Graduate Psychology

Application Dates
Refer to individual programs for application requirements. Programs may require a criminal history check as part of the final admissions process.

Counseling: College Student Personnel Administration
The application date for the fall semester is March 1. All application forms and supporting materials are due at this time. The program begins reviewing applications February 1 and will give preference to applications received by that date.

Counseling: Clinical Mental Health and School Counseling
The application date for the fall semester is January 15. The program will give preference to applications received by that date. The committee conducts screening interviews in late February and early March.

Counseling: Counseling and Supervision Doctoral Program
The application date for the fall semester is January 15. The program will give preference to applications received by that date. The committee conducts screening interviews in late February and early March.

Psychological Sciences
The application date for the fall semester is January 20. All application forms and supporting materials are due at this time. The program begins reviewing completed applications in February.

School Psychology
The application date for the fall semester is February 15. The program will give preference to applications received by that date. The committee conducts screening interviews during March.

Mission
Our mission is to transform students into outstanding practitioners and scholars of psychology and counseling. We work to create a community that celebrates diversity and creativity, and that values learning, scholarship and service to others.

Overview
James Madison University offers seven graduate masters-level programs designed for individuals who want to pursue advanced training in psychology and counseling. These programs share the goals of academic enrichment, refinement of research skills, development of applied skills, and personal and professional growth.

Programs

Counseling Programs
The Graduate Psychology Department offers M.Ed. and M.A./Ed.S. degrees in counseling with three available concentrations:

The department also offers a Ph.D. degree in Counseling and Supervision.

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Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program

Dr. Renee Staton, Program Director

Admission Requirements
Minimum admissions requirements for entry to the clinical mental health counseling program include the following:

Mission
As members of the clinical mental health counseling program of James Madison University, we have formed our own special community of faculty, staff and students. We vary in abilities, age, class, gender, ethnicity, race, religion, sexual orientation and place of birth, but we share a common vision of achieving a vitally important mission – transforming students into successful community counselors.
Our alumni are dedicated to providing competent, caring and ethical services to diverse clients in public agencies, community programs and private practices.

Putting our principles into practice, we strive to create a caring community in which we can thrive personally and grow professionally. While many of our graduates work in rural communities in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley or among the mountains of West Virginia, many more have moved on to serve in other communities throughout the mid-Atlantic region and across the nation. We invite our students to embark on a life-long journey of exploring new possibilities, refining their skills and staying fresh throughout their careers. We encourage them to support one another in the formidable task of facilitating the change process in individuals, couples, families, groups, and communities as licensed professional counselors. Finally, we challenge our graduates to advance the clinical mental health counseling profession through service, research, innovation, advocacy and training.

The program requires the completion of a minimum of 60 credit hours.

The Master of Arts degree is awarded only after completion of all educational specialist degree requirements. This program provides the academic and applied training necessary for individuals seeking employment as counselors in clinical mental health agencies, psychiatric facilities or private practice.

The community counseling program, which was offered until fall 2010, is approved by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs, an affiliate of the American Counseling Association. During the upcoming accreditation process JMU will seek accreditation of the clinical mental health counseling program. The JMU transcript endorses students as graduates of an accredited program and as being eligible to take the National Board for Certified Counselors examination leading to recognition as a National Certified Counselor. Students also take all courses required for licensure as professional counselors in the Commonwealth of Virginia. A comprehensive examination including oral, written and applied components is required prior to internship.

Clinical Mental Health Educational Specialist Degree Requirements

Minimum Requirements Credit Hours
PSYC 600. Introduction to Measurement and Statistics 3
PSYC 607. Assessment Procedures in Counseling 3
PSYC 614. Advanced Developmental Psychology 3
PSYC 630. Clinical Mental Health Counseling 3
PSYC 660. Counseling Theories 3
PSYC 661. Counseling Techniques 3
PSYC 663. Substance Abuse Counseling 3
PSYC 664. Counseling Process 3
PSYC 665. Group Counseling 3
PSYC 668. Couple and Family Systems 3
PSYC 669. Career Development 3
PSYC 685. Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Intervention Planning 3
PSYC 695. Practicum in Counseling 3
PSYC 710. Counseling Strategies 3
PSYC 749. Multicultural Perspectives of Intervention 3
PSYC 760. Supervision and Consultation for Counselors 3
PSYC 790. Internship 6
Research Project/Thesis 3
Choose one of the following:  
PSYC 800. Educational Specialist Research Project 1  
PSYC 700. Thesis Research  
(Note: Thesis option requires an additional 3 credit hours)  
Elective course (adviser approval required) 3

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1 Only three credit hours of PSYC 800 may be used to satisfy program requirements for the educational specialist degree. If the research project is not completed after three credit hours, then the student must continuously enroll (each semester including summer) in PSYC 799 until the project is completed.

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College Student Personnel Administration Program

Dr. Joshua Bacon, Program Co-Director
Ms. Donna Harper, Program Co-Director

Admission Requirements
Minimum admissions requirements for entry to the college student personnel administration program include the following:

Mission
The mission of the college student personnel administration program is to prepare students to be educated and enlightened professionals who will lead productive and meaningful careers and to advance the profession of student personnel administration.

The Master of Education degree in college student personnel administration is designed to provide professional preparation for college, university and community college administrative positions. Preparation for college student personnel careers involves participation in learning experiences designed to provide an understanding of the college student, counseling theories, various collegiate subcultures and the nature of higher education as an institution in the United States. The program's link with counseling psychology provides opportunities for personal growth and the development of interpersonal relationship skills.

