This list is not official and is subject to change. Classes may be canceled or added prior to the beginning of the semester. Check MyMadison for the most accurate information.

This list does not reflect whether a class is open or closed for enrollment. Check MyMadison for the most accurate enrollment information.

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Honors General Education

Cluster 1: Skills for the 21st Century

Finish by end of freshman year.

Human Communication (C1HC)

SCOM 123H - Fundamental Human Communication: Group Presentations (3 credits)
Class #: 73781   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Tim Ball   |   MoWe 4:00-5:15 PM   |   Engineering/Geosciences 1302
Class #: 75100   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Lori Britt   |   MoWe 4:00-5:15 PM   |   Engineering/Geosciences 1302
Class #: 75897   |   Section: 0003   |   Instructor: Gretchen Hazard   |   MoWe 4:00-5:15 PM   |   Engineering/Geosciences 1302
Class #: 75898   |   Section: 0004   |   Instructor: Christina Saindon   |   MoWe 4:00-5:15 PM   |   Engineering/Geosciences 1302
Class #: 75899   |   Section: 0005   |   Instructor: Gretchen Hazard   |   TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM   |   Engineering/Geosciences 1302
Class #: 75900   |   Section: 0006   |   Instructor: Christina Saindon   |   TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM   |   Engineering/Geosciences 1302
Class #: 75901   |   Section: 0007   |   Instructor: Michael Clay   |   TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM   |   Engineering/Geosciences 1302
Class #: 75911   |   Section: 0008   |   Instructor: Jacob Wrasse   |   TuTh 3:30-4:45 PM   |   Engineering/Geosciences 1302 

Study of human communication as a process. Overview of the principles and practices of communication in small group and public communication contexts. Emphasis on examining the role of self-concept, perception, culture, verbal and nonverbal dimensions in the communication process, using power and managing conflict, applying critical listening, practicing audience analysis, and constructing informative and persuasive presentations. Public speaking required.

Cluster 2: Arts & Humanities

N/A

Cluster 3: The Natural World

Quantitative Reasoning (C3T1G1)

MATH 220H - Elementary Statistics (3 credits)
Class #: 71543   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Tracy Sprolden   |   MoWeFr 2:30-3:20 PM   |   Burruss Hall 0032, 0030

Descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, sampling, estimation and testing of hypotheses, regression, correlation and an introduction to statistical analysis using computers.

Physical Principles (C3T1G2)

PHYS 140H – College Physics I (3 Credits)
Class #: 75786   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Bradley Newcomer   |   MoWeFr 9:05-9:55 AM   |   HBS 4041

The first semester of a non-calculus sequence in general physics. Topics include principles of mechanics, thermal properties of matter, wave motion and sound. A working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is required.

Natural Systems (C3T1G3)

BIO 140H – Foundations of Biology I (4 Credits)
Class #: 76117   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Elizabeth Doyle   |  MoWeFr 1:25-2:15 PM   |   Bioscience 1007
Class #: 76118   |   Section: 1001-Lab   |   Instructor: Oliver Hyman   |   Tu 12:40-3:30 PM   |   Bioscience 1023

*Must enroll in both lecture and lab
The foundations of the cellular molecules, structures, and processes that sustain life in the contexts of evolution will be explored. Topics will include structure and function; information flow, storage and exchange; pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and systems biology. The lab experience will allow students to participate in science as it is practiced and will prepare students to be scientifically and quantitatively literate.

Cluster 4: Social and Cultural Processes

The American Experience (C4AE)

POSC 225H - U.S. Government (4 credits)
Class #: 73349   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Andreas Broscheid   |   MoWe 2:30-3:45 PM, MoWe 4:00-5:15 PM   |   Miller Hall 2110

4:00-5:15 PM meets periodically. An examination of institutions, processes and intellectual concepts which structure American political activity. The interaction of the political system with the changing American society and America's changing role in world affairs are also treated. The course provides an introduction to quantitative methodology.

