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May Symposium

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Institute and Lockdown Descriptions

Download the printable schedule. Lunch and afternoon coffee will be provided daily.

Integrating Service Learning Experiences into Your Courses Teaching Institute
Facilitators: Rich Harris & Walt Ghant (Community Service Learning) 
Mon & Tues 9:00 AM - 4:50 PM (Rose Library 2301)
Service-Learning is a method through which students learn and develop through active participation in thoughtfully organized service. This 2-day Institute for full-time teaching faculty interested in developing a new course or modifying a current course that integrates service-learning principles into the course’s learning outcomes. No background with experiential education is necessary.

This institute is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Have the opportunity to engage experienced faculty across disciplines about service learning activities and impact;
  • Discover potential methods for incorporating service learning activities within course curricula;
  • Have the opportunity to ask questions and exchanged ideas with faculty;
  • Be exposed to proven practices with embedding service learning activities in course curricula; and
  • Observe appropriate service-learning theories and pedagogies.
Assessment Progress Template Lockdown Career Development Lockdown
Facilitator: Keston Fulcher (Center for Assessment and Research)
Mon or Tues 1:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Rose Library 3313)

REGISTER

This workshop is the assessment analog to the Writing Lockdown. Assessment Coordinators across the university submit their assessment reports by June 1. The APT Lockdown provides these coordinators with time to complete their reports prior to the due date. Several assessments consultant are on hand to provide assistance when requested. 2013 would mark the 3rd year of this workshop, which has been called "very useful" by several past attendees.

This lockdown is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Finish assessment report or make substantial progress; and
  • Re-conceptualize aspects of programs' assessments.
Scholarly Writers' Lockdown Scholarship Lockdown
Facilitators: CFI faculty
Mon - Thurs 9:00 AM - 4:50 PM; Fri 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM (Rose Library 24-Hour Lab)

REGISTER

Need the time and space to advance or complete that writing project? This lockdown provides an opportunity to faculty members who desire time and structure to focus on academic writing. Join colleagues who will be independently working on their own work in a common space for an intensive writing experience, and leave with a productive start to your summer. Optional writing consultations are available.

This lockdown is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Increase scholarly productivity;
  • Advance scholarship agenda; and
  • Advance a current writing project.
Designing a Rigorous Mixed Methods Study Scholarship Institute
Facilitator: John Creswell (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Tues 9:00 AM - 4:50 PM (Festival Highlands Room)
This institute will take an applied, practical orientation toward mixed methods research to help participants design (or redesign) a rigorous mixed methods research study. Participants will examine the essentials of mixed methods research and then move into the steps in designing a mixed methods project, exploring such topics as drafting a mixed methods title, a general intent statement, types of data to be collected, a rationale for using mixed methods, worldview and theory positioning, mixed methods designs and creating a diagram of a design and noting its validity issues, and a mixed methods purpose statement and research question.

This institute is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Be able to describe both qualitative and quantitative research approaches;
  • Describe steps for designing a mixed method study;
  • Advance individual projects; and
  • Share rigorous designs with colleagues.
JMU Scholarly Commons Scholarship Institute
Facilitator: Genya O'Gara and Laura Drake Davis (Libraries and Educational Technologies)
Tues 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM (Rose Library 3313)
JMU Scholarly Commons is a new repository and publishing service of JMU Libraries and Educational Technologies (L&ET). JMU Scholarly Commons is being developed in response to the expressed needs of faculty across campus to collect, organize, and provide access to the intellectual output of campus broadly, as well as an internal need to better surface JMU Libraries local digital collections. In addition to a broad overview of the system, participants in this workshop session will focus on specific opportunities to deposit and centrally highlight their scholarship, deposit research products for which there is no current third-party repository (as required by granting agencies), and explore open access journal publishing opportunities using this tool. Participants will also learn about the development timeline for Scholarly Commons and how L&ET can directly support campus with this tool.

