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 Montpelier Magazine

2005 DISTINGUISHED TEACHERS AND STUDENTS

JMU recognizes the exemplary teaching and classroom achievement of its faculty and students each year during the James Madison Day celebrations. This year, six professors and two students were honored for their outstanding work and research.

2005 DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS FOR FACULTY

Research into police psychology, the literacy processes, the qualitative theory of differential equations, religion and politics and tax law have earned five JMU professors top university honors as Madison Scholars.

2005 MADISON SCHOLARS

Research into police psychology, the literacy processes, the qualitative theory of differential equations, religion and politics and tax law have earned five JMU professors top university honors as Madison Scholars.

THE CENTENNIAL DUKES ARE HERE

Their Madison Experience will be different. From the tme they received their acceptance letters to the cheers that rocked the Convo bleachers during orientation week, this year's freshmen knew one thing: they will make history. Four years hence, the members of the Class of 2008 will cross the graduation dais amid yearlong celebrations for James Madison University's 100th anniversary. The Centennial Dukes are ready.  They've organized, and they're going to chart their progress and milestones as JMU approaches its centennial. These Centennial Dukes are telling their stories.

WELCOME TO JMU!

Student volunteers leap into action to make JMU freshmen's first week at Madison a great experience

CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE BRIDE'S SOUL

Girl meets boy. Everything possible goes wrong. But love wins out in the end, and the bride gets a famous byline. Read more about alumna Ariana Adams ('89) in a feature by Montpelier intern Erin Pettit (05), and open the PDF to read Ariana Adam's original work.

SALUTING THE 2005 RETIRING FACULTY MEMBERS

With 193 years of combined service to Madison, seven professors retired in May. Is one of them be your longtime favorite?

ON BEING HUMAN

Poet Nikky Finney attends Joanne Gabbin's Furious Flower Conference at JMU, where she holds forth with writer Kendra Hamilton on convening, silence, empathy and being human.

DISTINGUISHED ART AND MUSIC

The alumni association honors longtime JMU voice professor In Dal Choi for his music and teaching achievement and Tina Updike for her service to the delivery of art history instruction.

TAILGATE CREW MAKES 22 HOMECOMINGS IN A ROW

Meet the Picardis and the rest of the Tailgate Crew who started celebrating life together back in Hanson Hall in the late '70s.

OPERATION PURPLE PRIDE

Are you or your classmates serving in Afghanistan or Iraq?  Whether you're on the front lines, in support roles, in the United States or overseas, Monty's the place to share your experiences with your classmates and the rest of the Madison community.

A PASSION FOR WIDE-OPEN SPACES

Students re-enter the Atlantic Collegiate Cycling Conference.  Art major Dan Delli-Colli ('07) is leading a young cycling club team back into collegiate competitions and enjoying some of the nation's best bike trails, right here in the Shenandoah Valley.

WHO'S GOT DUKE DOG'S BACK?

Duke Dog has reached the Capital One All-America Mascot finals with 11 other furry foes.  Now he needs your help to fetch the top spot.  Learn how to help vote in Duke Dog as the national mascot and meet his "campaign manager," a JMU senior on a mission.

MARINE BIOLOGIST ALUM RETURNS TO CAMPUS TO SHARE RESEARCH

Monterey Bay expert and marine biologist Christine Preston ('92) participated in JMU's first Biosymposium as a student.  For the 2004 symposium, she educated and entertained students as the keynote speaker.

CUPID IS STIRRING PURPLE PASSION AT ALUMNI CHAPTER EVENTS

Looking for love in all the wrong places?  These Dukes met their mates at alumni chapter events.  A purple and gold tribute to love by Tidewater Alumni Chapter President Kelly Stefanko ('94).

A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE ON HISTORY

JMU students and alumni explore new evidence at the first field-slave quarters discovered by archaeologists at James Madison's Montpelier estate.

VOYAGE OF HOPE

After recovering from a stroke and its debilitation, depression and anger, Les Bissell ('88) decided on an around-the-world sailing voyage as a means of raising stroke awareness.  As he says on his Web site, "My stroke was no longer going to slow me down."

LAUGHING ALL THE WAY HOME

Niki Lindgren ('98), actor, improviser and comedian with The Second City Touring Company of Chicago, was ecstatic to "come home" and perform in Court Square Theater in Harrisonburg. The Madison alumna says she "loved being back in the 'Burg" and took time for a quick Q&A with Montpelier.

ART OF SHARING

Even with her art in the homes of former President Jimmy Carter and the Rev. Billy Graham, Esther Augsburger feels that there are always more people to reach through her art.

YOU ROCK, GIRL

Or, you might say, Kelly Tober ('01) helps keep the rock-n-roll spirit alive in the nation's capital by keeping it all organized behind the scenes.

