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Admission

Mission

Program Guide

Course Offerings

Graduate Programs

History

Dr. Michael J. Galgano, Department Head
Dr. Steven A. Reich, Graduate Coordinator
     Phone: (540) 568-6132
     Web site: http://www.jmu.edu/history

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Professors
J.C. Arndt, S. Bland, D. Boyd-Bragg, J. Butt, M. Galgano, S. Guerrier, R. Hyser, M. L. Loe, H. Myers, D. Owusu-Ansah, J. Walker

Associate Professors
K. Borg, P. D. Dillard, K. Hardwick, L. King, G. Lanier, R. Meixsel, M. Mulrooney, S. Reich, M. Seth

Assistant Professors
L.S. Chappell, J. Connerley, J. Davidson, M. Gayne, H. Gelfand, M. Gubser, S. Hanifi, D. Kerr, K. McCleary, A. Sandman, A. Schweber, W. Van Norman

Adjunct Professors
A. Crabb, C. Hallman, T. Harter, R. Jacobs, D. Nash

Admission
All applicants must first satisfy the general application requirements of The Graduate School. For information, see the information for prospective graduate students on the Web site of The Graduate School (http://www.jmu.edu/grad).

In addition to satisfying all admission requirements set by The Graduate School, the Department of History requires applicants to its program to have an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution with a minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0 and satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination General Test (GRE). The department welcomes applicants from any undergraduate major, although the graduate committee may require students who have majored in other fields to take prerequisite undergraduate courses in history.

To Apply
For information about the application process, for the online application form and for application instructions, see https://www.applyweb.com/apply/jmug/index.html. There, applicants will upload the materials required for the application.

Required Materials
The Department of History requires all prospective applicants to submit the following:

Application Deadlines
Complete applications must be received by February 15. Incomplete applications will not be considered; applicants are responsible for assuring that all materials have been received. The graduate committee begins its review of all complete applications after February 15. Applications received after February 15 will be reviewed in accordance with openings available in the program. Students normally matriculate in the fall semester.

Students seeking admission to the Master of Arts with teaching licensure must contact the School of Education.

The Department of History offers the Master of Arts degree with a major in history.

Mission
The graduate program in history at James Madison University offers concentrations in European, American or local/regional/public history. It permits students to deepen their understanding, acquire knowledge and develop critical skills necessary for advanced research and writing in history. Through a blend of courses and internships, the program enhances levels of professional competence that demand mastery of the techniques of research, critical thinking, and careful oral and written communication. Graduates of the program are able to demonstrate an ability to understand and perform scholarly research with cross-disciplinary perspectives. We see this as essential since it provides important skills designed to meet the changing needs of our students in society. To ensure that our mission is kept in focus, we require graduates to demonstrate an advanced knowledge in their specific areas of study.

These often interrelated goals are achieved through coherent, orderly programs of study encompassing investigation and/or supervised practical experience. As part of a comprehensive university supported by public funds, the graduate program in history is committed to serving the needs of the Commonwealth of Virginia and the region. The Department of History's graduate program encourages students to develop strengths in critical and creative thinking, communication and applied skills. A balanced combination of theoretical and practical studies prepares the successful graduate for advancement in the workplace, future educational opportunities, informed participation in today's increasingly more complicated society and leadership in community affairs.

The graduate program in history serves multiple audiences. Since historians today practice their discipline in a variety of careers, we have expanded the more traditional concentrations in American and European to include a concentration in local/regional/public history. The concentration exposes students to the broad range of skills and issues associated with public history while providing them with a solid advanced background in history. Students also augment their academic training through internships in a range of public history settings including museums, archives, government agencies, libraries, historic preservation organizations, businesses, contract history firms, cultural resource management firms and historic sites.

The Department of History's graduate program actively supports all university and college goals and objectives.

The program offers an opportunity for concentration in three fields of history:

Minimum departmental requirements for the Master of Arts degree with a major in history are as follows.

The minor in history in the Master of Education degree requires 12 credit hours of graduate courses in history.

