"YOUR RIGHT TO KNOW"

SAFETY AT JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY’S SEMESTER IN LONDON PROGRAM
In Compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998 (formerly the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990)

October 1, 2007

Safety on the JMU London campus, Madison House, is a natural source of concern for parents, students and university employees. Education - the business of James Madison University - can take place only in an environment in which each student and employee feels safe and secure. JMU recognizes this and employs a number of security measures to protect the members of its community.

Although the area, a large, diverse metropolitan area, has a relatively low violent crime rate, crime prevention remains a high priority among residents. JMU does its part to ensure the safety of its students and employees. The local Holborn police force, a closely screened and well-trained residence life staff, and the students and employees themselves all share in the responsibility of making the London campus, specifically our residential hostel, Madison House, a safe place to study, work and live.

Police Protection

Madison House (located on Gower Street, Bloomsbury ward, in the borough of Camden) is under the jurisdiction of the Holborn Police Department. The Metropolitan Police maintains a facility in Camden which serves as Madison House’s local police office. The precinct, called Holborn was formerly known as Marylebone. There is still a Marylebone precinct, but it is one block west of Madison house and does not directly serve the program. The Holborn precinct headquarters are located at 10 Lambs Conduit Street WC1N 3NR (tel: 020-8733-6520 if in the UK; 9-011-44-208-733-6520 if calling from the USA).

Both the Holborn and Marylebone communities enjoy a noticeable and reassuring level of police presence. The general area has the reputation of being a relatively safe locale in central London. But, as always one should always be vigilant and take precautions to minimize becoming a victim of a criminal act (for more on that see the addendum “How Participants Can Have A Safe London Semester” at the end of this report).

All statistics at the close of this document are supplied by the resident manager of Madison House. Crime statistics for the entire London Borough of Camden are a matter of public record and are available broken down to Local Authority Ward level. Therefore, requested statistics specific to Madison House and environs have not been made available by the Holborn Precinct Police. But, an excellent source of crime statistics and crime prevention information for the London Borough of Camden is published by the office of the Chief Executive, London Borough of Camden, Camden Town Hall, Judd Street, London WCH1H 9JE.  It is entitled Camden’s Crime and Disorder Audit 2004 and is available at:  http://www.camden.gov.uk/ccm/content/housing/general-housing-information/file-storage-item/camdens-crime-and-disorder-audit-2004.en.   Borough officials only publish this every three years. To obtain this document you may also contact the Camden Senior Community Safety Officer Adrian Martin by e-mail at adrian.martin@camden.gov.uk or by dialing 9.011.44.20.7974.2729 (International) 020.7974.2729 (Local – Camden) and ask for Ms. Martin.  She will provide the booklet upon request.  For the Camden web site listing services provided by Ms. Martin go to: http://search.camden.gov.uk/search?q=Camd....   Another available source of information is the Borough of Camden's Community Strategy.  Go to the Camden main page http://www.camden.gov.uk and links to Public Safety in Camden and http://www.camden.gov.uk/ccm/content/policing-and-public-safety/community-safety/community-safety-in-camden.en?page=1 for further information related to safety and security in the borough of Camden.*

Finally, still another source of crime statistics can be found on the Metropolitan Police Web site at http://www.met.police.uk under the Camden Borough pages using the Camstats subsite.  If that is insufficient for your needs please feel free to make application under the UK’s Freedom of Information Legislation, details shown on the same site.

In addition to normal police protection, Madison House and the Semester in London Program have enjoyed and fostered a good working relationship with Police Sergeant Gareth Dowling of the nearby Marylebone Precinct as well as his colleagues at the Holborn station. Each semester, Dowling gives a lecture on the “Semester in London” program to the students and faculty during which security issues are discussed. We have relied on his advice and expertise in securing our facility over the years. We feel fortunate that this special relationship continues.

*Crime statistics for the city of London for the years 1999 through 2006 (to date), broken down to the borough level can be found at web site http://www.met.police.uk/crimestatistics/index.htm. The borough of Camden is included.  The borough is a civil subdivision of London overall, much like Brooklyn is a borough of New York City; and it takes in a wide and diverse geographical area with widely diverse demographics. As opposed to information found on the report for the main Harrisonburg (US) campus, found at web site http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/RTKtable.shtml, there is no micro view of the crime picture in and around Madison House available from the London Metropolitan Police. Presently the Metro Police cannot narrow crime statistics down to the ward level (in the case of Madison House, Bloomsbury). Even if London Metro could narrow it down to Bloomsbury, that information would not provide a true picture of the crime situation in and around Madison House and former off campus classroom sites not used since June of 2006.

Emergency Telephone Number

At the initial on-site orientation to Madison House, students are informed of the emergency number in the UK (999). The students are provided with mobile phones that receive incoming calls even if they have paid for pay-as-call service. Each student’s mobile phone number is distributed to Resident Managers, fellow Semester in London (SIL) students and the program Faculty Member in Residence.  Since the participants are issued their own mobile phones the public payphones formerly on the first floor landings of Madison House have been removed.  (The payphones have been removed from Madison House, please delete.) As part of their orientation materials, each student is provided a pocket-sized card which includes, amongst other important numbers, the numbers for emergencies. Students also are advised to alert the Madison House Resident Managers of any suspicious persons or activities in and around Madison House.

