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May Symposium

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CFI Conference Wednesday Session Descriptions

Lunch and afternoon coffee will be provided daily.

Is it too Early? Archival Work, Historical Recoveries, and Multimodal Composition in Freshmen Composition Teaching Roundtable
Facilitator: Cathryn Molloy (Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication), Lynn Eaton (Libraries & Educational Technology), Susan Ghiaciuc (Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication)
Wed 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM  (Festival Conference Room 2)
Exploring and analyzing the archives in JMU's Special Collections takes students out of their digital comfort zone and connects them to a world that they may perceive as faded, old, hidden, and possibly unimportant. This talk explores how a freshman composition course (GWRIT103) progressively trained students to read photographs and images, and allowing them to recover student life and culture at JMU in the early to mid-twentieth century. With some rudimentary knowledge of visual rhetoric, students explored JMU's Special Collections, imagined what it meant to be students many years ago, composed a research paper with their findings, and translated such findings into a documentary video, that paid closed attention to framing, cropping, agency in narration, and rhetorical purpose. In this talk, the speaker argues that GWRIT students are ready now to think and produce multi-modal work with very simple technological tools. In doing so, her students not only recovered lost texts, but they also gave them meaning, engaged with their surroundings, and thought of themselves as rhetorical beings.

This roundtable is designed to help faculty progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Examine pedagogical choices leading to students engagements in historical recoveries of local communities and JMU;
  • Model socialization of students into campus resources, namely our libraries and archives;
  • Explore the usefulness of multimodal applications to overall learning of subject matters;
  • Explore the usefulness of certain simple technological choices for class and student production; and
  • Model interdisciplinary collaborations among JMU units.
Facebook Official or Practically Married: Student Perspectives on Romantic Relationships Academic Culture Roundtable
Facilitators: Lesley Eicher (Student Health Services) & Phyllis Munn (Student Health Services)
Wed 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM (Festival Conference Room 3)
University Health Center practitioners and other Student Affairs professionals increasingly find that college students hold complex views of romantic relationships. The term relationship' has many gradations, and with each comes a separate set of 'rules' governing sexual behavior. Phyllis Munn (Women's Health Nurse Practitioner) and Lesley Eicher (Health Educator) embarked on a study with East Carolina University to better understand this phenomenon and its implications on patient care. In this session, they will share their findings from the study's first round of focus groups held at JMU.

This roundtable is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Identify and describe at least 3 terms that college students use when referring to romantic relationships or sexual behavior;
  • Differentiate between your own definitions of romantic and sexual behaviors and those used by students; and
  • Make use of this learning to build new meaning for your own work with college students.
Developing Meaningful Service Learning Assignments Teaching Roundtable
Facilitator: Walt Ghant (Community Service Learning)
Wed 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM (Festival Conference Room 4)
A faculty panel will share their stories of how they incorporate service learning into a course. This roundtable will be highly interactive and will explore the how, why, and benefits of service learning.

This roundtable is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Meet and network with other service learning faculty;
  • Participate in scholarly inquiry regarding the philosophical foundations of service-learning; and
  • Advance knowledge of academic service-learning.
Using Digital Technologies to Spark Learning Teaching Roundtable
Facilitator: Chris Arndt (College of Arts and Letters), Toni Whitfield (Communication Studies), & Sean McCarthy (Writing, Rhetoric, & Technical Communication)
Wed 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM (Festival Conference Room 5) or 3:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 3)
How might we use digital technologies to spark innovation in our classrooms and at the same time build upon the core skills and pedagogies within our disciplines? This roundtable will explore how 10 faculty from the College of Arts and Letters answered this question for their courses through a course design experience. More importantly, participants will dialogue on ways to gain working knowledge of popular digital tools such as Wordpress, Twitter, and cloud-based collaboration technologies. Discussion will focus on how these faculty, with the help of the instructors, CIT staff and CFI faculty, and fellow institute members, mobilized digital humanities tools and methodologies to design a fully realized digital assignment.

