James Madison University School of Music

Theory/Composition


 

VICKI CURRY, Assistant Professor

Vicki Curry is an Assistant Professor of Music in General Studies and Music Theory at James Madison University. Dr. Curry holds a B.M. degree in music education from Butler University (Indianapolis), an M.A. degree in music theory and composition from the University of Denver, and Ph.D. in music composition from the University of Utah. Prior to coming to James Madison, she taught at Westminster College (Salt Lake City) and, most recently, the University of Utah.

During her years at the University of Utah, Vicki Curry taught the whole gamut of undergraduate music theory for majors in addition to miscellaneous music history and appreciation courses for nonmajors. Twice, she offered short study-abroad courses that traveled to European cities such as London, Paris, Rome and Vienna.

Dr. Curry’s awards in teaching include Delta Gamma, "Anchor" Award for Teaching, 1997 and the “Student Choice Award for Excellence in Teaching,” University of Utah, 1999.

Over the years, Dr. Curry has reviewed numerous textbook manuscripts for publishers, written extended syllabi for correspondence courses in music theory and music appreciation, and published two workbooks to accompany textbooks used in general education. In addition, she created all the listening charts and musical analyses for Music: The Art of Listening, 5th edition by Jean Ferris. In 2005 she published Introduction to Music Theory--an interactive, multimedia textbook/workbook on CD-ROM. Currently, Vicki Curry is creating online tutorials for Joseph Kerman’s text Listen.

Email: curryvl@jmu.edu
Office: 540.568.5119

EDWARD GANT, Part-Time Instructor

Edward Gant received a BA in Elementary Education from Eastern Mennonite University, a BM in Music from James Madison University and an MA and DMA in Cello Performance and Pedagogy from the University of Iowa. Dr. Gant studied cello with Virginia Wendt, Frantisek Smetana, Robert Ashby and Charles Wendt.

He previously served on the faculties of Luther College in Decorah, Iowa and at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania in Indiana, Pennsylvania, Eastern Mennonite University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia and currently is a member of the faculty of the American Public University System. 

Dr. Gant is an active chamber and orchestra musician, recitalist, freelance musician and private cello teacher.  His recent interests include producing and recording a body of music for unaccompanied cello based upon European and American folk melodies and hymnody of the 18th through the early 20th centuries.

Email: gantes@jmu.edu
Office: 540.568.6044

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ERIC GUINIVAN, Assistant Professor

Eric Guinivan’s music has been performed by numerous orchestras and chamber ensembles across the United States, Europe, and Asia.  His works have received several awards and honors, including three BMI Student Composer Awards, two ASCAP Morton Gould Awards, and grants from the Theodore Presser Foundation and Meet the Composer.  Eric has received commissions from the New York Youth Symphony, the Delaware Youth Symphony, the Firebird Ensemble, the Michigan Music Teachers Association, ASCAP, the Society of Composers, Inc., the Lotte Lehmann Foundation, and pianist Vicki Ray.  Eric's music been presented at conferences and festivals around the country such as the 2013 Mizzou International Composers Festival, the 2010 and 2013 Society of Composers, Inc. National Conventions, the 2009 Aspen Music Festival, and the 2009 Athens Composer/Performer Conference in Greece, among others.

Eric began studying percussion at age 10 and is an active performer currently based in Harrisonburg, Virginia.  A founding member of the GRAMMY-nominated Los Angeles Percussion Quartet, Eric has also performed with orchestras and chamber ensembles across the country.  Eric made his Carnegie Hall debut in 2011 performing as soloist with the New York Youth Symphony in the premiere of his work Meditation and Awakening for percussion and orchestra.  The New York Times subsequently described the work as "engaging," praising its "shimmering colors" and "frenetic energy."  Eric has also performed as soloist with the Downey Symphony and the University of Southern California Thornton Symphony, and he served as the principal timpanist of the YMF Debut Orchestra in Los Angeles from 2007 to 2010.  Eric has given guest presentations and clinics at numerous institutions, such as the San Francisco Conservatory, California State Universities at Bakersfield, East Bay, and Fresno, Chapman University, Ventura College, and Kurashiki Sakuyo University in Okayama, Japan.