Emergencies

999(UK)

Information and emergencies

020-7323-5884
(Resident Managers)

Madison House from the USA

011-44-207-323-5884

Information and concerns—JMU Faculty Member in Residence Office

020-8883-3189

Faculty in residence from the USA

011-44-208-883-3189

Office of International Programs at JMU

540-568-6419

Security in University Housing

All Semester In London students reside in Madison House. Students participating in independent internships, not affiliated with the Semester In London, do not live in Madison House.  There is no formal relationship between these internship students and the Semester In London program.

Overseeing the security of Madison House is the full-time interim Resident Manager,  Charlotte Rudkin.  She can be contacted at the above telephone numbers or by e-mail at madisonhouse@btconnect.com.  Madison House can house a maximum of thirty guests. The twenty-six student rooms, including two doubles, can accommodate a maximum of twenty eight students. In addition to the student rooms (located on the first, second and third floors) Madison House maintains one additional room on the ground floor reserved for visiting scholars, faculty, friends and families of the students and other guests of the University.

Guests are asked to book their rooms through the Resident Managers at Madison House. Terms of our company status prevent Madison House from offering rooms to the general public, thereby minimizing that concern as a security risk. During on-campus and on-site orientations, students are cautioned to abide by the Madison House guest policies.

 

“Non Campus Area” Classroom Facilities Remote from Madison House

The JMU London Semester no longer has classrooms off-site.  All classes meet in the newly converted classroom in Madison House.  From the early 1990s through to mid-summer 2006 coursework had been carried out at one or both of the following two locations, also in the Bloomsbury ward, borough of Camden:

Swedenborg House was about a fifteen-minute (approximately ten block) walk from Madison House.  Swedenborg House is a private institute and was used in the Spring and Summer and Fall 2005 terms and Spring and Summer 2006 terms. 

Throughout the spring and summer of 2006, the students used a classroom at 99 Great Russell Street in the Florida State University student center, a 4 block walk down Gower Street and then right on Great Russell.

JMU occasionally rented a basement classroom in an Acorn, Ltd. managed property at 51 Gower Street.  That arrangement has ended as well.   51 Gower was not physically attached to Madison House being that it is located on the opposite side of Chenies Street. 

The JMU London staff reported that they know of no JMU student being victimized at any of these “non campus” sites since 1999, nor have they heard of any incidents prior to that at these two locations. The current house staff and coordinator of academic programs have been on site or otherwise responsible for programs since early 2003. .

 

 

Alcohol and Drug Policies

Alcohol

 

James Madison University prohibits the illegal or otherwise irresponsible use of alcohol by students.  It is the responsibility of every student to know the risks associated with alcohol use and abuse.  This responsibility obligates students to know relevant University policies and federal, state, and local laws and to conduct themselves in accordance with these policies and laws.  JMU students traveling abroad may be studying in countries where the legal age for alcohol consumption is different than in the United State.  Thus, while overseas, it is the responsibility of the student to know the relevant country and local laws concerning the possession, use, and abuse of alcohol.  If students who are of legal age choose to consume alcohol while abroad, they are expected to drink and behave responsibly.  The illegal or excessive consumption of alcohol or misconduct due to alcohol consumption will not be tolerated and will result in disciplinary action, including dismissal from the program and follow-up through the JMU judicial system. 

Many physical and psychological health risks are associated with the abuse of alcohol and other substances, including the following:

 

Staff members at the JMU Health Center and the JMU Counseling and Student Development Center can provide additional information about these concerns. More complete information on JMU's substance abuse policy can be found in the section on "University Policies.”

 

Drugs

 

Illegal drug use in any form is not tolerated.  JMU students traveling abroad may be studying in countries where drugs that may be legally possessed and used in the United States are prohibited by law.  Thus, while overseas, it is the responsibility of the student to know the relevant country and local laws concerning the possession and use of drugs.  Most foreign criminal systems are considerably less accommodating than those within the United States; student possession or use of illegal drugs may be punishable by fine, imprisonment, and/or deportation.  Study abroad participants found using or possessing illegal drugs in any form are subject to immediate dismissal from the program and/or follow-up through the JMU judicial system. 

  

Prevention Efforts

Students are informed, at their first orientation session, of JMU's "Right to Know" policy. They are reminded of their responsibilities in maintaining a safe secure building and premises. Students are informed about any previous crimes on Madison House premises since under JMU management, one date rape and several burglaries occurred in the last decade.

Following a burglary in the summer of 1996 and recommendations from the Marylebone Precinct Police, the premises were made more secure with the addition of electronic card access to the exterior entry door, plus a key pad entry system that requires an access code to then enter the interior foyer door.

Ongoing security evaluations are periodically done by the aforementioned Officer Dowling, and students meet with him every semester to discuss UK law and the nature of crime prevention in Greater London. For a list of the crime prevention and personal safety programs presented by various offices of James Madison University in Academic year 2006-2007, go to the end of this report.

