Learning, Technology and Leadership Education

 

Mission
The mission of the James Madison University professional education unit is to prepare caring, knowledgeable, skilled and reflective educators who believe that all students can learn and succeed. Our candidates and faculty are committed to lifelong learning and aspire to meet educational needs in a changing, pluralistic and democratic society. The personal and professional development of candidates is accomplished by emphasizing excellence and continuous innovation in quality undergraduate, graduate and professional programs.

 

James Madison University's College of Education is distinguished through faculty and candidate achievements, academic rigor, excellence in teaching, candidate and faculty interactions and relationships, technological innovations, and national recognitions. The college maintains relevance through active and growing interactions with other colleges within the university and with local, state, regional, national and international communities.

 

The college is committed to providing:

 

  • graduate programs that emphasize advanced knowledge in a specialty area and the development of effective leadership and professional skills for addressing the needs of a changing society.
  • continuing professional development and service programs in cooperation with public and private schools and agencies, other colleges, institutions, and businesses.
  • The undergraduate and graduate teacher education programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and approved by the Virginia State Board of Education.

 

The basic philosophy of the college is reflected in the following goals:

 

  • To educate men and women for the multiple professions included in the college at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, not merely by transmitting skills and knowledge but by stimulating creativity, developing cognitive abilities, and encouraging the testing of hypotheses and reinterpretation of the human experience.
  • To encourage a balanced faculty orientation toward teaching, research, scholarship, community service and professionalism that recognizes individual strengths and preferences of the college's faculty.
  • To create an environment that fosters an atmosphere of open communication among candidates, faculty members and community.
  • To anticipate societal needs and provide necessary resources for implementing effective on- and off-campus programs now and in the future.

 

Programs of Study
Learning, Technology and Leadership Education offers these programs:

 

  • Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed) in Adult Education/Human Resource Development with six possible concentrations
  • Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Education with a concentration in Educational Leadership
  • Certificate in Educational Leadership
  • Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Education with a concentration in Educational Technology
  • Certificates in Educational Technology, Educational Technology Leadership and eLearning
  • Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Education with a concentration in Equity and Cultural Diversity
  • Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) with a concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

 

Adult Education/Human Resource Development

 

M.S.Ed in Adult Education/Human Resource Development

 

Admission Criteria

 

  • An online application submitted at: http://www.jmu.edu/grad/prospective.
  • Official transcripts reflecting all post-secondary education, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 or higher. Applicants can have electronic copies of transcripts sent via eSCRIP-SAFE.
  • An official record of scores on the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (scores must be less than five years old). Applicants should use JMU's designated code of 5392 to send electronic test scores.

 

The following must be submitted when submitting the online application:

 

  • A two to three page personal statement explaining why the applicant is interested in pursuing a Master's in AHRD.
  • Two letters of recommendation from employers or educators who can attest to the applicant's potential for graduate-level course work.
  • A copy of the applicant's current resume.

 

The Master of Science in Education degree with a major in adult education/human resource development is designed for persons entering or advancing in positions associated with learning in education, business, industry, government, and other public and private sector organizations. The program is targeted to college graduates pursuing a career in the AHRD field, experienced AHRD professionals who want to expand their skills and enhance their career potential, and working managers and professionals in leadership roles where skills in developing and leading people have become critical to their organizations' success. A major strength of the program is that it allows individuals to tailor their programs to individual career needs and objectives.

 

Program Mission and Outcomes
The mission of the AHRD program is to prepare professionals to lead, design, implement and evaluate learning programs within education, business, industry, government, military, health care, and other public and private sector organizations. In addition to delivering effective instruction, AHRD professionals design ways to improve human performance, facilitate change and enhance creativity.

 

By completing our program, graduates will be able to:

 

  • Understand and apply systems theory, analytic systems, principles of adult development, learning theory, and leadership theory.
  • Understand business, industry, educational and other organizational settings.
  • Identify, understand and build effective organizational relationships that support teaching, learning and continuous human performance improvement appropriate to the context.
  • Organize, manage and evaluate teaching, learning, and continuous human performance improvement efforts.
  • Analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate targeted curriculum in appropriate modes (including distance, action, self-directed, transformative, informal learning, etc.) for individual, team, and organizational applications with a focus on continuous human performance improvement.
  • Facilitate and lead team-based learning activities appropriate to the context.
  • Apply appropriate technologies in the creation of learning programs.
  • Recognize and respond responsibly to issues of diversity and ethics.
  • Demonstrate the ability to articulate and forecast the vision and role for teaching, learning and continuous human performance improvement appropriate to a context.
  • Interpret and conduct research.

