For more information, see our Student section.


I got an email from Office of Student Accountability & Restorative Practices regarding a charge, now what?

If you have received an email from Office of Student Accountability & Restorative Practices, it means that you have been charged for violating university policy. The letter will list the charge(s) against you and the Case Administrator that has been assigned to review your case. You will need to call the Office of Student Accountability & Restorative Practices at (540) 568-6218 to schedule an appointment for your Administrative Case Review.

Arrive on time (if not a few minutes early) to your scheduled appointment. Missing your appointment, or being late, may result in an additional charge of Non-compliance with an Official Request being added to your case. Repeated violations may result in the case being reviewed in your absence.

For more information, our see our resources for Accused Students section.

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I'm a JMU student, what policies do I need to know?

JMU's student standards of conduct and policies can be found in the JMU Student Handbook online at: 

www.jmu.edu/osarp/handbook/OSARP/standards-policies.shtml

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Are my parents going to be notified?

The Family Education Rights to Privacy Act (FERPA) prevents us from disclosing information regarding charges to parents/guardians unless the charge is related to alcohol or drugs.

Therefore, the Office of Student Accountability & Restorative Practices notifies parents/guardians of students under the age of 21 after their first alcohol and/or drug violation(s) and any subsequent violation thereafter. Cases that may involve parental notification include those where students’ cases have been adjudicated on-campus and the student has been found responsible or when a student is arrested or received a citation off-campus for an alcohol and/or drug charge(s).

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Do I need to hire a lawyer?

Student Accountability proceedings at the University do not follow the same criminal or civil procedures used in a court of law. Most cases can be resolved without lawyers. You may hire an attorney at your own expense, if you choose, but it is not required. If you are charged with a violation of a JMU policy that is also a criminal offense, you may find it helpful to seek the services of an attorney. Our staff members are not lawyers or in any way associated with the criminal legal system. For legal support, refer to the VA state bar referral service at (800) 552-7977. However, your attorney cannot speak for you during the acountabilty process; he or she can can only advise you as a support person. 

If a student decides they need an advisor, any person may advise the accused student. This could include parents, faculty, attorneys or friends. The person selected as an advisor may:

  • Advise the accused student on how to prepare for and present their case;
  • Advise the accused student in preparation of any appeal.

The advisor may not:

  • Present any part of the case for the accused. (However, a student with a disability affecting communication or a student who cannot effectively communicate in the English language may seek a reasonable accommodation from the Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices to allow an advisor or interpreter to present or translate the case for the student;)
  • Directly examine or cross examine witnesses; or
  • Disrupt or delay the proceedings.

Advisors not complying with policy above may be removed from the proceedings. For more information, review the JMU Student Handbook: Student Rights.

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What are my rights as a student?

Please refer to the JMU Student Handbook: Student Rights section for a complete overview of the rights of JMU students; including the rights of victims and students charged with violation(s).

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What happens to the accused student if they are found responsible?

The sanction imposed depends upon the violation, the severity of the offense, the impact of the violation on the accusing party and the University community, and the circumstances of the particular case. A list of possible sanctions is available in the JMU Student Handbook.

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What happens if I'm charged with a JMU policy violation that's also a criminal or civil offense?

James Madison University's student accountability process is entirely separate from the criminal and civil justice systems. University proceedings may occur before or even during the resolution of a criminal or civil case. The resolution of a case in civil or criminal court has no bearing on the University's disciplinary process. Our staff members are not lawyers or in any way associated with the criminal legal system. For legal support, refer to the VA state bar referral service at (800) 552-7977.

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Will I be able to tell my side of the story?

Yes, that is the purpose of the case review appointment. A student who is suspected of a policy violation is given the opportunity to meet face to face with a Case Administrator, a staff member in the Office of Student Accountability and Restorative Practices, to discuss the charge at issue and their account of what took place.

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How does a student disciplinary record affect my application to graduate school, study abroad, etc.?

A student’s disciplinary record may impact their ability to gain approval to study abroad, participate in leadership roles or varsity athletics on campus on campus, transfer to another institution or gain entrance into a graduate program. Disciplinary records are maintained for a minimum of seven (7) years from the date of resolution. If Suspension or Expulsion is given in resolution of a violation, the disciplinary record will be maintained indefinitely.

If a student gives permission to access his or her disciplinary record, only general information about the student’s violation(s) will be shared such as:

  • Minor or Major violation
  • Date of Incident
  • Violation
  • Sanctions assigned
Graduate School & Study Abroad

Most graduate applications ask for information regarding a student’s criminal or disciplinary history. Some universities require more information, so be sure to carefully read what information the application is requiring. You should be honest about your disciplinary history. On occasion, universities will contact our office to verify the information you have provided on your application. Most applications include this waiver in the fine print and by signing the application you are typically granting access to your disciplinary records. James Madison University’s Office of International Programs does have access to OSARP’S database, so it is important that you represent any disciplinary record accurately on applications to that office. You may contact our office and we can verify your information.

Government Clearance, State Bar, etc.

We do receive requests for background checks from government agencies, state bar associations, and other such entities.  As with the graduate school and study abroad verification forms, the background check forms include a waiver and by signing this you are granting access to your disciplinary record. 

If a student gives permission to access his or her disciplinary record, only general information about the student’s violation(s) will be shared such as:

  • Minor or Major violation
  • Date of Incident
  • Violation
  • Sanctions assigned

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