College Student Personnel Administration Master of Education Degree Requirements

Minimum Requirements Credit Hours
AHRD 670. American Higher Education 3
PSYC 600. Introduction to Measurement and Statistics 3
PSYC 645. Student Personnel Services 3
PSYC 646. The American College Student 3
PSYC 649. Multiculturalism, Diversity and Difference: Theory Research and 3
Practice in Student Affairs  
PSYC 650. Organization and Administration of Student Services 3
PSYC 651. Supervision and Consultation Processes in Student Personnel 3
PSYC 660. Counseling Theories 3
PSYC 661. Counseling Techniques 3
PSYC 665. Group Counseling 3
PSYC 695. Field Practicum in Student Personnel Administration 3
PSYC 669. Career Development 3

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College Student Personnel Certificate Program
This professional development program accepts students who have earned a master's degree in a discipline other than higher education/student personnel services. Students admitted to the program are required to complete four courses. Upon completion of four higher education/student personnel courses (chosen in concert with an adviser), a student will receive a certificate of completion.

Students must complete four courses (12 credit hours) from the list of existing courses:

PSYC 645. Student Personnel Services
PSYC 646. The American College Student
PSYC 649. Multiculturalism, Diversity and Difference: Theory, Research and Practice in Student Affairs
PSYC 650. Organization and Administration of Student Services
PSYC 661. Counseling Techniques
AHRD 670. American Higher Education

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School Counseling Program

Dr. Renee Staton, Program Director

Admission Requirements
Minimum admission requirements for entry to the school counseling program include the following:

Mission
The school counseling program of James Madison University is a learning community of faculty, staff and students who vary in abilities, age, class, gender, ethnicity, race, religion and sexual orientation. Coming together from a variety of geographic areas, we share a common vision of achieving a vitally important mission – training students to become successful school counselors.

Our alumni are dedicated to providing competent, caring and ethical services to diverse students in public and private schools. Putting our principles of school counseling into practice, we strive to create an academic community in which our students can thrive personally and grow professionally. While many of our graduates play vital roles in schools along Virginia's Shenandoah Valley or among the mountains of West Virginia, many more have moved on to serve in rural, suburban and urban schools throughout the mid-Atlantic region and across the nation. We invite our students to embark on a life-long journey of exploring new possibilities, refining their skills and staying fresh throughout their careers. We encourage them to support one another in the formidable task of making a difference in students' lives by meeting their emotional, social, educational and career development needs as licensed or certified school counselors. Finally, we challenge our graduates to advance the school counseling profession through service, research, innovation, advocacy and training.

The school counseling program prepares students to be school counselors in elementary, middle or secondary school settings. Program graduates enter the field with the knowledge and competencies essential to provide quality developmental school counseling services.

The master of education degree in school counseling is in compliance with the 2001 Virginia State Board of Education licensure regulations for school counselors. The school counseling program is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs, an affiliate of the American Counseling Association. A comprehensive examination including oral, written and applied components is required prior to internship.

School Counseling Master of Education Degree Requirements

Minimum Requirements Credit Hours
PSYC 600. Introduction to Measurement and Statistics 3
PSYC 607. Assessment Procedures in Counseling 3
PSYC 614. Advanced Developmental Psychology 3
PSYC 660. Counseling Theories 3
PSYC 661. Counseling Techniques 3
PSYC 663. Substance Abuse Counseling 3
PSYC 664. Counseling Process 3
PSYC 665. Group Counseling 3
PSYC 669. Career Development 3
PSYC 685. Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Intervention Planning 3
PSYC 695. Practicum in Counseling 3
PSYC 710. Counseling Strategies 3
PSYC 749. Multicultural Perspectives of Intervention 3
PSYC 790. Internship 6

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School Psychology Program

Dr. Patricia Warner, Program Director

Admission Requirements
The minimum admission requirements for the school psychology program include:

Minimum admission requirements for the educational specialist degree in school psychology include a 3.5 grade point average and satisfactory review by the School Psychology Program Committee. Students applying to the program with a related master's degree from another institution will be required to provide three references and to participate in the interview process.

Mission
The school psychology program at James Madison University, housed within the Department of Graduate Psychology, resides within the College of Integrated Science and Technology (CISAT) and is fully accredited by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). The program emphasizes the role of the culturally competent school psychologist as that of a facilitator of an individual's overall well-being and potential. Within an integrated theoretical framework, students are prepared to be culturally competent, interpersonally skilled, data-oriented problem solvers. Central to the program focus is the understanding of children within a systems context, including the family, the school and the socio-cultural environment. Students are prepared in assessment for intervention, prevention, and promotion of well being, counseling, educational and mental health consultation, behavioral and cognitive interventions, and applied research. They are prepared to be applied child and adolescent psychologists in diverse educational and mental health settings.

The program expects students to have a commitment to academic excellence, personal growth, professional responsibility, sensitivity to and understanding of human diversity, and effective interpersonal relationships.

A Master of Arts (M.A.) degree is awarded at the completion of Level I of the program and a comprehensive examination.

School Psychology Educational Specialist Degree Requirements – Level I

Minimum Requirements Credit Hours
PSYC 525. Role and Function of the School Psychologist 3
PSYC 527. Psychological Foundations of Education 3
PSYC 605. Intermediate Inferential Statistics 3
PSYC 606. Measurement Theory 3
PSYC 618. Social and Emotional Development 3
PSYC 626. Advanced Developmental Psychopathology 3
PSYC 661. Counseling Techniques 3
PSYC 674. Assessment I 3
PSYC 695 Practicum in School Psychology 3
PSYC 749. Multicultural Perspectives of Intervention 3
PSYC 777. Assessment II 3

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School Psychology Educational Specialist Degree Requirements – Level II

Minimum Requirements Credit Hours
PSYC 609. Applied Research Methods 3
PSYC 750. Consultation and Intervention Techniques 3
PSYC 751. Psychotherapy with Children and Adolescents 3
PSYC 755. Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions 3
PSYC 778. Advanced Practicum in School Psychology 6
PSYC 779. Assessment III 3
PSYC 790. Internship in School Psychology 9
PSYC 800. Educational Specialist Research Project 6
PSYC 880. Introduction to Child and Adolescent Neuropsychology 3
EXED 512. Behavior Management in the Classroom 3
READ 658. Principles, Practices and Applications of Reading Assessment 3

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Students must complete all program requirements to be recommended for certification or licensure. Certain courses may be waived or substituted with adviser approval. Only six credit hours of PSYC 800 may be used to satisfy program requirements for the educational specialist degree. If the research project is not completed by the end of the internship year, then the student must continuously enroll (each semester including summers) until the project is completed.

