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Intelligence Analysis

 

Department of Integrated Science and Technology

 

IA 200. Introduction to National Security Intelligence.

3 credits.
Intelligence analysis is a complex, dynamic process that includes determining the intelligence needs, data collection, pre-processing, analysis and production of the customer's product. This is an introduction to the history, structure and practices of the national security intelligence community (IC). The course is team-oriented, project-based and grounded in the relevant legal and ethical context.


IA/CIS 210. Introduction to Global Competitive Intelligence.

3 credits.
This course will focus on global competitive intelligence (CI): the tools and methods that enhance strategic and tactical decision making in the analysis and interpretation of business data related to current and emerging competitors. The course is team-oriented, project-based and grounded in the relevant legal and ethical context. Not open to students in the College of Business.


IA 261. Hypothesis Testing.

3 credits.
Examines hypothesis testing in national, military, counter, and competitive intelligence. By comparing alternate theories in terms of their explanatory power and predictive success, students will learn the most relevant methods for integrating facts into unified theories, assessing theories, and properly qualifying and reevaluating theories to compensate for risk and uncertainty.


IA 280. Selected Project in Intelligence Analysis.

3 credits.
This course will examine projects of interest to lower-division students in intelligence analysis not otherwise offered in regular course offerings. They are offered only with the approval of the program director and they may be repeated when course content changes. Students should consult with the instructor prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: Junior standing.


IA/PHIL 312. Causal Analysis.

3 credits.
Examines causal analysis in national, military, counter, and competitive intelligence. By assessing a factor's amount and kind of efficacy, students will learn the most reliable methods for distinguishing between relevant/irrelevant events and factors, identifying and excluding "pseudo-causes," and anticipating higher order effects of a causal process.


IA/PHIL 313. Counterfactual Reasoning.

3 credits.
Examines counterfactual reasoning in national, military, counter, and competitive intelligence. By analyzing alternate scenarios and their consequences, students will learn the most relevant methods for employing creative thinking in generating, developing, and assessing possibilities; substantiating "after-action" reports, and structuring futures analysis.


IA/PHIL 314. Strategy Assessment.

3 credits.
Examines strategy assessment in national, military, counter, and competitive intelligence. By applying probabilities and goals to potential threats and opportunities (short and long-term), students will learn the most relevant methods for formulating and evaluating possible courses of action, and projecting and explaining actions by assessing an agents' strategic interests and circumstances.


IA 340. Data Mining, Modeling and Knowledge Discovery.

3 credits.
Data mining is the nontrivial extraction of previously unknown and potentially useful information from (large) data sets to help explain current behaviors and anticipate future outcomes. Students will apply data mining and knowledge discovery methods to data sets from business, industry and government. The course is team-oriented, project-based and grounded in the relevant legal and ethical context. Prerequisites: GISAT 251 or MATH 220 and ISAT 252.


IA 341. System Dynamics Modeling, Simulation and Analysis.

3 credits.
System dynamics analysis is a perspective and a set of conceptual and computing tools to help us understand the structure and dynamics of complex systems. This course will apply system dynamics analysis to complex systems (problems) that involve the interplay of physical and social-political factors. The course is team-oriented, project-based and grounded in the relevant legal and ethical context. Prerequisites: GISAT 251 or MATH 220 and ISAT 252.


IA 342. Visualization Methods, Technologies and Tools for Intelligence Analysis.

3 credits.
Data visualization presents laboratory or simulation data or the results from sensors out in the field in a way that aids reasoning about and hypothesis building in complex data sets. This course will apply data visualization technologies and tools to timely data sets from business, industry and government. The course is team oriented, project based and grounded in the relevant legal and ethical context. Prerequisites: GISAT 251 or MATH 220 and ISAT 252.


IA/REL 363. Apocalypticism, Religious Terrorism and Peace.

3 credits.
This course traces apocalypticism from its ancient Jewish and Christian roots to its contemporary manifestations in religious groups around the world. Since apocalypticism is a worldview that cuts across religious traditions, the course covers a variety of religious groups. The last half of the course focuses on the complex relationships between apocalyptic thinking and religious terrorism and entails an independent research project.


IA 400. Cognitive Science and Intelligence Analysis.

3 credits.
Cognitive science examines a wide range of mind/brain processes, including thinking, learning, language acquisition, pattern recognition, memory, creativity, volition, etc. This course will take an information processing systems approach to study cognitive processes that comprise intelligence analysis. The course is team oriented, project based and grounded in the relevant legal and ethical context. Prerequisites: GISAT 251 or MATH 220 and ISAT 252; IA 340 and either IA 341 or IA 342.


IA 405. Ethics, Law and Intelligence Analysis.

3 credits.
This course will examine ethical and legal issues raised in the practice of intelligence analysis. It will draw on philosophical ethical theories and reasoning to explicate the issues addressed, and will explore the relevant constitutional and other legal constraints on the practice of intelligence analysis, particularly issues of information privacy, civil liberties and limitations on government action. Prerequisite: Senior standing.


IA 440. Seminar on Issues in Intelligence Analysis.

3 credits.
This course will focus on important issues in the theory and practice of intelligence analysis as the basis for implementing team projects in the IA Capstone Seminar. Students will individually identify, analyze, plan and report on a feasible capstone seminar project. Students will then organize teams and develop plans to complete a subset of the most promising projects in the Capstone Seminar. Prerequisite: Senior standing in the IA Program.


IA 450. Capstone Project in Intelligence Analysis.

3 credits.
Building on the Seminar on Issues in Intelligence Analysis students will complete and present solutions for team-based intelligence community or competitive intelligence IA projects. Students will produce written and oral technical reports/briefs of their results. Prerequisite: IA 440.


IA 480. Selected Topics in Intelligence Analysis.

3 credits.
This course will examine topics of interest to upper-division students in intelligence analysis not otherwise offered in regular course offerings. They are offered only with the approval of the program director and they may be repeated when course content changes. Students should consult with the instructor prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: Junior standing.


 

 

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