An avid champion of new music, Eric has conducted the premieres of over a dozen new works for chamber ensembles in California, New York, and Indiana.  In March 2013, Eric conducted the New York City premiere of fellow LA composer Julia Adolphe's one-hour chamber opera Sylvia at BargeMusic.  Eric has also served as an Assistant Conductor to the Downey Symphony and University of Southern California Contemporary Music Ensemble. 

Eric currently curates the new music website Composers Circle, which he founded in May 2012 with the goal of profiling one composer and one piece each day.  Now in its second year, Composers Circle has profiled more than 450 new works and has been visited more than 50,000 times by guests from 112 countries.

Eric received Bachelor of Music Degrees in Composition and Percussion Performance from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music and holds Masters and Doctoral degrees in Composition from the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music.  He has studied composition with Stephen Hartke, Donald Crockett, Claude Baker, P.Q. Phan, David Dzubay, Don Freund, and Tamar Diesendruck, and his principal percussion instructors have been Gerald Carlyss and Anthony Cirone.  Eric is currently Assistant Professor of Composition at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA.

Email: guiniver@jmu.edu
Office: 540.568.6891
Visit Eric Guinivan's website - click here


JASON HANEY, Professor

B.A., Austin College (summa cum laude), M.M. and D.M. in Composition,  Indiana University. He was chosen as a National Merit Scholar in 1988. His latest CD, Resonant Edges, was recently released by  Capstone Records. (It is also available from Amazon.) His music has been performed at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, the Scotia Festival, Music2000 in Cincinnati, the Composers Inc. concert series in San Francisco, Richmond’s ChamberFest,  the Staunton Music Festival, and elsewhere throughout the US, as well as in Canada, Europe and Hong Kong, and by groups such as the New Millennium Ensemble, the Chester Quartet, the Sunrise Quartet, Colloquy, and the Indiana University New Music Ensemble. He has won awards and honors from ASCAP, the National Association of Composers USA, the Music Teachers’ National Association, the Washington International Competition, top honors in the University of Oregon's international Waging Peace Through Singing competition and a Dean's Prize from the Indiana University School of Music. He has earned residencies at the MacDowell Colony, the Ragdale Foundation and the Deer Valley Institute. His Symphony No. 1 was premiered in January, 2008, by the orchestra of Freiberg, Germany.

Go to http://jasonhaney.com for more information, and to hear samples of his music.

Email: haneyjx@jmu.edu
Office: 540.568.6664

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KATHLEEN OVERFIELD-ZOOK, Part-Time Instructor

Kathleen Overfield-Zook, originally from Essex, Vermont, began playing viola at the age of 9. She holds both a Bachelor and Master of Music degree in Viola Performance from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. While living in Michigan Kathleen performed with many of Michgan’s regional orchestras, including positions the Greater Lansing, Midland, Jackson and Dearborn Symphonies. She spent several summers at the Meadowmount School of Music, working with such great chamber musicians and pedagogues as David Salness and Charles Avsharian. She has played principal viola at the National Orchestral Institute in College Park, Maryland and traveled to Graz, Austria as part of the AIMS Festival Orchestra. After moving back to the east coast, Kathleen has led an active freelance career, holding positions with Allentown and Vermont Symphonies as well as performing regularly with the New Jersey Symphony orchestra under the baton of Neeme Jarvi. Now living in Virginia, she can be seen playing with Richmond and Roanoke Symphonies as well as continuing her tenure as Assistant Principal viola in the Harrisburg (PA) Symphony Orchestra.

Having been an active teacher since the age of 19, Kathleen was on faculty at the Westminster Conservatory of Music in Princeton, NJ for several years before joining the faculty of James Madison University in the fall of 2010.

