Department of Sociology and Anthropology

 

Sociology Program

 

Mission Statement
The mission of the Sociology program is to develop students' ability to analyze the social world by using diverse sociological theories and research methods that stress the importance of social, cultural and historical contexts for understanding relationships between social actors and structures.

 

Goals
To fulfill its mission, the sociology program cultivates the sociological imagination by:

Developing students' appreciation of the social component of all dimensions of human experience, including:

 

  • understanding human diversity and alternatives in social orientations and practices within and across societies.
  • the importance and usefulness of viewing oneself and others in social and historical contexts of diverse locations and cultures.
  • the varied and contested nature of different views of the social world.
  • Instructing with regard to schools of thought and methodological skills within the sociological tradition by providing students with:
  • an understanding of the theories that explain, interpret and critique patterns of social relations.
  • an ability to place the development of sociological research and practice within a social and historical context.
  • an understanding of the logic and use of sociology's various methodological skills and their relations to theoretical and philosophical commitments.
  • analytical skills required in the application and evaluation of sociological research methods.

 

To nourish disciplined, creative and spontaneous participation in the sociological endeavor by cultivating:

 

  • the importance in scholarly inquiry of honesty, introspection, logical consistency and openness to alternative ideas.
  • the norms of the scholarly community and a democratic society (openness to testing, reinterpretation and refutation, openness to public scrutiny, collegiality).
  • the scholarly traits necessary to practice sociology (objectivity, value clarity, skill development, perceptiveness, creativity, logical consistency, hard work and discipline).
  • the importance of social science to social policy decisions; political, social and cultural activity; and personal growth.

 

Career Opportunities and Marketable Skills
Working as a professional sociologist most often requires a graduate degree, but the following careers, some supplemented with collateral training, are representative of our previous graduates.

 

  • Criminologist, probation/parole officer, police officer, corrections officer
  • Teacher, professor, social worker, researcher, case manager, biostatistician
  • Admissions officer, demographer, data analyst, personnel interviewer
  • Nursing home director, hospice coordinator, day care provider/director, epidemiologist
  • Mediator, congressional aide, writer/author, advocacy worker,job analyst
  • Population specialist, management trainee, sociologist, market research analyst
  • Secret service agent, customs/immigration officer, labor relations specialist
  • Personnel administrator, public relations specialist, public health statistician
  • Urban/regional planner, race relations specialist, underwriter,fundraiser
  • Education specialist, community services director

 

A major in sociology provides skills and perspectives that enhance all careers. Students who study sociology gain:

 

  • Increased general knowledge.
  • Broadened viewpoints informed by sociological perspectives.
  • Sensitivity to organizational issues and social change.
  • Abilities in critical thinking, analysis, writing and communication, examination of attitudes and values, and enhancement of computer skills.

 

Further information about careers in sociology is available from the American Sociological Association website under "Careers and Jobs."

 

Co-curricular Activities and Organizations

 

  • Alpha Kappa Delta, the Sociological Honorary Society
  • Student Research Symposium
  • The Sociology Club

 

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Degree and Major Requirements

 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

 

Degree Requirements

 

Required Courses Credit Hours
General Education 1 41
Foreign Language classes (intermediate level required)2 0-14
Philosophy course (in addition to General Education courses) 3
University electives 23-37
Major requirements (listed below) and electives 39

  120

 

1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
2 The foreign language requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of the second semester of the intermediate level of the student's chosen language (typically 232) or by placing out of that language through the Department of Foreign Language's placement test.

 

Major Requirements
To earn the B.A. degree with a sociology major, students must complete a minimum of 39 credit hours in sociology. Of these credit hours, 18 are required courses; the remaining 21 credit hours are electives chosen from over 30 sociology courses.

 

Students must earn at least a "C-" in all sociology classes or any course that is substituted for a sociology core course. If a student earns below a "C-" in a course, he/she can re-take the course once in order to meet the "C-" standard.

 

Courses Credit Hours
GSOCI 110. Social Issues in Global Context 3
GSOCI 140. Microsociology: The Individual in Society 3
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method 1 3
SOCI 231. Introduction to Social Statistics 2 3
SOCI 300. Sociological Inquiry 3 3
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar 4, 5, 6 3
Sociology electives 7 21

  39

 

1 Prerequisite for SOCI 200: GSOCI 110, GSOCI 140 or SOCI 101.
2 Students can substitute SOCI 231 with MATH 220, PSYC 210 or COB 191, if SPSS is used in the course, but must take an additional sociology course to complete the required 39 hours of sociology.
3 Prerequisite for SOCI 300: SOCI 200 and SOCI 231 (or equivalent), sociology majors only.
4 Prerequisite for SOCI 480: SOCI 300.
5 This course fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.
6 Students may fulfill the senior seminar requirement by completing a supervised internship with a substantial writing expectation. Students must secure their own internship placement before enrolling in the internship course. Consult an adviser or the sociology program coordinator for details.
7 If a course other than SOCI 231 is used to meet the statistics requirement, 24 elective credits will be required to reach the 39 credit hour total.