This institute is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Experience training in submission of scholarship and other research outputs as required by granting agencies (e.g. data sets, presentations);
  • Gain an understanding of open access journal publishing possibilities (either departmental, subject, or student focused);
  • Explore the use of Scholarly Commons as a promotional tool for faculty research; and
  • Gain an understanding of what research outputs can be deposited beyond the traditional publication and the timeline for implementation of the various aspects of this tool.
Grant Writing Institute Scholarship Institute
Facilitator: Tillie Harris (Grant Training Center - Arlington, Va)
Tues & Thurs 9:00 AM - 4:50 PM & Fri 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM (Rose Library 3311)

This intensive three day grant proposal workshop is geared for: 1) those who wish to strengthen their grant writing skills and 2) beginners who wish to acquire and master the techniques of preparing, writing and winning proposals from various funding agencies. The focus will be on how to effectively tell the story that leads to funding, be it for the researcher in the sciences and social sciences, education, humanities, arts, or non-profit professional.

This institute is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Research and identify potential funding sources;
  • Create the right fit with the funding agency;
  • Address the guidelines of proposals;
  • Identify and effectively write the key elements of a proposal;
  • Integrate each component of the grant into the final product;
  • Develop focused and realistic budgets; and
  • Package professional grants submissions.
Making Debate the Centerpiece of Your Class Teaching Institute
Facilitators: Michael Davis (Communication Studies), Paul Mabrey (Communication Studies), Kathy Clarke (Libraries & Educational Technologies)
Thurs 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM (Festival Conference Room 5)

Many undergraduates may have, at best, a single classroom experience involving public speaking (Bellon 2000). Cronin and Glenn illustrate this point: Except for students majoring in communication, most undergraduates take at most one course emphasizing oral communication skills; therefore, most non-speech majors have little or no opportunity for structured practice with competent evaluation to refine and reinforce their oral communication skills (1991, p. 356). This institute is designed to assist faculty members in integrating debate and deliberation activities into their existing courses. Instead of debate being just an activity that is included in a course faculty will discover ways to make deliberation and the debate the centerpiece of a class (or a unit of their class).

This institute is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Analyze existing course objectives for opportunities to integrate debate activities;
  • Create meaningful opportunities for students to debate; and
  • Debrief students on debate activities and how they relate to the course objectives.
Integrating Ethical Reasoning and the Eight Key Questions into Courses Teaching Institute
Facilitators: Keston Fulcher, Bo Bashkov, (Center for Assessment and Research), Bill Hawk (Madison Collaborative), & Lori Pyle (Madison Collaborative)
Wed 1:00 PM - 4:50 PM (Festival Alleghany Room) & Thurs 9:00 AM - 4:50 PM (Festival Conference Room 4)

Promoting ethical reasoning skills in students can occur through a variety of disciplinary lenses and through many activities and assignments. The Madison Collaborative has developed a number of tools to assist instructors as they develop and implement activities and assignments that foster ethical reasoning - such as the Ethical Reasoning Rubric and the Eight Key Questions. The morning portion of this institute will introduce participants to the Ethical Reasoning Rubric, that will be used to learn about students' ethical reasoning ability through essay reading and scoring. The afternoon session will identify the context in which ethical reasoning may be integrated into their courses through a sharing experience with faculty who have used the Eight Key Questions in their courses. Ultimately, participants will identify learning activities and assignments that utilize the Eight Key Questions to stimulate ethical reasoning in their students.

This institute is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Use student ethical reasoning essays to form foundational knowledge of student ethical reasoning ability and identify areas of educational need; and
  • Develop learning strategies for incorporating the 8KQ into their courses.
Logic and Reasoning Institute
Scholarship Institute
Facilitator: David Ripley (University of Connecticut)
Mon -Thurs 10:00 AM - 4:50 PM & Fri 10:00 AM - 11:50 AM (Rose Library 3rd Floor Flex Space)

Logic has undergone significant changes since its discovery by Aristotle and its mathematicization in the 19th century.  Dave Ripley (University of Connecticut) will expose faculty, first hand, to new work in logic and philosophy of logic that is just beginning to seep into the undergraduate curriculum. The institute will  invigorate the scholarship and pedagogy of participating faculty by making them aware of alternative logics, their philosophical assumptions, and their applications.

This institute is designed to help faculty make progress towards the following outcomes:

  • Advance scholarly skills and output; and
  • Advance new techniques and ideas in critical thinking and reasoning.