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SCOTT ZANE SMITH, Part-Time Instructor

SCOTT ZANE SMITH is currently serving on the faculty at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia and teaches for the School of Music and Theatre.  He teaches various undergraduate courses including Jazz and Show Choir Techniques for music education majors, Theory Composition for all music majors, Class Piano for musical theatre majors and Group Voice and Acting for Theatre and Dance majors. He also aids in supervising student teachers in area school systems. Professor Smith is an active adjudicator for events sponsored by National Association of Teachers of Singers (NATS), Virginia Choral Directors Association (VCDA), Virginia Music Educators Association (VMEA) and the Virginia Jr. Miss Scholarship Pageant. He is also an active choral clinician serving as guest conductor for county and district choruses throughout Virginia and is an active presenter for Collegiate Music Educators National Convention (CMENC) on the topic of Musical Theatre in Secondary Education. Professor Smith also serves at various times on the summer music faculty at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) where he conducts and choreographs musical theatre literature.

Professor Smith previously served on the faculty at Shenandoah University, Lynchburg College, and Mary Baldwin College and is currently the artistic director of The Masterworks Chorus of the Shenandoah Valley (located in Woodstock Virginia).   He received an undergraduate degree in music education from James Madison University, a master’s degree in Piano Accompanying from Shenandoah Conservatory of Shenandoah University and has completed coursework for a Doctorate of Musical Arts (DMA) in music education from Shenandoah Conservatory of Shenandoah University. Professor Smith previously taught in the public school system for 14 years where he was named to Who’s Who among Teachers. He is the Minister of Music at the Linville Creek Church of the Brethren in Broadway, VA and resides with his cat, Madison in Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Email: smithsz@jmu.edu
Office: 540.568.6044

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STEVEN VOIGT, Part-Time Instructor

Steve holds PhD and M.A. degrees in composition from the University of California, San Diego, and a B.M. in theory and composition from Northern Illinois University. His compositions have been performed throughout the United States by ensembles including Either/Or, Noise, and Sirius. He has studied composition with Brian Ferneyhough, Rand Steiger, Harvey Sollberger, Joji Yuasa, and Roger Reynolds. He has presented papers on contemporary music at the annual conference of the Society for Music Theory and the West Coast conference of Music Theory and Analysis.

Go here to read a review of the New York premiere of Mercury Mirror.

Email: voigtsa@jmu.edu
Office: 540.568.6664

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J. RANDALL WHEATON, Assistant Professor

J. RANDALL WHEATON, Assistant Professor
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; B.M. (cum laude), Ohio State University; M.M., University of Michigan; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. Formerly an organic chemist in cancer research, his undergraduate work in music at Ohio State included studies in clarinet performance with Robert Titus and in conducting with Donald McGinnis. John Clough and William Benjamin were his main teachers at the University of Michigan, where his master's thesis focused on Alexander Scriabin's Désir, op. 57, and he spent a year in private study with David Shifrin. His principal mentors at Yale were Allen Forte, David Lewin, and Claude Palisca, and his 1988 dissertation was on the phenomenon of symmetry in pitch-class sets and their role in tonality. A former Editor of the Journal of Music Theory, he has served on the faculties of Yale, the University of Connecticut, and the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). Nominated for distinguished teaching awards at both Yale and CCM, he was Chair and Associate Professor of Music at Northern Kentucky University in 2001 and returned to CCM as Visiting Associate Professor of Music in 2002. Among his conference papers are studies on segmental invariance in the twelve-tone system, Mahler's Der Abschied, and Schumann's Carnaval. He delivered a paper at Columbia University in 2002 entitled “Looking Glass into the Vagaries of Improvisational Style: Structural Levels in C. P. E. Bach's 'Free' Fantasia in E-flat Major." His main areas of interest are Schenkerian analysis, set theory, the history of theory, music-theory pedagogy, and compositions from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Email: wheatojr@jmu.edu
Office: 540.568.5368