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May Symposium 2017 program printable pdf
Teaching      Scholarship  Academic Culture Career Planning Cross Area   
Programs are listed in Chronological order
Use the buttons to the right to skip to other sessions
11:00 AM-12:00 PM 1:45-3:15 PM 3:30-4:30 PM
Welcome and Networking Breakfast
8:15 AM-9:00 AM in Ballroom A

This networking breakfast with serve as the opening event of Conference Day 2017.  Participants are encouraged to engage with others at facilitated table conversations around the following themes: 

  1. Reflecting on Teaching – an opportunity for attendees to gather and reflect together on their semester of teaching.
  2. SoTL – Inquiry into Teaching – an opportunity for attendees to share, brainstorm, and contribute ideas on scholarly inquiry into their own teaching and students’ learning.
  3. Creativity in Action – a space for attendees to contemplate what creativity means in the context of teaching, scholarship, and career planning.
  4. Faculty-to-Faculty Collaboration – a space for attendees to discuss and formulate big (and small) ideas on how to foster collaboration among faculty and across units.
  5. Faculty Life 101: Why am I doing this? — an opportunity for attendees to reflect upon and share what drives and motivates their work as faculty.
  6. Beyond Balance: Work-Life Integration — a space for attendees to share and learn from each other’s tips to integrating work, life, community, and more.
  7. Project Planning “Geek Out” — an opportunity for attendees to discuss best practices in planning, scheduling, prepping, and more.
  8. Power and Play in Teaching--a conversation and reflection on the positive impact of play on learning.
CANCELLED --Green Zone Training: Working with Student Veterans (Academic Culture & Career Planning Workshop)
Facilitator: Jennifer Taylor, Political Science
9:15-10:45 AM in Conference Room 2
Green Zone training is for faculty and staff who wish to learn more about the military affiliated student experience. Its goals are to train members of the James Madison community to know more about the issues and concerns faced by military affiliated students and to identify individuals who are available to assist this population. Participants are not expected to be experts who can "solve problems"-rather, they are individuals who can lend a sympathetic ear and help the student veteran identify and connect with the appropriate resources. Participants who complete the workshop will receive a label/sign to display in their office or on a nameplate.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding the needs and concerns of faculty and students related to challenges faced by student veterans;
  2. Learning to provide support and information about resources for student veterans.
When is Too Much Not Enough? Using Cognitive Theories of Learning to Shape Instructional Choices (Teaching Workshop)
Facilitator: Michael Kirkpatrick, Computer Science
9:15-10:45 AM in Conference Room 3
As faculty, we frequently base our teaching methods on what we experienced as students because it "worked" for us. However, research in neuroscience and memory suggests that what we know about learning (and teaching!) is still evolving. Cognitive theories of learning can provide an evidence-based foundation for shaping our pedagogical styles and techniques. In particular, Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) can be used as a framework for identifying difficult concepts and selecting efficient strategies for helping students to learn and retain this knowledge. In this session, we will explore the basic principles of human cognitive architecture and apply the CLT research findings to curricular design. We will also discuss the limitations and common criticisms of this theory.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Summarizing foundational principles and concepts of cognitive learning theories;
  2. Explaining why domain-specific teaching strategies are necessary;
  3. Identifying strategies for designing curricula that address the three forms of cognitive load.
I See Your Point: Visual Facilitation (Teaching Workshop)
Facilitator: Gail Napora, HR Talent Development
9:15-10:45 AM in Allegheny Room
Would you like to know how to put more than words on a white board or flipchart? Using FranklinCovey video segments followed by practice, participants will learn how to use visual text, simple drawn images, and graphic metaphors as a natural part of engaging, analyzing, innovating, and getting people to put their ideas together and take action. No drawing experience needed!

