NELSON INSTITUTE DIRECTOR’S COLUMN EXAMINES CHINA’S ROLE IN AFRICA

August 24, 2006

HARRISONBURG—In his weekly column for the World Defense Review, Dr. J. Peter Pham, Director of the Nelson Institute for International and Public Affairs at James Madison University, examines potential challenges to American interests posed by the increasing economic and political engagement of the People’s Republic of China in Africa.

According to Dr. Pham, “The 2006 National Security Strategy of the United States declares that ‘Africa holds growing geo-strategic importance and is a high priority of this Administration’—as it should be for a region that currently supplies America with 16 percent of its petroleum needs and which, according to a report prepared for the National Intelligence Council, will be providing more than one-quarter of its oil imports by 2015, thus surpassing the total volume of oil imports from the Middle East. Consequently, the growing influence of any major actor on the continent—especially one as dynamic as ascendant China—bears very careful watching.”

Dr. Pham’s article, “China Goes on Safari,” can be accessed online by clicking here.