NELSON INSTITUTE DIRECTOR’S COLUMN TAKES ISSUE WITH TSA APPROACH

August 11, 2006

HARRISONBURG—In a commentary today for national security resource Family Security Matters, Dr. J. Peter Pham, Director of the Nelson Institute for International and Public Affairs at James Madison University, takes issue with the basic paradigm used by the Transportation Safety Administration in its allocation of resources to containing risks.

According to Dr. Pham, Israel’s successful use of intelligent profiling that targets people as well as what they may be carrying has some useful lessons because “if the resources available for securing commercial aviation, however generously funded, will always be nonetheless limited, it makes every sense to concentrate their deployment where the potential threat is greatest, rather than wasting them on a series of marginally useful, ‘feel good’ measures applied across the board.”

Dr. Pham is a contributing editor of Family Security Matters, which tries to provide national security and foreign affairs information in an accessible format in order to increase civic participation and political responsibility.

 The essay, entitled “Smarter Commercial Aviation Security,” can be accessed by clicking here.