Emergencies Involving Students

Madison House is located three blocks down Gower Street (a 5-10 minute walk or 5-minute cab ride) from the Accidents and Emergencies department (emergency room) of the University College Hospital. If a student requires assistance, they are accompanied to the hospital by one of the Resident Managers whenever possible. In addition to the close proximity of the Accidents and Emergencies department, students have access to the team of General Practitioners at local Medicentres (Oxford Street Plaza Medicentre, +44 (0)20 7637 7883, and Waterloo Medicentre, +44 (0) 20 7803 0732)

JMU London students can maintain contact with the home campus of JMU while away through phone, fax, internet and e-mail, and have at their disposal the normal services on campus, including the JMU counseling center and the Sexual Assault Education Coordinator. Additionally, the Resident Managers and attending faculty of the London Program have ready access to similar counseling services in London.

Missing Student

If a member of the Madison House Community has reason to believe that a Semester In London student is missing, all possible efforts are made to locate the student to determine his or her state of health and well-being though the collaboration of the Camden Precinct Police and the Office of International Programs. The Marylebone Precinct Police will be given immediate authorization from the London Semester officials to make a welfare entry into that student’s room.Concurrently university officials will endeavor to determine the student’s whereabouts through contact with friends and associates of the student. Whether or not the student has been attending classes, labs, recitals, and scheduled organizational or academic meetings will be established.

If located, verification of the student’s state of health and intention of returning to the campus is made. When and where appropriate if the need is determined a referral will be made to professional counselor(s) and/or medical practitioners.

If not located, notification of the family within 24 hours of receiving the initial report is made to determine if they know of the whereabouts of the student. The London Semester officials will cooperate, aid, and assist the investigative agency in all ways prescribed by prevailing law. The Madison House officials will remain at the disposal and cooperate thoroughly with the official investigation by the primary investigative unit.

All pertinent law enforcement agencies, be they neighboring precinct, borough, or municipal; those located along suspected travel corridors; or place of original domicile wherever it might be, will be notified and requested to render assistance, through direct telephone contact or visit, electronic data (teletype) message, and/or radio transmission with a comprehensive BOL message based on the totality of up-to-date information.

Upon closure of the investigation, all parties previously contacted will be advised of the status of the case.

General Security Procedures

Students are made aware from their very first day in London that no one is to be admitted into Madison House unless those persons are personally known to them or have been met by one of the Resident Managers. Officially, the Resident Managers are asked to be on duty during the normal working hours (9 a.m. - 5 p.m., weekdays). However, as the managers live on premises, students are likely to find them just about any time, day or night. The Faculty Member in Residence for each semester lives in northern London, but has office facilities in Madison House. The health and well-being of all students is one of their primary responsibilities. Both attending JMU faculty and all attending students participate in rigorous orientation sessions before their London semester and during the first few days in London, where security issues, UK law, emergency procedures and the rules and regulations set forth here are thoroughly discussed with the Director of the Semester in London Program, Professor Rustin Greene. Much of this information is included in handbooks prepared for the students and the attending faculty. On-site orientation materials, given to students upon their arrival in London, provide further emergency information.

The university's trespass policy, enforced by university police and posted in all university housing, is as follows:

Only those persons having legitimate business with James Madison University, members of the university community and their invited guests, are permitted in this building. The university reserves the right to exclude all persons not conforming to acceptable behavior from these premises. Those who disregard this warning are to be considered in violation of criminal trespass and are liable for prosecution.

Firearms and dangerous weapons of any type are not permitted in Madison House or other university facilities, except when carried by bona fide law enforcement officers within their jurisdictions. Intentional use, possession or sale of firearms or other dangerous weapons by students is strictly forbidden and is a violation of university policy as stated in the student handbook.

Depending on the particular circumstances of the crime, the Office of Public Safety may also post a notice on the campus-wide electronic bulletin board, providing the university community with more immediate notification for adverse events on the main (US) campus. In such instances, a copy of the notice is posted at our London facility.  The electronic bulletin board is immediately accessible via computer by all on-campus faculty, staff and students.

Crime Log Information

The requirement for crime log maintenance applies only to schools and/or branch campuses that feature a campus police or security department.  Madison House has neither.  Even so, the Madison House/London Semester community is kept aware of reported incidents on site and the immediate surrounding area by the Madison House resident manager staff. 

Timely Warnings

Depending on the particular circumstances of the crime, especially in all situations that could pose an immediate threat to the community and individuals, the Madison House staff will also post a notice on the on-site bulletin board and provide the Semester in London immediate notification. In such instances, a copy of the notice is posted on each lobby, residential, and study lounge bulletin board in a prominent location. Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to the Madison House staff, by phone (020-7323-5884 - Resident Managers) or in person.

Sex Offender Registry and Access to Related Information

The United Kingdom does not maintain a sex offender registry. Information about an individual's past criminal history is not made available to the public in the United Kingdom.

However, the JMU Office of Residence Life Housing Contract provides for the cancellation of the housing contract of a known sex offender, or any other known convicted person, who is disruptive to the educational environment of the residence hall.

Sexual Assault

Prevention, intervention and education programs specifically addressing rape, acquaintance rape and other sexual offenses are regularly sponsored by a variety of organizations at JMU. The JMU Health Center, Sexual Assault Education Coordinator, Counseling and Student Development Center and Women's Resource Center present programs throughout the year in classes, residence halls and student organizations. Programs on sexual assault occur at least once each semester in all residence halls and the topic is addressed at freshman orientation. London students are encouraged to attend on-campus sessions prior to going abroad.

If a sexual offense should occur, the victim should take the following actions:

Visitors, faculty and students living in London at Madison House and other university managed facilities are informed that they may report any incident to the staff of our local clinic and/or hospital, where provision is made to refer them to appropriate counseling and legal authorities.