 

Bachelor of Science in Sociology

 

Degree Requirements

 

Required Courses Credit Hours
General Education 1 41
Quantitative requirement 2 3
Scientific Literacy requirement 2 3-4
University electives 32-33
Major requirements (listed below) 39

  120

 

1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
2 In addition to course work taken to fulfill General Education requirement.

 

Major Requirements
To earn the B.S. degree with a sociology major, students must complete a minimum of 39 credit hours in sociology. Of these credit hours, 18 are required courses; the remaining 21 credit hours are electives chosen from over 30 sociology courses. Students must observe the prerequisite sequencing of required courses as shown in the course descriptions.

 

Students must earn at least a "C-" in all sociology classes or any course that is substituted for a sociology core course. If a student earns below a "C-" in a course, he/she can re-take the course once in order to meet the "C-" standard.

 

Courses Credit Hours
GSOCI 110. Social Issues in Global Context 3
GSOCI 140. Microsociology: The Individual in Society 3
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method 1 3
SOCI 231. Introduction to Social Statistics 2 3
SOCI 300. Sociological Inquiry 3 3
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar 4, 5, 6 3
Sociology electives 7 21

  39

 

1 Prerequisite for SOCI 200: GSOCI 110, GSOCI 140 or SOCI 101.
2 Students can substitute SOCI 231 with MATH 220, PSYC 210 or COB 191, if SPSS is used in the course, but must take an additional sociology course to complete the required 39 hours of sociology.
3 Prerequisite for SOCI 300: SOCI 200 and SOCI 231 (or equivalent), sociology majors only.
4 Prerequisite for SOCI 480: SOCI 300.
5 This course fulfills the College of Arts and Letters writing-intensive requirement for the major.
6 Students may fulfill the senior seminar requirement by completing a supervised internship with a substantial writing expectation. Students must secure their own internship placement before enrolling in the internship course. Consult an adviser or the sociology program coordinator for details.
7 If a course other than SOCI 231 is used to meet the statistics requirement, 24 elective credits will be required to reach the 39 credit hour total.

 

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Concentrations
The sociology program encourages majors to select electives that create a coherent program of study suited to their special needs and interests. Such a focus would involve four or more courses from the following concentration groupings: 1

 

Environment, Technologies and Innovations  
SOCI 311. Sociology of the Environment  
SOCI 313. Processes of Social and Cultural Change  
SOCI 315. Technology and Society  
SOCI 316. Space, Time, and the Human Environment  
SOCI 344. Work and Society  
SOCI 348. Introducing the Developing Societies  
SOCI 354. Social and Cultural Stratification  
SOCI 360. Social Movements  
SOCI 361. Sociology of Organizations  
SOCI 366. Sociology of Knowledge  
SOCI 375. Medical Sociology  
Political and Global Analysis  
SOCI 214. Social Deviance  
SOCI 260. Sociology of Culture  
SOCI 313. Processes of Social and Cultural Change  
SOCI 321. Politics of Society  
SOCI 342. Muslim Movements in the Middle East  
SOCI 344. Work and Society  
SOCI 348. Introduction to Developing Societies  
SOCI 354. Social and Cultural Stratification  
SOCI 361. Sociology of Organizations  
SOCI 375. Medical Sociology  
SOCI 379. Africentric Social Thought  
SOCI 478. Africa Centered Worldview  
Community Action and Evaluation  
SOCI 265. Sociology of the Community  
SOCI 276. Sociology of Families  
SOCI 280. Social Gerontology  
SOCI 321. Politics of Society  
SOCI 322. Sociology of Religion  
SOCI 327. Juvenile Delinquency  
SOCI 341. Sociology of Education  
SOCI 352. Birth, Death, Sex: Exploring Demography  
SOCI 360. Social Movements  
SOCI 375. Medical Sociology  
Markets and Cultures  
SOCI 260. Sociology of Culture  
SOCI 329. Psychological and Sociological Aspects of Sport  
SOCI 341. Sociology of Education  
SOCI 344. Work and Society  
SOCI 345. Sociology of Occupations and Professions  
SOCI 346. Leisure in Contemporary Society  
SOCI 348. Introduction to Developing Societies  
SOCI 358. Sociology of Consumption  
SOCI 361. Sociology of Organizations  
SOCI 368. Contemporary American Culture  
SOCI 478. Africa Centered Worldview  
Social Inequalities and Public Policy  
SOCI 214. Social Deviance  
SOCI 276. Sociology of Families  
SOCI 311. Sociology of the Environment  
SOCI 321. Politics in Society  
SOCI 325. Criminology  
SOCI 336. Race and Ethnicity  
SOCI 337. Sociology of Gender  
SOCI 354. Social and Cultural Stratification  
SOCI 360. Social Movements  
SOCI 366. Sociology of Knowledge  
SOCI 367. Sociology of Sexuality  
SOCI 369. Law and Society  
SOCI 375. Medical Sociology  
SOCI 379. Africentric Social Thought  