Prerequisites for enrolling in graduate courses in history are GHIST 225, U.S. History, or equivalent, for courses in U.S.; and general education history, or equivalent, for courses in European, African or Asian history.

Program Guide
All Master of Arts students are required to complete the following courses.

First Year, Fall Semester
HIST 671. Seminar in Historical Research Methods
HIST 672. Historiography

First Year, Spring Semester
HIST 673. Graduate Research and Writing Seminar

In addition to the semester-specific courses, students must complete one of the non-western history courses (Africa, Asia or the Middle East).

Course Offerings
History
HIST 600. Seminar in U.S. History: Early Period. 3 credits.
A topical approach to the study of early U.S. history. Topics might include Colonial America, the American Revolution, the Market Revolution, Civil War and Reconstruction, American Intellectual History, or any pertinent topic falling within the pre-1877 period. Topic and professor offering the course will change with each offering. This course may be repeated when content is different. See e-campus for topic and professor.

HIST 601. Workshop in History. 1-3 credits.
Intensive study of topics of current interest and demand. Primarily designed for history and social studies teachers. Topic and professor offering the course will change with each offering. This course may be repeated when content is different. See e-campus for topic and professor.

HIST 602. Workshop in Colonial American Life. 3 credits.
This workshop is a study of life in colonial Virginia. Through the use of primary and secondary sources, the students research and aspect of Virginia culture and society. A week of the course is in Williamsburg, Virginia. Graduate students are expected to lead research groups and demonstrate knowledge of secondary literature of the period.

HIST 603. Workshop in Civil War Virginia. 3 credits.
This workshop examines the impact of the Civil War upon Virginia and her citizens. It explores the secession crisis, tactical and technological developments, and the evolution into "hard war." A four-day battlefield tour will reinforce ideas discussed in the classroom. Students must demonstrate command of the historiography and key primary sources.

HIST 605. Seminar in U.S. History: Recent Period. 3 credits.
A topical approach to the study of recent U.S. history. Topics might include American science and technology, industrialism, 20th-century diplomacy, black nationalist thought, 20th-century American military history, or any pertinent topic falling within the post-1865 period. Topic and professor offering the course will change with each offering. This course may be repeated when content is different. See e-campus for topic and professor.

HIST 610. Seminar in European History: Early Period. 3 credits.
A topical approach to the study of early European history. Topics might include ancient history, medieval Europe, Tudor-Stuart England, renaissance and reformation, the era of the French revolution, or any pertinent topic falling within the pre-1815 period. Topic and professor offering the course will change with each offering. This course may be repeated when content is different. See e-campus for topic and professor.

HIST 611. Colonial America. 3 credits.
An interpretative survey of England's mainland colonies from 1558-1776, with special attention to the evolution of the first British empire, historiography and important primary sources.

HIST 613. The Anglo-American Constitutional Tradition. 3 credits.
Surveys Anglo-American political and constitutional traditions. Emphasizes the evolution of 17th- and 18th-century British constitutionalism, its transferal to the British North American colonies and the development of the first national and state constitutions in the United States. Emphasis on historiography and study from primary sources.

HIST 615. Seminar in European History: Recent Period. 3 credits.
A topical approach to the study of recent European history. Topics might include Europe in the 19th century, Europe between the World Wars, Europe during the Cold War, Russia or any pertinent topic falling within the post-1789 period. Topic and professor offering the course will change with each offering. This course may be repeated when content is different. See e-campus for topic and professor.

HIST 620. U.S. History, 1763-1800. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of the political, economic, social and cultural history of the United States from the French and Indian War through the Federalist period. Particular emphasis is placed upon historiography and analysis of primary sources as reflected through class discussion, oral presentations and writing assignments.

HIST 622. U.S. History. 1789-1848. 3 credits.
An interpretative study of the political, economic, social, intellectual and cultural history of the United States from the ratification of the Constitution through the Mexican-American War. Particular emphasis placed upon historiography and analysis of primary sources as reflected through class discussion, oral presentations and writing assignments.