Following an incident, victims are encouraged to make a report to local police. This action does not obligate prosecution, but it does make legal action possible if the decision to prosecute is made at a later date. The earlier an incident is reported, the easier it is to collect valuable evidence. Victims have the option of keeping their report of sexual assault in complete confidence, protecting their right to anonymity, if making a report through a professional or pastoral counselor.

University judicial action, criminal prosecution and civil suits are all options available to victims of sexual assault. To begin university judicial action, the counselor, police or victim should contact the university judicial officer. During campus judicial proceedings, both the victim and the accused may be present and may have a counselor, solicitor (attorney) and/or adviser present to provide support and advice. Both the victim and the accused will be informed of the results of the proceeding. Sanctions for sexual assault may range up to and include suspension or expulsion from JMU.

Date Rape Drugs

Date rape drugs can be placed in any drink, not just alcohol. Effects may range from a feeling of well being and short term memory loss to an apparent aphrodisiac and intoxication effect. Serious adverse effects can occur such as seizures, insomnia, anxiety, nausea, dizziness, hallucinations, coma, even death. Some common side effects of these drugs include a drunken appearance, drowsiness, light-headedness, staggering, confusion, muscle relaxation and amnesia that lasts up to 24 hours.

If one suspects that they or someone they know has been drugged and/or assaulted, first, go to a safe place, notify the Madison House staff or local police if off campus, go to the casualty department (emergency room) of the University College Hospital for immediate treatment. Again, if a student requires assistance, they will be accompanied to the hospital by one of the Resident Managers.

Resources For Support and Assistance

 

Plaza Medicentre  (Oxford Street, London)  

020 7637 7883

University College Hospital (London)

020-7387-9300

JMU Counseling and Student Development Center (main campus)

(540)568-6552

Sexual Assault Education Coordinator (main campus)

(540)568-2831

JMU Campus Assault Response Emergency help line (C.A.R.E.)

(540)568-6411

JMU Women's Resource Center (main campus)

(540)568-3407

JMU Judicial Officer (main campus)

(540)568-6218

Citizens Against Sexual Assault (Harrisonburg, VA, USA)

(540)434-CASA

Silent Witness: If you have any information you feel would be helpful in an investigation but wish to remain anonymous, you have the option to report it through Silent Witness at: http://www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/SilentWitness.shtml

Officials with Significant Responsibility for Student and Campus Activities otherwise known as

"Campus Security Authorities"

 

As specified in the Clery Act those considered to be "Campus Security Authorities" are deans (or other senior student administrative personnel), coaches, residence hall staff; overseers and advisors to student clubs, organizations, and Greek houses; and other campus officials having "significant responsibility for student and campus activities," not just police and/or security officers. All must report annual campus crime statistics (professional and pastoral counselors excluded; passages in quotations are taken directly from the applicable Federal Register)(1).

 

Although the timely reporting of campus criminal activity directly to the London Metro and/or Holborn Police is encouraged, in some instances members of the Madison House community may choose to file a report with one of the Resident Managers who are the primary Campus Security Authorities for Madison House. By law, James Madison University officials who learn about sexual assaults, as well as other crimes, will tell the victims that they can take their complaints to the police. JMU officials will help the victims if asked to do so. If making a crime report directly to the police the program participant is encouraged to make a report to a Resident Manager as well. 

 

Crime statistics are monthly and annually gathered from JMU Campus Security Authorities, including those in London, via fax, online and campus mail reporting utilizing a report/survey form supplied by the Clery Act Compliance Coordinator.  Any reportable crime made to a Campus Security Authority can be immediately transmitted to the JMU Police via fax machine, e-mail or conventional campus mail. 

 

Other people holding positions with the Madison House program considered to be campus security authorities under the law are the London Semester Program Director and The Faculty Member(s) in Residence (FMIR’s).

 

 (1) From page 59063, Federal Register/Vol. 64, No. 210/Monday. November 1, 1999/(Final) Rules and Regulations: "For example, a dean of students who oversees student housing, a student center, or student extra-curricular activities, has significant responsibility for student and campus activities. Similarly, a director of athletics, team coach, and faculty advisor to a student group also have significant responsibility for student and campus activities. A single teaching faculty member is unlikely to have significant responsibility for student and campus activity, except when serving as an advisor to a student group. A physician in a campus health center or a counselor in a counseling center whose only responsibility is to provide care to students are unlikely to have significant responsibility for student and campus activities."

Policy and Procedures for Developing Information for this Report

The offices of JMU’s London Semester, Judicial Affairs and Public Safety serve as "clearing houses" in the statistical gathering of crime data from those with "significant responsibilities for students and campus activities" and reports such statistics involving pertinent criminal incidents and arrests or referrals gathered from various "campus security authorities" to the Public Safety office on a monthly and/or annual basis.  The offices of Public Safety and Judicial Affairs routinely compare and reconcile the gathered information to minimize multiple postings for the same reported criminal incidents or arrests.

 

Likewise, the London Semester staff requests that pertinent information and data from the London Metro Police on crime in and around Madison House be forwarded to James Madison University annually.  All figures, if reported, are incorporated in the preceding statistical tables.