 

Learners majoring in adult education/human resource development must follow several fundamental guidelines:

 

  • Consult major and concentration advisers for advice and approval regarding the program.
  • Plan to count no more than six credit hours of workshop credit in any degree program. To be accepted, workshop courses must be approved for credit in the program. The program will not accept workshop courses offered by departments outside the College of Education for elective credit.
  • Adhere to The Graduate School policy that at least half of the courses in any major of concentration be at the 600 level.
  • Secure the required approval of major and concentration advisers for any course credits to be transferred into a JMU degree program.

 

Degree Requirements
The major consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours of course work. These credits include core program courses, electives, and either a research project or a thesis. Students electing the thesis option will take one fewer elective course as thesis credits total 6 hours.

 

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Master of Science in Education in Adult Education/ Human Resource Development

 

Degree Requirements

 

Degree Requirements Credit Hours
Program courses 30-33
Research Paper or Thesis 3-6

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Core Courses
The core requirements consist of foundational courses that are the basis for the understanding of adult education/ human resource development. These core courses encourage learners to investigate adult education/human resource development and to appreciate all facets of this dynamic field.

 

Minimum Requirements Credit Hours
AHRD 520. Foundations of Adult Education/Human Resource Development
or EDUC 641. Learning Theories and Instructional Models
3
AHRD 540. Leadership and Facilitation 3
AHRD 580. Learning in Adulthood 3
AHRD 600. Performance Analysis and Needs Assessment in Adult Education/
Human Resource Development
3
AHRD 630. Research Methods and Inquiry in Adult Education/
Human Resource Development
3
AHRD 640. Program Evaluation and Measurement in Adult Education/
Human Resource Development
3
LTLE 570. Design and Development of Digital Media 3
LTLE 610. Principles of Instructional Design 3

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Concentrations
In addition to the core courses, students will choose electives appropriate to their interests. These electives when combined with the core courses may form a concentration. These additional courses may be taken in the AHRD program or in another area related to the students' interests. These additional courses should complement the learner's studies in adult education/human resource development and support his/her professional goals.

 

Concentration areas for adult education/human resource development include the following defined areas of study: leadership and facilitation, instructional design, human resource management, higher education, individualized and AHRD program evaluation and measurement. Details for each defined concentration are listed below. A learner, in conjunction with his or her adviser, can also define a concentration in another area of study such as public administration, counseling psychology, secondary education or any content area that is complementary with the learner's professional objectives. Concentrations should be decided in conjunction with the learner's adviser.

 

Concentration in AHRD Program Evaluation and Measurement
This concentration is designed to provide learners with in-depth exposure to and practice of effective evaluation and measurement methods and practices related to various AHRD programs in organizations.

 

Minimum Requirements
Select a minimum of six hours from the electives listed below:

 

AHRD 550. Human Resource Work Experience

AHRD 620. Consulting AHRD

AHRD 690. Special Studies in AHRD

ISAT 620. Research Methods in a Multidisciplinary Environment

LTLE 695. Applied Research

PSYC 600. Introduction to Measurement and Statistics

PSYC 605. Research and Inferential Statistics

PSYC 606. Advanced Measurement Theory

PSYC 608. Multivariate Statistical Methods in Psychology

PUAD 606. Program Evaluation in Public Administration

 

Concentration in Higher Education
The concentration in higher education is designed to prepare learners who have experience and/or in-depth preparation in an academic area to provide instruction for undergraduate learners and adapt to other aspects of the undergraduate teaching environment in institutions of higher education.

 

Minimum Requirements

Select a minimum of six hours from the electives listed below.

 

AHRD 670. American Higher Education

AHRD 671. Teaching and Learning Processes in Higher Education

AHRD 673. The Community College

AHRD 690. Special Studies in AHRD
ADSU 640. The Fundamentals of Educational Administration
ADSU 642. Leadership for School-Community Relations
ADSU/LEAD 741. Leading Educational Organizations
EDUC 642. Curriculum Theory and Issues
PUAD 561. Education and Social Policy

 

Concentration in Human Resource Management
This concentration is designed to acquaint learners with business and industry and practices related to the management of human resources.

 

Minimum Requirements
Select a minimum of six hours from the electives listed below.

 

AHRD 550. Human Resource Work Experience

AHRD 570. Diversity & Ethics in AHRD

AHRD 620. Consulting in AHRD

AHRD 635. Organization and Administration of Adult Education Human Resource Development

AHRD 690. Special Studies in Adult Education/Human Resource Development

LTLE 695. Applied Research

MBA 600. Organizational Behavior

MBA 650. Managing Human Resources/Personnel Administration

MBA 651. Labor Relations

PUAD 625. Public Organizational Behavior

PUAD 626. Strategic Planning and Management

 

Concentration in Instructional Design
This concentration is designed to equip learners with skills to design and implement learning strategies using principles of adult learning and instructional design together with technology applications in adult education/human resource development settings.

 

Minimum Requirements
Select a minimum of six hours from the electives listed below.