HIST 625. Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 credits.
A study of the background, development, personalities and aftermath of the Civil War. Special attention is given to the coming of the war and different explanations of its causes and to the policies and significance of Reconstruction. Students must demonstrate command of the historiography and key primary sources.

HIST 628. American Workers in the Industrial Age, 1877-1948. 3 credits.
This course undertakes a critical examination of the impact of industrialization, race and gender, consumerism, the New Deal, and two world wars on the lives of American workers and their unions. Students will learn the major historiographical problems in American labor history and develop a mastery of the secondary literature.

HIST 630. The Gilded Age. 3 credits.
An interpretative study of U.S. history from the conclusion of the Civil War until the assassination of William McKinley, with special emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, western and overseas expansion, early reform movements and politics. Students will address historiography and examine primary sources.

HIST 631. Reform, World War and Prosperity. 3 credits.
An interpretative study of U.S. history from the rise of Theodore Roosevelt through the 1920s, with a focus on the progressive reform movement and the problems and issues generated by the Nation's emergence as a world power and an industrial urban society. Emphasis is placed on command of historiography and analysis of primary source material.

HIST 632. Depression, War and Cold War: U.S. History, 1929-1961. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of U.S. history from the onset of the Great Depression in 1929, through the inauguration of John F. Kennedy in 1961. The analysis of historical texts, historiography of major figures and seminal events, and interpretation of major debates and historiographical trends will be emphasized in this seminar.

HIST 633. Reform, Upheaval and Reaction. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of U.S. history from the inauguration of John F. Kennedy in 1961 through the present. The analysis of historical texts, historiography of major figures and seminal events, and interpretation of major debates and historiographical tends will be emphasized in this seminar.

HIST 637. Practicum: Selected Topics in Local and Regional History. 3 credits.
Selected historical topics relating to the Shenandoah Valley and surrounding region are studied in depth. Students will undertake primary research and collaborate on final project. Topic and professor offering the course will change with each offering. This course may be repeated when content is different. See e-campus for topic and professor.

HIST 640. Graduate Internship in History. 3 credits.
Provides students with practical experience in using historical skills in a public or private agency. Periodic student reports and seminars are required. This course may be repeated for credit. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: Permission of department head.

HIST 650. Seminar in World History. 3 credits.
A topical approach to the study of history in areas aside from Europe and the United States. Topics might include Latin America, modern Japan, modern China, modern Africa, Islamic world or any pertinent topic falling within parameters of concentration. Topic and professor offering the course will change with each offering. This course may be repeated when content is different. See e-campus for topic and professor.

HIST 653. Patterns of World History. 3 credits.
This course provides an introduction to the historiography and research methods of world history. Emphasis is on integrating local and regional studies into a larger framework of world/global history utilizing the themes and methodological approaches that have been developed by the major contributors to this subfield of history.

HIST 655. Global Political and Social Thought to Early Modern Times. 3 credits.
Seminar in examining and analyzing political and social theory from different cultures though the 18th century with emphasis on historiographical interpretation.

HIST 656. The Global Economy and Nationalism. 3 credits.
The course examines the growth of the global economy since the 14th century. Concentrating on world systems/dependency theory approaches, it investigates the emergence of capitalism, its relationship to modern nationalism, and the role that the concept of development has played in the contemporary organization of nation-states.

HIST 660. Modern Japan. 3 credits.
A study of Japanese history from around the mid-19th century to the present. Major topics include the Tokugawa Shogunate, the Meiji Restoration, the rise of militarism, the Pacific War, the occupation of Japan and the new Japan. In depth analysis of the above topics through historiographical approach. Additional assignments.

HIST 661. Advanced Seminar in Marxist-Leninist Theory in Modern Global History.3 credits.
Advanced examination and analysis of Marxist-Leninist theory and its impact; analytical study of the main Marxist texts and historiography.

HIST 662. The Rise and Fall of Nazi-Germany, 1918-1945. 3 credits.
An advanced study of the period of Nazi domination in Germany covering the Weimar Republic, the rise of the NSDAP, the Third Reich and World War II. The nature of totalitarianism, the character of Adolf Hitler and the general Weltanschaaung of Germany under the Third Reich are emphasized.