 

1 Within any of the defined concentrations students may gain credits toward completing the concentration through certain special topics or other courses. On occasion, courses taken outside the major or university may qualify. For special topics courses in sociology, see the instructor of record for that course. For other questions or possibilities see an adviser or the sociology program coordinator.

 

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Recommended Schedule for Majors 1
The following is an example of a four-year course of study for a student seeking a degree in sociology:

 

First Year Credit Hours
GSOCI 110. Social Issues in a Global Context 3
GSOCI 140. Microsociology: The Individual in Society 3
Sociology elective 3

  9

 

Second Year Credit Hours
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method 3
SOCI 231. Social Statistics 3
Sociology electives 3

  9

 

Third Year Credit Hours
SOCI 300. Sociological Inquiry 3
Electives 6-9

  9-12

 

Fourth Year Credit Hours
Sociology electives 6-9
SOCI 480. Senior Seminar (majors take this during their 3
final semester at JMU)  

  9-12

 

1 Transfer students on a two-year course of study should change "Year" in this sequence to "Semester."

 

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Minor Requirements

 

Sociology Minor
To minor in sociology, a student must complete a minimum of 18 credit hours of sociology course work including three core credit hours and 15 elective credit hours.

 

Core Requirements Credit Hours
SOCI 200. Development of Social Thought and Method 3
Sociology electives 15

  18

 

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Anthropology Program

 

Mission Statement
Anthropology is unique among the social sciences in that it celebrates humans as biological organisms and as innovative, creative, culture-bearing beings. Through course work, field schools, study abroad, independent studies and internships, students learn about cultural, linguistic, and biological diversity, human biological characteristics, and the human past as revealed by archaeology. The anthropology program provides globally-oriented courses that stress critical thinking, method and theory, gathering and interpreting data, intensive reading and writing, hands-on learning, and the research methods and techniques used by anthropologists to understand contemporary human problems.

 

Goals
The Anthropology program has the following goals:

 

  • To introduce students to the nature of culture and of diverse cultural systems, their social organization, and how anthropologists interpret cultural differences and similarities.
  • To introduce students to the relevance of human biology for understanding contemporary human populations and biological variation and disease, and to provide them with the fundamentals of evolutionary theory and the fossil and genetic evidence that supports it.
  • To develop student understanding of cultural origins and the development of human societies through the analysis of material remains (artifacts) left by prehistoric and historic cultures.
  • To encourage an integrative approach to understanding the human condition that incorporates the contributions of all sub-disciplines of anthropology.

 

Career Opportunities and Marketable Skills
An undergraduate degree in Anthropology provides a solid foundation for a wide range of rewarding careers. Students with a B.A. or B.S. degree in anthropology have gone on to become:

 

  • Graduate students in archaeology, cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistics and area studies programs
  • Professors of anthropology in each of the sub-disciplines
  • Professional students in law, medicine, education, international affairs, public policy and public health
  • Americorps and Peace Corps volunteers
  • Archivists
  • Business executives
  • City planners and government officials
  • College librarians
  • Field archaeologists
  • Cultural affairs directors
  • Historical preservationists
  • Museum and zoo curators and staff
  • International aid workers and development consultants
  • Management trainees
  • Nurses, medical technicians and physicians assistants
  • Forensic analysts
  • Coroners
  • Technical writers
  • Conservation scientists and practitioners
  • The anthropology major is a liberal arts program that stresses such marketable skills as:
  • Data analysis
  • Computer skills
  • Critical thinking
  • Global knowledge
  • Research skills
  • Rigorous writing and presentation skills

 

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Co-curricular Activities and Organizations

 

  • Lambda Alpha, Anthropology Honors Society
  • Student Anthropology Club

 

Degree and Major Requirements

 

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology

 

Degree Requirements

 

Required Courses Credit Hours
General Education 1 41
Foreign Language classes (intermediate level required) 2 0-14
Philosophy course (in addition to General Education courses) 3
University electives (beyond major) 25-39
Major requirements (listed below) 40-41

  120

 

1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill.
The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
2 The foreign language requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of the second semester of the intermediate level of the student's chosen language (typically 232) or by placing out of that language through the Department of Foreign Languages, Literatures and Cultures' placement test.

