presentation that was conducted by the Center for Multicultural Student Services:  

PROGRAM

AUDIENCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Party Policy and Safety

Multicultural Student Services (Organizational Roundtable)

September 20, 2006

Information presented to student leaders regarding procedures to implement for a on-campus party.  Items discussed were (1) door safety (2) security of money (3) contact information (3) give a clear and detailed description of any persons suspected of breaking a law or violation

 

 

 

LIST OF CRIME PREVENTION AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007  OFFICE OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION

 

 

PROGRAM

AUDIENCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Dating Violence 101

Women’s Studies 200 class, HHS 407, Madison Equality, JMU Residence Halls, JMU Brown Bag series

10/10/06

11/1/06

11/14/06

1/29/07

3/12/07

3/20/07

This program allows participants to learn the difference between healthy relationships and abusive relationships.  Participants will learn to recognize signs of a potentially dangerous situation.

Violence Against Women

Women’s Studies 200 class, JMU Students

11/21/06

1/17/07

This program discusses violence against women throughout history and the steps society can take to help end this pandemic problem.

Sensitive Response

Student Life RA’s and Hall Directors, JMU Cadets, CSDC Graduate Assistants and Pre-Doctoral Students

8/18/06

8/22/06

8/24/06

2/15/07

This program is designed to teach various group organizations how to meet the needs of victims of sexual assault and relationship violence.

Sexual Assault Prevention

JMU Athletics, JMU Brown Bag series, JMU Residence Halls

10/9/06

10/25/06

11/20/06

3/12/07

4/4/07

4/10/07

This program offers an insight into the facts vs. myths about rape, education and how to promote healthy views regarding women in our society.

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

JMU Sororities

2/26/07

This program lists resources, identifies myths, facts and behaviors associated with eating disorders. 

Your Role as a CARE Volunteer

New CARE member trainees

3/24/07

This program addresses the importance of resources and referrals, as well as allows the participant to become acquainted with various responses to sexual assault.  This program also addresses the cultural differences and individuality of survivors of sexual assault.

Resource and Referral: What is the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention

JMU Students and Staff

HR Diversity Training

10/20/06

4/6/07

5/4/07

This program offers information about our office and the services we provide, as well as other resources on campus and in the local community.

Alcohol, Women and Sexual Assault

Health & Human Services Class, JMU Brown Bag series

11/7/06

4/3/07

This program focuses on reducing the risk of sexual assault by discussing it relationship with alcohol and various myths, facts, and abuse factors.

Sexual Assault Prevention and Response

ROTC

University Health Center

9/26/06

4/26/07

This program focuses on they various types of sexual assault; learning how to stay safe; knowing what to do if a friend has been sexually assaulted; and listing various ways in helping to prevent yourself from becoming a victim.

Offender Program

Offenders sanctioned by the JMU Judicial Affairs Office

10/19/06

This program educates and counsels the student offender who has been convicted of a sexual assault crime in either the criminal justice system or the campus judicial system.  This program is designed as another tool to reduce the potential victimization of women.

Date Rape Hearing

Judicial Affairs Office

10/27/06

5/22/07

This program is designed to teach those chosen to participate in a “date rape hearing” the fundamentals of expectations and how to respond to those.

Take Back The Night

Open to all JMU students, faculty and staff

3/27/07

This is an annual event that allows victims or secondary victims to speak out against violence in our society.  This event includes professional speakers, music, a speak-out and candlelight vigil to “break the silence” of violence against women and men.

Sexual Assault Issues in Therapy

Safe Society Zone Conference, FL

10/30/06

10/31/06

This program is designed to offer participants the insight of dealing with a victim of sexual assault during therapy.

Adult Life as a Survivor of Child Maltreatment

Camp Kaleidoscope

NAMI, PSYC Graduate Class

10/3/06

10/6/06

10/24/06

10/25/06

3/20/07

This program provides participants with definitions of child maltreatment, as well as characteristics of abusers.  Discussion of actual case studies is presented giving the impact upon adult survivors.

