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Currently On Exhibit

 

Detail of Print

Unlocking Italy: A Legacy of Narratives

The exhibition consists of Italian art from the Etruscans and Romans through to modern painters and sculptures. It is designed to shape parallels between the narratives within the works and the viewer’s involvement through comparing the narrative relationships and the supportive use of ipads. This will allow people from all backgrounds to enjoy art on a relatable level rather than an intrusive one.  The ipads will help by allowing viewers to access more information on the works easily and more efficiently, if they so choose.  Overall, the idea is to create an environment that is comfortable and open to assist viewers to learn more about how to look at art. 

This exhibit was curated by Ms. Kathryn Harvey, a senior art history major.

Exhibit Dates: 10/17/11-11/11/11

Exhibit Opening: 10/19/11 4-6pm with gallery talk

Public Gallery Talk: 10/21/11 2-3pm with Dr. Kay Arthur

Exhibited Works

Juno Regina, Roman: Imperial Period, marble, 200 CE

“Psyche Gathering the Golden Wool” (after Raphael) from La Favola di Psiche, engraving, Agostino Musi Veneziano and the Master of the Die, Rome, 1530-1560

“Crucifixion” Pax Tablet, Italian master, brass, c. 1550-1650

“Lamentation,” North Italian or Bolognese school, oil on metal, c. 1575-1650

“The Creation of Eve, Temptation, and the Expulsion” (after Raphael) from the Vatican Loggia of Leo X, engraving, Francesco Villamena, Rome, c. 1600

“Maria del Sochorso,” Lombard or Emilian School, oil on canvas, c. 1650-1730

“Diana the Huntress,” (after Domenichino), Anonymous Italian Baroque artist, oil on canvas, c. 1675-1750

“Venus and Adonis,” (after Titian, or his brother Orazio Vecellio), engraving, Sir Robert Strange, Naples, 1762-79

“Virgin Galaktotrophousa, engraved copper plate, Gabriel of Skopelos, Mount Athos, 1871

“Louisa in the Outdoor Studio, Anticoli Corrado,” oil on canvas, William E. B. Starkweather, 1912 

“Portrait of Lorraine and Owen Voight as Children,” marble, Vincenzo Miserendino, 1925

"Keys to the City of Florence, Italy (replica)"Florence, 2009