Notice of Availability of Annual Campus Crime (Your Right to Know) Report

Each year e-mail and conventional mail notification is made to all enrolled students and employees that provide the web site to access this report.  Availability of the print version is also imparted to the community through the same means (“summary” statement on a 5” X 7” mailer card).  Prospective student and employees are informed of the report and how it may be secured.  The report is also made available to the general public upon request.

Crime Statistics

Crime statistics for the most recent three year period for the Madison House campus (UK), including incidents reported to the London Borough of Camden, the Holborn Precinct Police, are listed below.  PLEASE NOTE: The requested crime statistics were not made available by the London Borough of Camden, Holborn Precinct Police - all statistics below were compiled and supplied by the resident manager of Madison House.

REPORTABLE INCIDENTS AND ARRESTS CALENDAR YEARS 2004, 2005 & 2006

OFFENSE

(Mandatory Reporting)

YEAR

ON CAMPUS 4

**RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES

(Subset of  On Campus )

NON-CAMPUS 5

PUBLIC AREAS 6

OPTIONAL TOTAL

MURDER / NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

SEX OFFENSES, FORCIBLE 1

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

SEX OFFENSES, NON-FORCIBLE

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

ROBBERY

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

BURGLARY 2

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

ARSON

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

LIQUOR LAW ARRESTS 3

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS REFERRED FOR DISCIPLINARY ACTION 3

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

DRUG LAW ARRESTS

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

DRUG LAW VIOLATIONS REFERRED FOR DISCIPLINARY ACTION

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

ILLEGAL WEAPONS POSSESSION ARREST

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

ILLEGAL WEAPONS POSSESSION VIOLATIONS REFERRED FOR DISCIPLINARY ACTION

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

** CRIMES REPORTED IN THE RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES COLUMN ARE ALSO INCLUDED WITHIN THE ON CAMPUS CATEGORY.

OFFENSE

(Optional Reporting)

YEAR

ON CAMPUS 4

**RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES

(Subset of  On Campus )

NON-CAMPUS 5

PUBLIC AREAS 6

OPTIONAL TOTAL

DRUNK IN PUBLIC ARRESTS

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

SIMPLE ASSAULT

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

LARCENY

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

GAMBLING INVESTIGATIONS

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

GAMBLING

ARRESTS

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

GAMBLING

REFERRALS

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

FALSE FIRE ALARMS, DELIBERATE ACT

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

FIRE ALARMS, MECHANICAL OR ACCIDENTAL 7

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

FIRES

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

INJURIES DUE TO FIRE

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

DEATHS DUE TO FIRE

2006

0

0

0

0

0

2005

0

0

0

0

0

2004

0

0

0

0

0

** CRIMES REPORTED IN THE RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES COLUMN ARE ALSO INCLUDED WITHIN THE ON CAMPUS CATEGORY.

 

1 Forcible sexual offenses include offense of rape

2 Most burglaries are non-forcible unlawful entries involving petty thefts

3 Classification Liquor Law Violations does not include arrests for Driving Under the Influence and Drunk In Public

4 On Campus includes the figure from Residence Halls within the aggregate

5 Non Campus includes off campus affiliates such as privately owned off-campus fraternity houses and campus ministry

   centers in addition to university owned or controlled off-campus facilities not considered to be Branch Campuses

6 Public Areas are mainly the city streets and sidewalks (both sides of the street) bordering campus

7 False Alarm, Mechanical, Accidental refers to mechanical malfunctions, cooking odors/burned food, cigarette/cigar/pipe

   smoke and accidental activations

8 Fires – On Campus refers to mulch fires, vehicle fires, trashcan fires, other non residential structural fires

 

Hate Crimes

Involving Crimes or Incidents of violence against persons characterized by bias against Race, Gender, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Ethnicity, National Origin and/or Disability
Geographical Areas:
 On Campus, Residential Facilities, Non-Campus and Public Property

2006 – There were no reported bias motivated incidents.

2005 – There were no reported bias motivated incidents.

2004 – There were no reported bias motivated incidents.

A Note About the Metropolitan London Police Service’s Response to Our Inquiry About Their Crime Stats for the “Campus” (Madison House and Curtilage) and “Public” areas Surrounding Madison House (Gower & Chenies Streets):

The Metropolitan London Police Service responded that they were unable to provide data from the immediate area surrounding Madison House or supply details of certain offenses noted in the university’s request as required for compliance reporting for campuses in the United States. Camden Borough is broken down into 5 Policing Sectors. Holborn precinct is rather large in geographic area and takes in the political wards of Bloomsbury and Holborn & Covent Garden within the borough. Madison House is located within Bloomsbury Ward. A map of the wards of Camden Borough can be found at: http://cindex.camden.gov.uk/inform/wpdmaps/indexWards.htm. A sense of the size of the precinct can be estimated by locating Bloomsburg and Holborn & Convent Garden wards at the lower southeast end of Camden borough.

Camden, in which Holbern is located, is roughly equivalent to a borough in New York City, such as Brooklyn, Queens or Manhattan. Though not the largest in London in geographic area, it is very large and its population density is possibly the highest in London. Holborn would be the equivalent to a police precinct or district in a major city in the United States. Both the Holborn and adjacent Marylebone precincts enjoy a noticeable and reassuring level of police presence.

The Individual's Responsibility

Although JMU works hard to ensure the safety of all individuals within its community, students and employees themselves must take responsibility for their own personal safety and that of their personal belongings. Simple, common sense precautions are the most effective means of maintaining personal security.