Women Leading

International Leadership Conference

6/11/06

3/24/07

This program identifies the strength of women through communication and how it applies in everyday life.

Community Coalition on Alcohol Abuse

JMU Faculty, Students, and Staff

Local Community Members

10/6/06

10/16/06

This coalition is designed to build stronger bridges between JMU, Harrisonburg, and Rockingham County communities regarding alcohol abuse on the JMU campus.

Alcohol Awareness

FAR open house for bar owners, Brown Bag series

3/21/07

3/26/07

4/11/07

Various members of the Coalition answer questions about alcohol and its consequences.

Sexual Harassment: The Key to Stopping Harassment is Prevention

Human Resources Training for Staff, ROTC, Library Staff, UHC Staff, JMU Athletes

7/25/06

8/23/06

8/30/06

8/31/06

11/9/06

2/19/07

2/20/07

This program provides participants with definitions, victim impact, how to report, and responding to a victim of sexual harassment.

 

 

 

 

OFFICE OF JUDICIAL AFFAIRS - SANCTIONED PROGRAMS (some collaborative with Public Safety and other offices)  ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007

 

 

PROGRAM

AUDIENCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

 

By the Numbers

Judicially sanctioned students for minor alcohol violations

10 sessions in September  (60 students)

12 sessions in October (84 students)

10 sessions in November (92 students)

7 sessions in December (59 students)

10 sessions in January (83 students)

10 sessions in February (70 students)

 6 sessions in March  (49 students) 

8 sessions in April        (62 students)

 

One time, two hour program which addresses VA and Harrisonburg laws and JMU policies related to alcohol. Health and legal risk reduction strategies are discussed as well as safety precautions related to alcohol use.

 

Calling the Shots

Judicially sanctioned students for minor and major alcohol violations and minor drug violations

 

Three 3 week session in September (15 students)

Three 3 week sessions in October (14 students)

Five 3 week sessions in November (29 students)

Three 3 week sessions in December  

(9 students)

Three 3 week sessions in January (26 students)

One 3 week sessions in February (8 students)

One 3 week session in March  (10 students)

Four 3 week sessions in April (31 students)

 

A three week, two hours each week program which addresses alcohol and drug use and decision-making. A Harrisonburg or JMU police officer attends one of the 3 classes in a session to discuss risk reduction strategies, laws, and consequences.

                                                                                 

Back on Track

Judicially sanctioned students for repeated minor or major alcohol and/or drug violations

One 5 week program ending 10/12/06

(4 students)

One 5 week program ending 11/16/06

(2 students)

One 5 week program ending 12/04/06

(4 students)

One 5 week program ending 2/28/07

(4 students)

Three 5 week programs ending 4/2, 18,&, 23/07

(9 students)

 

A five week, two hours each week, program which addresses alcohol and drug use and the stages of change. Harm reduction to self and others is addressed. Counseling center staff are involved in one session to inform students about health risks and resources.

 

JMU's sanctioned alcohol/drug program, IMPACT, is designed on a three-tiered system. Each program becomes progressively more intense as the severity of the substance use violations increase. Students' individual needs regarding alcohol or drug intervention are determined prior to placement.


IMPACT I: By the Numbers - This two-hour program examines the reason for the establishment of Community Standards. An overview of existing policies and laws is given. The students are then given the opportunity to examine these policies and laws. Students are also offered practical tips for avoiding negative consequences of alcohol use. This short course was designed for minor alcohol violations and has an accompanying fee of $50.

IMPACT II: Calling the Shots - This three-week program asks students to review their past decisions in regards to alcohol and drugs. Students are guided towards making future decisions more consistent with their values and in compliance with the law. This program was designed for students with major or multiple minor violations of the alcohol or drug policy and carries a fee of $50.

IMPACT III: Back On Track - This five-week program offers a more in-depth look at the effects of alcohol and drugs on an individual, and is based on the trans-theoretical model of change. Through small group process, students are challenged to identify their issues with drugs or alcohol and acknowledge the seriousness of their behaviors. This intensive program might serve as a student's last chance before suspension and is used for most major alcohol/drug violations or for students with repeated violations. This program has a fee of $50.

