Skip to Main Content
 


 

 

Looking for a Good Read?

You are in the main content Speaker's Series
COMING SOON

 
Author: Jason Riley

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents:  Jason Riley

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 | 5:30 p.m. | Zane Showker Hall 105

"The State Against Blacks"

Jason Riley is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a columnist for the Wall Street Journal, where he worked for more than 20 years writing opinion pieces on politics, economics, education, immigration and race, among other subjects. He’s also a commentator for Fox News, where he’s appeared for more than a decade, and a frequent public speaker.

After joining the Journal in 1994, he was named a senior editorial page writer in 2000 and a member of the Editorial Board in 2005. In 2008 he published "Let Them In," which argues for a more free-market oriented U.S. immigration policy. His second book, “Please Stop Helping Us,” which is about the track record of government efforts to help the black underclass, was published in 2014. He joined the Manhattan Institute in 2015.

 
Author: George Akerlof

JIN Lecturer:  George Akerlof

Thursday, April 7, 2016 | 3:00 p.m. | Grafton Stovall Theatre

"Phishing for Phools"

The College of Business is proud to welcome American Economist and Nobel Memorial Prize winner in Economics, George Akerlof. 

Dr. Akerlof was educated at Yale and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he received his PhD in 1966, the same year he became an assistant professor at Berkeley. He became a full professor in 1978.Professor Akerlof is a 2001 recipient of the Alfred E. Nobel Prize in Economic Science; he was honored for his theory of asymmetric information and its effect on economic behavior. He is also the 2006 President of the American Economic Association. He served earlier as vice president and member of the executive committee. He is also on the North American Council of the Econometric Association.

 
Author: Greald O'Driscoll

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents:  Gerald O'Driscoll

Monday, April 11, 2016 | 5:30 p.m. | Zane Showker Hall 105

"Monetary Policy:  The Knowledge Problem"

Gerald O’Driscoll is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. He is a widely quoted expert on international monetary and financial issues. Previously the director of the Center for International Trade and Economics at the Heritage Foundation, O’Driscoll was senior editor of the annual Index of Economic Freedom, co-published by Heritage and the Wall Street Journal. He has also served as vice president and director of policy analysis at Citigroup. Before that, he was vice president and economic adviser at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. He also served as staff director of the congessionally mandated Meltzer Commission on international financial institutions. O’Driscoll has taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara; Iowa State University, and New York University. He is widely published in leading publications, including the Wall Street Journal. He appears frequently on national radio and television, including Fox Business News, CNBC, and Bloomberg. He is a member of the Mont Pelerin Society, and is a director of the Association of Private Enterprise Education. O’Driscoll holds a BA in economics from Fordham University, and an MA and PhD in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.

 
Author: Emily Chamlee-Wright

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents:  Emily Chamlee-Wright

Wednesday, April 20, 2016 | 5:30 p.m. | Zane Showker Hall 105

"Social Capital, Commercial Relationships, and Good Governance:  The case of a New Orleans neighborhood in the wake of disaster"

Emily Chamlee-Wright is the Provost and Dean of Washington College located in Chestertown, Maryland.  She received her PhD in Econmics from George Mason University in 1993.  Her research investigates the confluence of cultural and economic processes. She has published four books, including The Cultural and Political Economy of Recovery: Social Learning in a Post-Disaster Environment, and co-editor of The Political Economy of Hurricane Katrina and Community Development with Virgil Storr. 

Dr. Chamlee-Wright is a former W.K. Kellogg National Leadership Fellow and a recipient of the Underkoffler Award for Excellence in Teaching from Beloit College. In 2013, the Department of Economics and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at George Mason University recognized Chamlee-Wright with a Distinguished Alumna Award.

 
Author: Dean Stansel

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents:  Dean Stansel

Thursday, April 21, 2016 | TBA | TBA

"Economic Freedom:  What It Is and Why It Matters"

Dean Stansel is a Research Associate Professor at Southern Methodist University's O'Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom in the Cox School of Business in Dallas, TX. He earned a B.A. in Economics and Political Science from Wake Forest University in 1991 and a Ph.D. in Economics from George Mason University in 2002. Prior to entering academia, Stansel worked for seven years at the Cato Institute, where he authored (or coauthored) more than 60 publications on fiscal policy issues, including op-eds in the Wall Street JournalWashington PostInvestor’s Business Daily, and the Chicago Tribune. His academic research has focused on the impact of competition between local governments on fiscal and economic outcomes, the relationship between the size of government and economic growth, state fiscal crises, and a variety of other issues in the areas of public economics and urban economics.  In 2011, Stansel was selected by the Economic Freedom Project to help publicize the findings of the Economic Freedom of the World Report, the Economic Freedom of North America Report, and the virtues of economic freedom in general through a variety of media interviews (averaging about 75 interviews per year since then). In 2013, he published the first ever local index of economic freedom and was chosen to be the primary author of the annual Economic Freedom of North America Report.