 

AHRD 550. Human Resource Work Experience

AHRD 620. Consulting in AHRD

AHRD 690. Special Studies in AHRD

LTLE 565. Educational Technology Management

LTLE 580. Developing and Critiquing Visual Literacy

LTLE 625. Advanced Video & Audio Production

LTLE 645. Games, Simulations and Virtual Worlds for Learning

LTLE 650. eLearning Design

LTLE 655. Implementation and Evaluation of eLearning

LTLE 695. Applied Research

WRTC 521. Web Design

WRTC 565. DIgital Rhetoric

WRTC 655. Electronic Graphic Design

 

Concentration in Leadership and Facilitation
This concentration is designed for learners who wish to combine leadership, facilitation and creativity with an approved adult education/human resource development program.

 

Minimum Requirements
Select a minimum of six hours from the electives listed below.

 

ADSU 642. Leadership for School – Community Relations

ADSU/LEAD 741. Leading Educational Organizations

AHRD 550. Workshop in Adult Education/Human Resource Development

AHRD 560. Facilitating in Adult Education/Human Resource Development

AHRD 620. Consulting in AHRD

AHRD 660. Facilitating Experiential and Action Learning

AHRD 690. Special Studies in Adult Education/Human Resource Development

LTLE 695. Applied Research

PUAD 663. Philanthropy and Resource Development

PUAD 650. Management of Nongovernmental Organizations

 

Individualized Concentration
For minimum requirements, see the adviser.

 

Qualifying Examination
At the end the second semester in which the learner is enrolled in this program, he/she will participate in a qualifying examination to be conducted by the program faculty. This examination will cover content knowledge covered in the first two semesters of the program.

 

Comprehensive Examinations
During the final semester in which the learner is enrolled in this program, he/she will participate in both oral and written comprehensive examinations to be conducted by the learner's advisory committee. These examinations will cover key concepts, principles, theories and practices covered in the core courses. The comprehensive examination committee consists of at least two full-time AHRD faculty members and/or faculty of courses taken by the student.

 

Electronic Portfolio
During the final semester in which the learner is enrolled in this program, he/she will submit an electronic portfolio of all core course assignments to the program faculty. Evaluation of the learner's portfolio will be conducted by the learner's adviser and thesis/reading and research chair.

 

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Educational Leadership

 

M.Ed in Educational Leadership

 

Admission Criteria
All criteria are considered when reviewing the candidates for admission to the Master of Education degree program. However, no one criterion will be the sole reason for lack of admission to the program. Criteria include the following:

 

  • GRE scores at the 25th percentile or higher for both verbal and quantitative sections (candidates for the certificate program who already possess a master's degree in a related field from an accredited institution are exempt from the GRE requirement). Undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 or higher.
  • Baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college/university.
  • Professional resume.
  • Hold or have held a valid teaching license or provide documentation of professional employment in the field.
  • A two- to three-page written statement (double spaced) describing the applicant's professional background, the educational issues the applicant would like to address in the master's program and the applicant's long-term professional goals.
  • Three years of full-time teaching (or equivalent) experience in a school setting.
  • Recommendations from school personnel (administrative and instructional) familiar with the candidate's teaching performance and leadership potential.
  • Faculty interview session results (to assess conceptual and oral performance).
  • Writing samples provided by the candidate in response to questions administered by program faculty (to assess organizational and writing performance).

 

Candidates may be required to complete several other tasks and activities which are designed to assess leadership ability and other skills and competencies as a part of the admissions, retention and program completion processes.

 

The masters degree and certificate programs in educational leadership are designed for practicing school personnel who aspire to be educational leaders.

 

Program Mission and Outcomes
The master's degree in education with a concentration in educational leadership is designed to prepare candidates to assume leadership positions in both schools and district offices. The organizing theme for the program is the school/district administrator's central role as the interpreter, facilitator and initiator of educational change leading to effective schools for all children. The program focuses upon the principal within the context of the school community of students, parents, teachers, support staff, and administration and, the district supervisor within the community of schools. It recognizes the constant state of mutual influence, which exists among schools and the organizations and culture of broader society.

 

The educational leader must understand and interpret changes within this context that affect the mission and operation of schools. For example, as an interpreter of change, the administrator must be able to discern the meaning of modifications in financial support, school law, governmental policy and educational research, and communicate these changes to the staff and community. In the role of facilitator, the administrator must be able to effectively implement programs mandated by the school board, as well as nurture and support positive changes suggested by students, staff or parents. Finally, as the initiator of change, the administrator must provide leadership for the process of continuous school improvement.

 

The program is accredited by NCATE and the Commonwealth of Virginia and is national recognized by the Educational Leadership Constituent Consortium (ELCC).