Values Workshop - This four-hour interactive workshop reviews the components of ethical decision-making. Group interaction and discussion lead students on a journey to discover their own values system, to consider their responsibility to others and how that might play a role in their future decision-making. Criteria for referral include, but is not limited to: computer misuse, failure to comply with a disciplinary decision, personal abuse, non-compliance with an official request, etc.). Some students with honor code violations are referred to this program as well. This workshop has an accompanying fee of $50.

Civic Learning As a Sanction - This program is used for students who have violated University policy and lack a connection with the university campus. Through completion of the civic learning program, students make a connection with one of several university offices and perform tasks specific to that organization. Civic learning includes completion of site hours, partnership with a faculty/staff mentor, and a final learning paper. Hours can vary between 25 and 75 hours.

Civic Responsibility - This two-session program is used as a sanction for students who have violated policies that impact their community (such as disorderly conduct, vandalism, pulling a false alarm, or theft). Through discussions, readings, and other activities, students examine the concepts of character, citizenship, and community in connection with the ideals of James Madison, the man.

Anger Management Program – Referred to Counseling and Student Development Center

Sexual Offenders Program - Referred to Office of Sexual Assault Prevention  

Freshmen Outreach - Learning Outcomes:

     Students become acquainted with the judicial staff and their responsibilities.

     Students will identify possible consequences of their choices related to alcohol and drug use.

     Students will be able to define the Three Strikes, Parental Notification, and Off-Campus Adjudication policies.

     Students will gain knowledge of judicial policies such as non-compliance, weapons and personal abuse.

 

CRIME PREVENTION AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-07 by the COUNSELING & STUDENT DEVELOPMENT CENTER – BASICS, CHOICES and ANGER MANAGEMENT 

PROGRAM

AUDIENCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

BASICS – Brief Alcohol Screening & Intervention with College Students-Counseling & Student Development Center

Referrals from The Office of Judicial Affairs mainly. A few referrals from The Office of Sexual Assault Prevention & CSDC.

2006-07 individual sessions. Average 2 sessions per student –

 

 

 

 

 

56 sessions.

 

(28 individual sessions)

A Harm Reduction Approach—BASICS is a preventive intervention for college students 18 to 24 years old. It is aimed at students who drink alcohol heavily and have experienced or are at risk for alcohol-related problems such as poor class attendance, missed assignments, accidents, sexual assault, and violence. Students are seen individually by a clinician. BASICS is a non-judgmental and non-confrontational approach, and is conducted over the course of two 50 minute interviews, and these brief, limited interventions prompt students to change their drinking patterns.

Before or after the first interview, the student receives a self-report questionnaire to complete. From the questionnaire and the first interview, information is gathered about the student’s alcohol consumption pattern, personal beliefs about alcohol, understanding of social alcohol norms, and family history.

The second interview, which occurs approximately 2 weeks after the initial interview, provides the student with personalized feedback on myths about alcohol’s effects, facts on alcohol norms, ways to reduce future risks associated with alcohol use, and a menu of options to assist in making changes.

BASICS is a CSAP (The Center for Substance Abuse Prevention) Model Program and a NIAAA (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism) Tier 1 Program demonstrated to be effective with college students in reducing drinking and alcohol-related harm.

CHOICES – A Brief Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G-Health (mainly freshmen)

100

Fall Semester 2006

Choices is a brief alcohol abuse prevention and harm reduction program, for college students, involving interactive journaling. Choices is conducted in a 1 session 90-minute, peer-facilitated group. Students are presented with alcohol information and they are given the opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as it relates to their Choices regarding drinking in their personal journals. The Choices group intervention is non-confrontational and assists   students to make their own decisions about alcohol consumption. The aim of this group intervention is to help students make informed Choices. They are asked to apply what they have learned in a series of self-reflective questions.

Anger Management – Counseling & Student Development Center

Referrals from Judicial Offenses (3 students)

Self Referred (14 students)

 

 

 

JMU Public

7 separate individual sessions for the OJA referrals.