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Psychological Sciences Program

Dr. Michael Hall, Program Director
Email: hallmd@jmu.edu

http://www.psyc.jmu.edu/psycsciences/

Admission Requirements

Mission
The mission of our program is to provide students advanced empirical research training in the psychological sciences.

Description
The psychological sciences program at James Madison University fosters the development of students interested in becoming research scientists by providing rigorous training to produce graduates who are well versed in substantive content areas in psychological science and who are highly trained to independently conduct, critique, and report psychological research. Students who complete our program earn a Master of Arts degree in psychology and are prepared for further training at the doctoral level or for immediate employment in research settings.

At the core of the program is course work in multiple content areas within psychology; course work in statistics, measurement, and research design; a research apprenticeship; and a thesis. Students develop expertise in a specialty area through selected course work and closely mentored research experiences with a faculty adviser. Faculty advisers provide regular support and consultation regarding progress in the program and preparation for applying to doctoral programs.

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

Minimum Requirements 1 Credit Hours
Methodology and Research Core 15
PSYC 605. Intermediate Inferential Statistics (3 credits)  
PSYC 606. Measurement Theory (3 credits)  
PSYC 608. Multivariate Statistical Methods in Psychology (3 credits)  
PSYC 700. Thesis Research (6 credits)  
Content Courses (choose three of the following): 9
PSYC 610. Principles of Behavior Analysis (3 credits)  
PSYC 613. Cognitive Science (3 credits)  
PSYC 616. Social Psychology (3 credits)  
PSYC 624. Neuroscience (3 credits)  
Concentration and elective courses (adviser approval required) 12

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1 Before the Department of Graduate Psychology recommends students for graduation, they must have a successful review by the Master of Arts in Psychological Sciences Program Committee.

In addition to course work, all students in the psychological sciences program are required to complete a Research Apprenticeship during the first two semesters, attend the weekly Research Roundtable series all four semesters and present their thesis work at the Department of Graduate Psychology Student Symposium in Research and Practice (or approved substitute). The Research Apprenticeship, Research Roundtable and presentation requirements do not carry course credit but expose students to a range of research topics and methodologies in psychological science and expose students to activities that are an integral part of being a productive member of a scientific community early in their graduate training, which facilitates successful development and completion of the thesis. Throughout their tenure in the psychological sciences program, students are strongly encouraged to both present their research at conferences and submit manuscripts for publication.

Only six credit hours of PSYC 700 may be used to satisfy the program's credit hour requirements. In addition to a written thesis, students are required to pass a comprehensive examination consisting of an oral presentation and defense of the thesis research.

Once accepted into the program the student must continue to enroll in at least one credit hour each semester until the comprehensive examination has been passed and the thesis has been accepted by the student's faculty committee and The Graduate School.

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Behavior Analysis Concentration

Dr. Bryan Saville, Concentration Coordinator

Purpose
The concentration in behavior analysis is for students interested in pursuing a doctoral degree in behavior analysis or related disciplines (e.g., behavioral pharmacology, behavioral neuroscience). Although not a focus of this concentration, the course work may be able to be arranged to meet the requirements necessary to sit for the Board Certified Behavior Analysis (BCBA®) national certification examination.

Overview
In this concentration, students will complete course work and conduct research designed to facilitate mastery of major concepts, principles, practices and theories in the experimental analysis of behavior, applied behavior analysis and the philosophy of radical behaviorism. Students in this concentration are required to complete their research apprenticeship and thesis requirements through collaborative research activities with faculty who approach the scientific study of behavior from a behavior analytic conceptual and theoretical framework.

Methodology and Research Core (15 credits)
PSYC 605. Intermediate Inferential Statistics (3 credits)
PSYC 606. Measurement Theory (3 credits)
PSYC 608. Multivariate Statistical Methods in Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 700. Thesis Research (6 credits) 1

Content Courses (9 credits)
PSYC 610. Principles of Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
PSYC 624. Neuroscience (3 credits)
PSYC 613. Cognitive Science (3 credits)
   or PSYC 616. Social Psychology (3 credits)

Concentration Courses (6 credits)
PSYC 501. Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
PSYC 601. Small-n Experimental Research (3 credits)

Concentration Electives (6 credits; approved by adviser)

1 For students in this concentration, the thesis must be an empirical study that in either the experimental analysis of behavior or applied behavior analysis.

Other Experiences
In addition to course work and other requirements of the psychological sciences program (e.g., Apprenticeship, Research Roundtable), students participate in a monthly concentration meeting where faculty and students discuss published research and professional issues related to behavior analysis. Additionally, students in the behavior analysis concentration are required to participate in the activities of various local, regional, national, and international agencies, groups, and professional organizations that advance the scientific study of behavior and its humane application to solve practical problems.

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Clinical Research Concentration

Dr. Trevor Stokes, Concentration Coordinator

Purpose
The concentration in clinical research is designed for students interested in pursuing a doctoral degree in clinical or school psychology.

Overview
Students working on this concentration will learn a scientist-practitioner orientation to the field of behavioral health. Empirical approaches to treatment are emphasized and methods of studying treatment outcome and other clinical research are taught. Students work throughout their two years on research focusing on clinical issues and many work directly with clinical populations.