RECENT SPEAKERS

Stephen Miller | russell roberts | Deirdre McCloskey | Jayme Lemke | Jennifer Baker

 

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents:  Stephen Miller

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 | 5:30 p.m. | Zane Showker Hall G005

"Income & Wealth Inequality: What's the Big Deal"

Stephen Miller is the Executive Director of the Manuel H. Johnson Center for Political Economy and Adams-Bibby Chair of Free Enterprise at Troy University.  Miller received his Ph.D. in Economics from George Mason University in 2006.  He is currently an Associate Professor of Economics at the Sorrell College if Business at Troy University.   Miller has written many journal articles, book chapters and papers on topics ranging from economic education to the ideology of economics in society as well as government.  

Stphen Miller's research with Bryan Caplan on intelligence and economic beliefs has been mentioned in the Wall Street Journal’s “This Week in Ideas” column and on the Freakonomics Blog. More recently, Miller's research on Ability Bias and the external returns to education was discussed in this Carolina Journal interview.

generic
 
Author: russell roberts

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents:  Russell Roberts

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 | 5:30 p.m. | Zane Showker Hall G005

"How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life: An Unexpected Guide to Human Nature and Happiness."

Russell Roberts is the John and Jean De Nault Research Fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.  Along with his weekly podcast EconTalk–hour-long conversations with authors, economists, and business leaders, Roberts is the author of several highly rated books teaching economic lessons and ideas through fiction.  His latest book, How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life: An Unexpected Guide to Human Nature and Happiness, takes the lessons from Adam Smith’s little-known masterpiece, The Theory of Moral Sentiments and applies them to modern life.

A three-time teacher of the year, Roberts has taught at George Mason University, Washington University in St. Louis (where he was the founding director of what is now the Center for Experiential Learning), the University of Rochester, Stanford University, and the University of California, Los Angeles. He earned his PhD from the University of Chicago and his undergraduate degree in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 
Author: Deirdre McCloskey

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents: Deirdre McCloskey

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | 4:00 p.m. | Grafton-Stovall Theater

"Bourgeois Equality: How Ideas, Not Capital or Institutions, Enriched the World"

Deirdre N. McCloskey is a Distinguished Professor of Economics, History, English, and Communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She taught there from 2000 to 2015 and was also a visiting Professor of philosophy at Erasmus University, Rotterdam. Since October 2007 she has received six honorary doctorates. In 2013, she received the Julian L. Simon Memorial Award from the Competitive Enterprise Institute for her work examining factors in history that led to advancement in human achievement and prosperity. Deirdre has written 17 books and around 400 scholarly pieces on topics ranging from technical economics and statistical theory to transgender advocacy and the ethics of the bourgeois virtues. 

 

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents: Jayme Lemke

Tuesday, October 6, 2015 | 5:00 p.m. | Zane Showker Hall G005

"Unlocking the Gilded Cage: Economic Rights in American Women's History"

Jayme Lemke (Ph.D., Economics, George Mason University) is a Senior Research Fellow and Associate Director of Academic and Student Programs at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a Senior Fellow in the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. Her specialization is in public choice economics, constitutional political economy, and the political economy of women’s rights. 

 

Gilliam Center Speakers Series Presents: Jennifer Baker

Wednesday, September 16, 2015 | 5:30 p.m. | Zane Showker Hall G005

"Visible Hands: Virtue in the Market"

Jennifer Baker is a graduate of Brown University (B.A. in Philosophy and Political Science, 1995) and the University of Arizona (Ph.D., 2003). Her research is on virtue ethics, and she looks to ancient ethical theories as positive examples of how ethics ought to be done today. She teaches courses on ethical and political theory, environmental ethics and philosophy, business ethics, bioethics, and American philosophy.

generic