14 intake and 14 exit interview sessions for the self-referred students to complete the anger certificate.

6 Anger Management workshops with a total of 93 attending.

See description below

 

 

 

 

 

This program does not include individual counseling sessions like the more intensive program we provide for students who are judicially referred.  To register for this program students have a certificate program intake appointment.  To gain the certificate students attend four workshops, complete four hours of reading on anger and review four hours of taped materials on anger.  They write a one page reaction to each book and tape reviewed.  All materials are turned in during the exit interview.*

 

This is a one hour workshop on anger management.

Back On Track

Judicial Referrals for alcohol/drug offenses

As needed through Judicial Affairs.

Education as to effects of alcohol, drugs, and progression and identification of addiction.

*COUNSELING & STUDENT DEVELOPMENT CENTER'S ANGER MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE PROGRAM  (AMCP)

Students seen individually for any sexual assault were/are referred to Office of Sexual Assault for follow-up and assistance in any kind of judicial/legal options.  The report of that offense comes from that office, even if the student is still receiving services from CSDC. 

The AMCP includes assessment of anger expression and readiness for change in the student, three individual anger management counseling sessions, and assigned reading and taped materials. The following is the AMCP protocol:

1.             ASSESSMENT PAPERWORK
These self-report assessment instruments are to be completed by the student upon referral. Referred students are instructed to bring the completed paperwork to Varner House Counseling & Student Development Center and put it in the coordinator’s mail box. At this time students see the front office staff to schedule an appointment with the coordinator for at least one week from the current date.

o                     Readiness for change measure – Modified URICA

o                     Anger expression inventory – STAXI

o                     Authorization to Release information about satisfactory completion or failure to complete this required protocol

2.             FIRST AMCP APPOINTMENT
This is the first of three face-to-face appointments that the student will need to attend in order to fulfill AMCP requirements. In this session, the following agenda will be completed:

o                     Issues related to limitations of confidentiality of these sessions are reviewed to insure that informed consent is obtained to release relevant information about completion or failure to satisfactorily complete this protocol.

o                     A general clinical assessment is conducted.

o                     Student registers for appropriate certificate program workshops.

o                     Program requirements are discussed, including required reading, taped materials, reaction papers and appointments.

o                     Feedback is provided about the outcomes of the self-report assessments completed earlier.

o                     Perceived benefits of the acting-out behaviors for which the student was sanctioned are examined.

o                     Perceived consequences (risks) of the acting-out behaviors for which the student was sanctioned are examined.

o                     Begin discussion of what risk(s) the student would like to reduce (time permitting).

o                     Schedule next appointment for approximately one week later.

3.             SECOND AMCP APPOINTMENT

o                     Review material from last session.

o                     Review the past week to examine how the student responded to challenging situations.

o                     More specifically identify risks student would like to reduce.

o                     Identify one or more specific steps the student can take in order to accomplish those risk reduction goals.

o                     Schedule follow up appointment toward end of semester. Student must turn reaction papers in to the coordinator’s mail box one week prior to follow up appointment.

4.             FOLLOW UP AMCP APPOINTMENT

Š                   Review steps taken since last appointment

Š                   Review ways in which the student responded to challenging situations since last appointment.

Š                   As appropriate, revise the specific steps identified as helpful in the previous meeting. Further appointments may be considered as helpful next steps.

Š                   Review reaction papers students have written regarding AMCP reading and taped materials.

Š                   Complete follow up inventories and evaluation of this protocol.

Š                 A memo indicating that the student has completed the sanction is sent to the referring University office, with a copy sent to the student. 

  

 

LIST OF CRIME PREVENTION AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007 by the OFFICE OF HEALTH PROMOTION

 

The Office of Health Promotion, a unit within the University Health Center realm, sponsors classes and programs on a variety of health and safety issues, including substance abuse, sexual health, body image and eating disorders, sexual assault & healthy relationships, nutrition, club drugs, stress, safe spring break, and suicide prevention. The Reality Educators Advocating Campus Health (REACH Peers) are trained students who design and present programs on these topics to educate their peers in residence halls, fraternity and sorority houses, student organizations, health fairs, information booths, and as guest speakers in classes.  The Office of Health Promotion now located in Blue Ridge Hall, rooms 301-308. 