Methodology and Research Core (15 credits)
PSYC 605. Intermediate Inferential Statistics (3 credits)
PSYC 606. Measurement Theory (3 credits)
PSYC 608. Multivariate Statistical Methods in Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 700. Thesis Research (6 credits)

Content Courses (9 credits chosen from the following)
PSYC 610. Principles of Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
PSYC 613. Cognitive Science (3 credits)
PSYC 616. Social Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 624. Neuroscience (3 credits)

Concentration Courses (9 credits)
PSYC 661. Counseling Techniques (3 credits)
PSYC 695. Practicum: Clinical (3 credits)
PSYC 830. Structural Equation Modeling (3 credits)
   or PSYC 836. Hierarchical Linear Models (3 credits)
   or PSYC 805. Single-Case Experimentation (3 credits)

Concentration Electives (3 credits; approved by adviser)

Other Experiences
In addition to course work and other requirements of the psychological sciences program (e.g., Apprenticeship, Research Roundtable), students participate in a monthly concentration meeting where faculty and students discuss published research and professional issues related to clinical psychology, covering such topics as prescription privileges, mediators and moderators of treatment outcome, treatment manuals, and managed care. Many students in the clinical research concentration receive graduate assistantships to work on funded research projects and students graduating from this concentration have an excellent record of being accepted into clinical Ph.D. programs.

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Cognitive Science Concentration

Dr. Jeff Dyche, Concentration Coordinator

Purpose
The concentration in cognitive science is designed for students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in cognitive science or one of the disciplines that it encompasses (e.g., cognitive psychology, sensation and perception, experimental psychology, neuroscience, etc.).

Overview
Cognitive Science is an interdisciplinary field that studies the nature of thinking and the mind. It encompasses the efforts of researchers from several disciplines, including Psychology, Neuroscience, Computer Science, Philosophy, Linguistics, Biology and a variety of social sciences. Cognitive science seeks to identify and understand the structures and processes that underlie cognition and examines topics such as sensation, perception, vision, attention, consciousness, learning, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning and decision making. Students will work throughout their two years of course work, scholarly studies and research in the cognitive science area.

Methodology and Research Core (15 credits)
PSYC 605. Intermediate Inferential Statistics (3 credits)
PSYC 606. Measurement Theory (3 credits)
PSYC 608. Multivariate Statistical Methods in Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 700. Thesis Research (6 credits)

Content Courses (9 credits)
PSYC 613. Cognitive Science (3 credits)
PSYC 624. Neuroscience (3 credits)
PSYC 610. Principles of Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
   or PSYC 616. Social Psychology (3 credits)

Concentration Electives (12 credits; approved by adviser)

Other Experiences
In addition to course work and other requirements of the psychological sciences program (e.g., Apprenticeship, Research Roundtable), students participate in a monthly concentration meeting where faculty and students discuss published research and professional issues related to cognitive science.

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Quantitative Psychology Concentration

Dr. Sara J. Finney, Concentration Coordinator

Purpose
The quantitative methods concentration within the psychological sciences M.A. program has two basic purposes.

First, the concentration will prepare students for a number of master's-level careers involving applied measurement, applied statistics, program evaluation and assessment within a variety of settings (e.g., colleges and universities, corporations, testing companies, state departments of education and school districts).

Second, completion of this concentration will prepare students for doctoral study in quantitative methods (e.g., assessment, measurement, statistics, program evaluation).

Overview
In this concentration, students will expand their study of quantitative methods (statistics, measurement and assessment) while extending their understanding of psychological theories and principles. Students in this concentration are required to complete their research apprenticeship and thesis requirements through collaborative research activities with faculty who are studying or using sophisticated methodology.

Methodology and Research Core (15 credits)
PSYC 605. Intermediate Inferential Statistics (3 credits)
PSYC 606. Measurement Theory (3 credits)
PSYC 608. Multivariate Statistical Methods in Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 700. Thesis Research (6 credits) 2

Content Courses (9 credits chosen from the following)
PSYC 610. Principles of Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
PSYC 613. Cognitive Science (3 credits)
PSYC 616. Social Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 624. Neuroscience (3 credits)

Concentration Courses (6 credits)
PSYC 695. Practicum: Quantitative (3 credits)
PSYC 812. Assessment Methods and Instrument Design (3 credits)

Concentration Electives (6 credits; approved by adviser)

2 For students in this concentration, the thesis must be an empirical study that either (a) focuses on an assessment, measurement, or statistical issue or (b) demonstrates the application of sophisticated statistics or measurement techniques.

Other Experiences
In addition to course work and other requirements of the psychological sciences program (e.g., Apprenticeship, Research Roundtable), students participate in a monthly concentration meeting where faculty and students discuss published research and professional issues related to quantitative methods in psychology. Additionally, students in the quantitative methods concentration will become acquainted with and involved in the activities of the Center for Assessment and Research Studies (CARS). Many students in the quantitative methods concentration receive graduate assistantships to work at CARS, and students graduating from this concentration have an excellent record of being accepted into Ph.D. programs in quantitative psychology and in assessment and measurement.

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Course Offerings

Psychology

PSYC 501. Workshop in Psychology.
1-3 credits.
Designed to provide a study of a particular topic of interest in psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of department head.

PSYC 515. Basic Counseling Skills.
3 credits.
A basic counseling skills course designed for human services and mental health professionals without graduate training in counseling and for students from related disciplines who wish to acquire counseling skills.

PSYC 525. Role and Function of the School Psychologist.
3 credits.
Provides an understanding of the organization and operation of public schools and the educational and mental health practice settings as well as legal and ethical issues and responsibilities with which a school psychologist must deal.

PSYC 527. Psychological Foundations of Education.
3 credits.
Psychological theories and research applied to classroom and school settings.

PSYC 530. The Psychology of Child Abuse and Neglect.
3 credits.
Review of current psychological literature on child abuse and neglect including identification, etiology, treatment, prevention and legal aspects. Family violence issues are also discussed.

PSYC 600. Introduction to Measurement and Statistics.
3 credits.
An introduction to measurement and statistical tools used in conducting research. Specific topics include: reliability and validity; research methods and statistical analysis; quantitative and qualitative methods; needs assessment and program evaluation; use of technology; and legal and ethical issues of research.