 

Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by:

 

  • developing, articulating, implementing, stewarding and promoting community involvement in a vision of learning for a school and school district (ELCC 1.1-1.5)
  • communicating effectively orally and in writing (1.2)
  • promoting a positive school culture (2.1-2.4)
  • providing an effective instructional program based upon best practices (2.2-3)
  • designing comprehensive professional growth plans (2.4)
  • managing the organization and its operations and resources to promote a safe, efficient and effective learning environment (3.1-3.3)
  • using the available technologies for providing and managing instruction and resources (2.2, 3.1-3.3)
  • collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources (4.1-4.3)
  • acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner (5.1-5.3)
  • understanding, responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context (6.1-6.3)

 

Candidates should have substantial, sustained, standards-based internship experiences in real settings, which are planned and guided cooperatively by the institution and the school district (7.1-7.6).

 

Completion Requirements
All candidates must pass a comprehensive examination and submit a portfolio before completing the concentration. The comprehensive examination is designed to assess attainment of the desired instructional outcomes of the concentration. Some offerings require prerequisites for enrollment. These requirements enable a systematic and developmental approach to preparing school administrators. The concentration is fully aligned with the standards mandated by the Virginia Department of education.

 

Program Description
The program includes 36-39 graduate credit hours and is divided into three interlocking components: professional core courses, a set of key leadership courses, and a practicum or internship experience.

 

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Master's Degree in Education with a Concentration in Educational Leadership

 

Degree Requirements

 

Degree Requirements Credit Hours
Professional Core 15
EDUC 620. Changing Contexts of American Schools 3
EDUC 625. Evaluation in Education 3
EDUC 630. Inquiry in Education 3
EDUC 641. Learning Theory and Instructional Models 3
EDUC 642. Curriculum Theory and Issues 3
Leadership Concentration 18-21
ADSU 540. Technology for Administrators(may be waived with acquisition of
Technology Skills notation on the teaching certificate)
3
ADSU 640. Foundations of School Administration 3
ADSU 641. School Law 3
ADSU 642. Leadership for School-Community Relations 3
ADSU 643. The Principalship 3
ADSU 644. Supervision and Development of School Personnel 3
ADSU 652. School Finance and Business Management 3
Practicum and Internship Experiences 3
ADSU 668. Internship in the Principalship 3
or ADSU 678. Full-time Internship for School Administrators 3

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Successful completion of the Administrative Technology Portfolio may be substituted for ADSU 540.

 

Licensure Requirements
A candidate who has the appropriate teaching license, who completes the aforementioned program and who achieves a passing score on the School Leader's Licensure Examination is eligible for endorsement in PreK-12 administration and supervision in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

 

Certificate in Educational Leadership
Candidates who already have a master's degree and seek to add the Virginia Endorsement as a school administrator to a teaching certificate, may apply through the JMU Outreach and Engagement for the Educational Leadership certificate. Additionally, candidates must secure a passing score on the SLLA, Virginia's administrative licensure examination, to gain the administrative licensure from the DOE.

 

Required Courses
EDUC 641. Learning Theories
ADSU 540. Technology for Administrators (may be waived with DOE state mandated acquisition of technology skills as noted on the Teaching Certificate)
ADSU 640. Foundations of Administration
ADSU 641. School Law
ADSU 642. Leadership for School and Community Relations
ADSU 643. The Principalship
ADSU 644. Supervision and Development of School Personnel
ADSU 652. School Business Management and Finance
ADSU 668. Internship for Principals
or ADSU 678. Full-time Internship for School Administrators

 

Refer to the JMU Outreach and Engagement website for additional information.

 

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Educational Technology

 

M.Ed. in Educational Technology

 

The Master of Education degree (M.Ed.) with a concentration in educational technology serves students who work in, or who intend to pursue careers in K12, higher education, business, industry, government and consulting. The program provides candidates with opportunities to explore and research emerging technologies for learning. Candidates in the program will discover effective ways to integrate these technologies in their chosen professional settings. Graduates will possess a broad and deep understanding of the practice of educational design and technology.

 

Admission Criteria
All criteria are considered when reviewing the candidates for admission to the Master of Education with concentration in Educational Technology degree program. However, no one criterion will be the sole reason for lack of admission to the program. Students should meet the following criteria to be considered for admission:

 

  • GRE scores at the 25th percentile or higher for both verbal and quantitative sections.
  • Undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 or higher.
  • Baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college/university.
  • Professional resume.
  • Two letters of reference.
  • Work experience.
  • A two- to three-page written statement (double spaced) describing the applicant's professional background, the educational issues that the applicant would like to address in the master's program and the applicant's long-term professional goals.
  • Works samples – 2 or 3 examples of how the applicant is now using technology (these will be requested by the program director when the application is complete).