Cluster 5: Individuals in the Human Community

Wellness Domain (C5W)

HTH 100H - Personal Wellness (3 credits)
Class #: 73609   |   Section: 0201   |   Instructor: David Wenos   |   MoWeFr 10:10-11:50 AM   |   Miller Hall 2116

Emphasizes lifestyle behaviors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention. General areas affecting health status are identified. Suggestions are made as to how health-related behaviors, self-care and individual decisions contribute to health and influence dimensions of wellness.

Sociocultural Domain (C5SD)

PSYC 101H – General Psychology (3 Credits)
Class #: 75948   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Jessica Irons   |   MoWe 2:30-3:45 PM   |   Miller Hall 1107

A study of the nervous system, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, language, intelligence, motivation, emotion, life span development, personality, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social psychology and the scientific method. 

HON 100: Honors First Year Seminar

This course is restricted to first-semester Track I Honors students.

HON 100 is a one-credit hour, credit/no credit course that meets once each week. Each section of the course is taught by two upper-level Honors students. HON 100 introduces incoming Track I students to the Honors College and to JMU. Students learn about the goals, expectations, and programs offered through Honors; are introduced to a wide range of resources available at JMU; and get to know their fellow Honors students.

HON 100 is required for all incoming Track I Honors freshmen. Students can choose the section that best fits their schedule.

Class #: 73167   |   Section: 0001   |   Mo 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73169   |   Section: 0002   |   Mo 12:20-1:10 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73171   |   Section: 0003   |   Mo 1:25-2:15 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73173   |   Section: 0004   |   Mo 2:30-3:20 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73175   |   Section: 0005   |   Mo 3:35-4:25 PM   |   Duke 1041
Class #: 73161   |   Section: 0006   |   Tu 9:30-10:20 AM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73163   |   Section: 0007   |   Tu 12:30-1:20 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 75153   |   Section: 0008   |   Tu 2:00-2:50 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73165   |   Section: 0009   |   Tu 3:30-4:20 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73166   |   Section: 0010   |   Tu 5:00-5:50 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73168   |   Section: 0011   |   We 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73170   |   Section: 0012   |   We 12:20-1:10 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73172   |   Section: 0013   |   We 1:25-2:15 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73174   |   Section: 0014   |   We 2:30-3:20 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 75154   |   Section: 0015   |   We 3:35-4:25 PM   |   Duke 1041
Class #: 73162   |   Section: 0016   |   Th 9:30-10:20 AM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 73164   |   Section: 0017   |   Th 12:30-1:20 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 75155   |   Section: 0018   |   Th 2:00-2:50 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 75156   |   Section: 0019   |   Th 3:30-4:20 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 75157   |   Section: 0020   |   Th 5:00-5:50 PM   |   Duke 2040
Class #: 76750   |   Section: 0021   |   Mo 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Hillcrest House
Class #: 76751   |   Section: 0022   |   We 10:10-11:00 AM   |   Hillcrest House
Class #: 76752   |   Section: 0023   |   Tu 9:30-10:20 AM   |   Hillcrest House
Class #: 76753   |   Section: 0024   |   Th 9:30-10:20 AM   |   Hillcrest House

Honors Seminars

Honors seminars are recommended for sophomores and above but are open to second semester freshmen.

HON 200 - Biology in the Movies (3 credits)
Class #: 74924   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Christopher Rose (Biology)   |   TuTh 9:30-11:30 AM   |   EnGeo 1210

Advances in genetics and development biology allow scientists to manipulate genes, cells, and embryos in ways that increasingly challenge traditional concepts of human identity and could permanently alter the structure of human society. At the same time, media bombard the public with science-based entertainment that is timely, engaging, and at some level credible to an increasingly savvy and demanding audience. This course explores the intersection of these trends by addressing how popular culture presents science in movies and the potential costs of its misrepresentation. Topics include human cloning, genetic engineering, origin and evolution of humans, and artificial and extraterrestrial intelligence.