Further information about campus safety can be obtained from the director of Public Safety at (540)568-6913 in the U.S., as well as the Public Safety web site: www.jmu.edu/pubsafety/index.shtml For more immediate and localized matters such information may be secured from the London Marylebone Precinct Police HQ (tel: 020-7404-1212).

James Madison University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, veteran status, political affiliation, sexual orientation or disability (in compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act) with respect to employment or admissions, or in connection with its programs or activities.  Inquiries or requests for reasonable accommodations may be directed to the activity coordinator, the appropriate university office, or the Office of Affirmative Action, JMU, Harrisonburg, VA 22807, (540)568-6991 or 568-7902 TDD.
 


This map represents the public areas included in the crime statistics. They include but are not limited to the immediate area surrounding Madison House (Noted as “JM” in magenta at the corner of Chenies and Gower Streets). The London Police were unable to limit the results of the survey to just the block bordering Madison House.






 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC SAFETY (UNIVERSITY POLICE) CRIME PREVENTION

AND PERSONAL SAFETY CLASSES PROVIDED IN ACADEMIC YEAR

2006-07 AT MADISON HOUSE, LONDON

 

PROGRAM

AUDIENCE

DATES

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Full Madison House Orientation

 

Student Group for Summer 2006 Program

May, 2006

Topics include: fire safety, personal safety, rules of Madison House, alcohol and drug policies, and Madison House security.

 

Safety in London Talk – Sargeant Gareth Dowling

Student Group for Summer 2006 Program

May, 2006

Safety tips while staying in London and at Madison House

Full Madison House Orientation

Student Group for Fall 2006 Program

September 2006

Topics include: fire safety, personal safety, rules of Madison House, alcohol and drug policies, and Madison House security.

 

Safety in London Talk – Sargeant Gareth Dowling

Student Group for Fall 2006 Program

September 2006

Safety tips while staying in London and at Madison House

Full Madison House Orientation

Student Group for Spring 2007 Program

January 2007

Topics include: fire safety, personal safety, rules of Madison House, alcohol and drug policies, and Madison House security.

 

Safety in London Talk – Sargeant Gareth Dowling

Student Group for Spring 2007 Program

January 2007

 

Safety tips while staying in London and at Madison

House

Full Madison House Orientation

 

Student Group for Summer 2007 Program

May, 2007

Topics include: fire safety, personal safety, rules of Madison House, alcohol and drug policies, and Madison House security.

 

Safety in London Talk – Sargeant Gareth Dowling

Student Group for Summer 2007 Program

May, 2007

Safety tips while staying in London and at Madison House

Special Meeting with Participants in consultation with Sgt. Dowling relative stalking and harassment of a program participant

21 in Student Group for Summer 2007 Program (plus 3 staff)

June 2007

Concerns over specific individual, a student at London College University who habituates local clubs involved in harassment stalking, and cyber stalking of student participant; dangers of posting bio info on “Facebook;” and diligence in who are admitted as guests to Madison House

 

 

 

 

How Participants Can Have a Safe London Semester

Special Security Issues During Times of International Crisis

Since the tragic events of September 11, 2001, a set of special security measures and general precautions have been put in place for students attending the programs. These measures are discussed in detail at the orientation meetings on campus then reviewed as conditions warrant throughout the semester abroad.

Safety In Light of July 7 and 21, 2005 Terrorist Attacks on London Mass Transportation

The Madison House staff was in close contact with local Metro Police liaison Sergeant Gareth Dowling throughout the day. The following protocol was followed and will be highlighted in future orientations:

Introduction to International Program Safety

In 1979, the Semester in London Program piloted James Madison University's approach to international education leading to other JMU Studies Abroad Programs.

Generally, for student participant safety, it is strongly recommended that they wear a money/passport pouch around their neck and under their shirt, especially for when they are traveling. Students are recommended not to take expensive watches or jewelry with them. Pick pocketing is an art in England. It is recommended that students not take or carry lots of cash. The best and safest way for them to take money is in the form of Travelers' Checks, or to rely on an ATM/debit card, with a Visa charge card as an emergency backup.

Normal Everyday Security

Students may be concerned about the safety of Americans in Europe. As far as the British Isles, the truth is that if one remembers when crossing the street that cars drive on the left, one should be as safe in London as in any town in America, even a town like Harrisonburg. Nevertheless, some care should be taken.

Like all Londoners who have learned to live with the threat of IRA violence, one should be observant. The escalation in the potential for threats and harm for Americans in Europe as well as the rest of the world is apparent. As much for decorum as for safety, students are asked to not draw unnecessary attention to themselves in public by being a loud "ugly American" (once there, they will soon know what that phrase means).