 

Outcomes
Candidates will demonstrate the knowledge, skills and dispositions to:

 

  • design conditions for learning by applying principles of instructional systems design, message design, instructional strategies and learner characteristics.
  • develop instructional materials and experiences using print, audiovisual, computer-based and integrated technologies.
  • plan, organize, coordinate and supervise instructional technology by applying principles of project, resource, delivery system and information management.
  • evaluate the adequacy of instruction and learning by applying principles of problem analysis, criterion-referenced measurement, formative and summative evaluation, and long-range planning.

 

Degree Requirements
To complete a Master of Education degree with a concentration in educational technology, the candidate will complete a minimum of 36 hours of course work to include a professional core, educational technology core and advanced areas of study. In addition, candidates must successfully complete key assessments throughout the program. Full-time students will take a minimum of two years, mostly likely five semesters, to complete the program. Part-time students will be able to map a personal plan for completion within six years of acceptance or first course transferred into the program, as applicable.

 

Master of Education with a Concentration in Educational Technology Degree Requirements

 

Degree Requirements Credit Hours
Professional Core 12
EDUC 630. Inquiry in Education  
EDUC 641. Learning Theory and Instructional Models  
EDUC 642. Curriculum Theory and Issues  
LTLE 610. Principles of Instructional Design  
Educational Technology Core 12
LTLE 560. Foundation of Education Technology  
LTLE 565. Educational Technology Management  
LTLE 570. Design and Development of Digital Media  
LTLE 580. Developing and Critiquing Visual Literacy  
Educational Technology Advanced Courses (Choose three courses) 9
LTLE 611. User Interface Design  
LTLE 622. Professional Design in Educational Technology  
LTLE 625. Advanced Video and Audio Production  
LTLE 631. Data Visualization  
LTLE 645. Games Sims and Visual Worlds for Learning  
LTLE 650. ELearning Design  
LTLE 655. Implementation and Evaluation of eLearning  
Final Project 3
LTLE 695. Applied Research  

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Certificates in Educational Technology
Candidates who do not desire a master's degree may enter one of the certificate programs. Certificate areas are Educational Technology, Educational Technology Leadership and eLearning.

 

Certificate Programs

 

Educational Technology (12 hrs)

EDUC 641. Learning Theory and Instructional Models (3)

LTLE 610. Principles of Instructional Design (3)

LTLE 560. Foundations of Educational Technology (3)

LTLE 570. Design and Dev of Digital Media (3)

 

Educational Technology Leadership (12 hrs)

LTLE 560. Foundations of Educational Technology (3)

LTLE 565. Educational Technology Management (3)

LTLE 570. Design and Dev of Digital Media (3)

LTLE 622. Professional Development in Educational Technology (3)

 

eLearning (12/15 hrs)

EDUC 641. Learning Theory and Instructional Models (3)

LTLE 570. Design and Dev of Digital Media (3)

LTLE 610. Principles of Instructional Design (3)

LTLE 650. eLearning Design (3)

LTLE 655. Implementation and Evaluation of eLearning (3)

 

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Course Offerings

 

School Administration

 

ADSU 640. The Fundamentals of Educational Administration.

3 credits.

Examines the fundamental principles and concepts of organizational theory, structure and climate. There is an emphasis on the administrative processes and professional ethics of leadership, motivation, decision making, communication, organizational change and strategic planning. The course offers opportunities to apply theory to professional practice through the use of case studies.

 

ADSU 641. School Law.

3 credits.

Acquaints teachers and prospective school administrators with the laws governing public education and the legal responsibilities and powers of state and local governing bodies and individuals. Emphasis is given to federal and Virginia statutes and case law affecting due process, liability, equal protection, and the rights of teachers and students.

 

ADSU 642. Leadership for School-Community Relations.

3 credits.

The influence of the social and political structures and conditions on school leadership, personnel, programs and activities is explored. Strategies for interacting and cooperating with parents, community leaders, businesses and organizations for support in the effective attainment of school objectives and the educational goals of the community are emphasized.

 

ADSU 643. The Principalship.

3 credits.

Emphasis will be on instructional leadership and effective school management that promote positive student achievement, a safe and secure environment, and the efficient use of resources. Curriculum planning, scheduling, school improvement planning, assessment of student progress, school change, and program evaluation will be key topics covered by this course.

 

ADSU 644. Supervision and Development of School Personnel.

3 credits.
Concepts and approaches for planning and implementing activities for effective human resource management are explored. Theories and practices related to recruitment, development and appraisal of personnel are covered. Evaluation of personnel for the purpose of meeting school objectives and for professional development receives emphasis.

 

ADSU 652. School Finance and Business Management.

3 credits.

This course emphasizes the history and principles of public school financing and the roles of federal, state and local governments and agencies in financing public education. Taxation for school purposes, the economics of education, equity and disparity issues, budgetary concerns, strategic planning, and procedures for school-site management are included.