 

PROGRAM

AUDIENCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

SMASHED (Students Making Aware Safe Health and Educated Drinking Decisions) Alcohol Awareness Program

Kinesiology 100 classes

Nov. 13, 2006

Nov. 14, 2006

Apr. 2, 2007

Apr. 3, 2007

(presented 4 times on each of the above dates)

This program allows individuals to learn common alcohol facts and myths. Participants will be able to recognize the signs/symptoms of alcohol poisoning; identify safe ways to get home; and identify people who may have a drinking problem.

SMASHED (Students Making Aware Safe Health and Educated Drinking Decisions) Alcohol Awareness Program

JMU students, Residence Life RA’s and Hall Directors; SafeRides General Body Members; Sorority/Fraternity Life

Sept.26, 2006

Nov. 19, 2006

Feb. 17, 2007 (3 times presented to Greek Life – New Member Ed Day)

Mar. 12, 2007

Apr. 10, 2007

 

This program allows individuals to learn common alcohol facts and myths. Participants will be able to recognize the signs/symptoms of alcohol poisoning; identify safe ways to get home; and identify people who may have a drinking problem.

Alcohol 101 Program

Life Skills for Athletes Class

Oct. 2 2006 (2 classes)

Apr. 9, 2007

Apr. 10, 2007

This program was delivered to all first year athletes.  Participants will be able to recognize the signs/symptoms of alcohol poisoning; identify safe ways to get home; and identify people who may have a drinking problem.

Duke is Right

 

First Year Students

Aug. 24, 2006

This program is performed during Orientation and educates and entertains the freshmen class with information on alcohol, sexual health, sexual assault, and campus safety.

10 Seconds Can Change Your Life: The Power of One Decision

 

JMU Students, Faculty, and Staff

Oct. 16, 2006

This program was presented by Bobby Petrocelli. Bobby shares how a drunk driving impacted his life. This presentation provides insight into responsible decision making. Participants will learn the tools necessary to make low risk drinking choices and lessen the negative effects of alcohol in their lives.

It’s 5 o’clock somewhere Alcohol Awareness Fair

JMU Students, Faculty, and Staff

Oct. 16, 2006

This program was a passport program held as an Information Fair hosting several on campus organizations, campus offices and community agencies providing Alcohol Prevention information.

Sex and the Burg

JMU students, Residence Life RA’s and Hall Directors; JMU Sororities

Oct. 8, 2006

Nov. 7, 2006

This program allows individuals to identify STDs, healthy relationships, and sexual health myths

 

LIST OF CRIME PREVENTION AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007 by the OFFICE of COMMUNITY SERVICE-LEARNING 

Programs

Attendance

Dates Presented

Program Description

ASB Emergency Procedures

45

2/10/07

Alternative Spring Break leader training concerning safety and emergency protocols.

  

LIST OF CRIME PREVENTION AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007 by the OFFICE of INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

PROGRAMS

ATTENDANCE

DATES PRESENTED

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Spring 2007 Study Abroad Orientation

118

09/17/06

Safety precautions and security concerns while traveling abroad

Spring 2007 Non-JMU Study Abroad Orientation

66

11/28/06 and 11/29/06

Safety precautions and security concerns while traveling abroad

Summer and Fall 2007 Short Term Study Abroad Orientation

220

2/25/07

Safety precautions and security concerns while traveling abroad

Short Term 2007 Study Abroad Orientation

399

3/18/07

Safety precautions and security concerns while traveling abroad

Summer and fall 2007 Non-JMU Study Abroad Orientation

64

4/24/07 and 4/25/07

Safety precautions and security concerns while traveling abroad

International Internship Orientation

13

4/29/07

Safety precautions and security concerns while traveling abroad

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office of Public Safety

Anthony-Seeger Hall

MSC 6810

James Madison University

Harrisonburg, VA 22807