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Learning the benefits of visual facilitation;
  2. Identifying the basics of visual facilitation;
  3. Sketching the 7 Basic Shapes to visual facilitation;
  4. Developing a visual that illustrates a message.
Clarity in Career Purpose (Career Planning Workshop)
Facilitator: Liam Buckley, Sociology and Anthropology & CFI
9:15-10:45 AM in Conference Room 4
There are times throughout our careers, sometimes on a regular basis, when we can clearly see the purpose of what we do, and then there are those times when we lose that capacity to see. This program explores how and why clarity of purpose slips away and how it can be regained. We will practice a set of mindfulness-based techniques that allow us to perceive our careers with a clear vision. No previous experience in mindfulness practice is required.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Recognizing causes of loss of clarity in career purpose;
  2. Practicing methods for regaining clarity in career purpose;
  3. Engaging in mindfulness-based techniques to monitor sense of career purpose;
  4. Practicing the integration of scholarship with teaching and other career aspiration.
How Instructors can Excel with Excel (Teaching Workshop) 
Facilitator: Eileen Shifflett, College of Business
9:15-10:45 AM in Conference Room 8

This interactive workshop will show how Excel can be used to increase faculty efficiency in the administrative areas of their work. Wouldn't it be much simpler to allow Excel to clean up roster downloads from MyMadison, assign grades based on any grading scale, calculate grade distributions, and even adjust grades when you decide to do such things as dropping each student's lowest quiz score? Knowing how to use the functions that will do these things can save an instructor a significant amount of time and trouble!

Participants should bring their own laptops.