This roundtable is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Learn the basic tenets of digital humanities and social sciences;
  • Become more knowledgable about efforts to develop digital methodologies in the humanities and social sciences at JMU;
  • Learn how to participate in future institutes; and
  • Learn that acquiring digital skills is fairly easy.
Breaking the Read-Write-Only Norm of Online Learning Teaching Workshop
Facilitators: Corey Hickerson (Communication Studies), Donielle Janow (Psychology), & Juhong Christie Liu (Center for Instructional Technology)
Wed 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM (Rose Library 3313)
With the boom of MOOCs in 2012, online learning has taken on various tints of colors. It is certainly true that online course delivery depends a lot on the read-and-write norm. However, quality online classes can become lively, and optimize the interactions between instructor and students, between students and content, and among students. At this workshop, two of CIT's 2013 Excellence in Teaching with Technology Award winning faculty members will share their selective use of technologies to enable these interactions in their online classes. Participants will explore using screencasts for sustainable content delivery, twitter for learning community building, and blogs for students to apply critical thinking. Additionally, participants will gain perspectives on ways to help students stay more connected to the class using technologies like VoiceThread for group presentations, where students can record audio or video comments asynchronously.

This workshop is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Identify factors that lead to quality online courses;
  • Recognize technological features that can be integrated to courses taught in online environments; and
  • Appreciate that quality online teaching needs careful design and gradually updated content.
Creating Interactive Lectures with Assessment Teaching Workshop
Facilitator: Carol Hurney (Biology & Center for Faculty Innovation)
Wed 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM (Festival Allegheny Room)
In many disciplines, lecture remains the dominant pedagogy, despite evidence that shows active learning techniques are more effective for retention and learning. In this workshop, participants will explore and discuss a variety of assessment techniques (beyond just think-pair-share) that can be integrated into content-rich, lecture-based courses to engage students in the learning process. Participants will discuss techniques for assessing course-related knowledge, student attitudes & self-awareness, and student reactions to instruction. Finally, facilitators will guide participants through the design of specific activities that they can use in their classes.

This workshop is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Summarize the motivation for using active learning techniques;
  • Explain how assessment techniques can be used to engage students to become active in the learning process;
  • Describe assessment techniques and how they are used; and
  • Create specific assessment activities to use in your own classes.
General Education Lightning Talks Teaching Roundtable
Festival Board of Visitors' Room
Session 1 (9:00-10:20) - Sian White (English), Anna Courtier (Geology & Environmental Science), Kimiko Tanaka (Sociology & Anthropology);
Session 2 (10:30-11:50) - Tim Ball (Communication Studies), Kristen McCleary (History), Carol Hurney (Biology & CFI), Kristin Wylie (Political Science);
Session 3 (1:00-2:50) - Chris Arndt (College of Arts and Letters), Eric Pappas (Integrated Science and Technology), Chris Hughes (Physics), Kerry Dobransky (Sociology & Anthropology);
Session 4 (3:00-4:50) - Eric Pappas (Integrated Science and Technology), Meredith Conti (Theatre & Dance), Amanda Biesecker (Integrated Science and Technology), Terry Beitzel (Justice Studies), Kethra Fogler (Graduate Psychology)
What is the best part of General Education courses at JMU? Come find out! This fast-paced roundtable offers participants the opportunity to listen to 5 or 6 "Lightning Talks" from faculty who teach General Education. Participants can then share a particularly interesting aspect of their GenEd course. Come learn something about a great assignment, topic, lesson plan, student outcomes, and more. Facilitators will form small groups to encourage meaningful exchanges, keep track of time and then moderate discussion during the last 15-20 minutes of the session.