ASSIGNMENT AMERICA

Frequent flyer miles and exceptional news coverage lands Jim Acosta ('93) his dream job at CBS

SPORTS STANDOUT: 18 HOLES INTO HISTORY

Golfer Jay Woodson joins an elite group of golfers -- including Curtis Strange -- by winning his second straight Virginia State Amateur title in 2003.

SPORTS STANDOUT: ON AND OFF THE COURT

With outstanding performances on and off the tennis court, Rebecca Vanderelst was selected to attend the annual NCAA Leadership Conference at Disney's Coronado Springs Resort.

SPORTS STANDOUT: GOLDEN TOUCH

All-American archer Megan Bowker has a pair of international competition gold medals from the 2003 World University Games, where she and her teammates defeated host country, the Republic of Korea.

DIAMOND DUKES

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Eddie Kim ('03) leads EIGHT Diamond Dukes relishing the minor leagues. Facing their first "real" jobs, many 2003 JMU graduates walked into vast office buildings, while Eddie Kim ('03), stepped up to the plate -- literally.

INTERNATIONAL WEEK

Festive fun and serious discussions and lectures colored JMU's 2003 International Week activities, where students and professors learned about each other and the global community

MELANIE ALNWICK, EMMY WINNER

Alumna Melanie Alnwick, a general assignment reporter for WTTG-Fox 5 News, recently won a national Emmy award for Outstanding Regional News Story -- Investigative Reporting, for her work on the story, Buried Secrets.

GET A WHIFF OF THIS DUO

Declaring themselves "the Southeast's finest sniffers," Bob Carter ('84) and his mold-sniffing dog, Brandy, are changing the nation's mold-inspecting business. Find out how Brandy made it from "doggie-death-row" to become one of only 10 mold-detecting dogs in the nation.

TEACHING THE TEACHERS

What would entice experienced teachers -- tops in their field -- to devote a full week to intense study of the Constitution? And, how could you comfortably mix K-12 curricula? The answers came at the 2003 "We the People" institute.

FACULTY HONORS

Tessellating the plane? A restaurateur and educational expert? This dean and professor know their stuff and now have been honored for distinguished writing and excellence in education.

LOSE YOURSELF IN LUXURY

We've all seen the "Calgon, take me away" commercial.  Anne Munson ('99M) has created a unique day spa to help clients reach that relaxation nirvana -- while providing them with some healthful information at the same time.

HOKIE ROASTERS

For the first time, the five-year-old JMU alumni softball team won the Capital Alumni Network softball championship, defeating the No. 1 seeded Virginia Tech. JMU is the smallest (by enrollment) alumni team to capture the championship. Shortstop Greg Slang ('00) provides a season wrap-up.

DISPATCHES FROM THE SOUTH POLE

After almost a year at the South Pole, it's beginning to feel like home. The sun is beginning to rise after almost complete darkness. Clausson gives new meaning to the word winter. Wintering over at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica, since October 2002, Clausson says average temperatures are 60 F. degrees below zero. Read Clausson's dispatches from the world's highest, driest, coldest, most isolated continent.

WINNING COMPOSER MAKES HIS 'ESCAPE'

Escape, an original piece by composer Erich Stem ('96), will be performed by the Richmond Symphony at the Carpenter Center on May 22-24, 2004, as part of its Masterworks Series. Stem just completed an intense and exclusive workshop for the most talented composers.

BUSINESS AND SARS IN THE ASIA PACIFIC REGION

The outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in Asia earlier this year forced people to view disease with a totally different outlook, one of concern and paranoia, than I have ever witnessed in Asia. By businessman Charles Regan, class of 1984.

WICKETS, WOOD CLIPS, HOOPS AND GARDEN FLAGS

Barry Matherly ('87) really knows his croquet. The "fantasy job" for this economic developer from Lincoln, N.C., is to be a croquet pro. He's well on his way. Each year he organizes a large tournament and midnight croquet at Pinehurst Resort, which has the best croquet pavilion in the Mid-Atlantic.

DUKES PASSPORT TRAVEL SURVEY

We want to let traveling Dukes everywhere know how to find you. If you're in the hospitality and tourism field and you're a current or retired JMU professor or staff member, JMU parent, alumnus or donor, we want to hear from you.

MADISON SCHOLARS

Work with hadrons, budding playwrights, neural network modeling and learning disabilities have earned some favorite JMU professors top university honors as Madison Scholars.

DISTINGUISHED TEACHERS

JMU recognizes the exemplary teaching and classroom achievement of its faculty. Selected as this year's Distinguished Teachers are a chemist, mathematician, economist, historian and scientist.

YOU CALL THESE PROFESSORS RETIRING?