 

Bachelor of Science in Anthropology

 

Degree Requirements

 

Required Courses Credit Hours
General Education 1 41
Quantitative requirement 2 3
Scientific Literacy requirement 2 3-4
University electives 35-36
Major requirements (listed below) and electives 40-41

  120

 

1 The General Education program contains a set of requirements each student must fulfill. The number of credit hours necessary to fulfill these requirements may vary.
2 MATH 220, Statistics, is strongly recommended for those students who have not taken that course or an equivalent as part of their General Education.

 

Major Requirements
To earn a B.A. or B.S. degree in anthropology, students complete 40-41 credit hours in the major. Given the diverse opportunities the discipline provides, the major is designed to allow students the opportunity to work closely with their advisers to develop a curriculum appropriate to their personal and professional interests. Those students wishing to do so may elect to pursue a concentration in one of the three sub-disciplines of cultural, biological or archaeological anthropology.

 

The concentrations guide students in choosing courses to enhance opportunities for graduate school or allow them to pursue an area of personal interest within the larger discipline of anthropology. Up to two elective courses from a discipline outside of anthropology may be applied to the major. Elective courses from outside of the program must be approved by the student's adviser and must be at the 300- or 400-level. Students must receive at least a "C-" in a class to have it count toward the major.

 

General Program
The general program provides students with a holistic introduction to the breadth of anthropology highlighting experience in the sub-disciplines of cultural, archaeological and biological anthropology, as well as introductory experiences in linguistics. The program is designed to provide students with a well rounded understanding of the discipline in preparation for advanced graduate training or as an adjunct to their personal and professional aspirations.

 

Required Courses Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology 3
GANTH 196. Biological Anthropology 3
ANTH 197. Archaeology 3
ANTH 201. The Discipline of Anthropology 1
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology 1 3
One course from the following: 3-4
ANTH 315. Human Evolution  
ANTH 316. Human Evolutionary Psychology  
ANTH 435. Ethnographic Genres and Methods  
ANTH 455. Archaeology: Methods of Analysis and Interpretation  
One elective from each of the following: cultural anthropology, 9
biological anthropology and archaeology  
Other electives 2, 3 15

  40-41

 

1 Students should take two of GANTH 195, GANTH 196 or ANTH 197 and at least one anthropology elective before taking ANTH 375.
2 Students may take up to two adviser approved electives at the 300 or 400 level from courses outside of the program.
3 Students should consider including ANTH 305, Language and Culture, as one of their electives.

 

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Concentrations

 

Cultural Anthropology
Cultural anthropology is at the core of anthropology. It provides students with in-depth experience in the interpretation and comparison of cultures. It is closely linked to the humanities and to other social sciences. Students learn what culture is, how different cultural systems and forms of social organization work, how language both reflects and constitutes culture, and methodological and theoretical frameworks for interpreting cultural differences and similarities. Students work closely with cultural anthropology faculty to choose a series of electives from both within and outside of the department to refine their own research interests.

 

Students are encouraged (but not required) to become proficient in a foreign language beyond the level required for the B.A. and to develop a regional area of specialization through course work or a minor (e.g. Latin American studies, Africana studies, Middle Eastern studies, Asian studies). Outside upper-level electives are recommended in history, sociology, economics, religion, modern foreign languages and political science. Students are encouraged to pursue study abroad, ethnographic field school and internship opportunities.

 

Required Courses Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology 3
GANTH 196. Biological Anthropology 3
ANTH 197. Archaeology 3
ANTH 201. The Discipline of Anthropology 1
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology 1 3
ANTH 435. Ethnographic Genres and Methods 4
One upper-division course archaeology and biological anthropology 6
Electives 2, 3 18

  41

 

1 Students should take two of GANTH 195, GANTH 196 or ANTH 197 and at least one anthropology elective before taking ANTH 375.
2 Students may take up to two adviser approved electives at the 300 or 400 level from courses outside of the program.
3 Suggested electives include: ANTH 305, Language and Culture; area studies courses such as ANTH 265, Peoples and Cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean, ANTH 312, Native Americans, ANTH 280, Peoples and Cultures of Sub Saharan Africa, ANTH 295, Peoples and Cultures of East Asia; and upper-division courses addressing topical issues which are generally more theoretically intensive such as ANTH 390, Topics in Cultural Studies, ANTH 313, Culture Process and Change, ANTH 323, Visual Anthropology, ANTH 370, Topics in the Anthropology of Gender, and ANTH 395, Special Topics.