This roundtable is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • discover new possibilities for their own courses;
  • Have the opportunity to discuss their course with colleagues; and
  • Gain a broader perspective of the general education program.
Helping Students in Distress: The JMU Here to Help Program Academic Culture Workshop
Facilitators: Sarah Brooks (Art Design & Art History), David Onestak (Counseling Center), Elizabeth Howley (E&G Student Wellness and Outreach), Amy Sirocky-Meck (Student Health Services), & Paige Hawkins (Student Health Services)
Wed 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM (Festival Conference Room 8)
This two and a half hour program, followed by discussion, will introduce you to the benefits that our direct engagement can have with individual students as they face the challenges of balancing their academic careers and the other spheres of life as a college student. Learning from experts from the Health Center, the Office for Substance Abuse, and Counseling services, you will be introduced to the many existing programs that help support students in their successful lives on campus, and how faculty and staff can serve as a referral point for students seeking these resources.

This workshop is designed to help faculty and staff make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Identify signs of distress in students and steps you can take to assist them;
  • Identify disruptive classroom behavior and develop an intervention plan to reduce its occurrence;
  • Identify a dangerous student; and
  • Understand actions you can take to help to mitigate risk.
Give Yourself an ORCID: Boosting Your Visibility through Researcher Profiling Networks Scholarship Workshop
Facilitators: Carolyn Schubert (Libraries) & Steven Holloway (Libraries)
Wed 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM (Festival Highlands Room)
Looking for researchers who share your interests but not sure where to find them? Struggling to quantify all the different ways your research impacts your discipline? A number of free and subscription-based initiatives exist to promote researcher identification, manage researcher profiles and publications, and facilitate collaborative networking. The actors in this academic ecosphere include individual researchers, national governments, umbrella organizations, librarians, publishers, and research funding agencies.These platforms move beyond the historical citation metrics and enhances how we define the impact of scholarship by maintaining up-to-date researcher profiles and synchronizing their data. We will cover the nature of these researcher profiling network resources, the citation metrics they support, and reasons that your career can benefit from aggressively putting these systems to work for you. Participants will explore ORCID and Google Scholar platforms by creating profiles. Participants who attend this session will need to bring a laptop, mobile communication device (if they have one), and a digital vita. 

This workshop is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Gain a practical overview of the leading researcher profile systems, how to create and manage your own profile, and use them to network with other researchers;
  • Gain a functional understanding of the citation metrics they support, and how managing your profile can impact your public academic standing; and
  • Evangelize your colleagues and students by encouraging them to create their own researcher profiles.
Providing Effective Feedback on Student Writing Teaching Roundtable
Facilitators: Julia Sochacki, Sean McCarthy, Cathryn Molloy (Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication)
Wed 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM (Festival Conference Room 2)
Like many other instructors who use written assessments, the facilitators for this roundtable have struggled with how to make feedback on these assignments meaningful mechanisms to promote student learning. In this roundtable session, facilitators offer attendees a synthesis of scholarship representative of "disciplinary norms" in the field of Rhetoric and Writing on how to provide effective feedback on writing assignments. Further discussion will identify factors that influence the choices instructors make as they navigate decisions on the kinds of feedback they might offer students and the mediums through which this feedback might be delivered. Facilitators will also share perspectives on the use of audio comments for feedback on student work as a way to promote "deep learning" of the writing process. Participants will then be invited to engage in informal, reflective dialogue.

This roundtable is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Appreciate the use of digital tools for the delivery of diverse, dynamic forms of feedback on students' texts;
  • Extend the reach of instructional spaces by embedding broader, contextual feedback about a student's progress into feedback;
  • Increase students' attention to feedback through novel and thoughtful approaches to feedback content and delivery;
  • Develop a constructive, positive tone with feedback in order to convey care, interest and attention toward students' compositions and their progress as learners in general; and
  • Develop engaged dialogues with students about their learning through one-on-one conferencing with students about their writing projects.
Feedback to Feed Forward: Using Knowledge Surveys for Continuous Improvement Teaching Workshop
Facilitator: Steven Harper (Engineering)
Wed 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM (Festival Conference Room 3)
Struggling to work your end of course students' evaluations back into your course? Knowledge Surveys are an alternative to the typical course and instructor evaluation system - one that can tell you so much more about students' perception of their learning. Using knowledge survey to complement you other evaluation and you can gain insight about your students' learning on a course session by session basis. This workshop will take you from your text's chapter objectives to creating a tool that can tell you where your students started in their knowledge to where they perceive they are at the end of the course, while giving you feedback on how to improve their learning.