The realities of the post 9/11 world reinforced by subsequent attacks on civilians in Madrid and now most recently in London make it evermore necessary for everyone to be more diligent in observing what transpires on a daily basis.  London authorities ask the public to remain alert and to report any situation that appears to constitute a threat or suspicious activity, particularly on or around transportation systems such as the London Metro, to the London Metropolitan Police.  Security officials are not suggesting that people avoid public transportation systems; rather, they are asking they do so with an increased awareness of their surroundings.  Things to look for:

 

Most importantly, one should never give out their semester abroad address to people they do not know well. Students will be advised on the security procedures related to keys, guests, and fire regulations. They are asked to observe the same common sense about travel and strangers that one would take at home. Also:

  1. The number one rule is to have confidence! It is recommended that one should act like they belong in London. Students live there for a period of time, so they should not be mistaken for a tourist. It is recommended that students ask questions if they are lost, but not stand on a street corner with their map out and a confused look on their face. Dressing and acting like a native is the watchword. Projecting confidence, being comfortable, keeping one’s shoulders back, and dressing up to the occasion or the area will go a long way to helping the student fit right in.
  2. Students should know the phrases that will help one get around. They should ask directions of merchants, waiters, policemen, bus drivers and so on. If someone offers advice, students should thank them but do not accept an offer to be led to their destination.
  3. It's safer to travel in groups. It is especially important for students to stick together after dark. However, in London it is okay to travel alone during the day, if one knows the area. One always should know their route.
  4. London is NOT Harrisonburg! Again, knowing where one is going is recommended. One should not leave things unattended. One should not be obvious with money, cameras, expensive IPODs, etc. One should not use ATMs in lonely and poorly lighted areas after dark. The main places where people can be robbed are in metro or tube stations, crowded streets and open markets. Generally, bums and gypsies are harmless, but one should be on guard. Muggings are very, very rare, but again, pick pocketing and purse-lifting have been honed to a fine art and are commonplace since time immemorial. So, one should keep track of purses and wallets. One should never leave them on a café table or bench, and hang on to them securely while on public transport. A pouch worn beneath a blouse or shirt is recommended. It should be used for extra money, traveler's checks, passport, and Visa card. When traveling, one should wear this at night.
  5. When traveling it is recommended that one:
  1. Safe places to meet friends are restaurants, pubs and other public places (during peak hours).
  2. One should never appear drunk in public. Pickpockets and pick-up artists will take an intoxicated person as easy prey. Most natives regard drunkenness as deliberate stupidity and are therefore likely to be unsympathetic with someone who has made oneself vulnerable and dull-witted. One should always stay sharp.
  3. One should always avoid the neighborhoods known for prostitution.
  4. One should be extra careful about giving out personal details such as a mobile number, Facebook ID, London address or personal email address. There have been instances where students received unwanted messages from people that they met briefly at a club. When making new friends in London, plan to meet them in person during the day, in a safe place, along with other students from our program, waiting until a friendship and trust is established before revealing alternate ways to contact you.
  5. Finally, one should not carry their passport unless needed. In the London handbook information pertaining to health, safety and security issues can be found at:  http://search.camden.gov.uk/search?q=Health%2C+.... For further information related to safety and security in the borough of Camden, go to the Camden main page at www.camden.gov.uk and links  http://www.camden.gov.uk/ccm/content/policing-and-public-safety/..., http://www.met.police.uk/camden/stn.htm.

Preparation for and Response to Crisis Related to Short-Term International Programs

With the responsibility of leading a JMU study abroad program, Program Directors are aware that it is possible that an emergency may occur involving one or more of the students in the group. Students can and do become ill, suffer accidents, are the victims of muggings and assaults, find themselves caught up in potentially violent political situations, or fail to return on time to programs at the end of long weekends. While it is of course impossible to plan for all contingencies involving our students abroad, Program Directors are trained to follow sound recommended practices when emergencies do arise. They work individually and together to provide for the safety and well-being of our students.

JMU has therefore developed a series of specific procedures designed to safeguard the welfare of program participants. The Office of International Programs (OIP) takes responsibility for coordinating the University's management of emergencies affecting participants in JMU study abroad programs. The students are informed about these procedures during their on-site orientations.

What is an emergency?

An emergency is any circumstance that poses a genuine risk to, or that has already disturbed, the safety and well-being of program participants. Emergencies will include, though not be confined to, the following types of events and incidents:

What is done to prepare for emergencies?

Students are instructed that they are required to inform Program Directors about any medical emergency. Program Directors in turn are required to contact the OIP as soon as possible in order to inform the OIP Executive Director or Administrative Coordinator about the emergency. The students are informed that this information will be treated with the strictest confidentiality, and that it will be shared on a "need to know" basis only. If the crisis involving the student is grave enough to jeopardize his or her safety or well-being, the emergency contact they have provided at the time of registration will be informed. The Executive Director is Dr. Lee G. Sternberger, JMU Office of International Programs, Office: 540-568-6419 & 540-568-7002. The Administrative Coordinator is Ms. Jackie Ciccone, Office 540-568-7004.

  1. During the orientation on-site, the students will be provided with
    1. the local telephone number(s) the students should use to contact emergency services (i.e. the equivalent of the "911" that we use in the U.S., which provides access to police, fire and emergency medical services);
    2. a written list of reputable local medical clinics or hospitals.
  1. During the on-site orientation by the Program Directors, students will be informed of the exact location of the U.S. Embassy. and be highly encouraged to register with the Embassy. In order to register, they will need all of the information provided on the front page of their passports. Semester In London students are registered at the US Embassy by OIP staff in Harrisonburg. The students will be strongly encouraged to stop in at the Embassy or Consulate before and during their travels away from your site in order to get updated information about each country they plan to visit. The students will be advised to avoid travel to or through any location where tensions exist and travel may be dangerous. Experience has shown that students may benefit from a security briefing offered at U.S. Embassies abroad; such briefings will assist in reinforcing the message to the students that travel to dangerous areas should be avoided.