 

Archaeology
Archaeology is the study of the development and change of human societies from the prehistoric past to the present through the identification, gathering and interpretation of material remains. While a major contributor to biological anthropology and forensics, archaeology is most closely tied to cultural anthropology and has been described as cultural anthropology in the past tense. As demonstrated by the emergence of discipline of historical archaeology, the field has strong ties to the practice of history.

 

Students planning a career in archaeology might enroll in an archaeological field school. Those interested in historical archaeology should consider the cross disciplinary historical archaeology minor. Archaeology students are also encouraged to take ANTH 435, Ethnographic Genres and Methods. This sub-discipline shares strong methodological and thematic ties with history, geology, geography, biology and art history, and upper-level course electives from these areas are encouraged. Students may consider co-majoring or minoring in these fields as a complement to their education.

 

Required Courses Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology 3
GANTH 196. Biological Anthropology 3
ANTH 197. Archaeology 3
ANTH 201. The Discipline of Anthropology 1
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology 1 3
ANTH 410. Spatial Analysis for Anthropologists or ANTH 490 2 3-4
ANTH 455. Archaeology: Methods of Analysis and Interpretation 4
One upper division course in cultural and biological anthropology 6
One regional archaeology course (ANTH 250, ANTH 325,  
ANTH 327, ANTH 333) 3
Electives 3, 4 10-11

  40-41

 

1 Students should take two of GANTH 195, GANTH 196 or ANTH 197 and at least one anthropology elective before taking ANTH 375.
2 Instead of ANTH 410 students may take ANTH 490, Special Studies, and complete a project that requires the analysis and interpretation of archaeological data.
3 Students may take up to two adviser approved electives at the 300 or 400 level from courses outside of the program.
4 An archaeological field school is strongly encouraged for any students wishing to pursue professional or graduate opportunities. ANTH 435, Ethnographic Genres and Methods, is also recommended.

 

Biological Anthropology
The focus of biological anthropology is the study of human biology from an evolutionary perspective. Biological anthropology is interested in understanding how and why the human species became what it is today. Thus, it involves the study of human evolution, human biology and its variation, human ecology (how humans interrelate with their environment), and primate behavior and biology (to place humans in the proper comparative context). Biological anthropologists also recognize that human culture, and learned behavior in general, are fundamentally important to understanding the human condition which leads them to emphasize a bio-cultural approach in which both biology and culture are integrated into a holistic understanding of humanity.

 

Students work closely with biological anthropology faculty to choose electives from both within and outside of the department to refine their own research and scholarly interests. Upper-level electives in biology, psychology and/or geographic sciences are recommended depending on the student's particular goals. Students might consider taking a minor or second major in these disciplines. Students are strongly encouraged to gain practical experience in biological anthropology through study abroad, internships or independent study with faculty.

 

Required Courses Credit Hours
GANTH 195. Cultural Anthropology 3
GANTH 196. Biological Anthropology 3
ANTH 197. Archaeology 3
ANTH 201. The Discipline of Anthropology 1
ANTH 375. History of Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology 1 3
One upper-division course in archaeology and cultural anthropology 6
Choose two of the following courses: 6
ANTH 315. Human Evolution  
ANTH 316. Human Evolutionary Psychology  
ANTH 317. Primate Evolutionary Ecology  
At least one additional upper level course in biological 3
anthropological topics  
Electives 2, 3 12

  40

 

1. Students should take two of GANTH 195, GANTH 196 or ANTH 197 and at least one anthropology elective before taking ANTH 375.
2. Students may take up to two adviser approved electives at the 300 or 400-level from courses outside of the program. BIO 270 (Human physiology) and BIO 290 (Human anatomy) are accepted electives.
3. In addition to biological anthropology courses, students are encouraged to take electives from across the breadth of cultural and linguistic anthropology and archaeology.

 

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Minor Requirements

 

Anthropology Minor

Students complete a minor in anthropology by completing 18 hours in anthropology including the core courses GANTH 195, Cultural Anthropology; GANTH 196, Biological Anthropology and ANTH 197, Archaeology. Students must receive at least a "C-" in a class to have it count toward the minor.

 

Historical Archaeology Minor
The minor is designed for students interested in the field of historical archaeology, a discipline that integrates the research interests and methods of archaeology and history. For a full description of this program, refer to the cross disciplinary Historical Archaeology program.

 

 

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