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Next Month

October 2014

October 24: Seminar: The Critical Role of Higher Education in Science Teacher Preparation and K-12 Outreach: How to Start Preparing our 2025 Freshmen Now:

Bioscience 1007

The Critical Role of Higher Education in Science Teacher Preparation and K-12 Outreach: How to Start Preparing our 2025 Freshmen Now 

Kerry Cresawn, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, James Madison University

The US currently ranks 20th out of the 34 OECD countries in science education as reported by the most recent PISA results which assess science competencies in >500,000 15 yr. olds.  Contributing factors include the high-stakes testing, teacher attrition rate of 50% within the first five years, and the very limited time for teaching K-5 science, which is at an all time low of 11% since 1998 while students spend 17% of their day on material management such as cleaning off their desk. Proposing a solution for improving the science education available to our future students is overwhelming and frustrating, however, we have both a responsibility and an opportunity to make a significant impact on this problem by both better preparing future teachers and sharing our knowledge, creativity, enthusiasm, and resources for science with the K-12 community.

In this seminar, I will present 4 different projects I have been involved in over the past year, which bridge scholarship, teacher preparation, and outreach. The first of these is an outreach program to prepare future middle school science teachers to design and implement literacy integrated and culturally relevant science experiences for ELLs. The second program is a traveling science program I designed with a focus on keeping the foundations of the S in STEM and on scaffolding from macroscopic to microscopic concepts and is available to 48 elementary schools in our region. The last two are collaborative efforts between the other 3 CSM science departments and the College of Education to recruit, retain, and better prepare high quality future high school science teachers.  Each of these projects includes a scholarship component to address questions including those related to the impact of these experiences on both the future teachers and K-12 students. 

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October 31: Seminar: The Physiology of Yawning:

Bioscience 1007

Melanie Shoup-Knox, PhD.
Department of Psychology, James Madison University

Yawning occurs across all five classes of vertebrates, suggesting an evolutionarily old but retained function.  Recently, it has been suggested that yawning may serve a thermoregulatory function.  The current research explores factors that contribute to central thermoregulation and examines the physiology of yawning that may contribute to such a function in both rats and humans.

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Current Month

November 2014

November 7: Seminar: Water as a source of infection MORE >

December