A-to-Z Index

Mount Hebron Cemetery,

 Winchester

Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, gatehouse

Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, gatehouse

Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, detail

Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, detail

Mount Hebron Cemetery in Winchester was originally chartered in 1844 and by 1900 included the grounds of the Old Reformed Church (1741), the ruins of the Old Lutheran Church (1753), and the Stonewall Confederate Memorial Cemetery (1866).  The west gatehouse was designed by the New York architectural firm of Barney and Chapman, and completed in 1902.  Done in the style of a French chateau, the façade is an asymmetrical design containing a large square central tower, arched entryway, smaller round tower, and semicircular north chapel. Multiple window shapes and sizes, including tall, thin lancets in the main tower, suggest the castellated style. The roofing consists of hipped, dormer and conical forms.  

Gothic elements include pinnacles, ogee arches, and buttress-like carvings. The main gatehouse was once inhabited by the gatekeeper of the property. Significant monuments in the cemetery include Charles B. Rouss’ Neo-classical mausoleum, Judge John Handley’s Gothic Revival monument, the Stonewall Confederate monument, commemorating the numerous unknown Civil War soldiers laid to rest there, and the McCormack family plot, whose entrance arch is decorated with Gothic style corbel heads. There is a Gothic Revival style cast-iron fence with an elaborate gate now located at the east end of the cemetery.

Andrea Morgan