 

ADSU 658. Practicum in School Administration.

3 credits.

The practicum provides administrative field experience in a school setting. Students spend a minimum of 75 hours during the semester working under the guidance of a practicing school administrator and university supervisor. Other course requirements include seminars and the completion of an administrative project. Course graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 15 credits and permission of instructor.

 

ADSU 668. Internship for Principals.

3 credits.

Students spend a minimum of 200 hours over six months working under the supervision of a practicing school administrator and a university professor. The student should experience the full range of duties, problems and issues encountered by a school administrator, and receive developmental and evaluative feedback. Course graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: Completion of 30 credits in the Educational Leadership Program or permission of adviser.

 

ADSU 678. Full-time Internship for School Administrators.

3 credits.

Candidates spend a minimum 90 full-time days working under the working under the supervision of a practicing school administrator and a university professor. The candidate should experience the full range of duties, problems and issues encountered by an administrator and receive developmental and evaluative feedback. Course graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: Attainment of a full-time administrative position and permission of adviser.

 

ADSU 680. Readings and Research.

1-3 credits.
This course provides opportunities for directed readings and research in areas of special interest. Reading and research may be done only in the major field of study. Prerequisites: Written permission of the adviser and program coordinator.

 

ADSU/LEAD 730. Advanced Learning Theories and Instructional Models.

3 credits.

This course focuses on the design, delivery, assessment and supervision of instruction in schools, across schools, throughout the school division and in the community. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 

ADSU/LEAD 735. Advanced Curriculum Theory and Instructional Issues.

3 credits.

This course focuses on the determination, development, implementation, assessment and revision of curriculum and its relationship to the design, delivery, assessment and supervision of instruction in schools, across schools, throughout the school division and in the community. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 

ADSU/LEAD 741. Leading Educational Organizations.

6 credits.

Analyze, apply study of ethics, values and leadership concepts. Apply four ethical paradigms of justice, care, critique and profession. Integrate and apply knowledge of educational laws, personnel supervision and education finance. Analyze change theory as related to cognitive and social processes and apply to school and organizational change. Analyze the impact of personnel motivation, work performance and evaluation on school culture. Evaluate sociopolitical influences on leadership in schools. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 

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Adult Education/Human Resource Development

 

AHRD 520. Foundations of Adult Education/Human Resource Development.

3 credits.
Historical beginnings of adult education and human resource development programs are examined in order to understand current practices. Current issues and trends, research, legislation and publications will be incorporated into the course.

 

AHRD 540. Leadership and Facilitation.

3 credits.
This course examines the multi-faceted concept of leadership and facilitation, focusing on facilitative leadership approaches and how these contribute to organizational and individual performance. Traditional and emergent paradigms will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge, attitudes and skills that enable a facilitator to work effectively with diverse work groups, enhance creativity and draw from organizational and community resources.

 

AHRD 550. Human Resource Work Experience

This independent study course provides on the job experience in a human resources department or setting. Students gain experience in all phases of human resource development, including needs assessment, research, instructional design, materials and workshop development, facilitation, and evaluation. 

 

AHRD 560. Facilitating in Adult Education/Human Resource Development.

3 credits.

This course equips students to participate in and facilitate groups in organizational settings. Students examine theories and tools for developing and supporting effective learning groups and will practice facilitation skills. The course will address group dynamics, clarification of group task/agenda, meeting goals and use of the self as a facilitating instrument.

 

AHRD 570. Diversity and Ethics in AHRD.

3 credits.

This course focuses on two of the critical areas, diversity and ethics, in AHRD. It examines and explores theories and techniques for dealing with institutional "isms" (e.g., multiculturalism, sexism, ageism and professionalism, etc.), as they relate to managing training, conflict resolution, career development, mentoring, performance improvement, team building and peer rating methods. Prerequisite: AHRD 520.

 

AHRD 580. Learning in Adulthood.

3 credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of learning in adulthood. Emphasis is placed on learning contexts, what and why adults learn, the nature of learning, learning theories, adult development and the development of adult learning theory. Ways and means to enhance learning opportunities in the lives of adults at work, school, worship, in leisure and for better health are explored.

 

AHRD 600. Performance Analysis and Needs Assessment in Adult Education/Human Resource Development.

3 credits.

Focuses on knowledge and skills basic to organization, process, and task analyses, including approaches and steps in identifying root causes of performance problems. Current performance analysis practices in AHRD will be discussed. Methods and techniques in developing specific instruments for performance improvement data collection and data analysis will also be covered. Prerequisite: AHRD 520.

 

AHRD 620. Consulting in AHRD.

3 credits.