Click here for session materials.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Gaining more familiarity (and thus comfort) with Excel;
  2. Learning how to utilize the functions and shortcuts that will greatly reduce the time spent on administrative tasks.
Student Engagement via Active Learning: Simple Ways to Involve Students in the Learning Process for Greater Participation and Retention★ (Teaching Workshop)
Facilitator: Elizabeth Keene, School of Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication
9:15-10:45 AM in Conference Room 8
Participants will explore the need for increased student engagement with course material through active learning strategies, and ways to incorporate these types of activities into course design. The first portion of the session will help participants understand students’ need for active learning activities, while the second portion of the workshop will be devoted to exploring various strategies for involving student participation. Participants will be exposed to a variety of web-based technologies that can help facilitate active learning across contexts, regardless of the content or the number of students in the course. ★Participants are asked to bring their own computers or tablets for the web-based portion of the workshop.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Realizing the need for incorporating active learning strategies in the university classroom, regardless of the discipline;
  2. Understanding ways that technology can be used to create more active learning opportunities in a variety of classroom settings;
  3. Determining which strategies are most useful in achieving different student outcomes;
  4. Playing with various technologies to create more active learning experiences;
  5. Creating activities to engage students with material in real time through the use of simple technologies.
Enhancing Learning by Embracing Dissonance (Teaching  Workshop)
Facilitator: Steve Grande, Community Service-Learning
9:15-10:45 AM in Ballroom B
In our current climate of unrest and cultural misunderstanding, educational efforts that emphasize contradiction and indigenous knowledge have the potential to lead students to complex and systemic understanding of themselves and the world in which we live. These constructivist practices can create an overarching structure that enables students to acknowledge the ambiguity inherent in complex systems, hold contradictory thoughts regarding basic beliefs and values, and thereby deepen their comprehension and critical thought while respecting the integrity of the communities with which we work. This session will use a three-stage model to introduce activities that facilitate critical thought and engage dissonance.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Developing a greater understanding of constructivism and its role in classrooms;
  2. Developing a greater understanding of how engaging dissonance and embracing multiple, contradictory truths can assist students in developing greater complexity;
  3. Increasing their comfort with facilitating activities that enhance student’s ability to consider ambiguities and contradictory truths.
A Model for Teaching Large Classes: Facilitating a “Small Class Feel” (Teaching Workshop)
Facilitators: Eric Pappas, Integrated Science & Technology; Rosie Lynch, Research Sustainability
9:15-10:45 AM in Ballroom C
This workshop presents a model for teaching large classes that facilitates a "small class feel" to counteract the distance, anonymity, and formality that often characterize large lecture-style courses in higher education. One presenter has been teaching a 300-student general education Cluster One critical thinking course for ten years, and the other has assisted in the administration and instruction of said course for four years. This session presents a model that is more active, conversational, and characterized by stronger relationships between students and instructors than is typically found in large classes. Participants will work with the facilitators to determine how they might use some of these methodologies in their classes. Considerations include the role of TAs and graders, small group work, instructor presence, writing skills, student mentoring, grader education, large class discussion, among others.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Implementing instructional methodologies (especially critical thinking) to facilitate a "small class feel" and incentivize student participation;
  2. Analyzing their own administrative practices versus the model presented;
  3. Learning large class grading methodologies and class policies that increase student engagement;
  4. Analyzing and discussing their own classroom "persona" in light of workshop suggestions.
Madison as Mentor: Incorporating Madison’s Legacy (Teaching Workshop)
Facilitators: Michael Davis, School of Communication Studies; Lori Britt, School of Communication Studies; Meg Mulrooney, Department of History.
9:15-10:45 AM in Board of Visitor's Dining Room
James Madison is ever present across campus, but many of our students have not been asked to examine the impact that our namesake has upon the founding of our nation. This session will work with faculty members as we examine Madison’s Legacy and the ways the course content and assignments can be relate to around the writings and/or ideals espoused by Madison.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Examining ways that Madison’s Legacy can inform course design focusing both on course content and assignment development;
  2. Learning about the impact that Madison’s Legacy can have across a variety of disciplines and course structures.