This workshop is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Gain an appreciation of what information Knowledge Surveys can give you;
  • Create a start (several textbook chapters) on an actual knowledge survey for your course;
  • Gain experience in how to analyze and display knowledge survey information semi-automatically; and
  • Learn how to interpret the results of a knowledge survey at both a macro and micro level of analysis.
Survey Your Syllabus to Increase Inclusion Teaching Workshop
Facilitators: Andreas Broscheid (Political Science) & Edward Brantmeier (Center for Faculty Innovation)
Wed 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM or 3:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 4)
Inclusive teaching is effective teaching, yet requires significant thoughtful preparation. This workshop asks participants to analyze their syllabi with the goal of making their courses more inclusive, to invite multiple perspectives, and to include different voices. To do so, participants will use, evaluate, and revise an exploratory syllabus audit tool that the facilitators have developed together with Carl Moore (Temple University). Participants are required to bring a syllabus for examination.

This workshop is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Become aware of strengths and growth areas related to inclusion and diversity in your syllabus;
  • Use a syllabus to examine strengths and growth areas related to inclusion;
  • Consider adaptations and modifications to a syllabus to be more inclusive; and
  • Interact with other faculty to exchange ideas on increasing inclusion and diversity in their own classes.
It's All Greek to Me! Academic Culture Roundtable
Facilitator: Adam Lindberg (Madison Union)
Wed 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM (Festival Conference Room 5)
From secret rituals to special houses, fraternities and sororities have been a pillar of the social culture within Higher Education since 1776, when the first fraternity was founded at William and Mary. Here at JMU, over 3,000 students are a part of 29 organizations on campus. But who are the students wearing letters in your classroom? How does their involvement in a fraternity or sorority impact the social culture on campus? How do organizational values inform a student's academic career, and what role can you play in this student's personal and professional development? This roundtable is designed to introduce faculty to the many facets of fraternity/sorority life at JMU. Come learn more about who these students are, the role of fraternity/sorority life in promoting student development, and the potential for fraternities/sororities to impact campus culture and tradition.

This roundtable is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Understand the difference between social fraternities/sororities, academic/special interest fraternities/sororities, and multicultural fraternities/sororities;
  • Understand the foundations, values, and various academic and community service requirements of social fraternities/sororities;
  • Understand the role of the Office of Fraternity & Sorority Life in the social fraternity/sorority community; and
  • Learn of the positive impact that fraternities/sororities have on the social culture at James Madison University.
A Conversation: Is Your Promotion & Tenure Document Rewarding A, While Hoping for B? Career Development Workshop
Facilitator: Steven Harper (Engineering)
Wed 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 5)
How is your promotion and tenure document written? Very general in some areas and very specific in others? What is the outcome of this clarification or lack of clarity? Are you getting the results desired? This session will start with a discussion of "On the folly of rewarding A, while hoping for B" (Kerr 1995) and then relating that to the tenure document for your department. The unintended consequences of providing clarification (often in the form of quantitative metrics) will be explored. The end result will be a broader understanding of how the reward system as written by a P&T document might be influencing the characteristics of your department.