PSYC 601. Special Topics in Psychology.
1-3 credits.
In-depth study of current topics in the field of psychology. Content varies depending on the topic and instructor. May be repeated for different Special Topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 604. Computer Assisted Data Management and Analysis.
3 credits.
Provides an introduction to the management and analysis of data using statistical software packages. Emphasis is placed on planning data files, performing basic data transformations and statistical analyses, and transferring data across software programs. Prerequisites: Completion of an undergraduate or graduate introductory statistics course and permission of instructor.

PSYC 605. Intermediate Inferential Statistics.
3 credits.
Provides an understanding of types of research, inferential statistics, and research report development. Special emphasis on experimental designs, power analysis, analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, and effect sizes. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 606. Measurement Theory.
3 credits.
Measurement applications of classical test score theory, generalizability measurement theory, scale construction concepts, test bias, standard setting techniques and item response theory. Prerequisite: PSYC 605.

PSYC 607. Assessment Procedures in Counseling.
3 credits.
A study of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation. Activities include administering, scoring, and interpreting tests of ability, interest, personality, and achievement for both children and adults. Students also assess case studies, perform a self-analysis, and review selected assessment procedures. Computer-assisted assessment and ethical issues are addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC 600 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 608. Multivariate Statistical Methods in Psychology.
3 credits.
Continuation of PSYC 605, with emphasis on multivariate analyses, including multiple regression, discriminant analysis and MANOVA. Prerequisite: PSYC 605.

PSYC 609. Applied Research Methods.
3 credits.
Provides an understanding of applied research methods, including Qualitative Research, Quasi-Experimental designs, and program evaluation: Prerequisite: PSYC 605.

PSYC 610. Applied Behavior Analysis.
3 credits.
This course examines the science and practice of applied behavior analysis, which focuses on how environmental events influence the development and change of behavior repertoires, emphasizing the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, implement and assess interventions for behavior problems in a variety of settings including health and human services, education, business and industry, and with individuals from diverse populations. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 611. Comparative Psychology.
3 credits.
Introduces graduate students to basic concepts, methods and theories in the study of animal behavior. Topics covered include the evolution of behavior, communication, sensory processes, reproductive behavior, parental behavior, sociality, aggression, territoriality and feeding behavior.

PSYC 612. Personality Theories.
3 credits.
Major theories of personality, including historical and philosophical assumptions underlying them, with a consideration of research stimulated by these theories.

PSYC 613. Cognitive Science.
3 credits.
Examines a wide range of human cognitive processes including pattern recognition, attention, memory, language and decision making. The course emphasizes research methods, empirical findings and applications in selected areas.

PSYC 614. Advanced Developmental Psychology.
3 credits.
An overview of the theories, research, and applications relevant to the development of behavior and mental processes throughout the life span.

PSYC 616. Social Psychology.
3 credits.
An advanced study of the research and theory of the way an individual's social behavior is influenced by the behavior and attitudes of other individuals.

PSYC 617. History of Psychology.
3 credits.
The history of psychology as depicted through the development of American psychology. Consideration of the history of schools of psychology as well as the historical development of areas such as clinical, physiological, developmental, industrial, cognitive and social psychology.

PSYC 618. Social and Emotional Development.
3 credits.
An examination of how developmental psychologists collect and interpret data; how theory guides research and practice. Topics include: early determinants of behavior; identity development; prosocial and antisocial behavior; family, peers, and schools. Exemplars, such as attachment, are used to show how research, theory, culture, and clinical practice shape a topical area. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

PSYC 619. Cognitive Development.
3 credits.
This course examines the characteristics of and processes through which thinking changes with development. Important research paradigms and theoretical perspectives, as well as various practical implications of related research will be explored. Topics include perception, memory, language, reasoning, individual differences, academic skills and selected applied topics.

PSYC 622. Abnormal Psychology.
3 credits.
A critical review of the issues, research and etiological aspects of the mental disorders, as well as the general concepts used in the area of psychopathology. Topics include models of pathology and wellness, mind and body problems, and interprofessional relationships.

PSYC 624. Neuroscience.
3 credits.
An analysis of brain/behavior relationships with an emphasis on neurological and biochemical mechanisms. Neuropsychological theory and psychopharmacology will be emphasized.

PSYC 626. Advanced Developmental Psychopathology.
3 credits.
An overview of child and adolescent behavior disorders and psychopathology with an emphasis on diagnostic and treatment issues.

PSYC 630. Clinical Mental Health Counseling.
3 credits.
An introduction to the history, profession, and practice of clinical mental health counseling. Specific topics include: intervening with individuals, groups, families; developing and evaluating programs; consulting with other professional helpers; promoting personal and systemic well-being; dealing with diverse clients; and addressing legal, ethical, and professional identity issues.

PSYC 640. School Counseling.
3 credits.
An introduction to the history, theory, philosophy, principles, organization, and personnel practices of school counseling. Specific topics include: developing and evaluating programs; intervening with individuals, groups, parents and schools; dealing with diverse students; and addressing legal, ethical and professional identity issues.

PSYC 643. Advanced School Counseling.
3 credits.
A study of the role of the counselor in elementary, middle, and secondary schools with an emphasis on the function of counseling, consultation and coordination. Techniques and materials used with children, teachers and parents will also be examined. Prerequisite: PSYC 640 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 645. Student Personnel Services.
3 credits.
A detailed study of student services offered in colleges and universities. Legal, ethical and professional identity issues are also examined.

PSYC 646. The American College Student.
3 credits.
An examination of developmental theory and review of the literature and research related to the American college student.

PSYC 649. Multiculturalism, Diversity and Difference: Theory, Research and Practice in Student Affairs.
3 credits.
An environment for students to cognitively and experientially explore issues of multiculturalism, diversity and differences as it relates to work in student affairs, student services and higher education through assignments, exercises, discussions, readings and reflection.

PSYC 650. Organization and Administration of Student Services.
3 credits.
A study of organizational and management theory/practice in higher education. Upon completion of the course, students will have an understanding of the college/university as an organization and the role that student service programs play in the mission of the institution. Prerequisite: PSYC 645.