HIST 663. Tudor-Stuart England. 3 credits.
A study of the economic, intellectual, political and religious development of the English people from 1485-1714, with particular focus on the constitutional struggles of the period. The analysis of historical texts, historiography of major figures and events, and interpretation of major debates and historiographical trends will be emphasized.

HIST 664. Renaissance and Reformation. 3 credits.
A study of high medieval civilization as an introduction to the history of modern Europe. Attention is given to the Italian and northern renaissance, the fragmentation of western christendom, the intellectual impact of Luther and Calvin on western thought, and the structure of Tudor despotism in England. Students must demonstrate command of the historiography.

HIST 666. The Family, 1400-1800. 3 credits.
Detailed analysis of the bibliography, methods, substance and interpretations of family history in Europe and America. Emphasis will be on sources, structure, patterns of change and continuity, and stages of family life to the Industrial Revolution.

HIST 670. Modern Africa. 3 credits.
Africa in the 20th century, with emphasis on Senegal, Ivory Coast, Ghana and Zaire. Special attention is given to the legacy of the slave trade and the effects of colonization on independent Africa. Prerequisite: HIST 395. Instructor's permission required to waive HIST 395 for non-history majors.

HIST 671. Seminar in Historical Research Methods. 3 credits.
Systematic presentation of the theories and approaches to historical research, including detailed analysis of historiography past and present. Required of all first year graduate students.

HIST 672. Historiography. 3 credits.
An intensive reading colloquium focused on selected historiographical issues, topics, concepts, methodologies and interpretations of European history from the Renaissance to the end of the 20th century. Readings in American titles will cover issues and topics from the Colonial period to the end of the 20th century. Issues and readings will change with each offering. Required of all first year graduate students.

HIST 673. Graduate Research and Writing Seminar. 3 credits.
An intensive research and writing seminar focused on the process of conceptualizing, researching, writing and refining historical research papers grounded in primary sources. Emphasis will be on evaluation of sources, interpretation of evidence, refinement of presentation and development of professional standards of criticism. Required of all first year graduate students.

HIST 675. Soviet Russia. 3 credits.
The seminar covers the period from the Russian Revolution in 1917 to the present. Topics include pre-revolutionary Russia, the revolutions of 1917, civil war, the 1920s Stalinism, World War II, the Cold War, the disintegration, the current situation in the former Soviet states, and the historiographical literature.

HIST 677. Medieval Europe. 3 credits.
Attention is focused on Europe in the middle ages, with a concentration on social and intellectual aspects and on the development of parliamentary institutions. Students must demonstrate command of the historiographical sources.

HIST 678. Europe since 1914. 3 credits.
An advanced study of the lands between Germany and Russia, from the Baltic to the Balkans. Emphasis is on the Hapsburg monarchy and its successor states, the origins of the World Wars, the post-World War II communist governments, and the cultural and intellectual contributions of the Eastern European peoples.

HIST 680. Modern China. 3 credits.
An in-depth study of Chinese history since 1840, with particular emphasis on China's response to the West, the demise of imperial China, abortive experiments in republicanism, the origin and evolution of Chinese Communism under Mao and after Mao's death. The historiography of seminal figures and events will be emphasized.

HIST 681. Early Modern Europe: The New Worlds of Exploration and Science. 3 credits.
A study of the major changes in world view brought on by exploration and science in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries in Europe. Attention is given to the causes of each movement as well as the individuals and the technology involved. Students must demonstrate command of the historiographical sources.

HIST 683. Baroque and Revolutionary Europe, 1648-1815. 3 credits.
This course examines the old regime, its institutions, the causes of popular revolts, the enlightenment, the beginnings of industrialism and the impact of the French Revolution upon Europe. Analysis of texts, the historiography of major figures and seminal events, and the interpretation of major debates and historiographical trends will be emphasized.