This workshop is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcome:

  • Gain a broader understanding of how the reward system as written by a P&T document might be influencing the characteristics of your department.
Orchestrating Pedagogy with Digital Technologies Teaching Roundtable
Facilitators: Christopher Carrillo (Music), Barbara Reisner (Chemistry), Chris Hughes (Physics), David Stringham (Music), & Kevin Giovanetti (Physics)
Wed 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM (Festival Allegheny Room)
This roundtable will be facilitated by seven faculty members from across the university who teach with technology funded by Center for Instructional Technology Seed Grants or grants from other university sources such as 4VA Initiative. These faculty members will share (a) rationale for selecting particular technology/ies, (b) examples of activities that incorporate technologyies in their classrooms, and (c) intended and unintended outcomes of these activities. Session attendees will then be invited to join in conversation about potential for adapting these ideas to their own classrooms, as well as pedagogical concerns about incorporating technology in their teaching.

This roundtable is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Identify factors that influence pedagogical choices related to technology in varying disciplines;
  • Articulate how current pedagogical choices reflect disciplinary norms; and
  • Discuss how pedagogical choices might change/expand to incorporate technology within and/or beyond those norms.
Mixed Methods: State of the Art Scholarship Plenary Talk
Facilitator: John Creswell
Wed 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM (Festival Highlands Room)
Mixed methods research represents a growing set of strategies supporting scholarly work in many disciplines. This scholarly talk will explore the current definition of mixed methods research - what it is and what it is not; when mixed methods research developed and how it has expanded; when to use this methodology to study research problems; specific procedures used in conducting mixed research including the major research designs currently being employed, and both the challenges and rewards of using this methodology in research. Finally, current readings will be advanced to learn more about mixed methods research.

This plenary talk is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Gain clarity about what mixed method research is; and
  • Appreciate the challenges and rewards of mixed-method research
Knowledge, Ambiguity, and Authenticity: Postmodern Students in a (Less than) Postmodern Classroom Teaching Workshop
Facilitator: Julie Gochenour (Communication Studies)
Wed 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 2)
Have you ever wondered what your students think, value, and believe? How their cultural norms frame and interpret you, your course content, and your teaching--before they even walk through the door? Wish you could decode students' attitudes, put these to work in your classroom, and use them to your advantage? This lively, interactive, humorous and highly utilitarian workshop unpacks JMU students' cultural postmodernism; examines the largely unconscious lens this creates; and explores how faculty can use these default settings" to create a constructive and culturally-congruent learning environment where both faculty and students thrive.

This workshop is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Distinguish between cultural and philosophical postmodernism;
  • Work in small groups to compare and contrast the characteristics of knowledge, scholarship, and the academic enterprise with JMU students' normative cultural postmodernism;
  • Utilize these results to interpret cultural postmodernism and formulate specific strategies to enhance cultural congruence in your classrooms; and
  • Identify and evaluate attributes of cultural postmodernism to integrate into your pedagogy.
An Evidence-based Faculty Mentoring Program Career Development Workshop
Facilitators: Linda Hulton (Nursing), Erika Sawin (Nursing), Amy Graham (Nursing), & Julie Sanford (Nursing)
Wed 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM or 3:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 8)
Recruiting and retaining expert faculty is key to meeting the current and projected need for excellent faculty. In many cases, experts in non-academic and practice settings who begin academic teaching are novices in classroom and experiential learning environments. Mentoring is a recommended strategy to provide support to individuals who are transitioning into new roles as educators. Moreover, faculty at different stages of their careers often seek mentoring to grow in different directions. This workshop will present a needs assessment, conceptual framework, evidence-based program essentials and competencies, first-year program evaluation, and a discussion of resource requirements for a new mentoring program launched by the Department of Nursing. Participants will have the opportunity to engage one another in exploring ways to formalize and evaluate faculty mentoring within departmental cultures.

This workshop is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Describe the evidence-based essentials of a faculty mentoring program;
  • Compare and contrast the needs of faculty members in early, mid-career, and late-career appointments; and
  • Summarize the benefits and challenges of the process of developing a faculty mentoring program and its potential impact on the Academic Department.
Mentoring Students 101: The Civic Learning Program Career Development Roundtable
Facilitators: Chris Ehrhart & RJ Ohgren (Judicial Affairs)
Wed 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 4)
The Civic Learning Mentoring Program, coordinated through the Office of Judicial Affairs, is an informal mentoring program that provides students the opportunity to develop a relationship of mutual respect and trust with a JMU faculty, staff, or graduate student. This roundtable will explore the impact, theory, and processes associated with mentoring students both within and outside of and our program.  