PSYC 651. Supervision and Consultation Processes in Student Personnel.
3 credits.
This course will focus on the processes of supervision and consultation as they apply to student personnel management. Opportunities will be provided to make practical application of management knowledge and organization theories to personnel issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 650.

PSYC 660. Counseling Theories.
3 credits.
A study of the philosophy and principles of various schools of counseling, and the techniques employed in the counseling process by practitioners in each of these schools.

PSYC 661. Counseling Techniques.
3 credits.
An opportunity to learn fundamental counseling skills that form the foundations of successful counseling practice. Students develop these skills through experiential learning activities, directed reading assignments, discussions and lectures, practice in small groups, and participation in critiques of videotaped microcounseling sessions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 663. Substance Abuse Counseling.
3 credits.
A study of substance abuse to include related personal, social and physiological factors, and methods of rehabilitation and counseling for the chemically dependent. Prerequisite: PSYC 515 or equivalent.

PSYC 664. Counseling Process.
3 credits.
An experiential study of the relationship between counselor and client. Explores the phases of relationship from initiation to termination, including predictable crises and issues which normally arise. Analysis of resistance, transference and counter transference, dependency, and termination issues will be discussed. Attention will also be given to gender and diversity issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 660, PSYC 661 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 665. Group Counseling.
3 credits.
A study of the theories, techniques, dynamics, process and practice of group counseling. Students become members of a laboratory group and also conduct research into issues of group counseling. Each student pairs with a partner, creates an intervention plan, and facilitates the group process. Prerequisites: PSYC 660 and PSYC 661 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 668. Couple and Family Systems.
3 credits.
A study of the dynamics of couple and family living, focusing on social change, social stratification, mate selection, marriage, divorce, child rearing, sexuality and individual behavior, and its effect on the family structure. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 669. Career Development.
3 credits.
The impact of career choice throughout the life span is explored. Vocational theories and a variety of approaches to career decision-making will be introduced. Several career-related assessment instruments will be used to help students develop skills in administration and interpretation.

PSYC 674. Assessment I.
3 credits.
Students develop proficiency with administration, interpretation and reporting results of current cognitive ability measures and the issues in nondiscriminatory multicultural assessment. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 680. Independent Study.
1-3 credits.
An opportunity for independent study or research in an area of special interest. Prerequisite: A written plan must be submitted and approved by a faculty supervisor, the student's program director and the department head prior to registration.

PSYC 685. Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Intervention Planning.
3 credits.
Training and practice in the following: making reliable and valid diagnoses of mental disorders; appropriately addressing the ethical and cultural issues involved; performing collaborative diagnostic interviews; participating in effective case conferences; and planning interventions to achieve therapeutic goals. Prerequisite: PSYC 600, PSYC 661 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 690. Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
3 credits.
The experimental analysis of behavior (EAB) involves identifying functional relations between behavior and its controlling variables, primarily in individual organisms, and typically under rigorous laboratory conditions. Focus will be on the findings from empirical research with some attention to extensions of the fundamental principles of behavior to applied behavior analysis (ABA) and to the underlying philosophy for both EAB and ABA, radical behaviorism.

PSYC 695. Practicum.
1-6 credits.
Provides a variety of supervised field, laboratory or school experiences. Course will be graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 698. Comprehensive Continuance.
1 credit.
Continued preparation in anticipation of the comprehensive examination. Course may be repeated as needed.

PSYC 699. Thesis Continuance.
1-2 credits.
Continued study, research and writing in the area of thesis concentration. (This course does not count towards fulfilling the required hours for the degree; it may be repeated as needed. Students who have registered for six hours of thesis credit but have not finished the thesis must be enrolled in this course each semester until they complete the thesis.)

PSYC 700. Thesis Research.
3-6 credits.
This course is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory/in progress (S/U/I) basis.

PSYC 710. Counseling Strategies: Special Topics.
1-3 credits.
Training and practice in the use of a specific counseling method. Prerequisite: PSYC 660, PSYC 661 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 727. Instructional Interventions: Science and Practice.
3 credits.
Principles and research relevant to teaching and learning in schools. Emphasis will be placed on the culture/organization of the schools, curriculum and interprofessional collaborations. The psychology of reading will be highlighted, including assessment, interventions, and work with English Language Learners. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 748. Gender Issues in Counseling.
3 credits.
An exploration of gender issues as they relate to counseling theories and techniques. The social construction of gender roles as well as the gendered nature of society are discussed. Implications for working with women, men, gay/lesbian/bisexual, and transgendered individuals are addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC 660, PSYC 661 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 749. Multicultural Perspectives of Intervention.
3 credits.
Offers a cognitive and experiential study of sociological and psychological variables, such as race, gender and socioeconomic status, that influence the professional helping relationship. Culturally relevant models of counseling theory and practice are presented. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 750. Consultation and Intervention Techniques.
3 credits.
Provides the knowledge and skills necessary to engage in consultation and systems level intervention within educational and mental health settings. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

PSYC 751. Psychotherapy with Children and Adolescents.
3 credits.
Theoretical and cognitive bases for understanding frequently used therapeutic strategies and techniques. Specific sections will focus on general practices and procedures in psychotherapy, and on therapeutic strategies for children, adolescents and families.

PSYC 752. Theory and Practice of Play Therapy.
3 credits.
An introduction to the historical and contemporary context of play therapy including an overview of play therapy theories and methods. Examination of cultural influences, ethical issues, and outcome research in play therapy. Prerequisite: PSYC 660, PSYC 661 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 755. Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions.
3 credits.
An overview of the theoretical and applied aspects of operant behavior modification and cognitive behavior therapy. The course focuses on applications with children, adolescents, and their families in educational and mental health settings.