Programs are listed in Chronological order
Use the buttons to the right to skip to other sessions
9:15-10:45 AM 1:45-3:15 PM 3:30-4:30 PM
Explore Your Community Engagement Roadmap with IIHHS (Academic Culture & Scholarship Roundtable)
Facilitators: Rhonda Zingraff and Pat Kennedy, both from Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services.
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Conference Room 2
Representing JMU's Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services, Pat Kennedy and Rhonda Zingraff explain how this "uncommon model" of long-lasting community engagement has grown into an extensive resource for networking. The power of connections between the campus and community to advance knowledge correlates with the accomplishments of those connections on behalf of community wellness. A Q&A on community engaged scholarship will offer practical ideas for professional development plans.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Gaining awareness of established community relationships open to collaboration;
  2. Discovering depth of community assessment data available to them;
  3. Determining overlap of teaching and scholarship interests with areas of JMU's professional practice in health and human services.
Making Headlines: Getting Your Scholarship in the News (Scholarship Roundtable)
Facilitator: Eric Gorton, University Advancement
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Conference Room 3
In Making Headlines, staff from University Communications will explain the types of scholarship that make the news, both national and local; efforts to place JMU scholarship in the news; and how media attention benefits faculty, their departments and the university as a whole. The session will draw on what journalists advise about pitching to them as well as examples of what has and has not worked at JMU. Testimonials from faculty who have worked with University Communications will be provided.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Gaining an understanding of the kinds of scholarship that resonate with the media as well as effective ways to frame it;
  2. Learning about the strategies and tools university communications uses to pitch scholarship news to the media and to gauge its effectiveness;
  3. Learning who to work with in university communications.
Learning Creative Confidence: The X-Labs Experience (Academic Culture & Teaching Roundtable)
Facilitator: Sean McCarthy, School of Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Allegheny Room
In the book Creative Confidence, Kelly and Kelly argue that "creativity is a muscle - it can be strengthened and nurtured through effort and experience" (p 27). Initial research conducted here at JMU suggests that design thinking can improve teamwork skills, problem solving, confidence and creativity, and ethical reasoning among our students. In this session, faculty who collaborate together on design-driven, interdisciplinary courses will share their insights into how best to inspire our students to be creative.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding design-driven inquiry;
  2. Considering potential applications of design thinking in their courses;
  3. Making clear pathways between course objectives and assessment of student learning.
Partnering With Procurement (Academic Culture Roundtable)
Facilitators: Caroline Dickens, Katie Weaver, & Michael Morrison; Procurement
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Conference Room 4
This roundtable is an introduction to the resources provided by the Department of Procurement Services. A general understanding of the purchasing process can make obtaining goods and services for you or your grant easier and will ensure compliance with university policy, grant guidelines, and state regulations.  Although Procurement staff often works with departmental staff and administration, faculty can also benefit from developing relationships with Procurement Services and understanding the types of support the office provides.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding the role, responsibilities, and resources of Procurement Services;
  2. Networking with staff from Procurement;
  3. Identifying current or future opportunities to work with Procurement Services.
Teaching in EPIC: What's In It for Faculty? (Teaching & Scholarship Roundtable)
Facilitators: Stephanie Stockwell, Integrated Science & Technology; Lori Britt, School of Communication Studies; Isaac Woo, School of Communication Studies; Jamie Calcagno-Roach, Libraries & Educational Technologies; Brian Charette, Strategic Planning and Engagement.
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Conference Room 8
This roundtable is designed for faculty interested in but not yet teaching in the EPIC classrooms, which are innovative learning spaces located in the Student Success Center. Four experienced EPIC faculty will share their strategies and struggles regarding teaching in the space. Faculty will consider pedagogical opportunities afforded by the space as well as scholarly benefits faculty themselves may reap. Participants then will be invited to ask questions about teaching in EPIC and talk with members of the EPIC Steering Committee about filling out the application for the space.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Considering the impact of space on pedagogy;
  2. Connecting with a network of faculty teaching and researching in and about technologically-rich spaces;
  3. Gaining awareness of the role of EPIC classrooms in JMU.
Open Conversations and Consultations (Cross-Area Roundtable)
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Highlands Room

