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November 2014


November 5   - Take Your Class Outside: Teaching in Outdoor Settings
Location:  UREC 128

Register Here


Outdoor education offers an important alternative to traditional learning settings, providing hands-on experiences that enhance (or even replace) classroom activities across disciplines.  UREC is a partner for  JMU Faculty who are interested in creating curriculum in the outdoors, and with the Office of Environmental Sustainability and Stewardship, created the “Take Your Class Outside” program in 2014.  This roundtable, led by UREC staff and JMU faculty who participated in the program, introduces the process of creating an ‘outdoor class,’ including pedagogical approaches, field logistics, and student responses.

Facilitators:

Guy deBrun, Adventure and Challenge Course Programs, UREC; Robert Brent, Ph.D., Integrated Science and Technology; Wayne Teel, Ph.D., Integrated Science and Technology; CJ Brodrick-Hartman, Ph.D., Integrated Science and Tehcnology  and Executuve Director of the Office of Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability.



November 13 - Assignment Design: Creating Aligned Assignments (Workshop)
Location: Rose 3311
Light breakfast provided at 9am; lunch at 12
Wine and cheese reception to follow afternoon session.  
(Each session presents the same information.)

Register Here for the morning session (9-12pm)

Register Here for the afternoon session (1-4pm)

Results from the 2013 National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) provost survey indicate that some of the most valuable and useful information on student learning comes from classroom-based assessments which take the form of well-designed and crafted assignments. Yet, it is difficult and scholarly work to craft an assignment which can serve as an assessment and one that is well aligned with learning outcomes to elicit students demonstration of their knowledge, skills and abilities. This workshop will consider good assignment design, issues of alignment, discussion of curriculum mapping, and exploration of an assignment library and other available resources.

Particpants are expected to bring an assigment.

Facilitators:

Natasha Jankowski is Associate Director of the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) and Research Assistant Professor with the Department of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She holds a PhD in Higher Education from the University of Illinois, an M.A. in Higher Education Administration from Kent State University, and a B.A. in philosophy from Illinois State University. She previously worked with the Office of Community College Research and Leadership studying communitycolleges and public policy.

Paul Gaston is one of the four authors of the Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP).  He has written books on accreditation and the Bologna process, and is an experienced scholar with a focus on higher education reform, public policy, and the humanities. He serves as Kent State University's sole Trustees Professor in the Department of English. He has served as Provost at Kent State University and at Northern Kentucky University along with various other faculty and administrative roles. He holds a PhD in English from the University of Virginia.

Sponsored by:

Quality Collaborative Grant from the Lumina Corporation and SCHEV



November 14 - Managing Your Faculty Identity Online
Location: Rose 5211

Register Here


Over the past two decades, the rise of the internet has changed not just the ways that faculty interact with the communities that encompass faculty roles in teaching, research, service and leadership, but also how academics are asked and often expected to brand themselves as public intellectuals. Blogs, e-zines, online academic journals, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIN, digital repositories – each platform presents a host of opportunities as well as questions about how faculty use their limited time wisely, present a coherent and professional image, and manage their identity online. 

Facilitators
Meg Mulrooney, PhD, Associate Vice Provost for University Programs; Associate Professor of History
Yasmeen Shorish, Assistant Professor and Physical and Life Sciences Librarian
Douglas Harrison, PhD, Department of English and Center For Faculty Innovation


November 14 - Assignment Charrette (Workshop)

Location:  Rose 3311, a light breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Register Here

A charrette is a process whereby faculty come together to share and discuss assignments designed to elicit students demonstration of specified learning outcomes. Faculty will share and discuss an assignment, provide feedback and commentary for revision, and engage in a guided process of assignment review. Faculty participants will work together in groups to refine, hone, and better align assignments to learning outcomes, discuss student involvement and perception of assignments, and begin to build regular conversation on assignment design into their ongoing processes.

Particpants are expected to bring an assigment.

Facilitators:

Natasha Jankowski is Associate Director of the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) and Research Assistant Professor with the Department of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She holds a PhD in Higher Education from the University of Illinois, an M.A. in Higher Education Administration from Kent State University, and a B.A. in philosophy from Illinois State University. She previously worked with the Office of Community College Research and Leadership studying communitycolleges and public policy.

Paul Gaston is one of the four authors of the Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP). He has written books on accreditation and the Bologna process, and is an experienced scholar with a focus on higher education reform, public policy, and the humanities. He serves as Kent State University's sole Trustees Professor in the Department of English. He has served as Provost at Kent State University and at Northern Kentucky University along with various other faculty and administrative roles. He holds a PhD in English from the University of Virginia.

Sponsored by:

Quality Collaborative Grant from the Lumina Corporation and SCHEV



November 19 - The Lisanby Museum and Prism Gallery: Learning through the Arts
Location: Festival Conference and Student Center, Conference Room 4

Register Here


Housed in the lower level of the Festival Conference and Student Center, the Madison Art Collection (MAC) has an extraordinary collection of aesthetic and culturally significant objects.  In addition to providing important materials for research and exhibition, MAC also offers resources that can enhance course development.  Join MAC Director, Dr. Kathryn Stevens, and Associate Director, Mrs. Melanie Brimhall, as they introduce the Lisansby Museum, Prism Gallery, and Study Center Case as teaching tools across the curriculum.  

Facilitators
Dr. Kate Stevens, Ph.D., School of Art, Design, and Art History; Madison Art Collection
Ms. Melanie Brimhall, M.A., Madison Art Collection

Sponsors
Madison Art Collection


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