HON 300 - JMU Undergraduate Research Journal (3 credits)
Class #: 73032   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Kevin Robert Jefferson (WRTC) & Kurt E. Schick (WRTC)   |   TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM   |   SSC 4041

Students who enroll in JMURJ courses serve on the James Madison Undergraduate Research Journal Editorial Board and collaborate to promote, publish, and share undergraduate scholarship from all JMU disciplines. Board members will work within and across teams as they develop particular sets of skills: Marketing/Outreach editors network with university stakeholders, develop publicity initiatives, and create funding opportunities; Design editors use the Adobe Creative Suite and other software platforms to design layouts and art for publication in online and print formats; Editing editors correspond with student authors, coordinate the efforts of the JMURJ Faculty Review Board, and comprehensively edit text- and media-based submissions from disciplines across the university. Visit the JMURJ website for more information and letter of interest instructions.

*Area of Emphasis Flag: Global Studies, Leadership, Service

HON 300 – From Habermas to Hamilton (3 Credits)
Class #: 76351   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Jody Fagan (Libraries and Educational Technology)   |   TuTh: 2:00-3:15 PM   |   SSC 4047

With Hamilton, Lin-Manuel Miranda transformed Ron Chernow’s 735-page scholarly biography into a hit musical that is influencing popular conversations across America. Amidst the maelstrom of fake news and “alternative facts,” how can enlightened citizens bring research-based knowledge into public discourse, especially in the context of social media? How have scholars traditionally disseminated knowledge, and how can you translate their work for use in new media platforms? This course is grounded in the fields of critical theory, scholarly communication, communication studies, computer-mediated communication, writing and rhetoric, and library and information science. Students will engage with theories that underpin rhetorical participation within public spheres (e.g., Habermas), learn about web technologies supporting information diffusion, gain practical experience writing for social media platforms, think about how to advance research and scholarship in these domains, and increase scholarly research skills. Students will increase their confidence and ability to meaningfully influence the world through writing in the areas of their chosen academic discipline and interests.

HON 300 – Geometry, Democracy and the Foundations of Western Culture (3 Credits)
Class #: 76354   |   Section: 0003   |   Instructor: Edwin O’Shea (Mathematics and Statistics)   |   MWF 11:15-12:05 PM   |   Burrus 0036

Euclid's Elements is the cornerstone text of mathematics and is considered as being only second to the Bible in its influence on western thought. Indeed, it was considered part of the bedrock of every liberal arts education into the nineteenth century, more than two millennia after its writing. This honors seminar will provide a hands-on introduction to the Euclidean geometry while incorporating the humanities perspective. Connections across the undergraduate curriculum will be made, including star turns by the ancient works of Plato and Aristotle, the classical writings of Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, and the modern soapbox that is the bumper sticker, all testifying to the singular potency of the axiomatic method. 

HON 300 – Cilmate Change and Humanities (3 Credits)
Class #: 76355   |   Section: 0004   |   Instructor: Katey Castellano (English)   |   MW 2:30-3:35 PM   |   SSC 4041

This course examines climate change from the perspectives of the academic humanities and artist-activists. We begin with a discussion of the science of climate change and the concept of the anthropocene, which both confront us with the fact that humans have already irrevocably altered the climate and ecology of our planet. Climate change and the problems that accompany it, such as species extinction, higher temperatures, and rising sea levels, are difficult to represent because their causes span long periods of time and the effects are global. Moreover, the effects of climate change are unevenly distributed with poorer countries bearing the burden of climate change that is caused by the carbon emissions of wealthier countries. This course will consider how the humanities—literature, philosophy, history, visual culture, and religion—can conceptualize and critique the cultures of climate change. Throughout the course we will experiment with the way the humanities can mobilize the environmental and moral imagination in order to analyze the crisis of global climate change and gesture towards modes of intervention. 