Walk-in consults and discussions available to enhance teaching, scholarship, and career planning.

Feeding Forward: Reflections on Teaching. Reflect on lessons learned from spring 2017 teaching; brainstorm new ideas for fall 2017. Steve Harper; Department of Engineering, and CFI.

Interpreting Course Evaluations. Work with a consultant to interpret and make meaning of course evaluations. Emily Gravett; CFI, and Philosophy & Religion.

Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research. Discuss your own ideas and questions involving qualitative and mixed methods research with a consultant. Cara Meixner; CFI, and Graduate Psychology.

Fulbright 101. Consider ways to make a Fulbright Scholarship part of the career planning journey. Ed Brantmeier; CFI, and Learning Techonolgy and Leadership Education.

Annual Report Consultations. Talk about ways to create an annual report that effectively reports achievements. Andreas Brosheid; CFI, and Political Science.

Crafting Mentoring Networks. Think aloud with a consultant about creating networks to mutually nurture excellence and well-being for yourself and your peers. Michael Deaton; Integrated Science & Technology, and CFI.

Instructional Design Consultations: Meet with an Instructional Designer from LET Innovation Services to discuss your ideas and questions related to topics like developing digital assignments, designing your course using Canvas, and creating instruction to develop 21st century skills. Elaine Kaye; LET Innovation Services

Gen Ed and Beyond: Effective Practices for Large Classes (Teaching Roundtable)
Facilitator: Scott Paulson, Physics and Astronomy & CFI
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Ballroom B
Teaching large classes can provide unique challenges. At JMU there are dozens of general education courses each semester with enrollments of 175 students or more. This session will introduce techniques that can be used to address difficulties faced specifically in large enrollment classes. Participants will be invited to share and exchange their perspectives on large-class teaching.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Developing an informal network of colleagues facing similar challenges with large courses;
  2. Identifying effective practices that can be adopted in their courses. 
Teaching News Literacy and Information Literacy in the Age of "Fake News" and "Post Truth" (Teaching Roundtable)
Facilitator: Dolores Flamiano, School of Media Arts & Design; Hillary Ostermiller, Libraries and Educational Technologies
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Ballroom C
Teaching news literacy and information literacy in the age of "fake news" and "post truth" Teaching critical thinking about the news is more important than ever in the current media landscape, characterized by the rise and proliferation of highly partisan "news" sites and the spread of misinformation via social media. This roundtable will provide a forum for sharing news literacy strategies and tools. For example, media literacy professors and librarians will share guidelines and tips that will help students (young news consumers) to check the credibility of news information and sources.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Evaluating claims in terms of clarity, credibility, reliability, and accuracy;
  2. Demonstrating the ability to identify, analyze and generate claims, arguments, and positions;
  3. Identifying and evaluating theses and conclusions, stated and unstated assumptions, and supporting evidence and arguments.
Scholarship of Engagement: How JMU Faculty Are Turning Work in the Community into Research (Scholarship Roundtable)
Facilitator: Community Engagement Group
11:00 AM-12:00 PM in Board of Visitor's Dining Room
Scholarship of engagement is an important research trend for higher education and is unquestionably present on our campus, but do all faculty and administrators feel comfortable identifying and evaluating this sort of scholarship? This roundtable, presented by the Community Engagement Committee, seeks to share 3-5 examples of engaged scholarship – mainly in poster format – as well as short stories from the authors. After brief explanations of each scholar’s work, participants will be invited to share their own experiences with and ideas for producing scholarship of engagement in an effort to increase discussion at the faculty level about JMU’s engagement initiative and to continue to build networks of faculty interested in this sort of work.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Gaining awareness of new modes and categories of scholarship;
  2. Seeing examples of successful scholarship of engagement and hearing from the faculty responsible;
  3. Contributing to dialogue concerning the role and valuing of scholarship of engagement on this campus.
Programs are listed in Chronological order
Use the buttons to the right to skip to other sessions
9:15-10:45 AM 11:00 AM-12:00 PM  3:30-4:30 PM
Inclusive Excellence at JMU: Creating an Environment that Values and Supports All Learners (Plenary)
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Tasha Souza, Boise State University
12:15-1:30 PM in Ballroom A
This interactive plenary will offer participants the opportunity to enhance student learning by creating more inclusive classrooms and spaces. In particular, participants will be able to identify inclusive excellence strategies most relevant for their courses and contexts and explore common challenges to inclusive excellence. 