This roundtable is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Define mentoring;
  • Understand the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change and how it applies to mentoring;
  • Understand the impact of the Civic Learning Program on students, both within and outside of our the Civic Learning Program; and
  • Understand the processes associated with becoming a mentor through the Civic Learning Program.
Navigating the Road to Alumni Engagement Academic Culture Roundtable
Facilitators: Carrie Combs (College Engagement) & Ashley Privott (Alumni Relations)
Wed 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM (Festival Conference Room 7)
Are you interested in engaging in meaningful connections with alumni but don't know where to start? Do you want to better understand how maintaining these connections can enrich departmental culture, promote opportunities for current students and create funding opportunities for faculty and departmental support? Establishing relationships with alumni allows the departments to follow graduates as they start their careers and graduate work. Navigating the path to engagement and best ways to promote meaningful connections can difficult and even burdensome. This roundtable will provide the chance to discuss and share alumni engagement experience, as well as, provide resources to get you started. We'll also be sharing the results from our Awareness of Advancement survey that was sent to faculty and staff earlier this spring.

This roundtable is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Explore strategies to connect with alumni; and
  • Develop appreciation for the role of long-term planning to develop vibrant alumni networks.
Explore Teaching Inquiry and Develop a Research Question Scholarship Workshop
Facilitator: Carol Hurney (Center for Faculty Innovation)
Wed 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM OR 3:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 7)
Teaching inquiry is a scholarly journey where you (and your students) explore the impact of your course on learning. The culmination of this journey can result in conference presentations, book chapters, or scholarly articles. But where do you start? Some participants may be puzzled by how their students learn and want to investigate what is happening. Other participants may have identified obstacles to their students' success and wonder how to overcome them. This workshop will offer an opportunity to craft a good research question, develop a research plan, and will surely energize participants to consider their roles as teacher-scholars.

This workshop is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Define teaching inquiry and the scholarship of teaching and learning;
  • Develop a good research question; and
  • Consider yourself as a teacher-scholar in your discipline.
Scholarly Publishing: Tips and Barriers Scholarship Roundtable
Facilitator: John Creswell (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Wed 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM (Festival Highlands Room)
In this scholarly roundtable, the prolific author of over 22 well-known and well-used books will discuss his journey in scholarly publishing. Dr. John W. Creswell will provide tips to fellow travellers in the scholarly publishing world, as well as barriers he has experienced along the way.  Those interested in understanding the inner workings of the scholarly publishing world will enjoy this brief presentation, followed by facilitated conversation with participants.

This roundtable is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Appreciate best practices and barriers to book publishing;
  • Share strategies on how to navigate the publishing world.
The Madison Collaborative and the Eight Key Questions Teaching Workshop
Facilitators: Bill Hawk (The Madison Collaborative), Lori Pyle (The Madison Collaborative), David McGraw (Integrated Science and Technology), Mark Piper (Philosophy & Religion), Shelly Laurenzo (Career & Academic Planning), & James Ward (Philosophy & Religion)
Wed 1:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Allegheny Room)

The Madison Collaborative: Ethical Reasoning in Action, adopted as JMU’s Quality Enhancement Plan, embodies and complements the university mission as we promise to prepare students to be “educated and enlightened citizens who lead productive and meaningful lives.” JMU already values and promotes integrity within its community, yet the complex society which our graduates enter calls us to do more. The Eight Key Questions provide a foundation for members of the JMU community to integrate ethical reasoning skills into varied learning opportunities. In this workshop, participants will learn more about the origins and nuances of the Eight Key Questions and engage in an interactive workshop designed to enhance inquiry and meaningful discussion.