*Area of Emphasis Flag: Global Studies 

HON 300 – Spirituality in Ancient Mediterranean (3 Credits)
Class #: 76356   |   Section: 0006   |   Instructor: Kathryn Stevens (Madison Art Collection)   |   MW 8:40-9:55 AM   |   EnGeo 2207

This Honors Seminar will explore the art and architecture created within the religious and philosophical traditions of Egypt, Greece, and Rome.  Students will read and discuss core texts such as the Pyramid Texts, the Coffin Texts, and the Egyptian Book of the Dead from ancient Egypt; the Homeric Hymns, Hesiod’s Theogony, Plato’s Republic from ancient Greece; and Virgil’s Eclogues, The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, and the Orations of Emperor Julian from ancient Rome to understand the contexts of artworks, architectural structures, and gardens.  Contemplative practices will be incorporated into the classroom, especially where appropriate to the use of a work of art that serves as a meditative focus.  Student assessment will be based upon class participation and discussion, a reflective journal, a research paper, and engaged learning activities. Students will carry out first-hand study and writing on original works of art in the Madison Art Collection in class and in a visit to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. 

HON 300 – Stories That Heal (3 Credits)
Class #: 76357   |   Section: 0008   |   Instructor: Lucy Malenke (Learning Centers)   |   MWF 12:20-1:10PM   |   SSC 4042

Do you have a passion for helping people? Do you plan to enter a “helping profession,” such as nursing, social work, speech language pathology, occupational therapy, public health, medicine, counseling, coaching, or ministry? This service-learning course will help you develop narrative competence, which is the “ability to acknowledge, absorb, interpret, and act on the stories and plights of others” (Dr. Rita Charon). In addition to completing 15 hours of community service, you will also explore (through reading, writing, and discussion) the ways that story-telling can promote healing and human connection. This is a MWF class, but it will not meet most Fridays of the semester in order to accommodate the service requirement. 

*Area of Emphasis Flag: Service & Civic Engagement

HON 300 - Teaching Honors for TAs (1 credit)
Class #: 73858   |   Section: 0009   |   Instructors: Jared Diener & Philip Frana (Honors)   |   Fr 10:10-11:25 AM   |   Keezell 0310

Teaching assistants are selected by application in the spring semester.

HON 300 – Practicum Seminar in Undergrad Research Journal (1, 2, or 3 Credits)
Class #: 73982, 73983, 74285   |   Section: 0071, 0072, 0073   |   Instructor: Kevin Jefferson (WRTC) & Kurt Schick (WRTC) | TuTh 2:00-3:15 PM  | SSC 4041

Students who enroll in JMURJ courses serve on the James Madison Undergraduate Research Journal Editorial Board and collaborate to promote, publish, and share undergraduate scholarship from all JMU disciplines. Board members will work within and across teams as they develop particular sets of skills: Marketing/Outreach editors network with university stakeholders, develop publicity initiatives, and create funding opportunities; Design editors use the Adobe Creative Suite and other software platforms to design layouts and art for publication in online and print formats; Editing editors correspond with student authors, coordinate the efforts of the JMURJ Faculty Review Board, and comprehensively edit text- and media-based submissions from disciplines across the university. Visit the JMURJ website for more information and letter of interest instructions.

HON 300 - Teaching Assistant for HON 100 (1 credit)
Class #: Various   |   Sections: 0080-0099   |   Instructors: Jared Diener & Philip Frana (Honors)   |   Various times   |   Various rooms

Teaching assistants are selected by application in the spring semester.

HON 321 – Gender & Leadership (3 Credits)
Class #: 73887   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Amelia Underwood   |   W 4:40-7:10 PM   |   Moody 0020

This course examines the unique challenges, constraints, and opportunities that face men and women today as they ascend to leadership positions in organizations. Topics include: theoretical perspectives on how the concepts of gender and leadership are constructed; gender and leadership in the workplace; the media, the political sphere and the global community; and strategies to facilitate equity. This course is experiential and will require students to reflect on past and present challenges, as well as future opportunities as they develop their own personal leadership style.