PSYC 760. Supervision and Consultation for Counselors.
3 credits.
The course includes an introduction to concepts, processes, and styles of supervision. It offers students the opportunity to gain experience in providing supervision to other counselors in training. The course also provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage in consultation, negotiation/mediation, and systems level intervention in mental health and education settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 660, PSYC 661, PSYC 664 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 768. Couple and Family Counseling.
3 credits.
A study of the various approaches to couple and family counseling, focusing on theory, techniques and research that relate to the counseling process. Prerequisites: PSYC 661 and PSYC 668 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 770. Assessment and Public Policy.
3 credits.
Delineates and compares the history and role of assessment, accountability, and quality assurance to the governance, funding, and purposes of higher education; describes an implementation process of assessment for educational programs and services. Prerequisite: PSYC 600.

PSYC 777. Assessment II.
3 credits.
An advanced laboratory course for students in school psychology. Covers comprehensive evaluation of domains and abilities which relate to academic success. Enrollment is limited to allow individual instruction and supervision. Prerequisite: PSYC 674 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 778. Advanced Practicum.
1-6 credits.
Provides a variety of supervised field experiences in schools and other settings. The student may re-enroll in this course for different types of practicum experiences. Course is graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 779. Assessment III.
3 credits.
Advanced students achieve basic understanding and competency in the administration and interpretation of personality assessment procedures most frequently used in school settings with children and adolescents. Enrollment is limited to allow individualized instruction and supervision. Prerequisites: PSYC 606, PSYC 674, and PSYC 777 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 790. Internship.
3-6 credits.
Provides a student with a supervised field experience. Students should contact their program director for specifics concerning the internship experience. Course will be graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

PSYC 799. Educational Specialist Research Project Continuance.
1-2 credits.
Continued study, research and writing in the area of Educational Specialist research project. Course may be repeated as needed but does not count toward fulfilling the required hours for the degree. (Students who have registered for the maximum hours of PSYC 800, Educational Specialist Research Project, but have not finished the project must be enrolled in this course each semester until they complete the research project.)

PSYC 800. Educational Specialist Research Project.
1-3 credits.
Opportunity for advanced applied research in an area of special interest to a school psychology or community counseling student in an Educational Specialist program. Specific course requirements are listed in the separate research project guidelines for school psychology and community counseling students. Course is graded on an S/U basis. Successful completion of the research project fulfills the comprehensive examination requirement for the School of Psychology educational specialist degree. Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

PSYC 805. Single Case Experimentation.
3 credits.
This course examines the logic and practical considerations of experimentation in research using small numbers of subjects, as it relates to single case experimental designs, which demonstrate functional relationships between adjustments in independent variables and their effects upon dependent variables in repeated measures behavioral research.

PSYC 812. Assessment Methods and Instrument Design.
3 credits.
This course covers reliability and validity issues associated with instrument and methodology design. Delineation of goals and objectives, assessment purposes, test and task specification, item/task development, pilot, review, and maintenance procedures will be applied. Consideration of multifaceted validity and validation issues will be stressed throughout the process. Prerequisite: PSYC 605, PSYC 606 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 814. Performance Assessment.
3 credits.
The optimal use of tools that assess products and processes is explored within a variety of assessment contexts. This course focuses on the design, development and implementation of performance-based assessment. Task analysis and design, scoring rubric development and use, and assessment deployment are covered through critique and practice. Potential benefits offered by computer-based administration of performance assessments are introduced. Particular emphasis is given to validity issues throughout the course. Prerequisite: PSYC 606.

PSYC 816. Classical Test Theory and Generalizability Theory.
3 credits.
This course examines classical test theory and generalizability theory and their application to the practice of assessment. As a foundational level, model assumptions are explored and used to understand the development of different notions of reliability and dependability. At a practical level, statistical techniques developed from these two theories will be applied to develop and/or improve assessment practices. Prerequisite: PSYC 606.

PSYC 822. Assessment in Early Childhood Special Education.
3 credits. (Cross-listed as EXED 622.)
This course provides the student with exposure to screening assessment and diagnostic procedures utilized in the identification of handicapped students ages 0-5. A case study approach to diagnostics is emphasized. Family assessment is also an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and EXED 621 or equivalent.

PSYC 825. Doctoral Seminar in Professional Psychology.
1-3 credits.
This course covers issues and content designed to foster the development of the student's identity as a doctoral-level professional psychologist. Course is graded on S/U basis.

PSYC 826. Advanced Seminar in Developmental Psychopathology.
3 credits.
This course reviews at the doctoral level current research and theory regarding childhood disorders, their origins, their consequences for life span development, and the factors that mitigate against them. Specific topics include theories of development and psychopathology; taxonomy and diagnosis; longitudinal studies of continuity and change; development of depression, aggression, and anxiety; and resilience.

PSYC 830. Structural Equation Modeling.
3 credits.
Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, path analysis and relevant aspects of measurement theory are introduced. In this context, several mathematical and technical issues about model fitting are presented: the statistical requirements for a model, estimators and estimation, model evaluation, model modification, software use, and pertinent troubleshooting strategies. Prerequisites: PSYC 606 and PSYC 608.

PSYC 832. Item Response Theory.
3 credits.
This examines the use of Item Response Theory models for test construction and ability estimation. Models for tests with dichotomous and polytomous items will be covered. Other topics for discussion include advantages and disadvantages of IRT relative to Classical Test Theory, the detection of differential item functioning (or item bias), and the role of IRT in Computer Adaptive Testing. Prerequisite: PSYC 606.

PSYC 834. Computers and Testing.
3 credits.
This course focuses on the computer as a medium for the administration and scoring of achievement tests. Strengths and limitations of current computerized testing methods are addressed, as well as future issues and challenges. Topics to be discussed include linear and adaptive tests, problem simulations, performance assessment, and expert systems. Prerequisites: PSYC 606 and PSYC 832.

PSYC 836. Hierarchical Linear Models.
3 credits.
This course will illustrate how to use Hierarchical Linear Models (HLMs) to answer research questions in education and the social sciences. Students will learn HLM through applied experiences with a variety of different hierarchical data structures (e.g., students within schools, patients within clinics), including longitudinal and met-analytic data. Prerequisite: PSYC 608.