HIST 684. 19th-Century European Civilization, 1815-1914. 3 credit
An interpretive study of European history (and the historiography devoted to the period) from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. Particular attention is given to the intellectual climate of the period, with emphasis on liberalism, nationalism, socialism and nihilism.

HIST 685. The Arab Middle East, 1945 to Present. 3 credits.
A survey of the special problems which have beset the Arab Middle East since World War II. Special emphasis will be given to Palestinian nationalism and to the PLO, to the origins of civil conflict in Lebanon, to Iraqi and Syrian Baathism, and to the revival of Islamic fundamentalism.

HIST 686. Europe Since 1914. 3 credits.
An interpretive study of European history (and the major interpreters of that history) from World War I to the Cold War, with special emphasis on the revolutions of 1917-1919, the rise of totalitarianism, the origins of the World War II, the Cold War and its aftermath, and the continuing crisis of values.

HIST 687. World War II. 3 credits.
This course examines World War II in Europe and in Asia. The major military campaigns are discussed, as are collaboration, resistance and the war crimes trials. Analysis of texts, the historiography of major figures and seminal events, and the interpretation of major debates and historiographical trends will be emphasized.

HIST 690. Special Topics in History. 3 credits.
Selected topics are studied in depth. Topic and professor offering the course will change with each offering. This course may be repeated when content is different. See e-campus for topic and professor. Prerequisite: Permission of department head.

HIST 691. Editing Historical Documents. 3 credits.
A seminar in the techniques of analyzing manuscript collections in order to create an edition of historical documents. Both the theory and methodology of documentary editing will be emphasized, including collection, selection, transcription, annotation, proofing, illustration, indexing and publication. Software tools and issues will be considered.

HIST 692. American Material Culture. 3 credits.
Focused readings on material culture studies. Readings explore approaches, theories and methods of various disciplines that utilize material culture as evidence. Emphasis is on persistent themes in material culture studies including regional variation and cultural transfer, identity formation and class issues, consumerism, and ethnicity and acculturation.

HIST 693. Historic Preservation. 3 credits.
An introduction to the philosophy and technique of historic preservation. Course examines the Secretary of the Interior's guidelines for restoration, state and national register forms and procedures, historic architecture, structural analysis, restoration techniques as well as the business aspects of historic preservation projects. Students undertake leadership assignments for architectural field assessments and national register nominations.

HIST 694. Introduction to Museum Work. 3 credits. (Cross-listed as ART/ARTH 594.)
A study of the philosophy and practice of museum work. Emphasis on museum administration, conservation, exhibition and education. Provides background for internships and employment in the field. Students undertake a focused research project as well as leadership assignments for class projects.

HIST 695. Introduction to Archives and Manuscripts. 3 credits.
An introduction to archives administration and the principles and practices of archival arrangement and description. Through targeted readings and leadership roles in discussion, as well as field trips and projects, graduate students will explore topics in appraisal, acquisition, preservation, and intellectual and physical access, as well as contemporary ethical, legal and technological issues.

HIST 696. Introduction to Public History. 3 credits.
An introduction to the varied and interdisciplinary "field" of public history–such as community/local history, historic preservation, archives, historical archaeology, museum studies, business and policy history, documentary editing and publishing, and documentary films–through readings, class discussions, occasional guest speakers, occasional field trips and an extended public history research project.

HIST 697. Genealogical Research and Family History. 3 credits.
A seminar on the theory and methodology of genealogical research, including the critical evaluation of sources, incisive documentation, online resources and the critical analysis of research findings. The course will require extensive utilization of local and state repositories and engagement with local research topics as well as with personal data. Personal genealogical information should be collected and secured at home before the state of the semesters.

HIST 698. Comprehensive Continuance. 1 credit.
Continued preparation in anticipation of the comprehensive examination. Course may be repeated as needed.

HIST 699. Thesis Continuance. 2 credits.
Continued study, research and writing in the area of thesis concentration. Course may be repeated as needed.

HIST 700. Thesis. 3 credits each semester.
This course is graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis.

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