*Area of Emphasis Flag: Leadership

HON 321 – Leadership I: Exploring Leadership (3 Credits)
Class #: 73888   |   Section: 0002   |   Instructor: Brian Charette, Jonathan Alger   |   Tu 3:00-5:00PM   |   SSC 4043

This course provides basic concepts of leadership and the essential skills required to become an effective leader. The course includes the study of leadership as well as the application of leadership theories, concepts, and skills. The student will be provided the opportunity for personal development through exercises in communication and leadership effectiveness. Objectives of the course are to understand leadership, know your own style and have a plan for developing your leadership. This course will examine what we know about the leadership practices that lead to effective team and organizational performance.

*Area of Emphasis Flag: Leadership

HON 331 – Introduction to Global Studies (3 Credits)
Class #: 73886   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructors: Jason Good & Delores Blough (Center for Global Engagement)   |   Tu 4:00-6:30 PM   |   Madison Hall 2001B

Through this course, students will examine how people study and have perceived similarities, differences, and interdependencies among human societies. The course is interdisciplinary and incorporates the arts, social sciences, humanities, health, education, environmental and developmental studies, and more, all within an integrative, global framework. Materials and guest speakers will encourage discussions, introduce and engage students in new concepts, and promote critical thinking through current issues and case studies related global studies in order to become better global citizens.

*Area of Emphasis Flag: Global Studies

HON 351 – Service & Civic Engagement I (3 Credits)
Class #: 73891   |   Section 0001   |   Instructor: Philip Frana (Honors)   |   Tu 3:30-5:30 PM   |   Duke 2039

Engaged citizens make differences in the quality of life in local, national, and global communities. Upon studying a wide spectrum of contemporary issues, engaged citizens take action. This seminar provides opportunities for students to combine their intellectual pursuits with civic engagement and discourse, thereby empowering them to become engaged participants in tomorrow's global society.

*Area of Emphasis Flag: Service

IND 200 – Interdisciplinary Scholarship: Introduction to the Independent Scholars Major (3 Credits)
Class #: 74060   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Staff   |   TBA   |   Hillcrest Conference Room

* Restricted to Independent Scholars majors.
IND 200 is designed to introduce students to the Independent Scholars major, and to the concepts of interdisciplinary study. Students will explore interdisciplinary research in a range of contemporary areas of study, including scientific, environmental, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students will also gain familiarity with the possibilities for individualized study at JMU. Successful completion of the course will involve the development of proposals for individualized curricula. 

IND 300 – Independent Scholars Workshop (1 Credit)
Class #: 75125   |   Section: 0001   |   Instructor: Staff   |   TBA   |   Hillcrest Conference Room

* Restricted to Independent Scholars majors.
IND 300 is a one-credit workshop course designed to provide students in the Independent Scholars major (ISM) with methodological competencies linked to major learning objectives across their curriculum, including independent research methods, preparing presentations, data visualization, research methods, working with teams, and enhancing intellectual creativity.

Other Courses

ISAT 203H - Viral Discovery (2 credits)
Class #: 74550   |   Section: 0001-lab   |   Instructor: Louise Temple-Rosebrook   |   TuTh 9:00-10:40 AM   |   ISAT/CS 0340
Class #: 76464   |   Section: 0002-lab   |   
Instructor: Louise Temple-Rosebrook   |   TuTh 11:00 AM - 12:40 PM  |   ISAT/CS 0340

An exploratory laboratory experience, designed for incoming freshmen. Students will learn about the life cycle and ecology of viruses infecting bacteria. Soil samples will be collected, and techniques for isolation and purification of the viruses will be performed by the students. Isolated viruses will be visualized using electron microscopy. The genomic material will be isolated and prepared for nucleic acid sequencing.

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