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Explaining inclusive excellence and why it matters;
  2. Considering specific strategies to create an inclusive learning environment;
  3. Reflecting upon one's own positionality & the role it may play in pedagogical/curricular choices;
  4. Identifying ways to mitigate microaggressions.
SESSION FULL --Using Low-Stakes Writing Activities to Enhance Learning and Critical Thinking (Teaching Workshop)
Facilitator: Lucy Malenke, Academic Development - The Learning Centers
1:45-3:15 PM in Conference Room 2
Are you interested in activities that will engage students with course material without increasing your grading load? Do large class sizes discourage you from using writing assignments? Would you like to improve your students’ communication and critical thinking skills? This workshop will demonstrate how to use low-stakes writing activities to enhance learning, critical thinking, and course engagement. Participants will learn specific activities that can be easily integrated into their courses to help students engage more deeply with readings, lectures, and other assignments. Bring a course’s syllabus, textbook(s), and lecture notes to this hands-on workshop.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Learning the pedagogical principles behind low-stakes writing assignments, as well as 15 specific types of low-stakes writing activities;
  2. Creating at least three low-stakes writing assignments tailored to their course(s).
Moving the Needle: Insights on Ethical Reasoning in the Classroom (Academic Culture, Scholarship & Teaching Workshop)
Facilitators: Daisy Breneman, Justice Studies; Bill Hawk, The Madison Collaborative; Kara Kavanagh, Education Programs; Kristi Lewis, Health Sciences; Kristen Smith, The Graduate School; Wayne Teel, Integrated Science & Technology.
1:45-3:15 PM in Conference Room 3
In August 2016, the Madison Collaborative for Ethical Reasoning and the Center for Assessment and Research Studies partnered with a group of faculty across a range of disciplines to develop effective teaching strategies designed to enhance students' ethical reasoning skills. During the Fall semester, faculty members piloted the strategies in six courses across four colleges, and researchers observed and analyzed the teaching practices using implementation fidelity research--that is, research that ensures faculty teach what they say they are going to teach.  This workshop brings together these faculty to discuss strategies for teaching ethical reasoning, summarize findings on the effectiveness of the strategies, and share insights from their experiences. Through this workshop, attendees will explore opportunities to apply ethical reasoning strategies and implementation fidelity research to their own teaching and scholarship.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding some of the principles and applications of implementation fidelity research;
  2. Developing specific strategies for implementing ethical reasoning into their classrooms;
  3. Identifying opportunities for collaborative teaching and research project around ethical reasoning.
Graphic Design 101 for Faculty (Scholarship Workshop)
Facilitator: David Hardy, School of Art & Art History
1:45-3:15 PM in Allegheny Room
Need to design and produce a poster, flyer, or graphic for an academic event or function? Don't dig into Word's clip art collection and guess your way through dozens of fonts. Participants will learn how to effectively produce well-designed communication pieces by following some "Design 101" rules.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Learning effective tools and techniques for basic graphic design application;
  2. Using limitations as a design challenge;
  3. Effectively communicating via print and digital output.
JMUke: Engaging the Community in Making and Learning (Teaching & Scholarship Workshop)
Facilitators:David Stringham, School of Music; Jesse C. Rathgeber, School of Music; Jon M. Stapleton and Sarah E. Wilson,graduate students, School of Music; Bridget A. Brown and Andrew S. Foote, undergraduate students, School of Music.
1:45-3:15 PM in Conference Room 8
At JMU and in the Harrisonburg community, most opportunities for individuals to make music are presentational in nature. While these may be meaningful experiences, the prevalence of presentational music may limit musical opportunities for the vast majority of the populace; this is reflected in recent research indicating that existing presentational music groups engage 10-20% of K-12 school populations in the U.S., and only 5% of American adults identify as participants in community presentational music making. JMUke, a project funded by a Faculty Senate Mini-Grant, engages undergraduate music students in using technologies and pedagogical approaches heretofore underrepresented in their education as they build ukuleles and plan participatory events at various locations in the community (e.g., Discover More Children’s Museum, JMU Libraries, Pale Fire Brewing). In this session, faculty members will be joined by students to (a) review relevant research literature related to presentational and participatory experiences; (b) engage participants in a truncated JMUke session; and (c) facilitate discussion of possibilities for integrating participatory and/or community-based experiences into existing courses.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Reviewing relevant research literature related to presentational and participatory experiences;
  2. Learning with students and other faculty in a truncated JMUke session;
  3. Considering possibilities for integrating participatory and/or community-based experiences into existing courses.
Facilitating Difficult Dialogues and Managing Hot Moments in the Classroom (Teaching Workshop)
Special guest facilitator: Dr. Tasha Souza, Boise State University
1:45-3:15 PM in Highlands Room
How can one transform a tense classroom discussion into a positive learning experience? This workshop will provide strategies for effectively facilitating difficult dialogue and managing hot moments in the classroom.  In addition to exploring what can be done prior to a difficult discussion so that it may be a productive one, we will explore effective strategies for facilitating difficult dialogues and responding to hot moments. Further, we will examine what can be done after a difficult dialogue to assess the outcomes of the experience.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Laying a foundation for productive classroom dialogue;
  2. Considering response strategies during hot moments;
  3. Applying the OTFD framework as a strategy for difficult dialogues and hot moments;
  4. Describing options that follow a difficult classroom dialogue.
Facts Matter: Helping Students (and Faculty) Identify and Analyze Sources (Teaching Workshop)
Facilitators: Michael Davis, School of Communication Studies; Heather Scheuerman, Department of Justice Studies
1:45-3:15 PM in Ballroom B
In an increasingly more complex world students (and faculty) often find it difficult to identify qualified and relevant sources in the cacophony of information available. This session will provide tips and activities for faculty members who want students to become critical consumers of knowledge and engage in thoughtful reflection. Special attention will be paid to evidentiary concerns across a variety of disciplines and course delivery methods.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding the integration of robust methods for source evaluation and analysis;
  2. Tailoring rubrics for source analysis and sample assignments for a variety of disciplines.
United We Serve:  A JMU Partnership to Enhance Grant Support for Faculty Scholarship (Scholarship Workshop)
Facilitators: Tamara Hatch, Research & Scholarship, Advancement; Debbie Perrone, Corporate and Foundation Relations
1:45-3:15 PM in Ballroom C
United We Serve reviews university resources for seeking both governmental and non-governmental external funding, including an overview of the partnership between the Offices of Sponsored Programs and Corporate & Foundation Relations (Advancement) for non-governmental grants.  As two sides of the same coin in pursuing non-governmental grants, these offices work together to ensure the greatest competitiveness and highest quality of proposals to a variety of private funders.  This session will cover external funding processes generally, while also clarifying the respective roles of these two offices in the case of private grants, and how and when to enlist their assistance. 