How Program Directors respond to emergencies

  1. In an emergency, the first responsibility for a Program Director is to safeguard the safety and well-being of program participants. Whatever is necessary is done to assure this, whether this means obtaining prompt and appropriate medical attention, Embassy intervention or police protection.
  2. When all that can be reasonably done to assure the student's welfare, the Program Director will immediately contact the OIP and brief the Executive Director, Administrative Coordinator or his/her representative, in a detailed way, about the situation. Every effort will be made to reach the Executive Director or Administrative Coordinator by telephone, rather than e-mail or fax for the opportunity to fully discuss the situation.
  3. The Program Director will notify the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate about the crisis, and follow whatever procedures they may require; if there is a continuing risk to the welfare of the students (during a terrorist threat, for example), the Program Director will ask the appropriate Embassy or Consulate Officer to provide advisory information on a regular basis about the evolution of the crisis and about how the students should respond. In any other sort of emergency, the Program Director will notify the local police about the situation - if the Program Director and the Embassy believe this is appropriate - the Program Director will then follow the procedures the police may require of them or the student.
  4. During an ongoing crisis, the Program Director will keep the OIP informed on a regular basis, through telephone, fax, or E-mail messages, about the evolution of the crisis until it has passed.
  5. In the event of a crisis, it is important that all concerned not overreact or panic. The Program Director will help the students to get through a difficult time. The OIP staff members have experience dealing with crises in the past and are ready to assist the Program Directors during and after any type of event or incident.
  6. After the OIP is informed about an emergency, and after OIP personnel consult with the Program Director and other appropriate individuals on site, the OIP may, depending on the acuteness of the crisis, fax a description of the course of action that the Program Director and the students will need to follow. All program participants will be required to sign a statement acknowledging that they have received, read and understood this response plan; after all of the participants have signed, the Program Directors will fax the OIP the signed acknowledgments.
  7. During a political crisis or some other emergency during which foreigners in general or U.S. citizens in general may be at risk, the Program Directors will request that the students keep a low profile. The students will be told to avoid demonstrations, confrontations or situations where they could be in danger; to avoid behavior that could call attention to themselves; to avoid locales where foreigners or Americans are known to congregate; and to take down signs, avoid using luggage tags and wearing clothes that would label them as Americans.
  8. It is highly unlikely that participants would need to be evacuated from a site abroad; of the hundreds of U.S. institutions operating programs abroad when the Gulf War and Iraq Wars broke out, only a handful concluded that events indicated that they should bring their students home. However, JMU would of course bring faculty members and students home if a situation were to deteriorate to the point where the degree of risk to participants was deemed unacceptable. If this unlikely event were to happen, the Executive Director, in consultation with the Program Director(s), the U.S. Embassy and State Department, plus appropriate individuals on the home campus, will develop an evacuation plan in as much detail as possible. This plan will be transmitted to the Program Director(s) in confidence, and the Office of International Programs will continue to work closely with the Program Directors(s) throughout the process.
  9. In the event of a significant crisis, individual students have the option of returning to the U.S. Every reasonable effort will be made to allow them to continue their academic program on campus, and to be housed appropriately as well. Refund policies are outlined in the faculty handbook for the Program Directors; withdrawals and grades will conform to JMU policies as well.

 

Observing the procedures outlined here will help our students have the unique educational experience abroad.

Insurance and Medical Treatment Related to Short-Term International Programs

Insurance Coverage

Students participating in a study abroad program are strongly urged to have hospitalization and medical insurance that is valid outside the United States. It is the student's responsibility to know about his/her coverage and to accept any financial risk that may occur. Proof of coverage is not required; however, the Office of International Programs (OIP) will enforce that requirement in the rare cases where proof of health insurance is required for a student to obtain a visa permitting them to enter the country and participate in the program. The OIP maintains a list of companies that provide term insurance for students and travelers.


Medical Expenses

Students should be are advised to have access to enough money, through a credit card for example, to be able to pay for any medical services they might need. In the event of a medical emergency, if the student decides not to pay for medical services, JMU cannot be expected to be responsible for these costs. This does not indicate less of an interest in the welfare of the student, but rather eliminate any misconception that every student participant is fully covered by insurance for their medical care. This is a financial and liability matter, not an indication that a faculty member should draw back from helping students get medical care, from accompanying them to a doctor, clinic or hospital, etc. It is the responsibility of the Program Director to make inquiries regarding available medical and professional services near the program site, to provide information for participants and to help participants obtain the services they may need during the program.

Important Policy Related to Short-Term International Programs - Alcohol and Drug Policy

Students participating in JMU's international programs are bound by all tenets of the JMU Honor and Judicial Systems. They are subject to all regulations in place on the JMU campus that pertain to every student enrolled in university-sponsored educational programs. Laws regarding alcohol and drug use are substantially different in other countries. If any student is observed in an intoxicated state and if that student's actions are deemed abusive by the Program Director or other program representatives in authority, the student is subject to disciplinary actions which may include suspension from the program and return to the U.S. As with all honor or judicial cases, the student has the right of appeal. The Executive Director for International Programs will serve as the appellate officer in all such cases.

The web address for the Office of International Programs is http://www.jmu.edu/international/