For more information, see our Student section.


I got an email from the Office of Student Accountability & Restorative Practices regarding an alleged policy violation. Now what?

If you have received an email from the Office of Student Accountability & Restorative Practices, it means that it is alleged that you have violated university policy; no decision has been made in your case. The letter will list the alleged policy violation(s) and the Case Administrator that has been assigned to review your case. You will need to call the Office of Student Accountability & Restorative Practices at (540) 568-6218 to schedule an appointment for your Administrative Case Review. If you do not schedule a Case Review time, OSARP will set an appointment time for you.

Arrive to your Administrative Case Review a few minutes prior to your scheduled appointment. If you do not attend an Administrative Case Review that you scheduled or that was scheduled for you, a decision will be made in your absence and OSARP will notify you of the decision made in your absence and any sanction(s), if applicable.

You will have the right to accept or reject the decision made at an Administrative Case Review.

JMU and the Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices are committed to ensuring that programs are equally accessible to all participants. If you need accommodation of a disability to support your participation in the Accountability Process, please contact OSARP to discuss your request for accommodations. Depending on the nature of your request, the Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices may request documentation of disability and may consult with the Office of Disability Services to determine reasonable accommodations.

For more information, our see our resources for Responding Parties section.

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I'm a JMU student, what policies do I need to know?

JMU's Student Standards of Conduct are outlined in the Student Handbook.

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Are my parents/guardians going to be notified?

The Family Education Rights to Privacy Act (FERPA) prevents the Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices from disclosing information regarding alleged policy violation(s) to parents/guardians unless the alleged policy violation is related to alcohol or drugs.

The Office of Student Accountability & Restorative Practices notifies parents/guardians of students under the age of 21 of any alleged violation(s) of the Alcohol or Drug policy. Cases that may involve parental/guardian notification include those where students’ cases have been adjudicated on-campus (i.e. Residence Life and/or JMU Police cases) and the student has been found responsible or when a student is arrested or received a citation off-campus from local officers (not JMU officers) for an alcohol and/or drug charge(s).

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Do I need to hire a lawyer?

You may hire an Attorney at your own expense, if you choose, but it is not required. The Accountability Process does not follow the same criminal or civil procedures used in a court of law. If you receive notification of an alleged violation of a JMU policy that is also a criminal offense, you may find it helpful to seek the services of an Attorney. However, your Attorney cannot speak for you during the Acountabilty Process; they can can only advise you as a Support Person. Our staff members are not lawyers or in any way associated with the criminal legal system. 

If you choose to have an Attorney or Support Person attend, as outlined in the Student Handbook, keep in mind that Attorneys and Support Persons are not permitted in Administrative Case Reviews. Attorneys and Support Persons may accompany a Responding Party at an Accountability Board Case Review, but my not communicate for or speak on behalf of the Responding Party. An Attorney or Support Person can advise the Responding Party on how to prepare for and present their case or advise the Responding Party in the preparation of any appeal.

The role of a Support Person or Attorney during the Accountability Board Case Review is to support the Responding Party or Reporting Party. Support Persons or Attorneys may not present the case for the Responding Party or Reporting Party; the Responding Party or Reporting Party must present their own case. Support Persons or Attorneys may assist the Responding Party or Reporting Party ahead of time in preparing for the case, take breaks during the Case Review with the Responding Party or Reporting Party if needed, and write notes to the Responding Party or Reporting Party during the Accountability Board Case Review.

Support Persons not complying with policy above may be removed from the proceedings. For more information, review the JMU Student Handbook: Student Rights.

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What are my rights as a student?

Please refer to the JMU Student Handbook: Student Rights section for a complete overview of the rights of JMU students in the Accountability Process.

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What happens to the Responding Party if they are found responsible?

Sanctions assigned depend on the violation(s), the severity of the offense, the impact of the violation on the Reporting Party and the University community, and the circumstances of the particular case. A list of possible sanctions is available in the JMU Student Handbook.

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What happens if I receive notification from JMU of an alleged violation of policy that is also a criminal or civil offense?

James Madison University's Student Accountability Process is entirely separate from the criminal and civil court processes. University proceedings may occur before, during, or after the resolution of a criminal or civil case. The resolution of a case in civil or criminal court has no bearing on the University's disciplinary process. Our staff members are not lawyers or in any way associated with the criminal legal system.

The Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices may initiate an adjudication process prior to the outcome of a court or other adjudicative decision. If the Accountability Process or Sexual Misconduct Accountability Process for an alleged violation(s) in the Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices stems from a current criminal case, civil case, honor council case, or case being adjudicated by another conduct process on JMU’s campus, the case may be heard concurrently by the Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices. If the case was heard concurrently and the Accountability Process or Sexual Misconduct Accountability Process concludes prior to the resolution of the criminal process, civil case, honor council process, or other adjudicative process on campus, the case in the Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices will not be revisited at the conclusion of the other adjudicative process. 

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Will I be able to tell my side of the story?

Yes; giving you the opportunity to share your perspective is the purpose of the Case Review(s). For cases other than Sexual Misconduct, a student who is suspected of a policy violation is given the opportunity to meet face to face with a Case Administrator, a staff member in OSARP, to discuss the alleged policy violation and their account of what took place. For cases relating to Sexual Misconduct, please see the Sexual Misconduct Accountability Process

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How does a student disciplinary record affect my application to graduate school, study abroad, etc.?

The effect that a student’s disciplinary record may have on a student's ability to participate in various campus acitivities, programs (including Study Abroad), positions, to transfer to another institution, or to gain entrance into a graduate program is at the discretion of those managing those positions, programs, or application processes. These positions, programs, and processes may ask for information regarding a student's disciplinary record, see the "Records and Transcript Notations" section for more information. Disciplinary records are maintained for a minimum of eight (8) academic years from when the adjudication of the case occurs. Records for cases alleging sexual misconduct and any case resulting in suspension or expulsion will be maintained indefinitely. For more information, see the "Records and Transcript Notations" section of the Student Handbook.

The Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices cannot release information regarding a student's disciplinary record without the permission of the student. 

For more information about what will be shared in these circumstances, please contact OSARP.

Most graduate applications ask for information regarding a student’s criminal or disciplinary history. Some universities require more information, so be sure to carefully read what information the application is requiring. You should be honest about your disciplinary history. On occasion, universities will contact our office to verify the information you have provided on your application. Most applications include this waiver in the fine print and by signing the application you are typically granting access to your disciplinary records. 

Government Clearance, State Bar, etc.

We do receive requests for background checks from government agencies, state bar associations, and other such entities.  As with the graduate school and study abroad verification forms, the background check forms include a waiver and by signing this you are granting access to your disciplinary record. 

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