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding existing university resources in order to identify and apply for external funding that supports scholarly objectives;
  2. Differentiating between complementary services offered by OSP and CFR and their respective roles and responsibilities;
  3. Developing a realistic budget representative of the resources required to support the project;
  4. Learning to determine when it is appropriate to explore support from private foundations;
  5. Summarizing their interests and needs for financial support using key words or objectives to be shared with the two offices.
Essential Ingredients to Creating and Sustaining a Service-Learning Course (Teaching Workshop)
Facilitator: Steve Grande, Community Service-Learning
1:45-3:15 PM in Board of Visitor's Dining Room
Service-Learning is a powerful pedagogical approach that can enhance student motivation and foster critical thinking as students connect course content with community needs. While integrating Service-Learning into courses can add a rewarding component for faculty and your students, it also raises new questions and challenges. This session will present some of the key considerations for thoughtfully incorporating Service-Learning as a means to achieve learning outcomes. Opportunities to discuss approaches and explore reflection activities will also be provided.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Considering to what degree Service-Learning as a pedagogy relates to courses and learning outcomes;
  2. Identifying decisions and considerations necessary to thoughtfully integrate Service-Learning into a course;
  3. Developing strategies for structuring the Service-Learning experience.
Programs are listed in Chronological order
Use the buttons to the right to skip to other sessions
9:15-10:45 AM 11:00 AM-12:00 PM 