This course focuses on models, techniques and practices of consulting skills in developing programs for learners as individuals, groups and organizations. Emphasis is placed on performance analysis, needs assessment, instructional design processes, approaches and practices, implementation procedures and evaluation approaches to various learning settings and clients. Prerequisite: AHRD 520, AHRD 560, AHRD 580, AHRD 600, LTLE 530, or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

 

AHRD 630. Research and Inquiry in Adult Education/Human Resource Development.

3 credits.

This course provides students with knowledge and skills in research and inquiry. This course will focus on different qualitative and quantitative research methods, research designs, approaches to doing literature reviews and analyses, and determining the size and scope of research projects. Data collection instruments and analyses approaches will also be covered. Prerequisite: AHRD 520 or students in the stage of conducting R&R projects.

 

AHRD 635. Organization and Administration of Adult Education/Human Resource Development Programs.

3 credits.

This course examines current and proposed legislation, program development and organizational structures found in adult education and human resource development. Emphasis is placed on changing existing structures to lifelong learner-driven structures.

 

AHRD 640. Program Evaluation and Measurement in Adult Education/Human Resource Development.

3 credits.

Focuses on theories and practices in evaluation and measurement of AHRD programs from the perspective of impact on organizations, work processes, and individuals, as well as follow-up decisions. Methods and processes in developing specific instruments for program evaluation data collection and data analysis will also be discussed. Prerequisite: AHRD 520.

 

AHRD 660. Facilitating Experiential and Action Learning.

3 credits.

This course examines the historical roots of action learning, organizational learning, various experiential and action methodologies; and a thorough description of action learning including what it is, key elements, when it works, organizational applications, and how it benefits the organization. Prerequisites: AHRD 540 or permission of the instructor.

 

AHRD 670. American Higher Education.

3 credits.

The objective and organization of prevalent types of institutions are studied. Current issues and problems in American higher education are explored.

 

AHRD 671. Teaching and Learning Processes in Higher Education.

3 credits.

Instructional practices and themes are studied in relationship to programs in higher education.

 

AHRD 673. The Community College.

3 credits.

The history, functions and personnel of the comprehensive community college in the American system of higher education are studied. Current issues facing the community college are explored.

 

AHRD 680. Reading and Research.

3-6 credits.

Designed to provide the opportunity for supervised reading and research in a special interest area of adult education/human resource development. Prerequisite: Approval from major adviser and completion of a basic research course.

 

AHRD 690. Special Studies in Adult Education/Human Resource Development.

3 credits.

Designed to provide learners the opportunity to explore topics of special interest that are more limited than the traditional three credit course. Prerequisite: Approval of major adviser.

 

AHRD 695. Portfolio.

The portfolio is a non-credit capstone course to demonstrate individual learning processes throughout the AHRD program. Students will construct their portfolios based on their professional and academic goals and experiences, from work completed in graduate courses. The portfolio will assist students, as professionals or advanced students, prove their expertise and academic preparation in the job market or in academia, and contribute to their comprehensive exam experience, allowing for reflection on the program and individual learning. Prerequisites: All core courses and/or concurrent with Reading and Research or Thesis Research.

 

AHRD 698. Comprehensive Continuance.

1 credit.

Continued preparation in anticipation of the comprehensive examination. Course may be repeated as needed.

 

AHRD 699. Thesis Continuance.

2 credits.

Continued study, research and writing in the areas of thesis concentration. Course may be repeated as needed.

 

AHRD 700. Thesis Research.

3-6 credits.

Continued study, research and writing in the areas of thesis concentration. Course may be repeated as needed. This course is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory/ incomplete (S/U/I) basis. Prerequisites: EDUC 630 and approval of graduate adviser.

 

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Education

 

EDUC 620. Changing Contexts of American Schools.

3 credits.

This course focuses on the nature of educational change in American schooling. Emphasis will be placed upon contemporary issues facing education, their historical and philosophical roots and the implementation of educational change.

 

EDUC 625. Evaluation in Education.

3 credits.

The course is designed to help practicing educators improve their development and use of assessment tools and techniques. Attention will also be given to analyzing and interpreting assessment results and investigating newer developments in the evaluation of learning and instructional programs. Prerequisite: An instructional methods course.

 

EDUC 630. Inquiry in Education.

3 credits.

Develop skills, insights and understandings which will enable the student to become an intelligent and critical consumer of educational inquiry and a productive participant in the inquiry process. Prerequisites: Appropriate technology skills or EDUC 505.

 

EDUC 641. Learning Theory and Instructional Models.

3 credits.

This course focuses on the diverse nature of learners, the processes of learning and development, the role of the teacher, the design and delivery of instruction and the processes and strategies of teaching.

 

EDUC 642. Curriculum Theory and Issues.

3 credits.

The study of curriculum theories and issues that lead to a comprehensive understanding of the purposes and functions of schools in a democratic society.

 

EDUC 682. Professional Development, Partnership and Advocacy.