Hardly, given their academic achievements, curriculum development, service projects, undergraduate mentoring and approximately 500 years of collective service; but that's what 21 professors are doing. Could one of them be your longtime favorite?

STUDENT SCHOLARS

On James Madison Day in March, JMU's senior and junior valedictorians were selected as the top award academic award winners for their achievement in the classroom. They are senior Amy Elizabeth Brown, who graduated in May, and Shane B. Galie, who is now a rising senior.

H20: NATURE'S BAROMETER

Water flows through the research of JMU scientists on seemingly disparate courses. It provides a barometer on fish populations, climate change, pollution, antibiotic effectiveness and ultimately the health of the planet.

LIKE WILD FIRE

Mountain biking brought them together. Computers made them successful. Peter Denbigh ('02) and Saunders Roesser ('02) created their own datacom and telecom company, Wildwires. They were JMU seniors when they started. Now they're post-grad businessmen.

IN LOVE AND IN LONDON

Madison House directors Jon and Gina Glassman ('93) find love, independence and a life abroad through JMU's Semester in London program.

HAPPY TOES WIGGLE WHILE HE WORKS

Sun-worshipping surfer dude Sean Berg ('92) has happy toes. He can wiggle them so freely that they might as well be bare. Fleece socks for flip-flops keep them toasty warm all winter long.

MARBLE SWAMP'S MUSIC MAN

When composer-percussionist-guitarist-entrepreneur Jon Solomonson is not on the road himself with a band, his company is distributing compositions to other bands in the mid-Atlantic.

JMU SENIOR FIGHTS TERRORISM WITH KNOWLEDGE

For those living in the Middle East, terrorism is a daily reality. Last August, senior Jose Gonzales and 26 other American students visited Israel to experience the dangers of the area and to bring back personal knowledge to educate their peers.

TOP SCIENCE STORIES OF 2002

Discover magazine ranks research by JMU biology grad as No. 43 of the top 100 science stories of 2002. Scientist Dave Rizzo, class of 1983, is the nation's leading expert on the plague that's killing coastal California oak trees and infecting more than two dozen other species. Rizzo confirmed last year that the microbe indeed threatens California's vaunted giant redwoods. He and agriculture officials try to halt its spread eastward.

THE RISKS OF SPACE

From their vantage point inside NASA, alumni Elizabeth Gauldin, class of 1950, and Greg Meeks, class of 1985, reflect on the loss of the Columbia and media speculation. NASA retiree Gauldin was involved in the space program from Apollo, through Skylab and the shuttle. Meeks is a NASA mission integration engineer.

REAL-LIFE ACCOUNTING

During his junior year internship at KPMG, JMU grad Mark Adamchak realized the accounting professionals there were counting on him!

MAKING MOLECULES

Chemistry undergrad Heather Morrison plans to pursue her Ph.D. in polymer science or organic chemistry. Meanwhile, she's trying to synthesize molecules to map out an inexpensive procedure for future molecule synthesis.

VISITING THIS PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE IS A GOOD THING

Education professor, freshman adviser and former high school principal transforms the K-12 classroom one day a week with a retinue of toy-based lessons that make learning fun -- and effective.

LIVING IN EXILE

Throughout history, the painful experience of exile has crossed borders to both alienate and inspire humanity to great intellectual and artistic achievements. In the article in the Winter 2003 issue of Montpelier (it's online too), JMU professors mark the 700th anniversary of Dante's exile with an academic conference in which they reveal exile's 'journey to one's self'. Here the JMU faculty shares additional insights.

WHAT A WEB SHE WEAVES

Psych professor Cheryl Talley pulls together music, sight, emotion, psychopharmacology, neuroscience, quantum physics, Buddhism and more.

AWESOME OPPORTUNITIES

That's the reason Morgana Wallace chose JMU, then immersed herself in service-learning -- on campus, in Harrisonburg, on alternative spring break trips -- and now she's off to the Peace Corps.

OUTBACK ADVENTURE

A semester Down Under shows JMU senior Jackie Stephenson that while the landscape and culture might seem exotic, she had a lot in common with the aborigines of Australia and the islanders of Torres Strait.

GENES AND FAMILY LINKS

One of 10 family members to attend Madison College and JMU, Betty Kay Keyser Mansfield ('75, '86M) presides over the federal flow of information to researchers and the public about the state of genetic knowledge.

SHOP 'TIL YOU DROP

The next time you have an urge to go shopping, head over to Charlottesville's Fashion Square Mall, which has recently undergone an $8 million renovation and is being promoted by marketing director Misty Parsons ('94).

SINGING STRAUSS

Music theater students stage the waltz king's party, the operetta, Die Fledermaus

MOTHER'S DAY

Daughter writes memoirs of Pauline Efford Delano ('32), including a chapter on her life at the State Teachers College.