PSYC 840. Qualitative Research Design and Analysis.
3 credits.
This course is designed to give students an introduction to the philosophical, conceptual, and practical basis of qualitative research. Provides an introduction to all phases of qualitative research design, developing research questions, doing data collection and analysis and writing a qualitative research proposal. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 850. Special Topics in Assessment and Measurement.
3 credits.
In-depth study of current topics in the field of assessment and measurement. Content will vary depending on the topic and instructor. May be repeated for different special topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 852. Advanced Consultation and Supervision.
3 credits.
An advanced course in models of consultation; supervision and leadership/management.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 855. Assessment Consultation and Practice.
3 credits.
This course provides guided opportunities for supervised application of sets of assessment skills and competencies with the development of professional self as an assessment practitioner. Students join with center faculty members to engage in ongoing assessment projects concerning at-risk students, alumni surveys, academic undergraduate and graduate degree programs, general education, academic program reviews, and distance education programs. Ethics will be emphasized, spanning the continua of assessment practice from establishing consultation relationships, assessment design, data collection, analysis, maintenance and archiving of data, and report writing to presentation of findings.

PSYC 864. Processes of Psychotherapy.
3 credits.
This class is a laboratory experience which explores the phases of the therapeutic relationship between therapist and client. The framework for conceptualizing psychotherapy will be the integration of the interpersonal approach with a multi-model, systems orientation. Topics such as diversity, resistance, transference and countertransference will be discussed.

PSYC 865. Integrative Psychotherapy for Adults.
3 credits.
An advanced course surveying the major approaches to psychotherapy (e.g., psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, and humanistic) in a manner designed to provide students with ways of integrating these approaches into a coherent theoretical model that can guide conceptualizations and interventions during the therapeutic process.

PSYC 874. Cognitive Assessment.
3 credits.
Students achieve basic understanding and competency in the administration and interpretation of intellectual and academic assessment procedures for children, adolescents and adults across a variety of settings and clinical areas. Issues of nondiscriminatory multicultural assessment will also be addressed. Students are also enrolled in a lab (PSYC 878) as part of this course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 876. Personality Assessment.
3 credits.
Students achieve a basic understanding and competency in the administration and interpretation of personality assessment procedures for children, adolescents and adults across a variety of settings. Issues of nondiscriminatory multicultural assessment will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 877. Advanced Seminar In Child and Family Assessment.
3 credits.
This doctoral-level course reviews advanced methods for the assessment of children and families, and focuses on the development of a case formulation that integrates test findings and informs intervention efforts.

PSYC 878. Doctoral Practicum.
1-6 credits.
Provides a variety of supervised field experiences for advanced, applied psychology doctoral students. Students may enroll for several types of practicum experiences (e.g., clinic, school, HDC). Course is graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 879. Doctoral Assessment Practicum.
3 credits.
This course provides guided opportunities for supervised application of sets of assessment skills and competencies with the development of professional self as an assessment practitioner. Students join with center faculty members to engage in ongoing assessment projects concerning at-risk students, alumni surveys, academic undergraduate and graduate degree programs, general education, academic program reviews, and distance education programs. Ethics will be emphasized, spanning the continua of assessment practice from establishing consultation relationships, assessment design, data collection and analysis, maintenance and archiving of data, and report writing to presentation of findings. Course will be graded on an S/U basis.

PSYC 880. Introduction to Child and Adolescent Neuropsychology.
3 credits.
This course will include a review of central nervous system (CNS) anatomy and physiology as it pertains to brain/behavior relationships and neuropsychological assessment. Emphasis is on providing a foundation for more intensive further evaluation and remediation within the school setting of children and adolescents surviving traumatic brain injury. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

PSYC 881. Issues and Techniques in Research and Evaluation.
1-3 credits.
Opportunity for applied research and/or program evaluation in areas of special interest. Students will participate as full members of a research team and assist with the design of a study. This course will serve as a basis for preparing students to develop the proposal for their doctoral research project. Course is graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: PSYC 605 and PSYC 608 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 889. Advanced Personality Assessment.
3 credits.
Critical review of theory, practice and research with regard to personality assessment techniques. Emphasis will be placed on teaching the Rorschach and MMPI, and using these and other assessment procedures to answer specific diagnostic questions (e.g., depression, psychosis, personality disorders, etc.). Prerequisite: PSYC 779 or equivalent.

PSYC 890. Doctoral Internship.
6 credits.
Supervised internship in a school and/or community agency approved by the Program Coordinator. Designed to meet APA internship guidelines. Course is graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: Completion of all course work and permission of program committee.

PSYC 891. Doctoral Assessment Internship.
3 credits (can be taken for a second semester).
Supervised assessment internship in a higher education, kindergarten through 12th-grade, business or health care setting that has been approved by the program coordinator. Typically involves the design and implementation of assessment strategies to meet the needs of the institution or agency. Course will be graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: Completion of all doctoral program course work, PSYC 878 and permission of the program committee.

PSYC 895. Doctoral Practicum in College Teaching.
1-3 credits.
This practicum course provides instruction, modeling, and supervision in teaching college or professional level learners. Students will teach undergraduate courses in psychology and/or make professional presentations, receiving feedback and supervision from the instructor. Prerequisites: Master's degree and permission of instructor.

PSYC 899. Dissertation Continuance.
1-2 credits.
Continued study, research and writing in the area of dissertation concentration. (This course does not count toward fulfilling the required hours for the degree; it may be repeated as needed. Students who have registered for six hours of dissertation credit but have not finished the dissertation must be enrolled in this course each semester, including summer, until they complete the dissertation.)

PSYC 900. Doctoral Dissertation.
6-12 credits.
Provides advanced research required of all doctoral candidates. Course is graded on an S/U basis. Prerequisites: completion of all course work and permission of program coordinator.

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