This session is open for all who wish to attend. To participate in the second part of this event, Thursday's Institute entitled, "Integrating Ethical Reasoning and the Eight Key Questions into Courses" you must register in advance.

This workshop is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Gain confidence with the Eight Key Questions; and
  • Improve facility implementing the Eight Key Questions.
Naturally Curious? Teaching Roundtable
Facilitators: Jacquelyn Nagel (Engineering), Marta Bechtel (Biology), and Brook Kennedy (VT)
Wed 3:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 2)
Biomimicry is an inherently interdisciplinary topic and requires knowledge retrieval and transfer across domains. Students benefit from learning about and experiencing the interconnections between disciplines, which is not only relevant but also has the potential to increase students' cognitive flexibility and adaptive critical thinking skills. In this roundtable, participants will engage in academically-informed inquiry around the topic of biomimicry and how it can be applied in the classroom across disciplines. The facilitators will share their perspective and their experience teaching biomimicry and using biomimicry in a course to convey to concepts. Faculty who are curious, want to know how to integrate, or who have already integrated biomimicry into their course are encouraged to attend. This will allow faculty to connect with other faculty and build a support network for implementing biomimicry in various courses.
This roundtable is designed for faculty to make progress towards the following outcomes:
  • Connect with other faculty;
  • Engage in academically-informed inquiry;
  • Learn about biomimicry; and
  • Develop an outline for how to integrate biomimicry into your course.
Teaching Student Veterans: The Green Zone Program Academic Culture Workshop
Facilitator: Jennifer Taylor (Political Science)
Wed 3:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 5)
Student veterans face numerous challenges as they transition into student life, particularly those who have recently returned home from active duty and are still transitioning to civilian life overall. Unlike the structured environment of the military, universities like JMU have a wide array of schools, departments and administrative areas that can be difficult to navigate and the general ambiguities that accompany transition to civilian life are stressful. The Green Zone program provides offers the opportunity for faculty to become more knowledgeable about student veterans issues and resources so they can assist these students, when necessary. Upon completion of the Green Zone workshop, faculty display a sticker outside their office door to let others know they are available to provide support and information about resource for student veterans.
The Green Zone is funded by the Aurora Foundation and the Region IV, Virginia Wounded Warrior Program.

This workshop is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Learn about the student veteran population at JMU;
  • Discuss unique experiences and strengths of student veterans in the classroom;
  • Examine specific strategies and resources to successfully respond to student veterans needs; and
  • Practice responses to the most common scenarios that JMU student veterans face.
Incorporating Alternative Spring Break into Teaching and Learning Teaching Roundtable
Facilitator: Misty Newman (Community Service Learning)
Wed 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM (Highlands Room)
A panel of faculty and staff who have partnered with the award-winning Alternative Break Program will
share their experiences. Colleagues will share information about being a Learning Partner, a Small Group
Leader, and/or developing a course that incorporates a required Alternative Break experience. The
Alternative Break trips are a powerful partnership between faculty/staff and students.

This roundtable is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcome:

  • Interact and exchange ideas with faculty from other disciplines who have an interest in service-learning.
The Dream Team: Faculty and Advancement Partnering to Engage Alumni Teaching Roundtable
Facilitator: Carrie Combs (College Engagement), Ashley Privott (Alumni Relations), & Jay Jackson (Director of Major Gifts)
Wed 3:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Highlands Room)
Do you want to better understand how you can maintain alumni connections to enrich departmental culture, promote opportunities for current students and create funding opportunities for you and your department? Do you have ideas on how can University Advancement better support faculty in these endeavors? Faculty are an essential part to alumni engagement but are often left with little time and few resources to put toward maintaining these connections. This roundtable will provide an opportunity to discover and discuss simple and quick ways to participate in alumni engagement on an individual and departmental level.

This roundtable is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Explore strategies to connect with alumni;
  • Identify quick and realistic ways individual faculty can engage alumni; and
  • Develop appreciation for how to create opportunities for alumni involvement at the department level.