1 credit

Introduction of professional development offered by associations, professional organizations and higher education. Strategies for building partnerships with colleagues, families and communities are practiced. Advocacy for students' linguistic, academic and personal development is addressed. Students discuss public issues affecting the education of majority and minority students and develop the skills to support students and their families socially and politically. Prerequisite: Student teaching/internship.

 

For a full listing of EDUC courses, see the Early, Elementary and Reading Education section.

 

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Learning, Technology and Leadership Education

 

LTLE 560. Foundations of Educational Technology.

3 credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide you with a critical framework with which to assess the impact of technology on education. We will be examining the meaning of technology, discourses that construct technology, and a variety of different social issues related to the use of educational technologies.

 

LTLE 565. Educational Technology Management.

3 credits.

This course will focus on how to organize and provide leadership in educational technology programs. It is designed to provide a foundation for understanding educational technology management, including short and long range planning, project and resource management, and evaluation.

 

LTLE 570. Design and Development of Digital Media.

3 credits.

The foundational skills course introduces the processes for the design, development, and distribution of digital media elements. Concepts introduced include technical terminology; file management; computer-based learning, distance learning, and blended learning; the use of collaborative tools for learning; and practical applications in K12 and business. This course provides skills for future digital media development.

 

LTLE 580. Developing and Critiquing Visual Literacy.

3 credits.

This course will cultivate the ability to evaluate and create conceptual visual representations. Students will practice the necessary critical attitude, principles, tools and feedback to develop their own high-quality graphics for learning and performance. Topics also include the impact of visual literacy on the learning process related to instructional design, instructional technology, and information presentation.

 

LTLE 610. Principles of Instructional Design.

3 credits.

Examines the overarching process of instructional design as it relates to the design, development, and implementation of technology-based instruction. Instructional design models will be compared and contrasted, and students will be challenged to develop their own model that is appropriate for the given workplace. Includes discussions on design methodologies, principles, and instructional strategies.

 

LTLE 611. User Interface Design.

3 credits.

This course will explore the concepts of mental models and user-centered designs; visual design including but not limited to color, consistency, and iconic representation; layout, navigation and flow; affordances and constraints; principles of user interface design and universal design; cognitive load; and designing for transfer of learning. Students will practice communicating with stakeholders and target users to make iterative design changes and will apply appropriate methods and tools for usability testing, analysis and reporting.

 

LTLE 622. Professional Development in Educational Technology.

3 credits.

This course will focus on instructional models, strategies and assessment of professional development activities among instructional leaders of educational settings. Professional development is the bridge between where prospective and experienced educators are now and where they will need to be in order to meet new challenges in their profession. System-wide planning including relevant content, strategies, and organizational supports for educational technology will be emphasized.

 

LTLE 625. Advanced Video and Audio Production.

3 credits.

This advanced course will address the pre-production, production and post-production process of making educational videos. The content is framed by discussions of critical media literacy and the integration of video into modern learning environments for training and school applications. Students will develop technical skills and hone artistic expression using message and design techniques, and will learn how video is used for research. This is a "hands on" course where students will develop graded products, both individually and as part of a crew.

 

LTLE 631. Data Visualization.

3 credits.

Detailed study of different data visualization schema and techniques used to support instruction in a variety of areas. Discussion of best practices in the design of data visualization and use of appropriate tools including image processing and geographic information systems. Survey and analysis of the research base supporting the use of these tools in instruction.

 

LTLE 645. Games, Simulations and Virtual Worlds for Learning.

3 credits.

This course explores modeling and simulation and their application in designing, developing and implementing games and virtual worlds for instruction. The goal of this course is to connect the theory of cognition and user interaction and apply them to develop engaging, effective instructional experiences in simulated environments. Includes survey of appropriate formative and summative assessment schemes and discussion of socio-cultural implications of constructing or deconstructing reality in learning environments.

 

LTLE 650. eLearning Design.

3 credits.

This upper level course will address the theories, principles, instructional strategies and software applications used to create instructionally sound eLearning programs. The course content includes instructional design methodologies appropriate to the creation of eLearning programs, as well as the selection and utilization of media elements that support and enhance the learning process. Students will develop skills in instructional analysis, instructional design, problem solving, project management, consulting and teamwork while working with a variety of software applications to build a cohesive eLearning program. This applied course will require students to develop projects individually and as part of a design team. Prerequisites: EDUC 641, LTLE 610 and LTLE 570.

 

LTLE 655. Evaluation of eLearning.

3 credits.

This advanced course will address the practice of eLearning implementation and the processes and tools used to evaluate its effectiveness. Prerequisite: LTLE 650.

 

LTLE 695. Applied Research.

3 credits.

This course represents a "clinical" or "action research" approach to project development in which students identify problems then systemically design, develop, and pilot an intervention. Prerequisites: Approval of graduate adviser.

 

 

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