1:45-3:15 PM

The Experience of Being Mid-Career (Academic Culture & Career Planning Roundtable)
Facilitator: Liam Buckley, Sociology and Anthropology, & CFI
3:30-4:30 PM in Conference Room 2
This roundtable presents the results of recent CFI focus-group research into how faculty at JMU experience being mid-career.  The data suggest insights into how faculty conceptualize "mid-career," how they articulate the emotional experience of this career stage, and how they envisage post-tenure career planning.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Learning about current research into mid-career planning;
  2. Understanding the academic culture of "mid-career" at JMU;
  3. Being able to assess the qualities of their own mid-career experiences.
Studying Motivation Across the Disciplines (Scholarship Roundtable)
Facilitator: Laura Leduc, School of Management 
3:30-4:30 PM in Conference Room 3
Motivation is a topic that is studied in various domains: management, psychology, education, sports, etc. This roundtable is designed for researchers who study or are interested in studying motivation to come together and discuss current projects and interests. Participants should come prepared to talk briefly about a project that they are involved in, or interested in starting, that involves motivation. What motivational theory are you using? What’s interesting about your project? How are you collecting data? Please also feel free to bring any challenges that you might be struggling with regarding this research.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Building a community among researchers at JMU who all pursue a similar topic, but from different perspectives and disciplines;
  2. Developing new ideas for ways to make progress in their scholarship as it relates to the topic of motivation.
Lead Thoughtful and Enriching K-12 STEM Outreach (Teaching and Scholarship Roundtable)
Facilitators: Kerry Cresawn, Biology;Cindy Klevickis, Integrated Science & Technology; John Almarode, Early, Elementary & Reading Education; Kyle Gipson, Engineering; Anthony Tongen, Mathematics and Statistics, & CFI
3:30-4:30 PM in Allegheny Room
K-12 STEM education and outreach is an important, yet difficult task. It is extremely important for faculty members interested in this topic to learn from those who have come before. This roundtable will feature faculty members who have spent considerable time and energy working in K-12 STEM outreach.  This roundtable will also discuss ways to partner with JMU's Center for STEM Education and Outreach in your K-12 STEM outreach efforts.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding the process of quality K-12 STEM Education and Outreach;
  2. Discussing opportunities for professional development and partnerships through JMU’s Center for STEM Education and Outreach.
JMU and the Harrisonburg Community: Take the Lessons Outside the Classroom (Academic Culture & Teaching Roundtable)
Facilitator: Diana Galarreta, Foreign Languages & Literatures
3:30-4:30 PM in Conference Room 4
Discover efforts to engage students and the local community, with focus on one professor's example drawn from medical Spanish classes. Participants will learn about the use of online portfolios and guest visits from the community, which create spaces where students and the local community meet, collaborate, and engage. Focus will also be given to sharing from JMU faculty participants who are also interested in creating and fostering lessons outside of the classroom.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Sharing their ideas/projects about including a service element in their classes;
  2. Reflecting on the importance of creating partnerships between the JMU community and Harrisonburg;
  3. Discussing the difficulties of bringing the outside world to the classroom.
Exploring Open Access Scholarship and the Promotion and Tenure Process (Academic Culture, Teaching & Scholarship Roundtable)
Facilitators: Liz Thompson, Yasmeen Shorish, and Howard Carrier; Libraries and Educational Technologies
3:30-4:30 PM in Conference Room 8
The characteristics of open access publishing align with many of JMU's Core Qualities, yet many scholars default to using traditional publication methods. This session explores the value of open access scholarship within the process of faculty evaluations and promotion and tenure. Librarians will lead the conversation examining the current publishing environment and its impact on faculty scholarship decisions.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding the open access publication model;
  2. Examining how the values of open access align with JMU's Core Qualities;
  3. Identifying opportunities to clarify the value of open access publications in the T&P process.
Is It Real or Is It Fake? Teaching to Evaluate and Authenticate Visual Information
Facilitators: Elizabeth Pass & Mark Hawthorne; School of Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication 
3:30-4:30 PM in Highlands Room
As a culture, the majority of communication and information is visual. A hotly contested issue now is how to distinguish between authentic/factual and fake/distorted information. Teaching visual interpretation and evaluation has become essential. Therefore, educators need strategies to verify the authenticity of visual information. This session will highlight some strategies for teaching students how to evaluate and authenticate visual information and demonstrate/discuss techniques for implementing them in the classroom.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Understanding how to evaluation visual information;
  2. Learning strategies for authenticating visual information;
  3. Finding ways to use visual evaluation and authentication strategies in the classroom.
What’s Happening in Gen Ed? Lightning Talks (Teaching Roundtable)
Facilitator: Scott Paulson, Physics and Astronomy, & CFI
3:30-4:30 PM in Ballroom B
What's Happening in General Education courses? Come find out! This fast-paced roundtable offers participants the opportunity to listen to 5 or 6 "Lightning Talks" from faculty who teach General Education. Participants can then share a particularly interesting aspect of their GenEd course. Come learn something about a great assignment, topic, lesson plan, student outcomes, and more.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Exploring novel approaches that they can bring to their general education courses;
  2. Exploring how to reinforce Cluster 1 (or other cluster) learning outcomes in their classes.
Making Engagement Work: Benefits, Barriers and Strategies for Engaged Faculty (Academic Culture, Teaching & Scholarship Roundtable)
Facilitators: Jen Almjeld,School of Writing, Rhetoric, and Technical Communication; Kerry Cresawn, Biology; Christie Liu, Libraries & Educational Technologies, Jennifer PeeksMease, Communication Studies; Steve Grande, Community Service-Learning; and Iona Black, Chemistry
3:30-4:30 PM in Ballroom C
In Making Engagement Work, members of an interdisciplinary research group investigating the benefits and tensions surrounding faculty engagement work will share initial findings from their study. Participants will be invited to share their engaged teaching and scholarship, but also to generate strategies for overcoming barriers from both other participants and from the research team’s findings. This roundtable offers a space to network with other engagement scholars and to crowd source answers to specific engagement questions. Participants will also be directed to resources including engagement journals and conferences.

Participants will make progress toward these outcomes:

  1. Articulating benefits, barriers and strategies associated with engagement work;
  2. Gaining knowledge of the growing body of scholarship related to engagement work;
  3. Networking with others doing or interested in engaged teaching and/or the scholarship of engagement.
IMPACT3 Community Service Project in Rural West Virginia (Career Planning Roundtable)
Facilitators:2016-17 IMPACT3 Cohort 
3:30-4:30 PM in Board of Visitor's Dining Room
Community engagement is often a challenging process that involves changes in assumptions and new relational landscapes that can evolve over time. Through reflective processes, adult learners can gain powerful insights.The members of the 2016-2017 Impact3 cohort partnered with the Rural Appalachian Improvement League (RAIL) for a three-day community service trip to Mullens, WV.  As part of the experience, the cohort had direct interaction with the local community who benefit from RAIL. In addition to discussing the benefits of a community service project from a JMU employee perspective, the cohort will also discuss some of the lessons learned from the experience as well as how the experienced influenced their own professional development.

Participants will make progress towards these outcomes:

  1. Identifying the challenges related to planning/executing a community service trip;
  2. Examining how a community service trip can impact one's own professional development;
  3. Analyzing the impact of reflective practices on community service learning.
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